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Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
 
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Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 05/20/2021 13:53:10

Originally posted here: https://theotherside.timsbrannan.com/2021/05/review-spelljammer-ad-adventures-in.html

Come back to me if you will to a time just right before the Internet. (Ok, technically the roots of the Internet were here in ARPANet and what I was using BitNet at the time. But you know what I mean.)

The time is 1989 and the game on my table is AD&D 2nd Edition. Well, it is really Ravenloft, because, in college that was my setting of choice, AD&D just happens to be the system that ran underneath it all. So a couple of points already. I was playing AD&D 2nd Ed and really all I had the money for at the time was for one setting and that was Ravenloft. There were a lot of great settings in the AD&D 2 days; Forgotten Realms loomed large and impressive, and maybe a little intimidating. Greyhawk and Mystara only had some minor entries, much to my disappointment, Al-Qadim and Kara-Tur both looked like fun, and then we would also get Planescape. But there was one out that seemed so strange to me that I wanted to know more but yet could not bring myself to buy. Until now.

DriveThruRPGs Print on Demand has been a fantastic opportunity for those of us who want to go back and look at some of these other systems and games of our youth. While I have relied mostly on the aftermarket to get myself up to speed on the Forgotten Realms (and enjoying it) I recently picked up the hardcover POD version of AD&D's Spelljammer. And I am so happy I did.

Now don't get me wrong. I wanted to play SpellJammer back then. We ever started a new campaign where all the characters were in a navy, so they all had 3 free levels in fighter, and then they were level 1 (or 4 for the fighters) in whatever other classes they were going to be. Using the AD&D dual classing rules meant they could not act as fighters until later. But it boosted their HP. They were going to spend some time at sea, but eventually, they were going to turn their ship into a SpellJamming one. I named the ship "The Black Betty" after the Ram Jam song because every time I heard "Spelljammer" I thought "ram jam" and the Black Betty was a good name for a ship. Sadly we never got very far. I was at University and my DM at the time was at a different school and the other players were also at yet another school. Meeting only over the summer was not helpful for a long-term campaign.

Fast forward to today.

Spelljammer: Adventures in Space

For this review, I am considering the Print on Demand hardcover and the PDFs from DriveThruRPG. There may be things true of these versions that are not true for the original boxed set and things that might be the other way around. I can't speak to the boxed set since I never owned it.

Spelljammer is a whopping 278 pages. Jeff Grubb is our primary author with art by Jeff Easley, Jim Holloway, Dave "Diesel" LaForce, and Roy Parker. Easley is responsible for our cover, and indeed many of the covers from this time. The interior art is Jim Holloway who really set the tone and feel for what I consider the 2nd Ed "style" of that time. The interior is largely black and white with some color illustrations. Mostly the pictures of ships, what were covers in the separate boxed set books, and some maps. The scanned pages are not crisp, but they are easy to read.

The book is divided into two large sections that correspond to the two 96-page books that came in the boxed set, Lorebook of the Void and Concordance of Arcane Space.

Lorebook of the Void

We are introduced to how Spelljammer, AD&D in Space, came about. We also now know that this was the first of new boxed set settings to come out for AD&D 2nd ed. More would follow and make 2nd Ed more famous for their settings rather than their rules. The goal for Spelljammer was overtly a simple one; AD&D in space, connect all the main AD&D worlds, and make them work together without changing what makes each one unique.

This section covers the basics of Spelljamming and operating a spelljamming helm. We get a good overview of the types of spelljamming ships and that various races that can be found in Arcane Space. We learn that gnomes and halflings for the most part avoid Arcane Space since they are too closely tied to their planets (makes sense) but Krynn's Tinker Gnomes are not so tied to their world in the same fashion so they are very much at home in Arcane Space. We even get a bit on goblinoids.

The next third covers the various monsters and creatures you will find in AD&D 2nd Ed Monstrous Compendium format. We are given new details on the Beholders (they take the place of Daleks in Arcane Space) and the Neogi. Mind Flayers also get new treatments.

The last thrid covers the three main AD&D game worlds, Krynn (Dragonlance), Oerth (World of Greyhawk), and Toril (Forgotten Realms). The problems begin to show here since the cosmology of Krynn is tied very much to their gods. This is not the fault of Spelljammer or Dragonlance, but rather one of trying to fit the divine into a scientific worldview. I will admit I do like how the spheres are covered here. It reminds me a little of how the solar system of Urt is covered in the D&D Immortals Set. One could take that information and drop it rather cleanly into this book. It was not done of course because at this time Urt/Mystara was considered part of D&D and not AD&D. Even discussions online close to the time described AD&D as one universe, maybe even in the same galaxy, and D&D in a different universe altogether.

Concordance of Arcane Space

The second major section of the book covers the rules part of Arcane Space. The first chapter describes some basics of how Arcane Space and the Phlogiston work. Chapter 2 covers some changes to the AD&D rules. The first change, Lizard Men are now a playable race. There are changes to some spells and how clerics can talk to their gods. We also get some new spells. Chapter 3 covers the ships. How they are made, flown, and the capabilities (armor, weapons, storage) of examples. Combat is covered in Chapter 4. Ships are a lot like characters in they have an Armor Rating and Hull Points. Damage by large ship weapons can deal hull damage and/or hit point damage. Chapter 5 covers celestial mechanics, or how systems are made. While in real-life astrophysics we know that forces like gravity will produce round (or oblate) planets and stars, there is a wide variety of things found even nearby to us. Arcane Space should be just as diverse if not more so. Oerth (Greyhawk) is a Geocentric system, Toril and Krynn are heliocentric. There are other systems that can be and should be, even stranger. We learn that there is a flow to the Phlogiston and that some worlds might easy to travel to, but harder to travel away from.

We also have several appendices. The first covers how magic spells and items work in space. Appendix 2 covers travel times with Earth and the Solar System as an example along with Krynn, Toril, and Oerth. Mystara/Urt can be substituted for Earth easy enough. Flow can affect travel times.

The last section of the book are the color deck plans of various spelljamming ships. Maps and cut-out-and-fold ship minis. Best get the PDF along with the printed book so you can print these on your own. A large black-hex map would work great for movement in space.

Reading it today I can overlook some of the flaws that would have bothered me in 1990.

Print on Demand Book

The Print on Demand book is hardcover, mostly black & white with some color art inside and color covers. It is a hefty volume on premium paper which makes it a little thicker than you expect a 278-page book to be. It is very high quality.

Converting to 5e

In the first chapter of the first section, some advice is given about converting older AD&D monsters to use with Spelljammer since in theory every monster could be found somewhere. The example given is the Grimlock from the Fiend Folio, a monster they describe as not likely to be updated to 2nd Edition.

Well. We know now the Grimlock. And updated to 3rd and beyond. So there is no good reason to assume that Spelljammer will "Never" be updated. In fact with D&D 5's desire to embrace the past and every world of D&D in their products it is reasonable we will see some Spelljammer at some point. A spelljamming ship was already placed on a level in a 5th edition adventure.

But converting to 5e based on the material in this book? Well really there are two main areas of focus; monsters and magic. Many of the monsters have newer 5e writeups now, so this is less a question of conversion and more of replacement. Magic, in particular spells, would need some more work but the guidelines are in place. Similar spells should change in similar manners. Combat can be swapped out for 5e combat, which not terribly different. So yes, if you are playing a 5e game then you can get a lot of use and play out of this book.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by John M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/20/2021 13:43:42

Very pleased with having this whole boxed set wrapped up in a hardcover volume; the print looks absolutely legible through the whole book, and as far as people who were concerned with the books' ordering of the various books that were in the boxed set, well, that's a little nit-picky, as you can always just flip to the section you need. Very happy to have this on my shelf and not to have to try to snag a boxed set copy that'll run me several times more.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by John R. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/27/2020 13:00:11

The softcover printed version is really nice, good square binding, glossy color cover, good interior color.

My only gripe is that it is a thick book, and the pages are printed too far into the crack in the middle of the binding. To read it comfortably, I will eventually crack and crease the nice square binding. It's a small quibble, and one many people will overlook, but some of us Book People are a little crazy.

It looks like the printing could be shifted 1/8 of an inch toward the outer edge without too much crowding. This isn't a lot, but it could help.

Otherwise, it is well made, and worth the purchase.

I give it a 4.5 / 5, rounded up because checkboxes.

And cut-and-pasting from a review from Brent C. "My only hope is that other box sets will recieve print-on-demand hardcover versions (coughPlanescapecough)" I can't say that loud enough.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Brent C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/29/2020 16:42:17

This is a review of the hardcover print-on-demand copy of Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e).

All in all I am satisfied. The binding is in line with other POD hardcovers I have purchased. It will do the job and stand up to a moderate amount of abuse. The book is not so thick that I'm concerned about the integrity of the binding. The cover is clearly a print of an image, and while the image has no blur or pixellation, it does have a barely visible border around it. The image on the spine is also not perfectly aligned, leaving a thin white strip on the spine that should be part of the back cover. However, I was pleased that it does have the title and logo on the spine. It looks good on my bookshelf, small issues aside.

In terms of contents, others have noted that the two books from the box set appear in reverse order. Concordance of Arcane Space ought to be read first. I don't consider this a critical error, especially if you are already familiar with the product from its previous box set incarnation. I won't say any more about that.

The print quality is fine. It is obviously a print of a PDF, but this is made clear in the product description. The text is fuzzy from being enlarged, but not nearly so that I find reading difficult. The maps and ship tokens are reproduced, split across pages, and in good quality. If you want to use those, however, I would recommend getting the PDF as well just for convenience.

Again, I'm satisfied with this product. It met my expectations and it will make a great reference that allows my original box set to sit in comfortable retirement. My only hope is that other box sets will recieve print-on-demand hardcover versions (coughPlanescapecough).



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Thomas A. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/17/2019 22:01:42

For high fantasy, there's the Realms. Romance? There's Dragonlance. But Spelljammer? Well, it's for the real weirdos out there. We got antiquity-level physics. We got a legendary immortal spaceship. We got malevolent eel-spiders and giant snail shell spaceships and hippopotamuses who love guns.

That should be enough to sell you on this book, or else you've probably already closed the tab.

As far as print quality, the hardcover that I received in Summer 2019 is quite high quality. It's not blurry, and it's not missing letters, like it sounds previous scans had problems with. It's a little strange that the two books are printed in the opposite order that the original material suggests, but it's not a big deal. There are several pages where material gets lost in the fold, since it wasn't intended to be presented in this way. But if you're interested in this strange, strange universe -- which can link the Realms, Dragonlance, and any other campaign, by the way -- and you're not as concerned with collectability, it's hard to go wrong with this.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Luke F. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/24/2019 06:13:09

CONENT: D&D fantasy in space. The concept never appealed to me back in the 80s, but there are plenty of RPGs put there now for low fantasy and realism that this offers something unique and entertaining. if you want to play out crazy campaigns flying your pirate ship to fight goblins using planet destroying weapons of mass destruction - or play out the stories of the Gloryhammer albums - this is it. Some of the favourite villains of classic DnD feature heavily, such as the Mindflayers and Beholders.

BOOK: The scan is good, though the few colour pictures of the covers are a little over-saturated with colour. A minor complaint is that the two books, here included as a single volume, are tge wrong way round: volume 2 is placed first and is followed by volume 1. The handouts from the box set are duplicated in the book, though these have been cut up to fit the dimensions of the book.

A novel game, good facsimile and great if you were unable to get the original box set that is entirely duplicated here.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Kyle C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/01/2019 10:49:42

Complete, even with the doubled-up ship cards. They should have shown more care with the book order. The book intended to be read first is the second in the PoD volume.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Simon H. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/15/2016 02:14:15

Unless you're a big fan of D&D 2nd edition as a rulebook this leaves a lot to be desired. Given a few mistakes in the actual book (what's a ships spelljammer rating again (SR) because you give two different examples which disagree entierly on rounding up or rounding down) and the actual clunky rules involved it probably only gets 2 stars as a rulebook.

However there's a reason that D&D is on an entire third revision since then and that's probably not why you're interested in this. And as a source of ideas and materials this book can really shine. Frankly most fantasy settings ignore space to a ridiculous degree given how powerful and prideful the wizards are usually getting. Seriously, in many fantasy settings it should be a surprise that some wizard hasn't taken getting to the moon as a challenge... and then succeeded. Spelljammer gives you tools and ideas on how to handle this, especially if your cosmology isn't especially scientific.

It's hard to say how much of the book could be useful to the average DM. Some stuff, like ideas about the Giff, Neogi, and Illithids can be pretty useful to just about anyone. Other stuff, like the phlogiston, isn't going to work for too many people. Basically you should treat this as a mix and match grab bag of ideas that you're still going to have to kludge a little to make work for more modern rulesets. On the flipside there's a lot of stuff here that can be easily converted in different ways. Want some basics for a fantasy extraterrestial invasion of your campaign world? The info on the Neogi and Illithids, especially their ships, is excellent. Want to run a campaign about a mad wizard striving to get to space? This is THE book you need for the climax to that. Want to try adding some sort of intergalactic travel to your setting? The book provides several different drives, some possibly useful rules and considerations about travel time and even if you don't like the phlogiston you could do a quick bodge and just call it hyperspace.

All in all it's not a brilliant product but it is potentially a very useful one.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Levi A. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/08/2014 13:10:51

The classic DnD campaign setting, in a handy digital package. I've been waiting for some time for this set to come back into print, so a review of the contents of the books wouldn't be objective at all. Sure, Spelljammer has some rough edges, and in some places is downright wonky, but the sheer audacity of it is what made it so great. With that said, this review is going to focus on the digitization thereof.

The book scans are very clear, appear to quite high resolution (I didn't check the DPI), and are miles better than another one I'm aware of. The box set is split into two books, and all the extra materials are appended to the end of the first book. This is less than ideal (I'd have preferred a third document), but is not any real hardship. (Although, they'd have probably fit better as part of the Lorebook of the Void, seeing as that's the DM book.) They are formatted at the same page size as the book, so I don't know if they where scanned at a higher resolution or not (for the ship cards and tokens, it probably doesn't matter, but being able to print large format versions of the maps would be nice).

There doesn't appear to be a scan of the box itself. What's a box set with no box? Incomplete, that's what. While it's a minor bobble, as many won't miss it and few will make use of it, it still cost this review about 3/4 of a star. While some manipulation with PDF hacking tools can split the books into as many parts as a savvy user requires (or combine them into one), one can't (easily) replace missing content.

I haven't printed any of the contents, so I can't specifically say how it'd go, but everything I've seen indicates it should be high quality.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Alexander L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/07/2014 08:48:51

Originally posted at: http://diehardgamefan.com/2014/03/07/tabletop-review-spelljammer-adventures-in-space-advanced-dungeons-dragons-second-edition/

Wow. I can’t express how happy I am to have the Spelljammer: Adventures in Space boxed set once again available to the public. Sure it’s in PDF form instead of in a fun box, but you can’t lose the maps and ship handouts with a digital copy like twelve year old me did with the physical version. Spelljammer is just such a fun and fantastic idea and along with Planescape and Ravenloft, it remains one of my three big campaign settings for Advanced Dungeons & Dragons and is a big part of why 2e is my favorite version of D&D.

Spelljammer somehow manages to change everything you know about D&D while still holding true to the mechanics and core ideas of the game. Through it, you can have a wonderful blend of sci-fi filtered through a high fantasy lens along with the ability to travel from say Oerth to Krynn and then on to Toril. It’s really a wonderful idea and in fact, one started by Gary Gygax himself with Expedition to the Barrier Peaks. After all this earlier OD&D adventure had characters entering a sci-fi location with strange aliens and technological marvels a plenty. What Spelljammer did was simply flesh out the sci-fi aspects of Advanced Dungeons & Dragons while still making them work with wizardry and iron age combat. Spelljammer is the setting where Beholders and Mind Flayers were given complete ecologies, histories and homeworld. It’s the setting where the tinker gnomes of Dragonlance were given a serious look. It’s where Lizardmen were first treated as a playable PC race. It’s the setting that gave us Giffs, Neogi, my beloved Rastipedes and of course GIANT SPACE HAMSTERS. I could go on for hours about everything that makes Spelljammer so entertaining, but suffice to say, the fact that you are getting the full boxed set for only $9.99 makes this not only a must buy, but perhaps the biggest bargain on DNDclassics.com

Spelljammer: Adventures in Space gives you two core books. You get The Concordance of Arcane Space and Lorebook of the Void. The original physical boxed set also came with eleven handouts and four maps. These are now included with The Concordance of Arcane Space‘s PDF. Everything looks as crisp, clear and colorful as with the original print copies and it’s easy to read all of these on either computers or e-readers like a Kindle Fire. Now, the maps and handouts are only the size of a regular page now that they are in PDF form, but that’s a minor kibble at best.

The book you should read first is The Concordance of Arcane Space as it gives you the introduction to Spelljammer. Here you get an overview of the setting and what to expect from it. This is where terms like Wildspace, Phlogiston Spheres and other Spelljammer specific jargon gets explained for the very first time. Even if you never play a Spelljammer campaign, the explanation for everything is just so fascinating, fun and imaginative, that you’ll enjoy reading it. I can’t believe how fresh this feels even twenty five years later. Rules for air quality, gravity, temperature and time are all things that you’ll find in The Concordance of Arcane Space – mechanics you’d never need or even think of for other campaign settings.

Although most of the playable new races are found in The Complete Spacefarer’s Handbook, you will find rules for Lizardmen PCs here. You’ll also find some very important rules for playing a Cleric in Spelljammer and how it can be quite hard to gain spells outside of you God’s sphere of influence. Conjuring and Summoning spells also take on different characteristics. Fire however may have the biggest impediment. This means a lot of common spells and especially healing magic take on a new twist, causing players to think different about what kind of a character to make and the tactics they will use.

Of course, what would Spelljammer be without rules for how to buy and/or build your own ship? That’s all in here too. Of course, building a ship is extremely expensive and you have to maintain a crew to boot. This means Spelljammer is an excellent way for long running characters to use that hard gained loot that is just sitting around somewhere. You’ll also find rules for ship on ship combat, saving throws for all sorts of potential hull materials, crew based morale checks and interplanetary travel.

The last thing we’ll look at in The Concordance of Arcane Space is “The Rock of Brawl,” which gives DMs and players alike their first playable Spelljammer location, complete with story seeds, a cast of memorable characters. There is a lot of great stuff here and the map still looks great. The map does have one minor problem with it though. In coverting it from an oversized map from the boxed set into a standard PDF page, the words “The Lesser Market” and “Dungeon” are warped and blurry. There’s also a red dotted line going through the entire map towards the top. A minor quibble, but one purists might grumble over.

Now let’s talk The Lorebook of the Void. This second book in the “boxed” set is also a lot of fun. The first chapter in the book gives DMs a lot of ideas and suggestions for running a campaign in space as well as one that flitters between worlds. You are also given a glossary of terms and a fun ideas on making alien versions of common D&D creatures. One great example is the Beholder bartender who has a Detect Lie eye instead of the Death Ray one. This lets it be an effective bartender and patrons don’t have to worry about being killed instantly. They do have to worry about disintegration or petrification if they don’t pay their tab however…

Chapter Two is all about Spelljammer vessels. You’re given a whole host of crafts along with their stats. These are common spacefaring vessels and should help DMs running a Spelljammer campaign immensely. The Gnomish Sidewheeler and Neogi Mindspider are amongst my favorites. Chapter Three is entitled “Spacefarers” and it talks about the culture of various D&D races in space. You get a really nice look at all the PC and NPC races common to the game, regardless of setting and how alien versions might be different from established worlds. Goblins, Ogres, Giants, Centaur, Dragons and even Undead have their own listings here. Of note are the entries for Mind Flayers and Beholder, as this is the book and setting that really defined both as a species instead of just creepy looking antagonists. Lycanthropes too have a long and highly detailed section in this chapter – for obvious reasons. The chapter then ends with Monstrous Compendium entries for a lot of creatures, all of which are tremendously entertaining and worth using. Chapter Four is “Known Spheres” and it talks about the core D&D worlds: Krynn, Toril and Oerth, along with important planets or moons within their sphere. That, my friends, is the entire book.

So yes, you’re getting all this plus maps and handouts for under ten bucks. It’s a terrific deal and one any D&D fan can make great use of. Even if you don’t play Second Edition AD&D, the ideas, mechanics and creatures presented here can be applied to any version of the game with a little effort and the end result will be well worth it. Out of everything on DNDclassics.com so far, this is by far my favorite offering (so far) and with a little luck, it will be yours too. Now, let’s see those Ravenloft and Planescape boxed sets on the site as well, am I right?



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Dustin B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/03/2008 15:24:41

This was the first boxed set on one of my favorite settings. Sure it was quirky, but that was part of it’s charm.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Nicholas B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 06/17/2008 10:46:16

Reasonably good scan (knocks it down a notch, not perfect, alas....that thin paper gets some bleed through the scanner picks up) of one of the best D&D campaign settings ever made.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Richard L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/06/2006 00:00:00

I like this product and I'm planning to use it if my players ever decide to pursue the option of space travel in my Tale of the Comet campaign.

Unfortunately, it's going to require significant retooling to make it work. My campaign is a high technology vs. magic setting and the two take very different approaches to how the universe is organized.

If you like weird stuff, then this one is for you!<br><br> <b>LIKED</b>: It's an interesting read. Lots of unique ideas are presented within.<br><br><b>DISLIKED</b>: It presents a completely different cosmology from the one I'm used to in real life. That'll make it difficult to integrate into my Tale of the Comet campaign.<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Acceptable<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Disappointed<br>



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Nick V. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/04/2006 00:00:00

very cool product*****<br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Excellent<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Very Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space (2e)
Publisher: Wizards of the Coast
by Cameron B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/03/2005 00:00:00

While my other book reviews are longer and more detailed, Spelljammer begs a different description.

  1. It's D&D in outer space. Your planet is small and meaningless. Really meaningless. Elminster? A Nudnick. Raistlin? Lots of style, but small-minded. Mordenkainen? Big name, but so "planetary"... Why bother?

  2. Phlogiston. It burns. Fire is cool. And kinda dangerous.

  3. Mind Flayers. Lots and LOTS of Mind Flayers. And all DM's love Mind Flayers. Entire ships, manned entirely by them. Entire star systems ruled by them! Did I mention we have Mind Flayers?

Just get it, and let the players find out that they are REALLY nothing special. <br><br><b>QUALITY</b>: Very Good<br><br><b>VALUE</b>: Satisfied<br>



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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