DriveThruRPG.com
Browse Categories
$ to $















Back
pixel_trans.gif
Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Imperium Maledictum Core Rulebook $29.99
Average Rating:4.7 / 5
Ratings Reviews Total
43 6
7 2
2 0
1 2
0 0
Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Imperium Maledictum Core Rulebook
Click to view
You must be logged in to rate this
pixel_trans.gif
Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Imperium Maledictum Core Rulebook
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Bill [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/12/2024 11:59:59

This is a review of IM as a whole, both these core rules and the materials released to date. I waited to review IM until after running several sessions as a GM with experienced players. Bottom line for me: this is a great system. The rules flow, the Superiority/Resolve system is fun, the combat is just crunchy enough for tactics but not slow (and we can bring in more detailed combat rules from Warhammer Fantasy as needed). The Psyker powers and Warp Charge/Purgation system is very enjoyable. My only Con is also a system strength: the Setting. First let me say that I think the Setting is a great strength of IM. The team has done a great job on the Starter Kit and the purchasable adventures. I believe that coming out of the gate with solid adventures to accompany the rules is vital—I believe GM’s gain as much from reviewing well-crafted adventures as they do from having a well done and thoughtful ruleset. Here, the Rokarth Guide and included adventure in the Starter Set, and the two separately purchasable adventures are well done, solid, and play well. The reason I label the Setting a “Con” is due to the clear goal of the ruleset to provide a setting for playing games based on the Warhammer Crime series of novels. The Core Rules reference the Warhammer Crime novels and short stories explicitly. However, despite this, the Rokarth setting and the adventures are pretty far away from the Varangantua setting of the Warhammer Crime novels. The Crime setting takes place in a far more Cyberpunk influenced Varangantua setting, with cybernetic implants, corporate intrigue, a trodden down lower class but also a middle class of administratum functionaries, doctors, engineers, etc. It isn’t a world where you are either a barely living manufactorum serf, or a noble. And it works really well in the overall Warhammer 40k setting. Amazingly well imho. And my players, having read the Crime materials, and some of the great Warhammer Horror titles, expected Varangantua, or at least a Rokarth with similiar sociopolitical and tech features. The Rokarth setting is great, the adventures are great, but the setting really isn’t Warhammer Crime. On the plus side, it was fairly easy for me to convert the Rokarth adventures to ones with similar tech and sociopolitical dynamics from the Varangantua setting, including the extensive augments and the “Machine Communion” hacking that AdMech investigator Rho-1 Lux uses in the Noctis and Lux stories. The players loved it. So all in all, this is a great game. I would love a Varangantua setting book, or a source book to bring the game more in line with the Warhammer Crime stories.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
pixel_trans.gif
Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Imperium Maledictum Core Rulebook
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Jay S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/15/2024 17:19:46

I have no doubts that Imperium Maledictum is the Warhammer 40,000 game that I've been waiting an awful long time for. It does a great job as a "spiritual successor" to Dark Heresy and improves on it in ways that doubles down on the investigative angle in a terrifyingly corrupt Imperium that makes one wonder how the entire thing is still somehow operational given that it's held together by duct tape and prayers to the God-Emperor of Mankind.

Mechanically, the game stands out in terms of supporting careful and clever investigation thanks to the Superiority mechanics which rewards finding things with actual advantage in an confrontation. Add the Faction and Influence bits and you get a game where you are constantly favor trading with a host of groups that have their own agendas.

Setting wise, the Macharian Sector is HUGE, and a masterwork of building a setting where every planet is enough to kick off a full campaign. The writing team clearly brought their best work to the table and I applaud them for the effort.

I would be remiss if I didn't mention how pretty the book is, in the bleak and dire Warhammer 40,000 sort of way. Cubicle 7 has never failed in terms of artwork for their Warhammer RPGs and Imperium Maledictum is one of the better ones. The layout is also easy to read and the tables are easy to reference. Having page references built into the margins helps a ton as well.

Imperium Maledictum is a very, VERY easy recommendation for anyone who enjoys Warhammer 40,000 from a more human angle. Sure you won't be a Space Marine here, nor will you be going into fistfights with the Orks, but if you're looking to do some good old Eisenhorn-style adventuring while putting few bolt pistol shells into the skulls of a heretic, you'll find it right here.

This is a portion of a larger Let's Study series of my blog that goes through the various sections of the book. If you're interested, you can find it here:

https://philgamer.wordpress.com/category/imperium-maledictum/



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
pixel_trans.gif
Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Imperium Maledictum Core Rulebook
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Malkav A. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/29/2023 10:46:16

UPDATE: It appears that nearly every issue I had identified in the past has been remedied. I haven't had the time to sit down and do a serious, comprehensive review of the final product. However, I can confirm that the vast majority of the issues that were in the book no longer exist, and the rules seem genuinely complete, with no contradictions, unanswered questions, or immersion-breaking imbalances. It's a very substantial improvement, to say the least, and I'm quite pleased to see how much more polished and professional this book feels. If there are any other errors, I haven't caught them yet, and that's exactly the way a well-done publication should be. A deep "thank you" to Cubicle 7 for taking the feedback I and others submitted to make the final version of this book as clean as it is. I can honestly say now that this is well worth every penny I'd spent on it. I imagine that the only people who would be dissatisfied with this book are those who would strongly prefer a different ruleset or simply don't enjoy the 40k universe, as it presently seems about as well-written as you could hope for. A more in-depth review will follow in the coming weeks, as my free time permits.

....................

Before I say anything else, I want to say that I love the foundation that this core rulebook provides. As someone who is both a stickler for realism and deeply fond of elegantly simple design, there's a lot of material here that I find quite satisfying. It also contains quite a few novel solutions to problems I've had with other role-playing systems. The lore and fluff generously, painstakingly, and lovingly crafted herein is also very engrossing, meshes well with existing established canon, and otherwise "feels" very much like what you would expect from a WH40K book. In short, there's genuinely a whole lot to fall in love with, as far as this rulebook goes.

Why, then, did I rate it only two stars? Put simply: typographical errors and rules oversights.

I've purchased a number of physical rulebooks, and I can say with confidence that none of them have had nearly the number of typographical errors that I've found here. The typographical errors vary. Sometimes, a word is misspelled. Other times, similar-sounding words are interchanged. There are also several situations where simple confusion has resulted in certain terms being referenced incorrectly (i.e. the Mark of Khorne text initially refers to a +10 bonus to Strength, then references instead a +10 bonus to Perception just a little bit later in the text). Some rule text (such as the often-requested mechanics for the Recoil Glove equipment item) is missing entirely. There's even a situation where a semicolon (;) was used instead of a colon (:) when the colon was clearly intended and proper:

> "As the Gamemaster (GM), you have one of the most rewarding and important roles in the game; serving as the vital bridge between your players and the grim darkness of the 41st millennium."

The rules oversights are similarly varied. One of the more high profile issues rests with the Master Crafting system, which received a seemingly token amount of attention (i.e. a brief line of text setting the minimum cost of Master Crafted items to 500 Solars was added). There are other--more serious--issues, such as the rules for Flamers being able to turn Zones into Hazards (i.e. automatic 10 to 15 damage to all creatures in the Zone at the start of their turn), or the rules for the Psychic Static Psyker power theoretically allowing a Psyker to invisibly murder in "plain sight", so long as they only interact with their target. There are also some outright funny situations, such as Bolters having the Spread (i.e. tiny Area-of-Effect) ability whereas Flamers lack it and are effectively able to be used as precision weapons.

There's a lot to love here. But, there's also no way I can say with a straight face that this is a finished product. A detailed read will reveal that there are still many mistakes that should be rectified.

Several weeks back, I actually volunteered to contribute my substantial free time toward proofreading the entire book and submitting my findings so that these kinds of issues could be identified and remedied more quickly. I covered 36 pages (the rulebook contains 368 pages total) during my "test day", during which I sent an example of the kind of work I offered to perform. I was told that it was admirable but unnecessary, and they provided a number of reasons--including "meeting deadlines"--that they weren't able to accept my work. That was back in 12 April 2023. We are currently in 29 April 2023. No new revisions of the PDF have been released in over two weeks, nor has there been any word regarding when the next revision should drop. I'm starting to have concerns about what the final product will look like, as I ordered a physical hardcopy.

My recommendation: wait until you at least see comments on here confirming that the typos have all been cleaned up. Otherwise, I can't conscionably encourage others to purchase this when it's clear that the book still requires further proofreading.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
pixel_trans.gif
Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Imperium Maledictum Core Rulebook
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Erik [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/17/2023 05:29:08

Feels like Dark Heresy 2 had a love-child with the Call of Cthulhu 7e ruleset. Good combination of character options and useful but flexible rules



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
pixel_trans.gif
Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Imperium Maledictum Core Rulebook
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Paweł S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/15/2023 09:25:56

At first I was staggered by the amount of errors the PDF had but after months of fixes, listening to the community all my major gripes with the book were addressed. Finally we have a good system to take over from 40k FFG RPGs (which in my opinion are just bad, unless you play on low level campaigns or short ones). This is a great foundation to built upon and I can't wait to see more. I do hope we get some good expansions. I do want a WORKING Void Combat (Rogue Trader void combat doesn't work outside of 1vs1 ships).



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
pixel_trans.gif
Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Imperium Maledictum Core Rulebook
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 06/08/2023 04:55:42

https://www.teilzeithelden.de/2023/06/05/rezension-warhammer-40-000-imperium-maledictum-mit-kettenschwert-und-intrigen/

Ein zweites Pen-and-Paper-System für Warhammer 40.000? Vom selben Verlag? Braucht es das? Nicht schlecht staunten die Fans der grimmen Zukunft des 42. Jahrtausends, als Cubicle 7 mit Imperium Maledictum ein weiteres System in der düsteren Zukunft ankündigte. Wir haben getestet, ob sich ein weiterer Abstecher in diese Welt lohnt.

Mit Wrath & Glory sollte die düstere Zukunft von Warhammer 40.000, nach langen Jahren des Darbens, ein frisches neues Rollenspielsystem bekommen. Ulisses konnte sich den Zuschlag sichern und veröffentliche 2019 das heiß ersehnte System, denn das beliebte Dark Heresy war längst nicht mehr in Produktion. W6 statt W100, ein schnelles Kampfsystem und maximale Flexibilität für die Gruppenzusammenstellung waren nur einige der Versprechen. Doch der Start verlief holprig und durchwachsene Kritiken begleiteten die Veröffentlichung. Schließlich änderte Games Workshop seine Strategie und vergab die Lizenz neu an Cubicle 7, die bereits die vierte Edition von Warhammer Fantasy RPG verantworteten.

2021 erschien dann eine spürbar überarbeitete Auflage unter der Ägide von Cubicle 7. Seitdem gab es reichlich Begleitmaterial mit neuen Quellbänden, ergänzenden Regeln und Abenteuern. Nach anfänglicher Skepsis der Fans kann man das System als ziemlich lebendig betrachten. Daher kam die Ankündigung von Cubicle 7 vollkommen überraschend, dass man ein weiteres System in der finsteren Zukunft veröffentlichen wird: Warhammer 40.000: Imperium Maledictum. Mehr Fokus auf soziale Interaktionen, deutlich ermittlungslastiger und eine Rückkehr zum W100, wie dereinst in Dark Heresy oder im Warhammer Fantasy RPG.

Doch trotz jubelnder Dark Heresy-Fans stellt sich die Frage: Wie sinnvoll ist ein weiteres System in derselben Welt? Zwar gibt es auch zwei Warhammer-Systeme in einem Fantasy-Setting, doch diese unterscheiden sich allein schon vom Hintergrund, also Alte Welt versus Age of Sigmar. Wir haben den Bolter geladen und das Kettenschwert angeschmissen und uns ins Abenteuer gestürzt.

[spoiler title= "Triggerwarnungen"] Faschismus, Folter, Gewalt, Krieg, Rassismus, Tod, Verstümmelung [/spoiler]

Die Spielwelt

Die Spielwelt von Warhammer 40.000 dürfte, zumindest in groben Zügen, vielen bekannt sein. Wir schreiben das nunmehr 42. Jahrtausend und die Menschheit beherrscht weite Teile der bekannten Galaxie. Leider hat sich dabei nicht der humanistische Weg im Stil von Star Trek durchgesetzt (Wer dies sucht, wird mit Star Trek Adventures glücklicher), sondern das Imperium der Menschheit,  ein tief faschistisch-militärisches, korruptes und bis zur Lächerlichkeit bürokratisiertes System. Auf dem fernen Terra, der Erde, herrscht nominell ein Imperator, der seit über 10.000 Jahren an einen Thron gefesselt ist, der ihn am Leben(?) hält und ihn gleichzeitig zu einem Art Leuchtturm im Warp macht, dazu später mehr. Auf Terra glaubt ein Senat zu herrschen, genauso wie einer der Söhne des Imperators, der Primarch und Lord-Regent Roboute Guilliman.

Die Artworks wissen zu überzeugen.

Faktisch herrschen gierige planetare Gouverneure, verbissene Sektor-Militärs oder regionale Adelshäuser, deren oft illegale Aktivitäten in den Mühlen überbordender Bürokratie untergehen. Wäre das nicht schon Gemengelage genug für reichlich Abenteuer, bedrohen noch verschiedene, in der Regel auch nicht sehr nette Alienspezies die Menschen und es drohen noch schlimmere Gefahren aus dem Warp. Der Warp ist jene Parallelwelt, durch die man schnell die Galaxie durchqueren kann, die aber leider auch von Dämonen belebt ist, die sich sehr gerne auch die Realwelt einverleiben wollen. Ihr kennt Event Horizon? Dann könnt ihr euch den Warp gut vorstellen. Garniert wird dies mit einer schier nicht zu überblickenden Anzahl großer und kleiner Fraktionen im Imperium, die alle ihre oft widerstreitenden Ziele verfolgen. In diesen Wahnsinn werden die Spielenden nun geworfen und versuchen nicht nur Probleme zu lösen und dabei nicht zu sterben, sondern auch nicht Opfer der streitenden Fraktionen zu werden, denn im 42. Jahrtausend gibt es weitaus schlimmeres als den Tod.

Die Regeln

Imperium Maledictum nutzt das aus Warhammer Fantasy RPG und anderen Systeme bereits bekannte Prozent beziehungsweise W100-System. Die Charaktere haben dabei Attribute, Fähigkeiten und Spezialisierungen, auf deren (kumulierten) Wert eine Probe abgelegt wird. Ist das Ergebnis identisch mit dem Wert oder darunter, ist die Probe bestanden. Proben können dabei modifiziert werden, um die Schwierigkeit zu senken oder zu erhöhen.

Jeder begonnene Zehnerwert, zählt dabei als Erfolgsgrad. Dieser kann einen weiteren Einfluss auf das Ergebnis der Probe nehmen, sodass man zum Beispiel mehr Schaden in einem Kampf verursacht. Tritt man dabei in einem physischen oder sozialen Kampf, kann es auch zu vergleichenden Tests kommen. Dort werden Erfolgsgrade miteinander verglichen und entscheiden über den Erfolg eines Angriffes. Bei vergleichenden Tests kann es so sogar zu einem Erfolg kommen, wenn man eigentlich gepatzt hat. Der Charakter war zwar schlecht, aber der NSC schlechter.

[box]

Beispiel: Lisa würfelt einen Angriff gegen einen Chaos-Kultisten. Sie nutzt dafür ein Kettenschwert und demzufolge einen Nahkampfangriff. Ihr Wert ermittelt sich aus Weaponskill (32), Melee (10), Spezialisierung Einhandwaffen (10), also 52. Sie würfelt eine 22. Die Zehnerwerte werden subtrahiert 5-2=3. Lisa hat 3 Erfolgsgrade (=Success Level). Der Kultist pariert mit seinem Messer (Wert 40) und würfelt eine 54,

also 4-5=-1. Lisa hat Erfolg und verwundet den Kultisten.

[/box]

Apropos Kampf: Hier beginnt, wer den höchsten Initiativewert hat und dann wechselt man sich der Reihe nach ab. In seiner Runde kann man sich bewegen, das schließt in Deckung gehen ein, und hat eine Aktion. Die Aktion kann ein Angriff sein, man kann sich die Aktion zum Ausweichen aufsparen, Zaubern oder eine komplexe Handlung vornehmen, zum Beispiel einen Computer bedienen oder Nachladen. Einfache Aktionen sind jemandem etwas zurufen, die Waffe ziehen oder Handzeichen geben. Neu ist, dass das Kampfgebiet in Zonen aufgeteilt wird, deren Größe die Spielleitung bestimmt, die aber in der Regel einen durchmessen von fünf bis zehn Metern haben sollen. Bewegungen innerhalb der Zone sind immer frei, außer man geht in Deckung. Damit soll mehr erzählerische Freiheit geschaffen werden. Gleichzeitig dienen die Zonen auch als Distanzangabe für Waffenreichweiten. Short ist die eigene Zone, Medium die angrenzende Zone, Long die übernächste Zone und Extreme ist im Grunde unbegrenzt, im sinnvollen Rahmen.

Eine große Neuerung ist das Einflusssystem. Dabei hat der:die Auftraggeber:in der Gruppe einen positiven oder negativen Stand bei anderen Fraktionen des Imperiums, ebenso wie die Gruppe als auch der individuelle Charakter. Einfluss kann man steigern, aber auch verlieren und so ergeben sich im Spiel neue Möglichkeiten. Heute bekommt man noch Zugang zu Transportlisten ohne Probleme, morgen vielleicht nicht mehr, weil man an Einfluss eingebüßt hat. Dies gibt eine spannende weitere Komponente ins Spiel, die Charaktere dazu zwingt, Handlungen wesentlich genauer zu prüfen.

Charaktererschaffung

Die Charaktererschaffung ähnelt der von Warhammer Fantasy RPG, hat jedoch ein paar gravierende Unterschiede. Dies beginnt damit, dass sich die Gruppe samt Spielleitung eine:n Patron:in erstellt. Diese:r Patron:in vergibt primär die Aufträge und bringt nebst der narrativen Komponente, handfeste Vorteile, aber auch Pflichten mit. Diese Hintergrundcharaktere haben dabei eigene Ziele, die man am besten unterstützen sollte, gewisse Charaktereigenschaften und unterschiedlich Einfluss bei verschiedenen Fraktionen. Zu Beginn kann man bis zu vier Vorteile wählen oder auswürfeln, wie zum Beispiel eine geheime Operationsbasis mit guter Ausrüstung, ein Kommandotrupp als Kampfunterstützung pro Session oder ein eigenes Raumschiff.

Das Blatt für Patron:innen ist überschaubar und selbsterklärend.

Allerdings ist die:der Patron:in vielleicht mit jemand verfeindet oder will, dass man verbotene Artefakte einsammelt. Aus neun Fraktionen mit je zwei Patron:innen kann man dabei wählen, die alle sehr spezielle Dinge mit sich bringen. Mit dabei sind natürlich die Inquisition ebenso wie die Imperiale Garde, aber auch die Imperiale Flotte, Freihändler-Dynastien, das Adeptus Mechanicus (religiöse Techspezialisten) oder Verbrecherorganisationen. Damit ist auch klar, welcher Fraktion des Imperiums man aktuell dient.

Hat man seine:n Patron:in erstellt, geht es nun die Charaktere selbst. Als einzige Spezies gibt es derzeit Menschen. Im Imperium selbst ist das die vorherrschende Spezies, man kann aber davon ausgehen, dass mit Erweiterungen Ogryns (Oger) und Ratlings (eine Art Halbling) Einzug finden werden. Ob Xenos kommen werden, ist noch unklar. Zumindest theoretisch könnten bei den Freihändlern und einigen Inquisitoren Aeldar (Weltraum-Elfen) oder Kroot (Weltraum-Naturvolk) eine Rolle spielen.

Die Rolle im Team ist entscheidend.

Im ersten Schritt der Charaktererstellung werden die Attribute gewürfelt oder anhand einer fixen Punktzahl frei vergeben, es folgt die Herkunft, die einen Bonus auf Attribute gibt und die Auswahl der ursprünglichen Fraktion samt Beruf. Dies bringt erneut einen Bonus auf Attribute sowie Punkte auf spezielle Fähigkeiten, Einfluss und Ausrüstung. Abschließend wähle ich meine Rolle in der Gruppe, darf es eher Verhandler sein oder doch was Handfestes oder eher jemand der mit dem Intellekt arbeitet? Sechs Rollen stehen zur Auswahl und bringen weitere Fähigkeiten, Talente und Ausrüstung. Nun noch Kurzzeit-Ziel (zwei bis drei Spielrunden) und Langzeit-Ziel wählen und es kann losgehen. Die Erreichung der Ziele bringen dabei EP. Wer alles in der Erschaffung auswürfelt, bekommt bis zu 200 Extra-EP, die frei vergeben werden dürfen.

Das Powerlevel ist recht niedrig zu Beginn, kann jedoch auch deutlich höher angesetzt werden, wenn man will. Die Erstellung von Patron:in und einer Gruppe von fünf erfahrenen Spieler:innen, dauerte circa zwei Stunden.

Erscheinungsbild

Cubicle 7 hat sich, wie schon bei der Überarbeitung von Wrath & Glory, für eine weniger comichafte, dafür düstere Aufmachung des Regelwerkes entschieden. Dies war einer der Hauptkritikpunkte am System von Ulisses. Die Illustrationen sind durch die Bank hochwertig und stimmig und vermitteln auch Neulingen einen guten Eindruck der Welt. Der generelle Aufbau ist gelungen und gut nachzuvollziehen, man findet sich sehr schnell zurecht.

Bonus/Downloadcontent

Als zusätzlichen digitalen Inhalt gibt es Charakterblätter, ausfüllbar und hübsch oder druckerfreundlich, Patron:inblätter und eine Karte des Sektors, in dem man agieren kann.

Fazit

Mit Imperium Maledictum nähert sich Cubicle 7 wieder dem beliebten Dark Heresy an und bereichert es um neue und zeitgemäße Aspekte. Das Regelsystem ist dabei Warhammer Fantasy RPG sehr ähnlich und erleichtert den Einstieg für diejenigen, die bereits das Fantasy-System gespielt haben. Bereits bei der Charaktererschaffung merkt man jedoch, dass das System viel stärker auf Kampagnen statt einzelnen Abenteuern ausgelegt ist, im Gegensatz zu Wrath & Glory, dass sich als Action-Rollenspiel versteht.

Damit beantwortet sich auch schon die eingangs gestellte Frage nach der Sinnhaftigkeit eines weiteren Systems in derselben Welt. Wer von Anfang an auf eine längere Kampagne, mit Charakterentwicklung und auch Metaauswirkungen der Handlungen der Charaktere steht und zudem Spaß an reichlich sozialen Inhalten hat, der wird mit Imperium Maledictum sehr glücklich. Als One-Shot oder Pausenfüller kann das System seine Stärke nicht voll ausspielen. Daher kommen wir hier nicht um zwei Bewertungen umhin. Eine glatte 5 bei Kampagnen und eine verdiente 4 für One-Shots. Die Rezension basierte auf einem Spielabend inklusive Charaktererschaffung.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
pixel_trans.gif
Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Imperium Maledictum Core Rulebook
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Timothy W. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/31/2023 13:06:52

Well organized, evocative and themeatic, and really walking away feeling like I got my moneys worth. Excellent RPG and system, particularly once the next batch of proof-reading goes in. 5 stars.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
pixel_trans.gif
Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Imperium Maledictum Core Rulebook
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Matt P. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/28/2023 15:31:56

As of right now, I would wait on the book. This needs at least a few more passes with proofreading that we the players should not have to do for C7. You have in the character creation section alone pre-made Duty templates with skills and/or equipment unavailable to them and the character goals section refers to a non-existent table, some gear are listed in tables but have no description numerous errors like two of the roles having their names misspelt multiple times. Wait for it to marinate with some errata before taking it out of the oven and buy it then.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
pixel_trans.gif
Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Imperium Maledictum Core Rulebook
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Troy P. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/27/2023 20:54:04

Generally, this book is amazing to read and the patron creation rules is interesting and collabrative. The artwork is pretty amazing. This book has errata that needs to be corrected and it seems C7 is trying their best to get this corrected. My only real complaint and the reason my rating is 4 stars instead of 5, this book needs an index. I like my core rule books to have an index for finding items quickly or hyperlinks within the PDF for quick navigation.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
pixel_trans.gif
Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Imperium Maledictum Core Rulebook
Publisher: Cubicle 7 Entertainment Ltd.
by Alistair P. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/27/2023 17:29:53

Not great full of errors and none clarified rules clearly not had proofreading , i say steer clear of this product.

the set is a cross of WHFRP and Dark heresy and RT it doesn't really have anything or add anything to the old rule sets its confused and pointless anything this has you could already do,

dont give them money for nothing i fear this is a cash grab where like WHFRP 4th you will have lots of little books to provide what you should have been given in the core rules , it also has a strange thing where it wants the party to be nothing like its afraid that the PC’s have any status or power don't get this if you don't had Dark heresy or rogue trader get them if you want o play in a 40k universe



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
pixel_trans.gif
Displaying 1 to 10 (of 10 reviews) Result Pages:  1 
pixel_trans.gif
pixel_trans.gif Back pixel_trans.gif
0 items
 Gift Certificates