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T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules $19.99 $13.40
Average Rating:4.4 / 5
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T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
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T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by Brian B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/26/2013 07:50:24

I bought this so many years ago, it is a good rules system for sure, realistic enough, but still not overly so. The history is a bit contrived for sure, but here's thing sometimes reality is stranger than fiction. My biggest gripe is the system died way too fast, it had so much promise, so much I thought I bought the rulebook in dead tree format and pdf.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by Theodore E. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/30/2010 19:42:18

An excellent modernization of the original Twilight 2000 rules. Although the way they modified the time line to bring it up to was a little contrived, everything else about the system was well done and offered a compelling modernization of this classic RPG.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by Gene B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/20/2010 06:56:03

DISSAPPOINTED ON THE RULES OF A GAME THAT CRIES FOR D20 CONVERSION!!!!!!!!



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 08/15/2009 10:52:23

Chapter 1: The Twilight War dives straight in. It's mid-July 2013 and WW3 has been going on for at least three years. Right... and then the explanation of how we got to this point begins. There's a Designer's Note that says the break-point between 'real world' history and theirs is January 2007. While the back history is quite detailed, it is also a deliberately broad story so that individual characters or playing groups can decide which elements are most important for them in shaping their game. However, a recurring theme worldwide is food shortage, mostly caused by political misbehaviour. Mix in natural disasters and logical follow-through from various disputes already smouldering, and it is clear how easy a major war could suck just about everyone in - which, of course, for the purposes of the game it did. There are intriguing sidebars from various observers, including a chilling one from a 'private military contractor,' which add colour to a fairly dry account of the alternate history presented. As the years move on, distrust of foreigners is added to previous rivalries based on ethnicity, religion or political inclination, and several nations descend into chaos, even out-and-out civil war. The flashpoint for outright global conflict comes as France launches a nuclear strike in retaliation for a terrorist attack...

Once you've assimilated all the 'alternate history' backstory - and you need to if you want to understand why the world is in such a mess - Chapter 2: On the Ground 2013 looks at the current situation. While there's been plenty of narrative about who fought whom over what, the detailed orders of battle troop lists and nuclear target designations of previous editions of Twilight: 2000 are nowhere to be found - those who want that kind of detail can make it up for themselves, while it may not be needed at all if the focus of your game will be other than military action conducted almost wargame style. There is, however, a lot of detail about the current state of affairs both political, military and economic, around the world. Including a sidebar on the "English Royal Family" which shows a distinct lack of knowledge of that rather archaic institution! Many nations cease to exist as such, collapsing into a mish-mash of city-states and enclaves, while Switzerland seals itself off completely from everyone else. On 4 July 2013, the President of the United States dissolves the entire framework of Federal government... and this story, your adventures, begin.

While it has taken fully one-fifth of the book to 'set the scene' it is worth it, this is your world but no longer as you know it... while due to the short timescale of the collapse, your characters will be just as aware of the changes, of what's missing, as you are. Now fully briefed on the world your characters are to inhabit, Chapter 3: The Reflex System introduces the rule mechanics that will be used to resolve their stories. The Reflex System is designed for rapid descriptive play, with major number-crunching confined to character creation and maintenance. Depending on the levels of complexity, realism, ease of play and abstraction you prefer, there are three levels of the ruleset for you to choose from, an interesting idea to ensure compatibility between ardent rules-lawyers and those who prefer highly abstracted rules and rarely even roll a die. There's a lot of detail about what is the core of any game mechanic, the task resolution system - pretty straightforwards, but skipping ahead to see how a character is described rules-wise is recommended so you understand the factors that are brought to bear as a task is resolved. Character attributes mostly reflect innate physical and mental abilities, and range from 1-15, allowing a lot of granularity and fine-tuning of a character to suit your concept. To refine these innate abilities, there is also a wide range of skills which a character can acquire, many of which can include specialisations. It's all quite complex, and will require careful study: study that will be rewarded if your aim is to be able to describe an individual very accurately in game terms... there's not much guesswork about what you can and cannot do, it's all clearly laid out for you.

Next, Chapter 4: Survivors actually tackles character creation itself, in a five-stage process that is complex enough that a 'character creation worksheet' is provided to keep everything straight. This is in part due to realistic modelling of how people develop their abilities - you start with a concept, get your starting attributes and skills and then run the character through a 'life path phase' one or more times to reflect his age and experiences in terms of what he knows and can do. This could easily become an absorbing pastime, and it's certainly not the sort of character generation system that allows for quickly knocking out a character and playing him that same evening. It's a nice concept because when you are done you not only know what your character is capable of, you have an outline of his background and maybe even some idea of how events have shaped him into the character he is now. Attribute generation is recommended to be random, with a few added measures should your die rolling be rubbish - this represents the fact that none of us choose what we start with although we get to decide what we make of it... as the character will, with the rest of the process being one of choices rather than randomicity. (A point-build variant is provided for those who prefer more control, however.) Then it's on to the life path phases. There are a vast range of educational, civilian and criminal ones to choose from if you do not fancy the military life, and plenty of those if your character took an active part in the Twilight War (by choice or otherwise) or chose the military as a profession. Phases last for a variable number of years, depending on what you are doing, and as you decide how old your character will be when the game starts, you may undertake as many or as few as you see fit. There is one invariate: your final year is one of the 'Last Year Phases' which reflect what you were doing since the middle of 2012 as the whole world crumbled around your ears. Some optional rules follow, such as hazardous duty rolls if you've been engaging in a risky life path phase, a merits and flaws system and so on. Interestingly, there is much more emphasis on civilian life than previous editions - the survivors are not ALL going to be service personnel after all, and this ruleset allows you to have as detailed - and as capable - a character who never put himself in harm's way on his nation's behalf as you will with a conventional military character. The chapter finishes with some fascinating ideas for fostering teamwork - and giving advantages to those who work well together - in an individualistic bunch like most role-players tend to be.

Chapter 5: Combat doesn't just deal with the mechanics of brawling - most of that's already been covered earlier - it looks at 2 of the most novel attributes I've seen in an RPG: Coolness Under Fire and Observe-Orient-Decide-Act (OODA). Both are a mix of innate ability (bit like real life - I'm sure you know some people who are good in a crisis or emergency and others who are not) and training. OODA is a formalisation of what is a common process not just in combat but in regular life - you see something, work out what is happening, determine an appropriate response and then undertake that action - but it works particularly well in stressful time-limited situations, when you don't have all the time in the world to make up your mind what to do. Hence characters with a good OODA score are going to be more successful in combat. The discussion moves on to look at combat as a process, how it will proceed and how it's modelled using these game mechanics. For those who want precise modelling of combat, extreme realism in terms of sequence and possible actions, there is all the detail that they might possibly want; while it's quite possible to abstract if you would prefer to get through brawls more quickly and concentrate on other events in your game. However, even if you prefer abstracted combat, read this thoroughly as mixed in are all manner of useful points - including a delightful sidebar on how players often claim improbable amounts of cover... get them to show you just how they have taken cover, and use a laser pointer to demonstrate that the cover gives them a lot less protection than they imagine! Passive hazards - things that will harm you but which are not being used with deliberate intent for that purpose - are also covered, and of course, with the chance of injury along come the rules for healing and recovery. Combat in this game is deemed to be most likely conducted with firearms, and the rules are designed so that it comes with a real chance of serious injury if not death - be warned. This is not the system for those who like cinematic gunfights and expect to remain unscathed all the time!

Next is Chapter 6: Maintenance and Survival. This highlights the fact that most of the things we take for granted just are not available any more. Self-reliance is key to ensure survival in this game, weapons or vehicles cannot be sent to a handy repair shop, food is more likely to have been hunted or grown by the characters than bought in a food store. So here are rules governing catching, growing and looting for food, finding water and other basic survival needs which your characters will have to contend with. There's also more extended detail on medical care, infections and disease... along with ways your character might get a disease and some fine symptoms for him to contend with if he does! If that's not enough, there are natural and manmade poisons and radiation around as well. And weather. The chapter rounds off with details of how characters can improve themselves through experience, instruction and self-study.

Chapter 7: Equipment does not just look at what kit is available. By clever use of the Last Year Phase of character generation, each individual can assess what he's likely to have available at the beginning of the game, depending on what he was doing. From this assessment of what he likely had access to, you can then work out what he actually has. It starts off, though, by looking at economic realities of the post-Twilight War world - barter and trade goods will stand you in better stead than the abstract nature of cash. This is followed by a rundown of what is likely to have survived and how it is being used, as well as that thorny problem of encumbrance - characters are likely to need to carry everything that they need themselves, so they must know how much they can carry and how that load affects them. Replete with semi-random tables to pick equipment from and details of what everything is, the chapter ends with sufficient variety in firearms to keep all but the most ardent gun-bunny happy and notes on explosives.

Next Chapter 8: Vehicles and Travel explores the various perils and pitfalls of attempting to get around. There are plenty of hazards, as you'd imagine. Even those who have a vehicle still have to keep it fuelled and working... and will immediately become a target for those envious of their transportation. Everyone else walks, or at best uses animal power to get around. Assuming you are lucky enough to find one, plenty of both civilian and military vehicles are listed, along with comprehensive notes for conducting combat with them. There is a similar wealth of information about beasts of burden, should you be able to obtain a riding or pack animal; this also includes animal training and mounted combat.

Moving on to Chapter 9: Gamemaster's Toolkit. While the whole book is a toolkit for both GM and players, this bit is specifically addressed to the GM. While it is perhaps unlikely that a complete novice to role-playing might pick this up, it certainly might be the first game someone decides to run rather than play, so the chapter opens with some advice aimed at novice GMs... not that more experienced ones will not benefit from the comments herein. Indeed there are many thoughts which, while aimed at a Twilight: 2013 game, are applicable to whatever sort of game you are considering running. Clear evidence of thorough consideration of what makes a role-playing game work well and how to make it happen here, the sort of things any GM or prospective GM will benefit from reading - covering everything from what sort of game to run to how to cope with character death and bringing the replacement in plausibly. Amongst other useful items such as a cut-down generation system for bit-part NPCs, how to run contacts, and a variety of wildlife there is an interesting Renown system to enable characters to develop a reputation - good or bad - and have it work for or against them.

Finally, an Appendix includes a recommended reading list, along with movies, TV and websites; and an assortment of forms and tracking sheets for both players and GMs.

This is a worthy successor to earlier versions of Twilight, keeping the gritty realism and suvival necessities while providing a well-considered ruleset that caters for a variety of play styles, and will accommodate those who are not set upon playing combat veterans as well as those who are!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by Scott H. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/26/2009 00:49:24

Couldnt wait for a new version of Twilight 2000 to come out and Twilight 2013 fits the bill perfectly. I like the variation in the rules through Stage I to Stage III to add or take complexity out of some of the game mechanics. Awesome product and some great work here. Cant wait for some new sourcebooks.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by Philip O. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/26/2009 21:57:29

As a long-time player of both Twilight:2000 and Merc: 2000, I was a little nervous about a "reboot" of one of my favourite game franchises.

Well, I needn't have been! The producters of T2013 have done a sensational job in creating an immersive, realistic game and setting. Whilst not every single aspect of the timeline is as plausible as it could be (my favourite giggle was the idea that Britain would return to a monarchy), overall it hits all the major points, keeps enough from the original timeline and brings in enough from more recent events to make a wonderful "alternative history".

The Reflex system is one of the best I've seen, especially with regard to combat: quick, realistic and deadly. There's no charging in with two guns blazing in this game - it's about fire-and-manouvre, staying out of sight and keeping thick, hard stuff between you and the bad guys! Not only does it support the T2013 game beautifully, but it's flexible enough to be used just about anywhere: I'm looking forward to converting my old 2300AD campaign over to the Reflex system in the near future.

Well done, 93GS!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by David C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/19/2008 16:15:13

I'm thrilled by 93 Games Studio's updating this old classic! Moving from the original's Cold War Gone Hot scenario to a plausible and chilling vision of a near-Future Apocalypse,the new Reflex System looks like a very flexible and realistic way to play anything from Hard-bitten Veteran Soldiers to a former Stockbroker trying to survive in the ruins of NYC.

What can I say? My favorite RPG is back with an excellent new edition!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by alan r. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/30/2008 07:01:25

this is the most fun you can get shooting people and not get arrested. Very well laid out, suberb timeline. Character creation is a cinch, yet detailed, game can be played easily or highly indepth, a salute to the creators, this is how the original should have been.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by steven s. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/24/2008 11:00:02

LOVE IT!!!Any fan of the old twilight2000 will love it.Huge amount of info and an easy system to use.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by Kevin O. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/22/2008 21:10:24

Warning - long post. As discussed in some Twilight: 2000 forums many months ago, the background history is good but in some places feels contrived. Some assumptions have been made about various countries & how they fared in WW3 that indicate little knowledge about the places involved. The lack of knowledge of some areas is really shown when referring to the 'Northern Territories' in Australia, there are no Northern 'Territories', there is only one. Any look at a map of Australia would have shown that. There is a reliance on the fallacious 'Nuclear Winter' theory to cause bad weather in Europe so as to further the decline of civilization that probably wasn't really needed (things were bad enough already).

Another irritating aspect is the constant switch between metric & imperial measurements so we have statements like this "The winter of 2012 blankets England and Ireland in over 10 ft of snow and temperatures below the 0° C mark..."

There is the inference that only the USA is involved in War on Terror in Afghanistan & Iraq, little mention is made of the (sizeable) British force in those regions let alone the other nations like Germany, Poland or Mongolia. There are just a few brief comments about 'coalition forces'. There seems to be little understanding of the "British" Royal Family (refered to as the English Royal Family, perhaps the authors are unaware that the United Kingdom AKA Britain, comprises four countries, England & Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales).

This is further compound the comments on the Pope taking shelter in 'Ireland'. He commandeers St Patrick's Cathedral in Armagh. Ireland is comprised of two seperate countries, the Republic of Ireland AKA Eire and Northern Ireland. So where was the Pope exactly when the war started? In the Roman Catholic Republic or in the mixed Protestant & Catholic country of Northern Ireland? Armagh is in Northern Ireland so he is obviously in Northern Ireland but that isn't made clear by refering to the whole land mass as Ireland. They also seem to be unaware that Northern Ireland is part of the United Kingdom & they fail to make any mention of that country when giving background information on the UK.

There is a reference to the USA being the last Superpower on Earth which hides the fact that China is still very much a Superpower even if it hasn't been as overt on the world stage as the US. Background conditions in Korea after 2013 get given more coverage than those in China, even though China has invaded South-East Asia and is one of the nations attacking the USA.

Their research on Australia was threadbare as already noted in their reference to the Northern 'Territories' but highlighted by their reference to a British warship sinking off the coast near Garden Island. There are two places in Australia called Garden Island, one is an actual island less than 5000m off the coast of Western Australia. Most of the island is a Royal Australian Navy base. The second Garden Island is also a base for the RAN, it used to be an island within Sydney Harbour in New South Wales (the other side of the country) but land reclamation has seen it joined to the mainland. Seeing how this base is within Sydney Harbour and not on the coast, you could safely assume that Twilight: 2013 is refering to Garden Island in Western Australia... but only if you know something about Australia geography or bothered to check a map. Their statement that Australia uses the Leopard 2 tank surprises me greatly. The decision to purchase the Abrams tank for the Australian Army was a well known fact in 2006.

Another minor irritation is that the world background gives details on how South Africa survived & how it has become a major manufacturer of weapons yet we see none of these weapons mentioned in the equipment lists. For a gaming company that has access to potential Players/buyers from around the world via the internet, the focus still seems to be on Players from the USA with more background devoted to the conditions of post-WW3 USA than any other nation.

And this statement still irritates me greatly, "Fans of Twilight: 2000 will notice that Twilight: 2013 has evolved into a rich character-based role-playing experience, set against a military backdrop, with both military and civilian paths from which to choose." The original game was exactly that in the first place, 2013 hasn't evolved the game (only the timeline and equipment lists), it has simply continued it. Granted, more rules are available to offer guidelines for PC interaction in some situations not considered in earlier versions of the game but 'evolved into a rich character-based role-playing experience is a stretching the idea a bit too much.

However, this statement from one of the authors makes me truly angry, "The targeted audience (yours truly included) of the earlier editions was mostly wargaming grognards..." This statement has little basis in fact, it has been surmised from the contributions of a small group of fans on various forums who in general, weren't able to get a face-to-face game happening (for many different reasons) and instead spent their time further developing the gameworld and detailing the various Orders of Battle. The majority of Twilight fans were RPG players from the start and any discussion with them about their games reveals a very "...rich character-based role-playing experience, set against a military backdrop, with both military and civilian paths from which to choose".

The artwork throughout the core rules PDF ranges from cool to crap with one of the worst images (in my opinion) making the people in it look like midgets. Unfortunately for me, they choose to use that image as the lead-in to most chapters. And for all the effort that went into making some truly evocative artwork for the rule book, the character sheets are rather bland.

To be fair though, their treatment of how MilGov and CivGov in the USA come about is, I think, far better than the original game. The designers provide hard information on how easily a modern Western city can collapse simply because transport itself is not available to bring in all the items a modern city needs to survive. I really liked the twist on the Central American druglords giving up coca production to focus in coffee production as the new cash crop of choice.

I do appreciate the effort the designers went into to make the environment more of a factor in the game, with numerous ways in which noise, lighting, precipitation and wind can affect the outcome of an event. There are also rules for having psychology play a larger part in a PC's or NPC's life and rules for repairing and scavenging to keep equipment from degrading to the point of uselessness. A major plus is the inclusion of rules for rebuilding damaged structures or constructing new ones. There is a good 'cinematic' optional rule that allows a Player to sacrifice a piece of equipment (chosen by the GM) in order to prevent injury to their PC. They also include some good rules for animal training.

I would have rated this higher but the lack of research really bugs me considering how many fans from around the world were willing to offer contributions and how easy it is to do research thanks to the internet(personal idiosyncracy). Typos and bad grammar I can forgive but lack of research and crap artwork I can't.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by Les R. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/22/2008 18:58:29

This is an excellent effort from a small publisher to continue what has always been a very popular franchise. The new timeline reflects a changing and often confused world and is well thought and out quite plausible. There are those that will disagree with some of the details, I am sure, but on the whole are not that hard to buy into. Ones personally held opinions and beliefs can often get in the way of seeing a larger picture, and often truth can be much stanger than fiction. The mechanics and gameplay seem to also be very well thought out, the Reflex System giving combat a realism and lethality that is rare in RPG's. No firefights just for fun here. Charcter generation encourages one to realistically envision a concept and bring that person to life, offering a great deal of variety of lifepaths whether military or civilian. There are a few typos, as can be expected, but are pretty easily forgiven in a volume this size. The artwork is not over-the-top outstanding, but is very good and gives a delightfully gritty atmosphere to the post-apocolyptic setting. Definitely not the "fuzzy bunnies and elves" singing in the forest here, but a rich world of survival, development, regression and hopefully progression. Enjoy.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by Scott L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/21/2008 09:59:10

Looks to be a great system, and a worth successor to the previous 'Twilight:2000' games.

Well laid out and attractive, with innovative rules that I've never seen before, but make great sense.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by Neal H. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/20/2008 23:19:24

Twilight 2013 is a sort of homecoming for me. As someone who has played the game in an on-again, off-again way since the late 1980s, it's something that I've got a real sweet spot for. So, it should be no surprise that I reallly like the updated version. However, someone has asked already, why should you buy this version instead of older edition and simply update the setting to match what you think WWIII looks like? Here's a couple of reasons -

1 - The new Reflex system is one of the most technically accurate RPG systems for simulating combat that I've seen in a long time, but it doesn't bog the gameplay down. The tiered appraoch to the ruleset (Level 1 for basic simulation and easiest play, Level 2 for average difficulty, and Level 3 for people who think Star Fleet Battles is too simple) allows you to cater the game to yourself and your players. Also, the "tick" concept for initiative and holding and pressing is so original and workable that I plan to use it in my other RPGs. 2 - At 348 absolutely packed pages, this book feels like a core book and several supplements slammed together. Compared to D20 Modern, Twilight 2013 is by far more informative and entertaining to read.

One flaw I find in the book is the number of editorial flaws - poor grammer, mispellings, etc. I'm an editor by trade, so these things really bug me. On the other hand, it's still very readable and updated editions will take care of such things.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by Robert O. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/15/2008 21:44:44

This is a very good core rulebook.

The Reflex system is not math heavy and works well as the basis for a modern or near future rules set. Given the setting, topics such as disease, radiation and environmental effects, scavenging and equipment maintenance rules are presented in a very well-balanced package.

Combat works well; the devastating effects of automatic weapons and explosives are well modeled against characters, vehicles and other inanimate objects.

The only things that spoiled an otherwise excellent presentation were the numerous typos. These were most frequent in the timeline chapter, which was the weakest section of the book. The timeline chapter also had a few logic bombs or plot holes where changes were made in some sections of text, but not carried through to other sections dealing with the same topic.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
T2013- Twilight: 2013 Core Rules
Publisher: Game Designers' Workshop (GDW)
by Carlton J. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/14/2008 19:26:22

Story: 4 of out 5 - As other reviewers have said the Timeline has some 'huh?' moments, but overall very solid and plausible. Ultimately, you're left with an world that is devastated, interesting and one that your PCs can influence, and thats what PCs want in the end anyways. If you don't like it, adapt your own because the new system is the heart of this.

Character Generation: 4.5 of 5 - Little confusing at first but once past the learning curve a great system and flexible enough to create almost any sort of PC and still giving them a chance of survival. Easy to expand with your own Phases if you wish to introduce them.

Combat: 5 of 5 - Excellent system. Fluid and modular. Using a mix of stage II and III rules you can create a believable (not Rambo) world with consequences without having total party wipeouts every gaming session, with use of Survival points. Or, the option to go with the Rambo style. It's your game!

Equipment: 5 of 5 - Really another high point in the rules. Almost everything you could think of for modern equipment is included and the official forum, and developer support for anything else. Another key thing is that a lot of the equipment provides a noticeable but not over powering influence on combat or skill checks.

Skills and Task resolution: 5 of 5 - Great here. Short term goals (shooting, bluffing a guard) as well as long term construction and city community rebuilding ('large project' rules) are covered in a way that makes sense and rewards all types of PCs and their skills. Really gives you a long and short term perspective on your characters skills.

Overall 5 of 5 - Great successor of the Twilight series.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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