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Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e) $19.99
Average Rating:4.6 / 5
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Wayfinder\'s Guide to Eberron (5e)
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Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Matthew D. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/29/2018 02:31:36

A lot of useful stuff here; 176 pages is pretty hefty, and even the fluffy sections - like the brief descriptions of different nations - have some suggestions on how to tailor the game mechanics to fit the world. The new races seem a bit cumbersome - too many abilities - on the first read, but I'm interested to see how they feel in play. Definitely worth buying if you want to bring Eberron into your 5e game, especially if they keep updating and adding to it. Need that artificer!

Only 4/5 cause $20 feels like a bit much for a playtest document, but hopefully will pay off over time.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by David G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/04/2018 22:41:32

Worth the purchase price and so glad to finally have Eberron represented. Looking forward to the continued updates and additions to the setting in 5e.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Mark N. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/02/2018 18:27:55

Overall, I'm very glad I bought this. I think it's a great update and very useful, both for myself as a DM and as a resource I can use for my players. I've been trying to run Eberron in 5e for about two years now, using a mixture of my own homebrew and things I found across the web. I found the mechanical options in here to be better (both in function and simplicity) compared to a number of the homebrew elsewhere.

Here are some thoughts on a few sections. Races: I felt these did a great job at getting the races into the 5e system. Overall, I was very impressed with these. Dragonmarks: I like that the bulk of these are now an option at first level. I think subraces was a very good idea for how to do the dragonmarks, and it really works to amplify that these are an inborn ability, which may steer you towards a certain skill or class, but does not define you in the same way that your later actions might. The other oddity is that Mark of Finding half-orcs get goblin instead of Orcish. This makes sense with the optional language rule, but doesn't if a DM doesn't adopt that rule. Aberrant Marks: I like the flavor of this feat much better than just using magic initiate. I wish there was a way for Aberrant Marks to likewise be an option at first level, but I'm not sure how to make this work.

Other thoughts: I liked seeing examples of both common magic items as well as some eldritch machines and dragonmarked items. I am guilty of having first skipped just to the mechanical sections, but I'm really glad I went back and re-read the rest of the text. It was worth I liked a lot of the various roleplay options presented and the ways to think about actually being in the world. The chapter on Sharn was very useful for thinking about ways to set different adventures in different parts of the city.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Anthony T. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/31/2018 23:33:05

I've been running and homebrewing Eberron for 5e for several years now, so I was ecstatic to see this get an official release. Now that I've had to opportunity to full disgest it, I figured I would give my feedback on the mechanics here.

Dragonmarks

I had originally been resistant to the idea of dragonmarks as subraces when I first heard about it, because I was laboring under the assumption that the dragonmarks still worked like they did in the original Unearthed Arcana article about Eberron, where the dragonmarks just gave a few castings of a spell as is. In my homebrew I had decided to give all characters a bonus feat at 1st level to accomodate for what I felt was the necessity of allowing all races to start with a dragonmark if one was available to them.

But! In their current form, as fully-fledged subraces with their own Ability Score Increases and whole suites of abilities, I am loving it. It makes so much sense, and it really makes the world of Eberron "fit" into 5th Edition seemlessly without having to tweak game rules (like granting a bonus feat).

There are only two things missing from the dragonmark rules:

  1. The ability to suddenly, spontaneously develop a dragonmark (other than an aberrant mark) at higher levels, due to the story concept of delayed manifestation until later in life. I understand that we might be getting this in the upcoming Morgrave Miscellany product, so that will be great to have!
  2. The ability to play an Aberrant Dragonmark from level one. Currently only humans can do it. Perhaps there should be a rule that states you can give up +2 or +1/+1 of your racial ability bonuses to take the Aberrant Mark feat, to represent the negative aspect of having an Aberrant Mark causing pain or madness (sacrificed physical or mental ability scores). Whatever is ultimately decided, I think there needs to be mechanical support for the background of having had an Aberrant Mark already for a while when you start the game.

Unique Eberron Races

I am digging all the updates to the main 4 unique Eberron races (didn't really expect to see the Daelkyr half-blood, haha). The kalashtar look great, and it is really interesting to see Keith's thoughts on Changeling personas being given mechanical weight. The Shifter looks good too, and I'm hoping we'll see more of their classic Traits being included in future updates to the WGtE.

So, that leads me to the Warforged. Now, we can talk about how I feel about them being mechnaically humanoid and not constructs, and gaining full effect from healing, but that's all opinion and I wouldn't blame you for not caring about my opinon.

However, Integrated Armor is game breaking because it makes one simple mechanical error: It assumes it has to replace magical armor that all other PCs are getting.

In 5e, the system math DOES NOT ASSUME such a thing ever happens. If this Warforged racial trait takes magical armor into consideration, it will be the only mechanical element for players to specifically take into account the aquisition of magic items. This is a mistake.

The better course of action would be to design Integrated Armor as if it has to keep up with regular armor, maybe provide a minor net +1 bonus over regular armor to make the racial feature an actual perk instead of power neutral. Then if a Warforged wants to improve their Integrated Armor, bring back the Armor Enhancement Disc component from 3rd edition like so:

ARMOR ENHANCEMENT DISC, +1 , +2 , OR +3

Warforged component (requires attunement by a warforged), rare (+1), very rare (+2), or legendary (+3)

When you atttune to this dragonshard-studded metal disk, it becomes embedded in your chest and magically reinforces your body. While it is attached, you have a bonus to AC. The bonus is determined by its rarity.

You need to leave it up to DMs whether they want to deal with warforged with legendarily-high AC. It's not a given that every human fighter will have legendary +3 full plate by level 20.

Other than those critiques, which I hope have been taken in the constructive spirit they were meant, I am INCREDIBLY EXCITED to finally have Eberron for 5th Edition and the Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron is an AMAZING first step back into my favorite D&D world!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Edward K. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/27/2018 22:49:42

Ring Side Report- RPG Review of Wayfinder’s Guide to Eberron

Originally posted at www.throatpunchgames.com, a new idea everyday!

Product- Wayfinder’s Guide to Eberron System-DnD 5e Producer- Wizards of the Coast Price- $20 here http://www.dmsguild.com/product/247882/Wayfinders-Guide-to-Eberron-5e?affiliate_id=658618 TL; DR- A much needed update on nearly everyone's favorite modern crazy setting. 88%

Basics-Whose ready for some Dragonpunk? Wayfinder’s guide to Eberron is a 5e update to Eberron from Keith Baker. Eberron debuted in 3.5 DnD, received a 4e update, and this is the updated 5e version. What Eberron is is hard to describe. It's a post-magic war, Noir, fantasy, semi-modern sci-fi non-standard epic with sprinkles of Cthulhu mythos added in, with massive changes to the standard DnD world as magic is extremely common and every race doesn’t follow any of the normal conventions set before. The book itself has one chapter setting the tone and feel of the world. After that is a chapter on the geography of the main continent followed by a chapter on the different races of Eberron. From there the book shifts to magic, focusing one chapter on Dragonmark houses (think magic family guilds with tattoos that appear under stress providing magic powers), and then new magic creation rules as well as items for the world. The book wraps up by focusing on a major city of the world called Sharn, and finally providing additional resources like extra reading, a glossary, and pictures you can use for your game.

Theme or Fluff-I like the stuff in this book. It is travel guide to the world of Eberron providing a much needed update for the most recent system of DnD. Players get to learn about the world, and GMs get enough story seeds that they can set a story anywhere. The races feel fresh since that is a major point of Eberron, and the world is deep. My major complaint is this book feels short. Under 3.5, whole books were written about each of the different countries, and here each place gets about a page. For a book published by Wizards of the Coast itself, I expect a bit more for a $20 PDF. Nothing here is bad, but I expect a bit more from the main publisher. 4.5/5

Mechanics or Crunch-Wizards of the Coast put out a book, so they know their own system. I love the new races and am glad to see the races specific to Eberron get a 5e DnD coat of paint. I also can’t give enough praise and love to how Dragonmarks and magic item creation is handled. Dragonmarks are one of the core elements of the Eberron setting as these magic family businesses run large chunks of the world, at least by proxy. Previous editions handled this by feats, but this one sets them up as races. You are born a Dragonmark, which feels thematically true, but I also like the crunch of how each Dragonmark is handled. Magic items are extremely common with an almost cellphone like network existing in Eberron, so magic item rules needed an update. This book provides new item creation rules and providing costs for items. This is an update the system needed long ago as some DnD Adventurers’ League players are swimming in gold but have no real use for it. In Eberron, that gold has a place to go! 5/5

Execution- HOOOOLLLLYYYY COW! Wizards of the Cost put out a PDF and its hyperlinked!? Overall, I like the flow in this book. I don’t hate reading the book as it doesn’t hurt my eyes to scan or dive deeply into each topic. The text is laid out well, font is good, and I like the art. Now, the art is very recycled, but the DMs Guild lets authors use art from previous editions, so I don’t hate it. I would like a bit more from the mothership, but its is not bad. The book does feel short, and that short nature hurts it a bit. I could easily see expanding each country to two pages and adding in more art assets from other books. This also kinds of makes me angry as your charging roughly full price compared to Chaosium and Paizo for a book that the fluff is already written for and your art is already written for. The art is already made, and you have the graphics sitting on a hard drive, so why not use them? The maps are ok, but they are the most general ones from the setting, so you don’t even see the capital cities on them. This would also break up the text a bit more as multiple pages are two columns in a row. There is enough white space to not make reading boring, but I’d like more. 3.75/5

Summary-Eberron is an amazing setting that everyone should experience. From how it flips the script of traditional RPG elements to its Noir setting of morally gray characters, it should be on every RPG player's bucket list. This book provides a great new update to the world, providing both DMs and players with a wealth of information. My main complaint is that I would like more. For a $20 PDF, I would like a bit more, and some of the more I want are things that Wizards of the Coast already has like maps and art assets. Some are included in the back of the book, but putting them where they are mentioned in the book might help a bit more. That said, you can’t really go wrong with this book. If you are tired of the same Tolkien inspired fantasy, then check out Eberron. This book will give you the 5e shot in the arm you’ve been looking for to start your own game. 88%



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Thomas B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/27/2018 20:39:10

Great introduction to Ebberron and much awaitied high-quaility and semi official 5e update/pilot.

I have been waiting for published, semi-official 5e Eberron for a long time.
I have been playing other table tops; Have never bought any other 5e material. This is bringing me back into D&D, and I am going to run a campain.

The thoughtfulness and the quality of the discriptions, the notes on play, and the fresh new rules is giving me life. I love the tables, especially the 9 reasons you need 200 GPs now.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Blake J. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/27/2018 12:18:36

This is a great primer for Eberron. There is a lot of room for expansion however. Please make more!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by A. G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/26/2018 14:49:03

I was going to write a review now that I've read the entire thing (and revisited a few sections more than once) but reading Nausicaä H. and Dave D.'s reviews I realize they pretty much said everything I would've wanted to say and more!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Dave D. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/25/2018 08:06:56

Eberron is an alternate Dungeons and Dragons setting, introduced in 3e and also officially supported in 4e, which is distinguished by the ubiquity of low-level magic, and its integration into everyday life, mainly via tangible objects: trains powered by magical electricity, lanterns powered by magical fire, etc. There's more to it than that, but I'm not going to describe the setting in exhaustive detail in this review.

This document is intended to give players and DMs what they need to start running campaigns and adventures set in the Eberron world. It's a good first step, but it's by no means complete yet. I acknowledge that this is a living document, wich will be getting free updates, but this review looks at what you get on day one.

There's a brief overview of Eberron's history, geography, and culture for the benefit of people who are new to Eberron. There's just enough background to give players some context as to how they might want to create and play their character. The document goes into a bit more detail on the city of Sharn, and has numerous random tables for suggested plot hooks. The document emphasizes that Eberron's setting is meant to support the kinds of stories that dominated the pulp magazines in the 1920s and 1930s: swashbuckling high adventure, and hard-boiled noir.

In addition to background material, the book contains hard rules for Eberron's four distinctive races (Warforged, Shifter, Kalashtar, and Changeling) as well as rules for Dragonmarks and some additional magic items. This material all seems pretty good; the four races all have distinctive abilities and stories. Some of the racial abilities (especially the Warforged's integrated armor) seem a little overpowered right now, so I expect that community feedback will sand those down a bit.

It's notable that there are no new classes or class options in this document. The Artificer is the most obvious omission, considering its import to the setting as a whole. I believe it will be added in the coming weeks or months, but it's not here yet.

In summary, you're getting a LOT of Eberron right now in this book, but you're not getting absolutely everything. But, on the balance, I think it is definitely worth it to pick it up now.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Mr S. L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/25/2018 05:59:40

TLDR: It's a work in progress, and if that doesn't suit you, stay clear. For the KS generation, this is a great wip initial document.

As others have said, this is to complement and help transition content/setting from previous editions in to 5e, not to give comprehensive info on the setting. It is also not AL legal (at this time of review) and considered playtest material, so that might turn some people off this product.

I really love the integration of the dragonmarks, its very clever to make it subraces, and the bonuses seem relevant at all levels. I could personally have done without the copy/paste of the backgrounds from the PHB as they are unnessery, but hoping they are placeholders for future goodness.

My biggest concern when flicking through this was the missing artificer, but again rumours say that it will make an apearance later.

The new races are identical to the UA article races of Eberron, so if you cant afford to reward authors, or dont want to support this forray in to licensed WOTC PDFs, and only want the crunch you can probably skip it at this point in time.

Ive backed a lot of RPGs on Kickstarter, and this looks exactly like the nearly completed first draft of the rules you often get. A bit more content and a fine polish that comes from contact with the public is exactly what this needs. Im looking forward to seeing what this can become.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Christopher B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/24/2018 10:34:34

This is an awesome "1000 feet up viewpoint" product to create baseline Eberron games for 5e.

I loved the exotic races, the Dragonmarked feats, and seeing so much of the artwork from previous editions make it into the book.

Appendix A is a must-have for players who haven't encountered Eberron before. The other Appendices are a nice touch.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Makis K. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/24/2018 10:02:49

So happy to see that Keith Baker is working again on eberron. I love the way this pdf is written and i am willing to try it with my players. I love the approach on dragonmarks and magewrights because they are designed in the unique way that puts in the right eberron tone. I do not mind if some of these are unbalanced. For me dragonmarks are more about storytelling than breaking the game. As always it is in the power of the dm to bring balance and give feedback. Finally i adore the way eberron expands your imagination and helps both player and dm to create colourful characters and memorable adventures. I am 100% sure that all the wayfinder's guide will finds each way to the official stardom of the 5th edition. Great Job Keith, as a long time fan of your setting i feel blessed that you are back.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Felipe Z. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/24/2018 09:37:29

I really liked the way it turned out.

I own all books from the other editions, so wasting pages on stuff I already knew wouldn't offer me much, this new approach is very useful and interesting.

Minmaxing and power gaming notes aside, I really liked the way the dragonmarks got integrated into de current system (except for Aberrant dragonmarks, which still needs a bit of finetuning), and the 4 races all look very flavorful, well written, and rounded up.

Waiting for the artificer and some monsters (the daelkyr in particular).



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Nausicaä H. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/23/2018 20:29:10

WHAT I LIKE ABOUT THIS:

  • It provides information on how to use preexisting Eberron lore to run fun games and create new character concepts. "How to use this material" sections are something that I tend to support in general, as a design philosophy.
  • Also, I'm super excited to play a dippy Ghallanda socialite who blundered her way into a pact with an Archfey at one of ... those parties.
  • The idea of dragonmarks as a subrace/race variant feature. It makes dragonmarks one of those "significant choices", and follows the idea of subraces in Eberron being a matter of aptitude as opposed to genetics -- for example, elves in non-Eberron worlds can follow the narrative role of "rangerlike" or "wizardlike". The Mark of Shadow's existence gives elves a third narrative role in Eberron, "entertainer whom it is absolutely ridiculous to believe is a spy, I'll call the Watch for your impertinence!". Making dragonmarks a racial trait is a good expansion of what a "subrace" represents.
  • The Eberron-endemic races have new and ... interesting to say the least ... takes on their mechanical abilities. I really like changelings, and the envoy warforged model.

WHAT I DISLIKE ABOUT THIS:

  • Some of the mechanics are overpowered, or might be so -- there's some iffy dragonmark abilities, and I felt the traits were a little too free with Expertise, along with the far more obviously questionable warforged armor and Revenant Blade feat.
  • The fact that the only shifter with a natural attack is longtooth is somewhat disappointing, given my fond memories of my razorclaw scout pulling out her claws to the terror of everyone at the bar. Even a respin on the longtooth mechanics would have been nice.
  • There's no clear way to provide feedback on nonfunctional mechanics outside of reviews/discussion. I'm assuming there'll be a survey to follow up after the Unearthed Arcana on the Eberron races, but that's not clear from the product description.
  • I feel like this product would have been better served by waiting for the new artificer to be finished, rather than leaving with an Unearthed Arcana artificer that many have found mechanically disappointing and/or tonally inappropriate for Eberron. I have similar feelings about the lack of goblinoid and orc PC races that fit the Eberron lore, and the lack of a gnoll PC race entirely.
  • Minor thing, but I'll bring it up anyways -- the lore given on kalashtar gender directly contradicts one of the things I liked best about them in 3.5. In 3.5, the quori spirit was tied directly to the host's gender, even when the host might have been assigned the wrong one; as a trans woman, I found that, while it wasn't representation, it was a very useful metaphor. The idea that the quori spirit differs can also produce good stories, but I personally liked the idea that the quori spirit would always ultimately validate the mortal's gender identity.

WOULD I STILL RECOMMEND THIS?

  • Khyber yes.
  • Updates are free.
  • Again, tons of information on how to tell good stories in Eberron. I list more dislikes because they're more specific. "Good game products are all alike; every bad game product is bad in its own way," as Tolstoy definitely said.
  • Demonstrating interest in Eberron now is how we make a better final vision.


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wayfinder's Guide to Eberron (5e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Gonzalo C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/23/2018 17:51:05

As a big Eberron fan, I'll start saying that there is no way a new product would disappoint me. That being said, I just learnd from Mike Mearls via Twitter that, as playtest material, this will be updated as it is corrected and enhanced, so now I see it as a one-payment subscription into Eberron's 5e playtest.

I'll be waiting for the definitive Artificer class, but in the meantime my party will have lots of fun trying the new races. I also think that Keith Baker and Ruty Rutenberg show a lot of creativity trying the dragonmarks as sub-races and including Eldritch machines in the Magic Items chapter.

Best thing, though: thius book comes with the announcement that Eberron is now free to create content and publish here, so I expect tons of new content from these great authors.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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