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Hybrid Blood
by Clyde G. Date Added: 08/07/2018 14:00:42

This product misrepresents itself as Starfinder compatible. It's basically a Pathfinder and 5e supplement, with a quarter of one page or so for determining starting HP for hybrid races in Starfinder. If this book can be labled Starfinder Compatible, ANYTHING for Pathfinder is just as compatible. So, if you're looking for Starfinder content, this book isn't worth your time.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Hybrid Blood
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Creator Reply:
It is a legal requirement that the logo be displayed. Was there some aspect of these races/race building rules that you were hoping for some specific aspect of Starfinder that we failed to cover?
Hybrid Blood
by Customer Name Withheld [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/27/2018 16:31:05

Miscegenation has long been a thorny issue in tabletop role-playing games that involve racial hybrids. The question of why there are half-elves but no half-dwarves, or elf-dwarves for that matter, have long been one of those unanswered questions that has never had a good answer. Most of the time, the answer is a shrug and some utterance of “because that’s how it is,” since the alternative is to either begin charting out every possible combination (a task daunting in its impossibility) or disallowing crossbred characters altogether.

More recently, race-creation systems have been proposed as the answer. Any Pathfinder aficionado, for example, will likely be able to tell you all about the Advanced Race Guide’s use of Race Points (RP) as a means of generating a character of unique parentage. But even then, problems still arise: from issues of stark lists of abilities whose RP costs fail to invoke any ideas about what sort of beings would possess them to an overly-permeable scale of how many RPs a character can have before being “too powerful,” that and similar takes on standardizing the act of custom-race creation tend to be unsatisfying in what they offer.

Then we come to Hybrid Blood, the race-creation supplement from Silver Games, and the problem is solved.

Before I go any further, I need to make some disclaimers. The first and most important is that I have a potential conflict of interest here. Not only am I Patreon supporter of this company, I’ve also worked with the author on several projects. Make of that what you will.

Another thing that needs to be stated upfront is that this book, while it does deal with anthropomorphic characters (i.e. furries), contains absolutely no fetish-fuel whatsoever. Don’t expect anything even remotely suggestive here; the most you’ll find are a tame notation that “beast people” are able to interbreed. The artwork is likewise no more tantalizing than anything you’d find in a contemporary mass-market product. This book is all about being a role-playing game supplement, and nothing else.

Finally, let me note that Hybrid Blood is configured for no less than THREE distinct role-playing games: Pathfinder, Starfinder, and Dungeons & Dragons Fifth Edition (though the Starfinder material is often folded into Pathfinder). While I know a lot of gamers for whom that’s a huge issue (i.e. no one wants to buy material that isn’t for the game they’re playing), I can’t stress enough just how much the books use of layout and formatting makes this feel like a non-issue. The brilliant use of color-coded backgrounds/headers (always paired with a small two-letter symbol – PF, SF, or 5E – to make sure things are completely clear), completely eliminates any ambiguity and makes it easy for your eyes to instantly be drawn to the section of the page that’s relevant to your interest. The degree to which this mitigates the feeling of wasted space cannot be overstated.

With all of that said, how does Hybrid Blood tackle the topic of custom-race characters? Interestingly, the book presents two different answers to this question. The first is for “beast people” as an overarching race, while the second is present hybrid characters. The two are held as being distinct from each other, but their presentation is exceedingly similar in how they’re built.

For beast people, a standard PC racial write-up is given. The rub lies in the fact that a given beast person needs to pick not one, but two special qualities from a list: one for how they acquire their food, and one for their method of locomotion. This takes us to the book’s answer to the how races are built: by selecting multiple thematic packages of racial qualities.

To put it another way, your beast person character might (after noting the basic racial qualities given under the “beast person” racial outline) take “tooth and claw” for their diet-based quality, which gives them a choice of where they allocate their ability score bonuses and penalties, and gives them natural weapons. They’d then choose “tunneler” for their movement-based quality, potentially modifying their ability score distribution and giving them a burrow speed. Of course, height and weight tables are given, along with a robust selection of feats and traits to round things out.

Then we come to the next section, which takes up roughly three-fourths of the book: hybrid characters.

Hybrid characters, as noted above, are built similarly to beast people characters. The difference is that, while beast people are essentially a single race with some comparatively minor modifications based on their diet and movement, the qualities of a hybrid character have no standardized aspects to them: everything is determined by their construction. In this case, that construction is chosen by taking two “physical quality” packages and one “upbringing quality” package. I have to take a moment to point out the conceptual brilliance in making upbringing be an integral part of building a character this way; this is a (metaphorical) hobgoblin that the tabletop gaming community has struggled with for some time (i.e. “would an elf still be good with a bow if he was raised by dwarves and never taught archery?”), so clearly delineating which parts of a hybrid character are nature and which are nurture is a brilliant move that deserves notable props.

The packages denoting these qualities, both physical and upbringing, make up the bulk of the book, and for a very good reason: there are a LOT of them! Insofar as physical qualities go, the book presents the basic races, Ponyfinder races, Advanced Race Guide races, Starjammer races, and a collection of even more unusual races such as worgs or phoenixes alongside more familiar groups such as dragons or the undead. All for Pathfinder/Starfinder and 5E. Interestingly, the more familiar races are presented as having two physical qualities: “X Blooded” and “X Bodied” (where “X” is the race in question). The former denotes intangible qualities that are nevertheless biological, where the latter are gross physical attributes. This means that, if you take, say, Elf Blooded and Elf Bodied – along with the Raised by Elves upbringing – you’ll essentially have a bog-standard elven character, rather than a hybrid per se.

The book doesn’t end there. It makes sure to denote what you do if your qualities make you have different creature types (i.e. if you’re an Outsider or a Fey, depending on your choices), how this impacts reincarnation, sub-races, and other topics. There are also several new feats, traits, spells, and other character options to complement what’s given here.

I should also note that, while this is technically a Ponyfinder product, there’s very little setting-specific material here. The bulk of what you’ll find is an overview of how the gods of Everglow feel about the beast people, and how beast people tend to view other races. Other than that, you might find the odd reference to Everglow or its gods, but aside from that what’s here is completely setting-independent (save for the Everglow races being among the thematic packages). In this case, I can’t help but feel that this is a plus, since it widens the potential appeal; throw in how many non-pony-related races have material in here (tieflings and goblins and oreads and so many others) and this is essentially a setting-independent book for all intents and purposes.

Having said all of that, it should be obvious that what’s here is not just a stellar product, but one that can honestly claim to have set a new standard in answering an age-old issue among tabletop gamers. The rules here, specifically the hybrid rules, are a race-generation system that allows for myriad potential combinations that’s not only intuitive in its design, but stimulates the imagination far more than a dry listing of mechanical effects. With a layout that lets it easily work across three game systems, this book is one that you need to have in your library if you’ve ever given more than a passing thought to building a custom race.

The bottom line is this: when it comes to making new races, Hybrid Blood is the transfusion your game needs.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Hybrid Blood
by Michael S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/22/2018 00:28:17

I bought this to run with Starfinder as a kind of generator of animal themed and based alien speices to offer my players. Then it turns out that pretty much the whole book is devoted to Pathfinder and 5E with a bit of a throwaway line for Starfinder specifically in one of the Pathfinder boxed text. Now granted this is a minor quibble as there is very little real difference in my opinion between the two systems, as a way of contrast M&M is so far removed from its original source material that it's the fact thatt they use a d20 for all resolutions that is the sole reason I keep it under the d20 big top of games which consequently also applies to all three system this book services.

This discrepancy means to me that to use this for starfinder, I take all the pathfinder options and adust accordingly. Fortunately in my estimation there is no adustment to be made butI may find morre to adjust when I get a group of furries to gather around a tabble and try to break the game using this and other rules as is their wont. But for shheer versatility this has been a very satisfying purchase.

Ultimately I can't recommmend this book highly enough as a one stop shop for all your furry race building needs. As a member of the furry community I appreciate having this product immensely as it means I now have the PC friendly resource to take other properties such as iron Claw and Tall Tails and run them in a system I am far more comfortable with. For that I deeply and sincerely applaud your efforts in creating this wonderful resoure.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Glad you like it and I look forward to hearing tales of the hijinks this book enables. As for Starfinder, I imagine the only real tweak that will come up is natural armor -> KAC/EAC.
Hybrid Blood
by Travis B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/17/2018 18:05:16

I like it. I could go on and say why I like it, and I will. Customization, holy balls does this book let you do a lot of shit/crazy shit. the race supplied is incredibly customizable on its own, and I'd have bought a book for that as it provides plenty/endless avenues to make your own, personal race of beasties, in an much simpler/easy to understand and quicker than simply making a race on your own from scratch, by y choosing their diet and mobility type to construct their racial traits/attributes/stats, and with the amount here, you can as I said, make endless amounts of your own beastly dudes and duddettes to fill your world with and or play as. The various feats help add flavor and an extra dash of uniqueness or umph to your character. And just from that you can see the book is beautifully organized, and a far easier read than others I've encountered, with information sectioned clearly and so presented in an easily digestable way. The beast races you can create, even if you go wild aren't over or underpowered and would fit any pathfinder or 5e game well without breaking balance or shaking things up too much, and as I said, the feats are awesome.

then we come to the hybrid rules, which my god are just perfect. it is and expanded form of the beast race creation at the front of the book, and like those are easy to get into, and present even MORE options than they do, just a ridiculous amount. Even if you just had the basic races to work with it'd be a lot of options for half breed. Just with the featured races from pathfinder it'd be insane, but add in the more monsterous options of the physical qualities you select for you Halfbreed (you get two of these and one upbringing to make your hybrid, and most races have two kinds to split up their traits, which makes the sheer variety even more mind boggling), and these monsterous choices include such things as Owl bears, manticores, Aboleths and many more (seriously, those are some of the more mundane parentages you can select for you little abomination, in the monsterous section of hybrids), and you get so many options and mixtures that describing it would be hard, so I'm just going to say you have more than enough and endless ways to make your creativity and visions known (wanna mix dragon turtles and gnomes? well go right ahead you crazy person you). The upbringings that round out this creation start off normal, you know raised by so and so race, but then as it goes on you can get some really cool/ fluffy options (wanna have been raised by a dragon? A god? Want to be a wild child? a former slave? raised by kobolds? go right ahead, your halfblood can have been raised as or by any of those, or as previously mentioned be raised in much more mundane settings if you want). So the hybrid rules, well they're awesome, insane and have more options than you can shake a stick out or count. And, they aren't unbalanced, and wouldn't disrupt a game by falling behind or being massively OP. and the feats again add some awesome stuff to the table (my favourite being the one that gives you an additional Physical attribute/ heritage, as I am always one for playing weird freaks of nature/ monsterosities)

SO all in all, amazing book, simply fantastic. Might not be the longest, but it has two things I'd have bought entirely seperate books for if they were split and they are quality, so I am not bothered by its length, it fits more than books four times its size do in way of options/personalization/ and customization. And while I'd give my left kidney or leg for an expansion on these choices, I am VERY happy with what is already here, as I have mentioned so many times before, it is already so expansive.

Seriously if you have the cash, pick this book up, I know the cover may turn people off for being furry, but it really isn't at all and lets you play beastmen/anthros in a way that isn't creepy because of some guy injecting their fetishes into it Same thing with its (very very loose) connection to ponyfinder, even if you froth at the mouth at there mere mention of the colorful horses, pick this book up, you can just ignore the one section of the book they're really mentioned in

TL:DR: this book is amazing, look past the cover if it bothers you. The hybridization rules here ARE NOT TO BE MISSED. Seriously, the book is worth it just for them



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Thanks for the review! You named why these two halves are connected. By themselves, they were just under what we felt comfortable making a print book. Together, they easily qualified, and we wanted these rules in print very much. If you have the time, do post this review on amazon.com too. Many thanks and enjoy the book!
Ponyfinder - Kind Blades and Cruel Divinity
by Customer Name Withheld [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/28/2018 20:59:34

Kind Blade and Cruel Divinities is a stand-alone novel set in the Ponyfinder campaign world. A self-contained story, albeit with a potential continuation teased at the end, it tells the tale of a young human male training to become an adventurer in a nation of ponies. Unsurprisingly, adventure ends up finding him.

Before going any further, I need to make a disclaimer: I’m a supporter of the author’s Patreon, as well as having ghost-written a small portion of one of the Ponyfinder sourcebooks. I’ve also used some Ponyfinder material in the course of my own creative writing. All that, plus I consider the author to be a friend of mine. So take this review with whatever grain of salt you feel is appropriate.

With regards to the technical aspects of this book, it’s available in three formats; my review is focused around the PDF format only. In that regard, the book is one hundred seventy pages long (which makes the listing for one hundred thirty rather odd), and doesn’t seem to have the cover art attached for some reason. There are exactly three illustrations to be found, all of supporting cast members, rendered in grayscale. There weren’t any bookmarks here, which feels like an oversight, as it would be helpful to jump from chapter to chapter. But enough technical details, let’s get to the story!

Kind Blade and Cruel Divinities is the story of Christopher King, a young man who’s just journeyed to Viljatown, the capital of the Pony Empire, to enroll in their adventuring school: the Academy of Kind Blades. Told in the first person, we spend quite a bit of time following along as he trains at the Academy, getting to know both the ponies around him and what it means to be an adventurer. Both lessons are thrown into sharp relief as he goes on his first adventure where, appropriately enough, things take an unexpected turn that leads to more than he bargained for. I won’t say anything about the specifics of the plot, save that it gets into the “Cruel Divinities” part of the title.

The character of Christopher King is presented as something of an alternative to what you’d expect from someone actively looking to become an adventurer. Rather than being the brash, ambitious type, he comes across as someone much more reserved, almost to the point of being hesitant. He wants to be an adventurer, but doesn’t seem to have any particular goals beyond that (indeed, when it’s hinted that he’s destined for greater things, he’s less than thrilled). Analytical without being intellectual, his narration is presented in a tone that can border on being stilted, highlighting how he tends to be reactive rather than proactive. Although he’s no fool, Christopher comes across as someone doing his best to manage his circumstances, rather than trying to take control of them; after enrolling at the Academy, he seems content roll with the punches (sometimes literally)…until, perhaps, the very last page, hinting that we’re going to see some character growth if there’s ever a sequel book.

On the flipside, the protagonist’s major flaw isn’t one of character, but one of meta-character. That is, Christopher doesn’t quite function as a “stranger in a strange land” that new readers might require him to, if they’re not already familiar with Ponyfinder. Because Christopher himself is from a town with a mixed population of humans and ponies – along with his fairly passive nature – there are numerous background elements that aren’t expounded upon, and might not make sense unless you’re already familiar with the setting. For example, Christopher takes notice that the mayor of Viljatown is a cow rather than a pony, but when he points this out to other ponies they react with confusion, claiming that he’s mistaken and that the mayor is a pony after all. Why that happens (it’s actually a reference to the specifics of how the krava (cow race) integrated into pony culture, as per their game sourcebook) is never satisfactorily explained in the story.

That’s a flaw because the book quite clearly wants to serve as something of an introductory tale. We spend quite a bit of time following Christopher’s lessons at the Academy, which serve to walk us through the mechanics of how magic and certain other features of adventuring work. The characterization of the ponies around Christopher keep this entertaining even if you’re already familiar with the underlying game mechanics, thankfully. It’s just a shame that this same level of presumed ignorance wasn’t presented with regards to his four-legged classmates, since that’s likely to be the bigger point of uncertainty for those unfamiliar with Ponyfinder.

Overall, the story here is a fun one. Although it could have been stronger, the story manages to do a decent job of introducing readers to the Ponyfinder world while also taking them along on an adventure. The main character isn’t the sort of person you’d expect, but the story manages to lay down just enough breadcrumbs to make it clear that he’s going to become someone different as he continues to go adventuring. Given that, it’ll be interesting to see where the story goes from here.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Ponyfinder - Kind Blades and Cruel Divinity
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Ponyfinder - Campaign Setting
by Jacob K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/20/2018 23:52:06

I came to this book after a long time of seeing friends sing its praises, so I wanted to see what the fuss was about. For those of you who don't want to read the full review, the gist is that this is both a great setting and a great book of player options, whether or not you are already a fan of the series that inspired it. If you are, this facilitates all the pony adventures you could want.

The many racial choices presented are well balanced, with a couple of notable exceptions. Pegasi have the ability to fly from level 1, which can be an issue to some lower-powered groups. Similarly, the large-sized Anteans could unbalance things. The cursed Clockworks are notably underpowered, giving away much for little return, so new players should beware (and should probably pick the Steelhearts, presented later). The feats and traits sprinkled throughout range from unexciting to quite solid, and none that I spotted were immediate must-haves or system warping options. I will say that the organization of the book was sometimes hard to follow, as different options are often grouped by time periods in the setting history or set aside for other reasons. Everything you need is, in fact, there, it just isn't always where you expect it to be.

Other than these few notes, everything else is quite well thought-out. The Fingerless rule and battle harnesses let ponykind characters participate in standard adventures easily, the class archetypes each have unique niches that could see useful play, and a great many of the feats are quite serviceable to multiple potential character builds.

I will say, however, that the real gem of the book is the extensive Everglow setting, which has a multitude of awesome locations, characters, times, events, factions, and stories for your players to be a part of. The gods will look familiar to fans of the series, but are well-presented and have fleshed-out personalities and appearances. A couple, such as the CE goddess of revenge and Pyrrhic victories, are handled quite differently from other settings and will probably end up imported into my other games.

There are quite a few towns and notable locations listed, and many of these have abundant adventure hooks included. The timeline also details the rise and fall of the great empire, showing where pony heroes could be getting involved in service to (or despite) the Queen.

I will note one other thing. The author, David Silver, is notably responsive to legitimate questions and criticisms, and has told me that he is actively working on another revision to fix numerous small issues (sigh as layout, bolding, or fine-tuning class balance upwards to match what he now knows as a developer) that have been discovered since the book was first published. I greatly look forward to seeing this revision, but do still heartily recommend this for anyone who likes the game or the show.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Ponyfinder - Campaign Setting
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Ponyfinder - Everglow Bestiary
by Benjamin K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/20/2017 03:41:03

The Everglow Bestiary adds a lot of fun options for creatures to use. A lot of them follow certain themes or settings and would be great in the right situations. My only complaint is that I would have liked an even larger variety of creatures to go with even more settings in Everglow.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Ponyfinder - Everglow Bestiary
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Ponyfinder - The Unicorn's Crown
by Grey K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/28/2017 18:49:35

The Unicorn's Crown is a great adventure for Pathfinder characters and a fantastic introduction to the Ponyfinder universe. 58 pages long, the story is divided into four acts.

At each stage, player choices are open and allowed to affect the shape of the story. Players are rewarded for portraying ponies who solve problems without being your usual Pathfinder murder-hobos, but if that's the game your players want to play the module has advice for NPC reactions to choices.

It begins with an investigation and RP heavy interview sequence. Players are rewarded for finding the information, but if they fail the story doesn't grind to a halt. Each stage has options for moving the story along even if the players fail at their missions. This is not to say that their actions do not matter - the world is designed to react and respond to them and how they shape it.

At the end of this first book, players are faced with a decision that will shape the Empire - it is entirely in their hands.

The situations and challenges presented in this story are acceptable to play with young players while not being dumbed down in any way and still remaining fun for veteran/adult players.

The art by Sita Duncan & Tama’at Studio is vibrant and beautiful, and my only complaint is wanting more of it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Ponyfinder - The Unicorn's Crown
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Ponyfinder - Everglow Bestiary
by David J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/30/2017 16:53:39

For those with familiarity with the cartoon it is amusing to see the oblique references contained in "werebats", "gem gnolls", and "chaos ooze". The description doesn't lie. This book does contain more than a dozen creatures for Pathfinder and D&D 5th edition, depending how you count them, including one new race suitable for player characters. It gives stats for both so it's not a compact boo,k but it is a well organized one with good art so you can clearly visualize these critters. The evil griffon cult is particularly interesting as are the snake-people.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Ponyfinder - Everglow Bestiary
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Ponyfinder - Blood of the Elements
by Ben D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/31/2017 11:00:32

A nice book for a quick foray into elemental classing. 5 'elements', one of which works very well for merciful characters or in games where outright murder isn't the goal. Additionally, the class offers a pet option: the Elemental Guide, which functions as a short term summon and semi-familiar rolled into one. As a source for character flavor, or alternately a hook for the storyteller to bring in new elements, it's a nicely made book with enough material to add to, but not break, the session. From a mechanical point of view, there are a few great options, as well as a handful of rare/useless ones. Then again, variety is the spice of life and a clever or driven character can make use of even the most 'harmless' of things. The two most interesting options offered, in my mind, are the Elemental Pact of Love (which actively discourages killing or lethal intent) and the Swarm Elementalist (which summons a horde of tiny elements rather than a single being). Both offer interesting play options as well as character ploys with enough flair and benefit to make their respective weaknesses a tempting offer. Overall, a nice book with a decent enough variety to warrant the $6.99 price tag.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Ponyfinder - Blood of the Elements
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Ponyfinder - Day and Night
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/31/2017 10:09:50

Bought this a while back, when it first came out. The great thing about it is that it adds a lot of flavor to the world without being simply window dressing. Includes both 'in-character' views as well as some external information to make the pantheon more accessible. That being said, it's not just filler, either. From a crunchy point of view, you get 13 feats and info on 4 dieties. There's the traditional cover, disclaimer/OGL, title page, and plug for other books (total of 4 pages, all considered) which leaves 11 pages for setting the mood and info dumping. And for $1.99, that's not a bad deal at all.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Ponyfinder - Day and Night
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Creator Reply:
Thanks for the review! I had fun with this book and the larger one it became part of (It's part of a bundle so you get your full 1.99 credit back for buying this, we don't want to cheat anyone for buying early).
Ponyfinder - Character Sheet
by Leanne C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/28/2017 07:46:01

I'm sorry i cant recommend it, the layout is good, it covers everything you need with plenty of room to write all stats and abilities. I have no complaint having a detailed 6 page character sheet, but the color is too dark for printing in black and white and hard to adjust in photo editing programs such as Photoshop. When you are needing to print multiple copies all the time, printing in color, while it would solve the darkness issue, is simply not practical. For my campaign I think I'll just make my own sheets. Will edit my review if this is changed at any point.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Ponyfinder - Character Sheet
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Ponyfinder - Campaign Setting
by Samuel C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/05/2017 13:20:06

Fun. Simple as that. I got what i came for a detailed book for both serious and silly play with heaps of flexibilty and lore.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Ponyfinder - Campaign Setting
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Ponyfinder - Campaign Setting - Dawn of the Fifth Age
by Laura H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/14/2017 19:34:18

I backed the original Ponyfinder for the Pathfinder game and have since moved on to 5th edition therefore I was excited to get this version for the latter game. What a surprise! Not just a rules conversion for 5th edition, this volume contains information on the setting and Pony Empire , most of which was not found in the original rulebook. There is also a slew of completly new NPC writeups. Even some of the artwork is completly new and the art s much better formated in my 5th age PDF than in my Pathfinder printed copy.

My favorite bit is the character creation rules which give a whole new 'subrace' system for 5th edition. The method given is inspired and I am definatly going to use it in my own campaign world for a few of my own races.

The only downside was that the NPCs still lack stats but this is less of an issue in 5th edition than in Pathfinder as background and class give a much more detailed image of the character than Pathfnder's more 'number crunch' system.

All together a very nice product and one I will definatly get a print version of eventually.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Ponyfinder - Campaign Setting - Dawn of the Fifth Age
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Ponyfinder - Campaign Setting - Dawn of the Fifth Age
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/04/2017 16:43:56

First off, it's well made, the art is beautiful, the formatting is better than some of the previous offerings, and there was an update BEFORE the book went to print... apparently correcting for some issues from the original pdf. All good points.

The idea is the same as before: add ponies to the world of the single most popular tabletop rpg of all time, in a interesting and functional manner. Do so without infringing upon copyright while simultaneously filling a gap that a huge number of people still desperately want. Oh... and update it to the newest version of that system: 5th edition.

Did it succeed? I'll wager that it did.

The setting fits into the darker and more adult nature of tabletop rpgs that most folks are used to, curbing the 'cute' factor in favor of adding play flexibility and system functionality. Abilities, spells and the like are all fairly well applied, leading to usable characters and entertaining stories. The figures and world lore allow for interaction with non-pony characters (the rules even outlining hybrids) from other races and, indeed, other books. Specialized equipment means you can expect a character from this setting to be viable in other games as well... despite a decided lack of opposable thumbs. It has a full pantheon of gods, a battery of spells and abilities, and appropriately added origins and backgrounds to fit with the setting. You could just as easily run a full pony-only campaign as a 'normal' group or mixed group... something that many other supplements and third party addons cannot claim. It does all this while still presenting an unmistakable "non-human" set of races that fits well into many a traditional fantasy/fairy tale.

That is not to say everything is all rainbows and butterflies.

There are a few issues that exist, at least in the print copy, that were absent in the original pdf. Oddly, this means that the update that fixed whatever problem existed prior to print, actually ended up breaking some other parts. These included ADDING typos into the final copy that were absent in earlier versions, truncating sentences, and presumably losing words or even more in some places. That's not to say that the update was unneeded -fixing a number of problems did presumably occur... but adding typos or cutting off paragraphs should not happen as a side effect. That's similar to a surgeon removing someone's tonsils and giving them a free tatoo that says "I heart Morm"... unrelated and not really all too helpful.

Let me be clear... The book IS beautiful. I am greatly happy it was made and pleased that I have a hard copy. I will praise Silver Games LLC and David himself just about any day of the week for the work he and his crew have done. Heck, if the pdf gets a shiny new fixing, I ~might~ even be willing to shell out cash for another hardcover. I just wish that the final product, the thing that went to print, the thing I put money down for, had been checked over a few more times before being sent to the printers... and ending up in my hands.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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