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Five Torches Deep: Origins
by Allan N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/09/2020 21:47:11

Five Torches Deep as a baseline game is amazing both in play and conceptually. If you have enjoyed the base system, this book will be a more than welcome addition to this amazing game for both DMs/GMs and Players alike. The fact that this is less than $5 dollars is practically a steal for the value it provides you. Below I will review each provided system within this book.

1) Ancestries: The Lineage system is a wonderful tool for player's and DMs alike. Just a glance at the 12 provided fills my mind with ideas for characters, NPCs, Villians, and so much more. This single piece of the book, as an expansion to the base FTD rules alone would be worth the asking price in my opinion. By far, conceptually my favorites are the Corpse Flea and the Eternal(Spooky Scary Skeletons), a Corpse Flea is a body snatching psychic entity that needs a steady supply of bodies(Dead) to sustain it's existence with malleable physical stats, and the eternal is a Skeleton that can survive so long as it's skull is intact and I cannot get the image of a skull bouncing down a hallway to stab someone with a dagger held in it's mouth out of my head.

2) Life Paths: This system serves several purposes, both explicitly and implicitly. Explicitly this serves as a Stat generator and a basic backstory generator. It has risk associated for those willing to keep rolling, but rewards as much as it takes away in many cases. Implicitly this system allows those who enjoy fleshing out backstories a variety of options and flavors to add and allows you to take the seeds planted within this system and grow them forth into an extremely well fleshed out story to establish your character from. For those willing, I would absolutely reccomend you roll beyond the 3 safe rolls as the roleplay potential is more than worth the mechanical disadvantages that occur.

3) Lineages: I cannot state how absolutely amazing this syetem is. Acting as a guide rail that, as a GM myself, you should definately feel comfortable mixing and matching up to build an endless variety of characters. At base, this system allows both GMs and players alike a seemingly(and conceptually) endless combination for species and cultures with which to populate the worlds they play within. If your group loves Roleplaying unique characters this will absolutely be your bread, butter, and 5 course meal. The culture section of the lineage system can be as shallow or deep as you desire, but it provides no shortage of tools to players to use in the world of the GM incorperates it at all, which even in the most basic stock fantasy settings should come up at least once every 10 or so sessions.

4) Paragons: These, to me, are perfectly suited to the tropes that many are well aware of and have fun with in their explorations of these tropes. Flavorful, Fun, with unique abilities that provide utility. I especially find the halfling thrower to be entertaining as you could have an entire recreation of david and goliath with it or throw everything in the room at enemies dealing no small amount of damage. I can clearly see the use of carrots as lethal projectiles as a wonderful moment that I as a PC would seek out at every opportunity to only one up the absurdity of the item I finished off the last enemy with.

5) Bioessentiallism, Racism, and Colonialism: I will state this to start out, it is very much so a strong stement to have included this in the book and I believe it reflects well on Sigil Stone as a whole. I must commed you for this acknowledgement of the harms of our world that this content could dredge up, especially so now as of the time of writing this and the backlash that Wizards of the Coast recieved from a notable chunk of the 5e DnD community. As someone in pursuit of multiple social science degrees who is nearing graduation, I see here not a "cop out", as you put it, per say but rather a healthy acknowledgement that we in the Tabletop RPG community should look to far more than we do and should hold up as the new standard as more and more people enter into our ranks. Your acknowledgement speaks loudly and justifiably that your values are as much a part of your system and considerations placed within it as the hard work and thought that goes into the writing and mechanics you've made.

To those who are offended by this page, I present this question to you: Why does an acknowledgement of history and it's effects on people in the real world offend you so much? Perhaps you learned the Mythologized version of history that swept many of the atrocities that have occured sue to these very issues, and still to this day are issues we grapple with globally, under the rug? Perhaps you have been lucky enough to not see or feel the horrific effects, the damages, the evils that still permeate every part of our lives. Maybe you simply do not care, in which case you could simply ignore the page entirely if you really wanted to, but those of you who had an emotional reaction to this page I again ask: Why does THIS elicit your ire? Your annoyance? Perhaps you are simply a reactionary, or maybe you have some deeper seated issues or insecurities that you need to resolve. Regardless, you should seek a proper answer to that question even if it makes you uncomfortable for the sake of your own personal growth. Of course, if you're simply a Triggered Social Injustice Warrior who can't handle your ideas being challenged, you've probably stopped reading long before this, but if you are not I suggest you to ask yourself why you took issue with this.

Thank you Sigil Stone for making yet another beautiful product!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Five Torches Deep: Origins
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Five Torches Deep: Origins
by Jeremy S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/09/2020 07:23:35

This is a much-needed supplement in the RPG world. Origins, like FTD core, is thoughtfully designed and presented. The real selling point is a toolbox for chargen that can be used with any RPG system, which overrides and avoids problematic race-as-class templates. You'd probably want FTD core to make full use of this book, but Origins serves as a landmark, in my opinion, of an RPG supplement in which racial mechanics are addressed directly with new mechanical solutions AND the design reasoning behind those solutions are discussed explicitly in a one page essay included in the book. It's a wonderful essay covering historical development, colonialism, bioessentalism, and their influence on RPGs. The essay should serve as a manifesto and statement of values going forward in RPG development. Here's where we are now and here's what we're doing about it, and here's why. There will always be haters and derisive disrespectful critics (see below in the Reviews right here) but at least Sigil Stone Publishing stakes their flag.

As an RPG supplement, the book is very good, expanding FTD and our OSR toolboxes. As a mindful and inclusive statement that happens to include nicely designed RPG game stats, the book is fantastic.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Five Torches Deep: Origins
by Peter G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/08/2020 23:57:35

This book had both interestig takes on "race" as a mechanic in rpg's and some interesting takes on "race" and the history of racism in rpg's in general. while i dont 100% agree with every take in the book over all it is another fantasitc addition to five torches deep and one i will defintalty be using when i next run a five torches deep game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Five Torches Deep: Origins
by Brian Z. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/08/2020 20:55:25

A fine addition to FTD and a very interesting take on race in D&D and OSR style games. Very happy with my purchase!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Five Torches Deep: Origins
by Joao C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/08/2020 14:12:24

This is a great book for expanding on the idea of the other ones with ideas for quick creation of a number of different new lineages and a bunch of classic ones. I can already see myself using this to make up new places with distinct characthers on the fly. The paragon classes are a great way to play those classic fantasy tropes and also a nice tool for worldbuilding in the hands of someone creative, need to now the most common aspects of a person from this culture? The paragon class has them.

In short, a book to make fantasy games feel more fantastic and surprising with a bunch of different types of people and cultures.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Five Torches Deep: Origins
by Donald M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/08/2020 12:28:47

There is an SJW rant at the end of the PDF. It says things like, "Classic rpgs are rooted in colonialist, racist, and other bigoted concepts." and then goes on for an entire page expounding on the idea. If you are tired of such ideas, there's a good chance you'll find it offensive.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
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Five Torches Deep
by Michael L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/18/2020 18:31:14

I absolutely love this. It gets the crunch out of the way.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Five Torches Deep
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Dungeonbright
by Brian R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/28/2020 14:09:10

This is a shortened version of my review of Dungeonbright. For the full review visit https://deathtrap-games.blogspot.com/2020/06/game-review-dungeon-bright.html

This is a review of v0.1 of Dungeonbright. I have a lot of crtiticisms of this game, many of which may be addressed later onon

Dungeonbright is a self-published small RPG with a lot of big ideas, some of which are pretty damned cool. There are things I want to try with ideas embedded in Dungeon Bright. But I am not sure the engine is workable.

My critique, as always, is intended to be fair and offer growth points. Given the stage of the game's development cycle, I am hoping that it will be of great value to the Duttons. I am also hoping that I can create some hype so that tjis game can get some love and support, because I see great potential tangled up in there.

Charactes have three base Abilities and three Fields that are randomly generated between -2 and +3. Abilities (Body, Mind, Spirit) represent raw natural potential, while Fields represent training and personal development (Combat, Expertise, Magic). Characters also have three Stats (Vitality, Clarity, Will) that represent a characters ability to endure physical, mental, or mystical injury. They also have a list of skills, gear, talents, and traits that are non-numerical.

Often, when a die roll is called for, characters roll a d20 + a relevant Ability + a relevant Field against a DC set by the GM. Advantage and Disadvantage are used similarly tp D&D5e; roll 2d20, take the result you prefer.

There are also "Passives" a threshold derived by taking an Ability + Field + 10. This makes for a character sheet with 6 values between -2 and +3 creating 9 Modifiers between -4 and +6 and nine Passives between 6 and 16. If a character has a relevant skill or equipment and a roll DC would be under their passive, a character is automatically successful. Passives are also used as saving throws that a character must roll under on a d20.

In fact, automatic success is the way in which Dungeonbright attempts to create a game that is wholly narrative. Characters are expected to automatically succeed at anything when:

  • They have a clever idea.
  • They have appropriate gear.
  • The characters describe their approach in detail.
  • They have the relevant skill and a Passive Modifier higher than the DC.
  • They have a talent or trait that makes narrative sense to help them.

What I Loved

Dungeoneering Focus

The key assumption of Dungeon Bright is that a hellish supernatural darkness has consumed the world. Where there is no light, evil things manifest and stalk the living. The characters are brave scavengers looking to bring back valuable magic objects lost during the apocalypse.

Dungeonbright is totally focused on the dungeon crawl. It is not interested in complex intrigue or exploration play. It does well in building mechanics that facilitate that aspect of play specifically.

Character Development Engine

Characters have a level and a class like in most D&D / OSR games, but levelling is handled very differently from most games: there is no experience point system. Instead, in Dungeonbright you have a goal established by your class such as "Trap a terrible monster without anyone getting hurt" or "Evade a deadly captor through a combination of evasion and cunning." Once you have done that described deed you level up.

A character who levels up picks a class: either their current one, or a new one. Each time they take a level in a class they choose or roll one new skill, add +1 to a designated stat, gain a new skill, spell, or weapon proficiency, and choose or roll one of six special talents unique to that class. The class you chose determines the goal for your next level.

This is clever. You get levels by doing something exceptional that is congruent with ypur characters current focus. Levels come from accomplishments, not a grind of collecting treasure or killing monsters. The incentivised gameplay for players thus becomes "play your character's abilities to the hilt."

Light Effects

Dungeonbright is a game where supernatural darkness breeds monsters the DM rolls regularly against a slowly diminishing DC to determine random encounters. If the PCs have good, bright lighting from lanterns or magic, that roll has disadvantage. If the PCs are gropjng around in the dark the random encounter roll has advantage.

This means the longer you are in a dungeon and the deeper you go, the more likely the dark will coalesce into some horror. And if your lights run out, then the darkness is likely to grow teeth. And the darkness will make it hard to defend yourself.

Characters are all human in dungeon bright; there is no darkvision to bail you out here...

Cool Magic

Like in Knave, magic is not used for damage. Instead, spells are levelless and utilitarian, letting you do things like create light, conjure zip lines, create bait to distract monsters, or talk to animals. Almost every character knows a few spells to help them survive. Spells can be cast slowly for automatic success or cast rapidly. If you cast rapidly and fail the roll the magic goes wild, causing a described mishap and makes the spell unusable again until the PC performs a ritual that recharges the spell.

The recharge requirement for each spell reminds me of something out of Steve Jackson and Ian Livingstone's SORCERY! books. They are weird little rites like feeding food to burrowing animals, hanging coins in spider webs, or burning wet mushrooms. Very strange and evocative. My only gripe is that the hsme at present only has 15 spells.

Player-Facing Combat

The rules are vague here, but combat appears to be designed to be player-facing. They are not parsed out enough for me to be certain, however. If my read is correct, players always make a general combat roll against a DC based on whether they want to hurt, kill, intimidate, etc. On a success they accomplish their goal, while on a failure they get hurt or the monster uses a special power. If this read is correct, then combat is rather like a stripped down Powered by the Apocalypse game like Dungeon World.

Combat in this set up is tense and fast but lacks the granularity of most D&D based games, and so might not be to everyone's taste.

Growth Points

The Mechanics are Far from Unified

While certainly light on rules, Dungeonbright uses both d20 style roll-over mechanics for active tests, and roll-under for saves. Which brings back haunting memories of 7th grade and players asking before every die roll "Do I want high or low?" It is unnecessary, when a default DC can be set for saves instead. A monster's ability might use it Hurt DC for a save, for example. Traps might be handled with a trap DC.

The Power of Darkness Needs Expansion

Light and darkness are the stars of the show here. They could use some more importance to the actual game. Obviously, I would start by overtly pointing out in that most rolls players make are going to have disadvantage whrn groping around in the dark, as well as making random encounters more likely.

"Rulings, Not Rules" Still Needs a Complete Ruleset.

Dungeonbright includes some very well-considered rules, like its Encumbrance system. In other places it is woefully underdeveloped. For example the character "Traits" is an interesting table, but no guidance is offered on how to use it. The same is true of the monster ability notes: we have mention of blinding, paralysis, infection... but no clue how to use them.

Confusing Language

Dungeonbright has some places where the language gets confusing. The Combat section in particular needs some clarification. In several places we see highlighted terms like "down" that have no definition. There seems to be an expectation that a GM will simply adjust the narrative to incorporate a deliberately vague idea without guidance on how that should be reflected. If an item is important enough to be boldface, it probably needs some further exploration.

No Character Death

We have two states caused by injury in Dungeonbright: Wounded and Down, if a character depletes one of their Stats. Wounded applies disadvantage ro rolls, but what down means is, ad mentioned above, left to the DM. There is no state in which character death occurs as a part of the game's consequences. Presumably a character left behind in the Dark when "down" or having the whole party downed is the end of them.

Pointless Tag Syndrome

Dungeonbright incorporates weapon tags such as used in Dungeon World, in a new way. All characters can use any weapon, but have a list of weapon proficiencies. When a character uses a weapon they are proficient in, they can use the effects of the tags. However, the tags are, again purely narrative. Some tags, like blessed seem to have little to do with the training in a weapon type. Other tags like cursed and fragile don't seem like something you'd need special training to make part of the narrative, nor something a player might wish to have imposed as a penalty for having spent their proficiency slot. It also seems odd that you would need to be proficient to take advantage of the fact that a weapon is blessed.

Implied Rules There are a few implied rules in Dungeonbright that desperately need to be made overt. One of the big ones is the value of trying to hurt rather than kill enemies. There seems to be an implied rule that once a creature is Hurt it is easier to kill. That either rolls to kill it have advantage or that successfully rolling to hurt it a second time will kill it.

Causes for character death, the method of performing surgery, how to detect or evade traps, and how to select random encounters are all implied, rather than stated.

OSR Compatability is not Plug-n-Play While there is certainly plenty of debate over the specifics of what makes an "OSR" product one relatively consistent quality is a game that can be used to run adventures and easily and swiftly import items and spells from editions of Dungeons and Dragons before 3rd edition. And this is definitely one of Dungeonbright's main claims.

Unfortunately, Dungeonbright is just not "there" when it comes to OSR compatibility. They have a guide to give you approximate Hurt and Kill Dfficulty Classes for a few classic monsters and a guide for determining those two things for more enemies, it is not a very faithful conversion. After all, what defines a D&D monster is its special abilities, not jus its hit points. This is something that simply cannot be handled with one word tags without at least a little more work offering effective rules for common monster abilities.

Dungeonbright recommends removing spells that foreshorten travel, make supplies easier to manage, or deal damage entirely from material. Magic weapons get circumstantial narrative bonuses. For many older adventures, this could be a significant trimming process. And the suggesting of converting other magic items to folow the "spirit" of their design, while essentially good advice, adds a pile of work into the already tricky business of conversion.

I cannot see just grabbing Dungeonbright and a copy of Palace of the Silver Princess,and getting down to play without an hour of note-taking first. Although that might be a worthwhile timed project.

Conclusion

For a version 0.1 of a role-playing game, Dungeonbright offers an interesting twist on OSR game play. Where it works it offers a smooth, fast playing game with minimal dice rolling. here it doesn't it requires a lot of staring at the rules and trying to divine what was meant.

Dungeonbright is a fascinating experiment in adding more narrative flow to the OSR experience while staying closer to a d20 and avoiding the pitfalls of Powered by the Apocalypse. The concept of turning every dungeon into a mythic underworld and the cool character advancement tools are definitely worth pirating. The magical effects of darkness is absolute genius.

Before it can reach its design goals, however, the game needs to reduce some of the load placed on the GM by parsing out its rules, and offering more overt examples along with a broader range of content in the manual.

Overhauling the passive save system wil go a long way to reduce the problem of consistency.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeonbright
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Five Torches Deep
by Johnny P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/22/2020 14:02:07

Let me begin by stating that there are a litany of things I like about 5e. I love the advantage/disadvantage system, I love the lore surrounding the settings of Forgotten Realms. I love the amount of background and fluff the supplements provide. But that has become where my admiration of 5e ends. I had recently been running a 5e campaign set in one of the most beloved of all the adventure modules (hint: there are vampires and tarot card readings). Aside from being a very well laid out module, my players, despite being 5th level, were essentially god-like. The horror, fear, and dread that is to accompany the module was non-existent at this point. The party knew that unless I threw Tiamat at them, they were going to be ok. Magic went off without a hitch, hit points were replenished at every evening's slumber inside their Leomund's Tiny Hut, and the threats were no biggie to them. I admit some fault in this, but for the most part, it highlighted a problem for me that I hadn't really considered in several campaigns (which were never finished over second level)--a lack of grounding by consequence. Sure, the story can reflect the consequences of character/player choices, but the threat of danger and death were not apparent to them. Casting spells automatically for either full or half damage on a failed save, seemed kinda OP to me. When the fighter can strike out on sword attacks but the wizard can cast fireballs without fail, when the cleric casts Spirit Guardian and runs around exploding enemies without recourse, I felt, well, bored. My players weren't playing characters anymore, they were playing stats and those stats were carefully placed, dumped, and buffed by class (or subclass of subclass of subclass), archetype, race, background, and equipment. It felt like a videogame at that point, with players yelling out these obscure abilities they'd gained while never failing a die roll. Characters all felt flat, with player recitations of actions or abilities being the magic words from the player handbook or some other supplement. To say that maybe I let the game get away from me is not inaccurate, but I also think the ruleset and players-above-all milieu have allowed for this. With newer editions of the game having a more player-centric, video game feel to them, the role of the DM going from arbiter of worlds to just referee and facilitator has become commonplace. I wanted the game to give a sense of wonder AND threat as I'd played with my older brother in 2e AD&D. I started reading up on the Old School Revival, the rule sets which clone those older rules and provide a more visceral game which required just as much critical thinking and role play as it did stat stacking and dice rolling.

And then I found Five Torches Deep (thru a youtube review by DungeonCraft). It was exactly what I was looking for. It pared down the rules to something manageable. It got rid of the archetypes, subclasses, and backgrounds that absolve players from having to roleplay (and encourage min/maxing). It made death and dying a very real consequence for bad decisions. FTD allows DM discretion while allowing for balance and a concrete concept for play that is easy for new players and DM's alike to digest. It made magic magical and mysterious again. It still allows for advancement and the ability to "do cool things" but it removed so much of the blur that the Hasbro, er, WotC juggernaut has created in its wake. I love that races have been pared down to 4, that classes are pared down to 4, and that archetypes offer enough variety to keep things interesting, but still recognizable as an overarching class. It put the discretion back into the hands of the DM and made the players accountable to characters, not stat blocks. The players must think critically, and must create a character's backstory and personality from their own creative mind, not from a list of acceptable, sometimes randomly rolled, choices. If a player wants to play a wizard with dementia, go for it. There's no chapter on how that should look or any penalties for that option. If a player wants to play a barbarian with an obsession with mirrors, go for it, there's no bonds, faults, or outlooks that the player feels they have to choose from. Players wanted "balance" but not between the party classes and adversaries. They wanted balance with each other. They didn't think it was fair that a fighter would get three "measly" attacks while a wizard shot lightning bolts. They wanted to feel cooler than their fellow party memebers. This system puts everyone in the same sh*t sandwich.

Regarding the monsters, it's very easy to contruct your own, or even re-skin your favorite monsters from the Monster Manual. The encumberance system makes sense and I love the addition of sundering and durability of weapons and equipment.

So far, the system has been a blast for me and a hit with my players. They are more invested in the game, more concerned with their decisions, and more weary of charging headlong into a dark chamber. I very much appreciate the time and attention of the developers and am looking forward to the possibility of adventure modules being published in the old-school vein, with maps on the inside of soft covers, minimal guidance, and a lot of room for DM creatvity. Keep up the awesome work.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Five Torches Deep
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Dungeonbright
by Bob V. G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/16/2020 09:35:23

On June 15, 2020 I soloed my way through Master of the Fallen Fortress (Pathfinder 1.0 RPG, free at Paizo), a nine page adventure with six characters provided. It is for first level characters. It is designed for a Dungeon Master and several players. I used Paul's The Dungeon Oracle to solo it because I have played it before. The game system I used was Dungeonbright which is free at DriveThru. I used three paladins and a warrior. I have been DMing since 1976. I am willing to bet that you will not like a rule or two in this free RPG. Just change what you don't like and enjoy the system. The adventure - Jared the paladin had a skill of locks and traps. He had his moment of glory when he freed the prisoner (bard). However, he was picked by the party to go first when adventuring and to find the traps. He was not very good at this. He took damage from a trap he did not see. He later took shock damage and went unconscious. The party carried him around for awhile, got tired of that, and healed him. Soon after this he walked right by a secret door. He did not see it at all. The four of them did manage to finish the quest and survive. There was some nice loot. Give this a try.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Dungeonbright
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Five Torches Deep
by Adam T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/14/2020 22:36:15

I had the opportunity to run a short adventure (5-ish sessions) using 5 Torches Deep. I had roughly 2 years of DMing experience in 5e before running this system. I played online with a group of people who had D&D experience but no OSR experience. The following are my thoughts on the system based on my experiences:

The good:

Compatibility with D&D - Since the system uses 5e math, it was intuitive for everyone in the group to pick up and play. There were a few hiccups with this, but not many. The hardest part was remembering to use 5TD rather than 5e classnames.

Quick and easy NPC creation rules - I ran the adventure in a chinese fantasy world, which is not well-represented in statblocks in other systems. I was able to easily create a dozen or so statblocks, all of which worked fine. Same thing with retainers and even hench.

Untying kills to XP - This is something that is a feature of OSR in general, but as my first time running OSR, It was interesting how only complete success is rewarded, compared to partial failure by running away. The party had to run away from the main "dungeon" repeatedly because they kept getting in over their heads, so when they finally found a secret entrance and stole a significant amount of treasure, they felt extremely rewarded (level up as well of course).

The following comments are mostly based on my personal opinions and my players' opinions. I am aware that several of these are deliberate design decisions. The bad:

Spellcasting checks - The wild magic-esque nature of spellcasting felt more punishing than anything. Due to a string of bad rolls, the spellcasters had no class features, basically. The cleric's armor melted off, reducing their AC from 15 to 9. At the end, their magic suddenly started working and they were able to accomplish much more with it. Rolling for spell success is fine, IMO, but the magical mishaps and being unable to cast again felt too punishing and reduced the tactics involved with magic.

Divine Spells - My game started at level 3 and featured overland travelling through forests and mountains. The zealot was able to ignore food as a supply item by only using their 2nd level spell slot to rite cast sustenance twice in a day. Since overland travel doesn't heavily use torches, the supply mechanic went basically unutilized all game. Reforge made party weapons and armor breaking a non-issue, even though I did make them use normal supply to do so. The zealots also used providence+bless+divine vigor repeatedly, so oftentimes someone had +4 to checks in combat, which felt mechanically powerful but boring. I had to houserule that you could only be affected by 1 instance of providence/bless/divine vigor each, to prevent infinite bonuses to checks. In all, I felt that zealots were able to entirely circumvent several new and potentially interesting mechanics in 5TD. Illuminate is much less of a problem, since it is concentration (You don't want your light source to give out when you are fighting something with darksight)

Lack of detail on mechanics - I understand the rulings vs rules argument, but I believe that there should be more attention paid to the rules in certain key areas. For one, the durations on spells or whether they can stack would really help, as providence, sacrosanct, divine vigor, and more are missing these details. A rough power level on the expensive SUP items is also key, since 5 gp for a strong potion gives no idea to what the intended power level is. I ruled that weak potions gave you +level HP back on your next rest, and strong potions gave 1d8 HP back, as if Suture was cast. It would be good to know if that innocuously broke the game, or if that was within what was intended.

Finally, here's an idea of content that I found myself desiring as a DM when running the system:

Travel turn ideas - I designed my first batch of travel turns as skill checks that resulted in damage on failures, or encounters or similar. It would be nice to have various travel turn ideas for various terrains, dungeon themes, and ideas, like, how an encounter would differ if encountered on 2-10 vs 11-19. I realized after running the module that there could be more travel turn failures that could result in loss of supply, for example.

I was seeking a system that de-emphasized crunchy combat and focused on exploration and tactical thinking, while still being easy to understand for D&D 5e players. I got what I needed out of it, but some of the systems in the game disagreed with my personal tastes or felt like they needed another revision pass. Overall, I'd recommend this system to 5th edition veterans looking to play OSR.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Five Torches Deep
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Five Torches Deep
by John E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/07/2020 09:56:55

100% positive. Quality was great and the book is well made. An awesome addition to my collection.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Five Torches Deep
by Ruben R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/20/2020 20:40:41

This is minimalist old school gaming masking as 5e houserules. That is an excellent thing. The one-sheet class pages basically contain 99% of what a character needs, and are second only to Dungeon World playbooks in standalone niftiness. I love how 5TD repurposes every part of the traditional D&D concept, making both scores and modifiers actually important again.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Belly of the Beast RPG
by Ashley E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/14/2020 08:00:29

Unique little game. Got the paperback version of the book and genuinely love the presentation. Definately something to consider running if you want to play something really different.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Belly of the Beast RPG
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Five Torches Deep
by joseph a. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/07/2020 12:19:16

This is greatest TTRPG i've seen in decades. It is so lean and well designed allowing for so many different styles of play, i'm just dumbfounded. I put all of my other games to side and i'm now just using FTD. Please make more!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Five Torches Deep
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