DriveThruRPG.com
Narrow Results
 Publisher Info











Back
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart $0.00
Average Rating:3.9 / 5
Ratings Reviews Total
14 11
8 4
5 0
4 0
2 3
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Click to view
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Glenn F. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/21/2018 15:39:17

Take a long hard look at this game - it's got a great deal of promise.

A neat stat and skill based system with a 2(or more)d20 resolution mechanic that cleverly folds in special effects and varying success alongside levels of skill mastery and raw talent.

Armour and basic defences soak damage and circumstances increase difficulty. Effects add unique outcomes for different weapons and will work the same for spells.

Momentum is a group based mechnic that replaces your usual 'special' or 'critical' successes and can be shared with other players interchangeably with combat and non-combat skills.

Fortune are powerful 'Luck Points' and 'Doom' - Doom is something you buy for extra oomph when you need it, that the GM can spend later to fuel changes in circumstances or enemy spells (sorcery is nasty - just like the books).

DISCLAIMER: The above detail isn't designed to give you a pocket guide to the system, it's designed to make you ask the kinds of question that will lead you to the pages of the Quickstart, and hopefully, to a game run with them.

Only then will you understand what I've said, and a lot more besides.

Conan is shaping up to be a well-researched 'true telling' of the world as originally envisioned, and is supported by a rules system that suits it well. If you read elsewhere that the 'Doom' mechnic 'ruins' the game, do yourself the favour of ignoring the 'doom-mongers' (ironic yes?) and trying it out yourself. I don't think most people critiquing it bothered to actually play...

An elegant system and THE Swords and Sorcery world as a combo deal. What more can you ask for?



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/07/2017 12:07:48

The rules in this PDF are a great summary of the excellent Conan 2d20 system. If you have purchased the main book this quickstart is invaluable as a quick reference to counter the bloated verbiage of the core book.

Play is fast, combat is perilous. The system offers tactical choices to the players in combat and out. Stress and Harm are a wonderful mechanic. Momentum gained from excess player successes is a great currency for the players to spend. Doom, the GM's analog, is a bit harder to manage but does add some crunch to GM fiats.

The scenario is thin - I've actually run this same story (lifted from the Howard's "Beyond the Black River") several times before with other rules and I think the scenario authors missed some great opportunities. That said, it has all the materials you need to extend the scenario, so go read the original short story and use your imagination to fill it out.

Frankly, I think 90% of the value of the system is contained in this PDF. You will want the main book if you intend to play a campaign, as it contains character creation, a small bestiary, a vague magic system and some equipment tables. During play, though, this quickstart is far more useful than the main book.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/22/2017 03:35:34

Still I do not understand how you can combine, in 2017, a setting so gorgeous (from a literature so strong) with a game system as childish (and outdated as a gaming concept) instead of another who prefers the story.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 02/14/2017 08:22:11

Opening with a brief history of Robert E. Howard's creation of Conan, interspersed with quotations from the books, this work boldly proclaims that this Conan game, unlike any of its predecessors, has been produced in collaboration with serious scholars of Howard's work and thus is closer to the original concept than any other.

Next, Chapter 2: The Hyborian Age introduces the setting, describing the nations that populate this rich setting and discussing their loose relationship with real-world history, before we move on to Chapter 3: Basic Rules. This explains enough of the game mechanics to enable you to understand the notations on the seven pre-generated characters provided, and - of course - to play the sample adventure presented here. There's a brief overview of attributes and skills, then it gets down to the detail of how they are actually used in play. This includes the concept of Complications (adverse events that happen when you roll a natural 20) and Momentum (a pool of advantage gained by achieving more successes than you need, which can be used to boost the effectiveness of what you are doing straight away or any action taken shortly thereafter... or even made available to your colleagues). The GM meanwhile accumulates Doom, to use against the party. Some examples are given to show how the system works. Cnapter 4: Action Scenes then explains how combat works. Rather confusingly (as the rest of the rules are easy to understand) a weird symbol that looks like an eagle suddenly appears, which refers to custom 'combat dice' that have been produced for this game... and are explained a few pages later. Fortunately ordinary six-sided dice will do the job just fine.

Next comes the adventure itself, To Race the Thunder. This sets the party amidst a Pictish uprising on the banks of the Thunder River near Fort Tuscelan, with plenty of opportunities to brawl as they flee to safety. Both Picts and the local wildlife will be after them as they race to warn the Fort and other settlers... and to save their own skins! It's no walk in the park, with a tough pitched battle and encounter with a Pictish shaman as a finale.

The adventure provides a bit of excitement and some good exercise (not just for the sword arm!), and should give your group a feel of the sort of action they can expect when playing this game. It does capture the rougher, more combat-oriented aspects of Conan well and bodes well for the full game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Cedric C. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 02/07/2017 19:56:56

The game system itself does a very good job in covering cinematic combat (although sorcery is covered in the core book in its own chapter), the adventure, unfortunately, could just as be easily placed in any generic fantasy world.

Skill Checks: Conan uses the commonly seen skill check of making a die roll versus a target number. However, it then adds additional rules to add cinematic play. Characters have Attributes, Skill Expertise, and Skill Focus. Attributes are inherent abilities, and are Agility, Awareness, Brawn (Strength), Coordination, Intelligence, Personality (Charisma), and Willpower. Skills represent specialized training, and each skill is tied to a particular Attribute. When a character makes a skill test, they roll 2d20. Each result equal to or below the character's Attribute plus Skill Expertise is a success. However, if they also roll equal to or less than their Skill Focus, they receive two successes instead. Before making a roll, the game master assigns a difficulty level, typically D1, to determine how many successes needed. If two characters are in opposition to each other, including combat, they are considered to be in a Struggle. Both make a skill check against a Difficulty, with the character passing the Difficuty check and making the most successes being the winner.

Cinematic Rules: While many roleplaying games rely entirely upon the game master to make the encounter entertaining, Conan has specific rules for cinematic play. Experienced game masters who enjoy the freedom to "wing it" during a game might not like these rules. New game masters and those who prefer more framework for introducing new elements can now rely upon the game system to be fair and him to not seem arbitrary as he makes an encounter more challenging. Returning to the skill check, a low roll means success, so, if any dice the player rolls is a 20, then the game master can add a Complication for each 20 -- even if the roll otherwise succeeded. For example, a player using his bow may hit his target, but may find himself now out of arrows. Momentum is a currency players can use to add advantageous cinematic effects. For each success greater than the Difficulty, a player gains a point of Momentum. They can spend it on various actions, or placed in a shared pool for later use during the round. Desired Effects indlude adding +1 damage, disarming an opponent, or adding an addtional d20 to a skill test. Since a character starts with 2d20, even the most skilled character will only have two success (three if they make their Skill Focus). Characters may roll additional dice by spending Momentum, generating Doom points for the gamemaster, spending Fortune, or working together as Teamwork. A player character begins with three points of Fortune, and is awarded them for reaching milestones and other in-game accomplishments. They may be spent on a Bonus Die with an automatic roll of a one (hence up to two successes if they have a Skill Focus of at least one), a Bonus Action, etc. A character cannot roll more than three additional dice, except through Teamwork. With Teamwork, additional characters can work together as a team. Each player describes how he is assisting the leader (and doesn't have to use the same skill as the character he is assisting) and rolls one d20. If the leader scores at least one success on his roll, then any successes generated by the assistants are added to the leader's total.

Action Scenes: Any conflict is presented as an Action scene. Action scenes are divided into rounds. The length of a round depends on the encounter. Rounds may last a few seconds in intense combat, or minutes for a village raid. Each round, a character can take a single Standard Action (eg. an attack), a single Minor Action (such as running across a room or another action that does not require a skill test), and any number of Free Actions (eg. dropping a weapon). Additionally, Reactions are special actions characters can take, turning a skill test into a Struggle. Reactions include a Defend (when the defender doesn't want the attacker to use the default difficulty of one), Protect (when a character attempts to defend an ally from an attack), and Retaliate (a melee attack when an enemy attempts to make a non-attack skill test). A character (including NPC) may perform several Reactions, but the first cost a point of Doom, second two points, etc. (The gamemaster gains Doom points to the gamemaster's Doom pool for their characters, while the gamemaster pays Doom points from his Doom pool for NPCs). Players, being the heroes, usually go first, but the gamemaster can spend Doom to allow an NPCs to immediately take their turns. Surprise is treated as a Struggle, and players can still spend Fortune or add Doom if they do not succeed. Rather than a grid, the location of each character is abstracted into zones, as defined by the gamemaster. The game uses five broad range categories (Reach, Close, Medium, Long and Extreme). (Reach is defined as within an arm's reach, while Close is the character's current zone.) Each zone has various zone effects (eg. moving out of an enemy's Reach requires a Withdraw Action as a Standard Action, or risks a Retailate Reaction from the enemy), including terrain tests, which may require a Standard Action as a skill test. Terrain tests are divided into Obstacles, Hindrances, Hazards, and Cover.

Attacks: Conan has three methods of attacking a target: Melee, Ranged, and Threaten. After choosing a target, the attacker chooses a weapon (Melee and Ranged), or a method of scaring the target (Threaten). If the target chooses a Defense Reaction (paying or gaining Doom points), there is a Struggle. Otherwise, it's an Average (D1) test. If the attacker succeeds, he rolls a number of six-sided Combat Dice for Combat Damage. 1-2 causes that much damage. A 5-6 causes one damage and triggers an effect, such as Piercing or Vicious. The defender rolls a number of six-sided Combat Dice, depending on armor, Courage, cover, morale, etc., as Soak. The difference is damage, taken against the defender's Stress. If a defender takes over five damage or has his Stress reduced to zero, the defender takes a point of Harm. In less abstract terms, a Physical Damage Type would cause Stress against the target's Vigor, and Harm against his Wounds, while a Mental Damage Type would cause Stress against the target's Resolve, and Harm against his Trauma. Wounds cause an increase in difficulty for Agility, Brawn, and Coordination tests by one, while Trauma increases the difficulty of Awareness, Intelligence, Personality, and Willpower tests by one. Characters suffering four points of Wounds or Trauma become incapaciated, only able to take actions by spending Fortune. Minor NPCs generally become incapaciated or flee after one or two points of Harm. Momentum (extra successes beyond the requirement to pass a difficulty check) generated in combat can be used to additional effects, such as Bonus Damage, Confidence (additional Morale Soak), Disarm, Penetration (ignore an amount of Soak equal to twice the Momentum spent), Re-roll Damage, Second Wind (recover Vigor or Resolve), Secondary Target (another target within Reach takes half damage), Swift Action (gain an additional Standard Action with a penalty), and Withdraw (leave the Reach of an enemy without triggering a Retailate Reaction).

Adventure: The adventure develops over several encounters and teaches the game system. As a spoiler, the plot is that the heroes protect a village from an attack. But I would have also liked the adventure to better expose the players to Hyboria (perhaps through a scholar's writing on Hyboria that holds an important clue the players can use to for the adventure) and an encounter with an important persona in the Conan mythos.

Overall, though, anyone who wants a cinematic RPG should download this Quickstart and give it a try.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Samuel H. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/26/2016 15:11:56

After a long with the PDF, I finally got a chance to run it over the past two weeks. I can confirm that it's a great, fun system. It captures the picaresque spirit of scalawags and mercenaries bouncing from trouble to trouble, using their fists, wiles and swords to solve what comes their way. The Doom and Momentum mechanics really enhance the flow of the game, and surprisingly are very intuitive to track. I was a little concerned that a "Player vs GM" dynamic could develop and the players might be afraid to buy Doom, but they quickly learned that Doom was about making their characters' lives interesting rather than about killing them. Fights were fast and the system handles both single big foes and crowds of mobs with decent aplomb, an unusual feat.

I'm quite pleased with the result, and I'm definitely looking forward to purchasing the full game when it releases.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Michał B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/04/2016 03:41:44

I'm terribly sorry but i wasn't that pleased with this Quickstart. I ran the adventure yesterday, so my opinion is qiute fresh: Pros

  • 2d20 system is easy to learn. After our first enqounter even one amateur player was able to understand quite everything.
  • Momentum (when 1 player was managing the pool) is a lot of fun, giving players lots of opportunities to change the dice fate. Combining that with Fortune Points... just marvelous
  • Doom Pool was also quite fun, but one of my players decided that he won't be avoiding attacks (like Parrying) so I won't get any Doom points :)
  • Ready Characters are well balanced and they quite nicely fill the party.

Cons

  • Adventure was one of the worst (if not THE) scenarios I've ever run. Whatever the PCs did - THE PICTS ATTACKED. They turn left - THE PICTS ATTACK, they go to the farm - THE PICTS ATTACK, they run forward - THE PICTS ATACK, and so on... I know that I could make it more interesting but I wanted to run as it was written. BORING as hell - sorry :( But of course we had fun, we always have fun playing RPGs.
  • I had some issues with the soak and parry rules, but I figured it out. But still some rules stayed a mystery, but they weren't that significant to our first session.
  • No Conan in the adventure :(
  • No pictures of prepared characters

Altogether: Conan RPG as a system (+mechanics) VERY 5/5, the adventure - total crap. 1/5 (5+1)/2 = 4 :)



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Craig P. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/11/2016 15:58:16

The quickstart was all I expected it to be. Good game system. Can't wait for the complete rules.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Arthur L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/04/2016 23:11:05

Not sure what yo say, other than it seems to capture the flavor of Robert E. Howard's tales while conforming roughly to traditional fantasy rpg structure.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Paul T. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/04/2016 16:26:54

This 52 page starter is well formated and looks really cool. Now I just ned to find some players.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by John A. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/04/2016 13:06:03

Can only state that its what it says it is 4 Star for me but others might find even more use for it



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Rich P. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/28/2016 17:58:06

I wasn't familiar with the 2d20 system before and was concerned until I got to read the quick start. It reminds me a little of Marvel Heroic Roleplaying and a little of Fate but enough crunch for my crunch crazy players. I love the Doom and Momentum mechanic and no levels!

This fits the Hyborian Age setting and Conan perfectly, can't wait to see the full corebook. I'll be looking for 2d20 like products after this one!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Kai S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/28/2016 17:18:30

We just had a nice playing session, going through this entire Quickstart Adventure in about 5 hours, with 4 players + GM.

I dont like 5-Star or 1-Star reviews if they arent deserved, just because some minor issue (like a single mechanic) isnt to taste of the reviewer, so I ll try and be as even as I can be to justfy my 4-stars.

The Good:

  • VERY fast and comfortable. The 2D20 system reads more clumsy than it plays, even the combat dice are easy to use and read after a quick explanation. Really underestimated the elegance of this system.
  • Doom mechanic gives the players a feeling of having influence. All of them liked it that they could mostly, but not totally, control my Doom income at the risk of failing more.
  • Brutal, but not too random combat. You cant take many hits, but you ll not be critical-killed instantly. Shields and Armor are worth a LOT, active Parry and active Dodge are integrated nicely with the escalating Doom price to be paid if you overuse them.
  • Spontaneous Mob rules lets the GM speed up combat, or slow it down, to his liking. Enemies can group up and split again easily, unlike for ex. Star Wars RPG, where you pre-design the minion groups for them to work.
  • No rolling for initiative speeds up combat, and especially the START of a fight, immensely. Fight starts, and the first player is already rolling for attack
  • Momentum and Effects to trigger varying conditions and special moves made a lot of sense, and you can sometimes at least get a lot of momentum out of spending all those Doom.

The Bad:

  • Most actions in combat are "I hit the enemy with my weapon", especially when you are first in a round ,and little momentum is yet built up. There is a distinct lack of varying combat actions.
  • Soak is King. Adelstan, one of the premades ,is insanely hard to take out. Also, the constant replenishment of Vigor both infight and afterwards at times makes it feel somewhat "MMO-gamey" with a full heal. The Wound mechanic did not happen often enough. However, once wounded, things go downhill fast, as the penalties are harsh.
  • Minion Picts arent any danger.
  • Mental damage happens too rarely to be an issue in this adventure, even though a sidebar claims it is.

The Neutral:

  • Its a Quickstart Adventure, and as such intended to showcase the mechanics of a system. That it does quite well, its extremely combat-heavy, and little decisions or storytelling by default.
  • The premade characters are vastly unevenly suited to the challenges in this. Adelstan makes or breaks the party in terms of combat, pretty much. However, this showcases a variety of archetypes, and through teamwork and momentum rules, a lesser-skilled character is still important.
  • By design, this adventure features very little diversity in enemies. I spiced it up a little by having differently armed and acting picts.

Overall, I believe the system is very solid, works fine, is easy to get into (we had 2 total newbies to RPGs, and they did great), we had fun, and the combat is so swift, you can really let loose there. Even if no further changes would be made, its a good core of rules, and if your group likes the Doom/Momentum mechanic, you ll be golden.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by David T. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/27/2016 20:02:48

I have been running Conan role playing games since the 80's when the Dungeons & Dragons Conan adventure modules (Unchained &  Against Darkness )   came out. I've run countless campaigns with many game systems and I can say with certainty that this game is the best Conan role playing game to date.

I'm new to the 2d20 system, but unlike at least one reviewer here I did more than glance at a couple pages and then write a “review”. I've played through the Quick Start twice so far and never had a better time running a Conan game. The system is just pure fun at the table.

Players can spend Doom Points when they're desperate or reckless and really want to succeed, empowering the GM with Doom Points of his own. Players can also build up Momentum which allows ever increasing pulp adventure and exciting heroic action. Players also have Fortune Points they can spend to pull off amazing success, succeeding by strength of arm and will. I think any true fan will feel these combined mechanics really bring the world of Conan to life.

Combat is quick, ferocious, and bloody. Action is gritty and heroic, a great mix of realism and pulp. The game conveys a real feeling for the source material. It's a perfect blend of streamlined crunch and narrative gameplay. So much action can happen in a single die roll. This is Robert E Howard role playing at its best! 

Don't take my word for it, it's free by Crom! What are you waiting for? Download it and give it a try yourself!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Robert E. Howards CONAN Roleplaying Game Quickstart
Publisher: Modiphius
by Bryan B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/26/2016 12:58:28

Backed the KS and read this as a result. System appears to be a good mesh of crunch vs. narrative. Mechanics are simple enough to catch on easily, but allow for more depth and creativity in the sub systems. The artwork and layout are gorgeous and the editing is solid. Can't wait for the full rules.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Displaying 1 to 15 (of 18 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  [Next >>] 
Back
0 items
 Gift Certificates