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World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update $0.00
Average Rating:4.2 / 5
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World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
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World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Ian T. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/10/2017 23:53:21

A hidden gem of a supplement for World of Darkness 2.0 that would work well for adaptations of Supernatural especially, but has many fine little additions that could be used for any road trip or even post-apocalypse setting as scavenging and car chases are detailed here.

Recommended for anyone who's such a fan.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Andrea Z. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 01/27/2017 13:40:47

Is very nice to have an update to the new system for free, thanks!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Talen S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/23/2016 16:45:32

Great Stuff. I have had 8 of the books in the WoD series for quite a while. These additions helped a lot bring the life back to the system I have read over and over again.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Lisa A. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/09/2016 16:24:29

I like streamlined rules, so I like it.

I will ignore some of the new rules for Vices, my players can pick from a list that has nothing good sounding on it. That is, unless someone comes up with a well worked out idea, that doesn't make me feel I'm looking at a character with no flaws like a persona created for a job interview.

But, hey, it's a nice option, for those who like it. Likewise, I will choose whether to use the updated experience costs depending on whether I want mastery to represent something great that takes effort you can imagine doing, or rare that takes superhuman effort.

Aspirations is ingenious, get the players to tell you what they want. Breaking points is a smart way to get some background on characters, skewed in a horror setting. Respec-ing merit points is great, for keeping one player from hurting another by blowing up their resources (or outing the identity of someone with social merits to an evil conspiracy, or similar). It also means that players are more willing to risk those resources, if the story calls for it. I mean, it takes time to spend those points, but it's pretty neat. Also new merits and guidlines on making more merits and I like all this stuff.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Micah H. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/26/2016 23:25:54

A very nice update to the WoD 2.0 rules. Makes things a little more streamlined mechanically, while anabling players to customize their characters more and encouraging them to seek out character drama in their role-play.

Kudos to Onyx Path for making this update free, reading this definitely got me more interested in the WoD 2nd edition Chroincles of Darkness line.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 01/22/2016 08:27:30

This is the 'crunchy' appendix 'World of Darkness Rules Revisions' from The God-Machine Chronicle, released as a free download, and very useful it is too. Perhaps you are happy with your own chronicles and don't want to buy the full book, but even if you are using The God-Machine Chronicle most of it is 'Storyteller eyes only' whilst this material is useful to players - so send them to download this (as my Storyteller did a year ago) and they can have access to all the new rules mechanics without the temptation to read bits they ought not to see!

Since the New World of Darkness Core Rulebook was published in 2004, a huge number of books have come out to support the line, many of which have contained new rule mechanics to support whatever is presented in that book. Many of them, such as spirits (originally in Werewolf: The Forsaken), shards (Mirror), tiers (Hunter: The Vigil) and other mechanics have spread to other games in the line, becoming a general part of the New World of Darkness even though the core ruleset has remained the same. The material in this book is intended to draw all these strands together and present a new definition of the core rules, to be used throughout the line for future materials.

So, what's here? First of all, we look at Character Creation and Advancement. Start with the rules in the core rulebook, but apply these modifications and additions. New bits include Aspirations, where you set short- and long-term goals for your character and help develop his personality (and give the Storyteller hints as to opportunities you might like to have in future plots). There's an update to the Virtue and Vice rules, freeing you up from a set list and providing guidance on creating personalised ones instead. Their use has also been modified so that fulfilling a Virtue gives a full refresh to Willpower because your character feels so darn good about it, whilst fulfilling a Vice just restores a single point as he asserts his inner nature. There are examples to help (or use) of course. This section also introduces the concept of a Breaking Point and talks about experience.

Next comes a section on Merits, which replaces the Merits section of the core rules entirely. It includes most of the Merits from the core rulebook and those introduced in subsequent publications, and there's plenty of advice on how to use them in play.

This is followed by Conditions. These add an additional layer of consequence and reward to certain actions, but are based on circumstances rather than something you choose for yourself. They are temporary, being resolved by the effect that causes the Condition or the terms of the Condition itself (and when you resolve one you get a Beat towards your experience total). Some, however, are persistent - irrovocably linked to a character - and there's a subset called Tilts which are used in combat.

Then we meet Integrity. This replaces Morality as a guage of how a character's behaviour affects their psyche. There's a lengthy explanation of why Morality needed replacing due to the inconsistencies and oddities it produced. When you do something which hits a Breaking Point (as determined earlier), this may affect your Integrity.

Other things covered include Soul Loss (something to be avoided), Extended Actions (replacing the core rulebook mechanics for determining them) and Social Manoeuvering (also replacing the original rules for Social actions). This last is particularly comprehensive, but care needs to be taken that die-rolling doesn't replace role-playing. Used well, it will enhance it.

The next part of the book is given over to Combat and other ways of doing harm to characters (environmental dangers, illness, poisons, etc.). It makes combat even deadlier, something to be avoided where possible but very effective when you do engage in it. One interesting point is Intent: what does each participant actually want to get out of the fight, what are they fighting for? Defining your objective goes a long way to focussing the combat and provides a way of determining when an opponent will give up - some things just aren't worth dying for, even if someone thinks they are worth killing for. It makes combat more meaningful and integral to the plot rather than there just because, well, if there aren't a few brawls it's not a role-playing game.

Then come Ephemeral Beings: Ghosts, Spirits, and Angels. This provides a unified system of rules for all manner of ghosts (and can also be applied to God-Machine angels). Manifestations, possession and more are covered here, with effective use of Conditions to moderate what is going on when some spook comes a-calling. Neat. Finally, there's a comprehensive selection of Equipment of all kinds, find the right tool for the job here.

This part of The God-Machine Chronicles was written as Onyx Path Publishing was struggling to get permission to produce a second edition of the New World of Darkness Core Rulebook at the time. It's an excellent revision based on years of development and play, and well worth considering - and necessary if you want to use the Second Editions of the various game lines, as these rules are assumed to be in force. And it's free!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Jon L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/06/2015 16:29:03

Loving the new rules. Of course wanted to try and use it in a campaign but not all the 2nd edition books aren't out yet, but could still be used with minor mechanic alterations. I like a good campaign with a good story regardless I make it work. This was a really good book even for rules update but it inspired me to get the full book of this set.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Álvaro G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/23/2015 11:42:20

This is a worthy product of upgrading rules for the World of Darkness. Unless you have the main book updated editons of the core series, by Onyx Path, this one is a must have.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Andrew L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/25/2014 23:15:44

I realise I'm a little late to the party in regards to GMC, that it's been out for quite a while now but that's becasue it's taken me a few attempts to wrap my head around why anyone would see this as a good or worthwhile update, or why White Wolf/Onyx Path/CCP would see this as the best way forward for nWoD which was fairly straight forward.

I've been playing WoD since classic, I'm aware that I'm in a minority who actually enjoy nWod (Pre GMC)It was a simple system, a lot cleaner than classic WoD in many ways without being bogged down by a metaplot that can cause issues at the table (I've seen them) between players and ST's. GMC adds a metaplot, it overly complicates some aspects of nWoD, and makes other things a bit to wishy washy to the point of being far more abusable, this however isn't what truely annoys me about GMC, metaplots can be ignored with a firmer stance at games, wishy washy rules can be house ruled with a bit more structure and unlikable rules can be adjusted. What annoys me is that many of the rules changes already existed in nWoD through various suppliment books, most notably Mirrors as optional rules, where ST's could use ones they liked and ditch ones they didn't.

Onyx Path however seem to be intent from what I've seen over the past year or so on forcing these once optional rules on all their new publications instead of just simply cleaning up or refreshing things to a basic level that doesn't fundamentally change how a almost perfectly good system worked (I'm being honest nWoD wasn't perfect just more so that I feel GMC is)

Summerising my general feelings briefly at the end here, GMC wasn't needed, or to be more accurate I would have probably been more accepting of it if it where presented as optional rule changes along the same lines as Mirrors, and if the metaplot was clearly marketed and just ideas and not the foundation.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Carl L. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/08/2014 10:34:29

Let's start off with it being free. Always a good thing, or at least not bad. I like the inclusion of a lot of merits, possibly from various other supplements in the WoD lines, I'm not sure. I especially like that Professions from HTV show up, since the focus of the corebooks has been mortals in a messed up world.

I like the notion of letting players define their own trigger points for morality. I like that there is something that it's not just the player doing this, but it also needs to have the ST involved with it as well.

I like the idea of Beats, but just that. I think in actual play it would smack too much of every video game with an "award" for the simplest of "accomplishments". And looking at the number of things can that can award a Beat would pull from gameplay, considering that every scene might have several Beats, but only if a player tries some contrived BS to get the goodies. I also think the cost ratio of Beats to Experiences, and then the various aspects of the character costing a certain number of Experiences is ridiculous. It reminds me of Earthdawn, where you get your attributes, and then that gives you a Step number, and each Step number corresponds to a differing type and/or amount of dice to roll. It also undermines the notion of trying to not have such a linear concept to character advancement. I'd either go with the good ole' XP system, or take the plunge and work up something even a bit more in depth but still try to steer clear of "linear progression". I frankly see nothing wrong with awarding XP and having things with their costs. It's not so much a "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" but more if you are going to do something different actually DO something different.

Some of the Conditions are neat. Some things should have simply been left as Flaws. Or maybe a designation of Positive Conditions and Negative Conditions. I get why some aren't lumped into Merits, as they can be very temporary, but it still seems needlessly... changed. I kind of get the feeling that somebody wanted to essentially make a WoD 5th Ed. but without actually saying that's what it was since it's not even really called WoD 4th Ed.

As for the metaplot, I've never really used any of them. Even when I run Old WoD stuff it's never about that (which ever game it is). I did like the fiction from the original WoD corebook, especially the one that had the God Machine in it. And I also enjoyed what fiction is present in this update. It smacks a touch the Old WoD stuff, especially the Triat from Werewolf rolled in cthulu and a grandfather clock, but the fiction is good and creepy. A lot of my friends did love the old stuff, but they are also probably still playing within said metaplots. Still, good stuff there.

Some one else mentioned the social maneuvering and Opening Doors , and I agree with the assessment that it's needlessly complicated. I get the idea that there should be some way to convince some one to fork over their security pass, or to let you copy those file even though it is illegal to do such, or any number of things that people know they shouldn't allow but are convinced to do so anyway. I just think the whole mess of Doors and crap is trying too hard to be different for the sake of being such, and not actually being any better than making it an extended roll with "x" being successes needed (x being their Resolve, or even Willpower. Something).

I like the idea of changing with Virtues and Vices a bit, but I like the new-old set up better. I didn't mind the 7 Sins and Virtues. I think this new set up is a bit like Natures and Demeanors of Old. They were interesting, but there were just too many of them. Still, if you can not let the process of creating your own individual and unique Virtue and Vice not consume too much time, and what is come up with isn't worded to be a completely BS way of raking in the Willpower, have at it.

Though it seems kinda bitchy, I did like it. It's price tag has a lot to do with that. If I had actually paid money for this one I'd be rather pissed. Still, I like what it offers that I do like, and the rest I can ignore. I was sitting on a solid 3 for this review, but I figure the current price is worth another for a total of 4.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Scott S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 02/23/2014 15:15:09

Beautiful.

I've been playing WoD for about 2 years now and have loved it since I first played. The God Machine deserves a look at -- especially if it's free.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by H. G. C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/27/2013 16:47:56

Pretty good update. Includes everything that would've required a second edition of Blue Book nWOD for all the added stuff from other expansions, like soul handling. This also folds in a chunk of several other books like Armory and Second Sight.

Only downside is that it's a memory hog. Slow to read on tablets and slower to print.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Jo O. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/10/2013 16:19:34

I don't know how some reviewers can say with a straight face that the God Machine Rules update encourages minmaxing. A simple exercise in math proves them wrong.

Honestly, I wasn't going to write a review. I didn't feel the need. The fact that anything is being done with nWoD should speak for itself here, but apparently some folks, particularly a very long, rambling review that rates this 1 star, have a problem with math.

The God Machine Rules update does away with escalating experience costs. Some misguided reviewers are narrowing in on the 'no double penalty for 5 dots' rule change as some sort of min-maxer's paradise.

Let's break that down, shall we?

Pre-GMC, the incentive for the player is to put 4 dots in many skills, and as many 4 dots in Attributes as he or she can due to escalating experience costs. To purchase 4 dots in a skill post character gen, you'd have to spend 3 + 6 + 9 + 12 experience. That's 30 experience.

Now if you were to spend those points on 4 separate 1 dot skills, you'd be spending 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 experience. That's 12 experience.

Pre-GMC, those two purchases are considered identical at character generation, but vastly different for post generation experience purchases. Post GMC, both are 12 experience and you're no longer incentivized to maximize your strengths and minimize your weaknesses. (aka textbook minmaxing, which some reviewers have been hilariously railing against this book for encouraging!) A player who spends those 4 points on 4 different skills is now equally (if not moreso for adaptability) as a player sinking many more points into a single skill. It's a difference of 18 experience pre-GMC! You could buy a 4th dot and 5th dot in a merit with that xp in the old system, or Nine 1 dot merits.

Pre-GMC's system created character generation imbalance. That was a serious flaw and GMC addresses that flaw while giving even more freedom in character generation. (particularly with some merits being cheaper, like the ludicrously pre-GMC overpriced merit Striking Looks). As someone who had to design characters for a chronicle, it was a nightmare trying to balance characters when something as simple as four 1 dot skills vs one 4 dot skill created such a difference in effective xp spent.

GMC should also be praised for giving players the freedom for players to define their characters as they wanted to be defined. While I agree that restriction can breed creativity, defining characters purely by the Abrahamic system of sins alienates non-religious players. Taking away such mandatory designations encourages diversity and should be applauded, not condemned, particularly since the nWoD line is anti-gnostic and has no purely true canon.

The combat changes allow for simplicity, with the expectation that only a single roll is needed if there's no drama to be mined from hours of combat. This allows more time for roleplay if the ST deems it so, giving an out to STs who don't want to bogged down by combat rounds that slow game down to a crawl.

The GMC also collates merits from countless different obscure sourcebooks into one place. Taking what has worked and what has inspired interesting stories, and discarding what doesn't, along with errataing anything that just doesn't add to story. The revisions to availability and resources give life to areas and stories that didn't have any sort of systems (and hence were avoided) previously. The social 'Doors' system adds an interesting element that makes Social interactions more crunchy and less reduced to a single roll and glossed over dialogue.

The setting itself is classic nWoD. Agnostic, even when talking about a literal deity. The God Machine is entirely optional (except in the Demon storyline where it's a primary antagonist), and Mortal Storytellers are invited to take what they want from the story, or discard it at their leisure.

This bodes good things for the line, and I appreciate that the Onyx Path people are still plugging along, after all these years.

If you're into nWoD, get this book. If you want to pretend that this book somehow encourages minmaxers when it mathematically does just the opposite, stop posting reviews and take a math class.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by James C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/02/2013 00:00:00

The GMC rules update offers a much more storybook approach the role playing than world of darkness has ever experienced. Primarily a favorite feature of mine are the Conditions which allow the storyteller to apply realistic emotional and physical effects to players, encouraging role playing over "Dungeon Crawling". Of course if you prefer the classic Hack and Slash approach to the game then the updates to combat are extremely allowing for that field of play as well.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: God-Machine Rules Update
Publisher: Onyx Path Publishing
by Nathaniel R. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/18/2013 12:28:05

The format and legibility was excellent. I am very happy with the quality of the PDF.

However, this is hands-down the very worst product I have ever received. It was free, and I feel cheated.

I have twice read the PDF from the first word to the last. I have started over four dozen Microsoft Word documents writing notes on how to build the character. I have half-built backstories, saved progress, and then deleted hours of work. The God Machine supplement is almost unplayably bad. It guts the New World of Darkness, replacing many of its strongest points it with something inferior, and I would argue valueless.

God Machine changes how every dice roll works. Its steps for resolving combat are about as different from the actual New World of Darkness as they are from D&D. Not only is this the worst game supplement I have ever seen, it is far worse than any I could have imagined before reading it. I hate it with a special passion I usually can only muster for people who drive fifteen below the speed limit in the passing lane or parents who enter their toddlers in beauty pageants.

I thought, "Maybe I just don't like it because it's new," or "Maybe I just don't like it because I've gamed with some of the contributing authors, and I found each to be, uh, less than committed to the genre." No, after spending this much time with it, I can say for sure: I cannot play in this system because of its merits alone. If you ever run a New World of Darkness game, let me know, but I caution you against mistaking a campaign using God Machine to be such.

Exception: their grappling rules are pretty good, when adapted to fit the New World of Darkness system.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
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