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Those Dark Places: Industrial Science Fiction Roleplaying
by Philipp N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/17/2021 02:28:51

Not Hard-Sci-Fi

I'm searching for a Sci-Fi-RPG "our time plus 50-150 years and only believable technical progress" and was pointed in the direction of this book. However we have FTL, some debateable changes to Earth (regarding a hard sci-fi setting) and artificial gravity. Since all official texts never state that it is Hard-Sci-Fi, I don't blame the book, the authors, or the publisher.

Gritty stories in space

I still love the book, the setting, the easy rules and the ideas put into text. Games like Eclipse Phase make a lot of effort to get even things like the economy right, but I never was able to build a thriller-like tension, and I think that's because the players get the big picture why they have to suffer through the horros of the setting. Those Dark Places delibrately puts the big picture to the higher-ups and doesn't even try to explain it. FTL works like "you set course, point the ship into the right direction and push the button. Then you go to sleep". You are months away from Earth and nobody on the ship would be able to repair or modify anything on the FTL drive, instant tension, even if everything goes well (also I found no FTL communication, so any distress call takes some years).

Conclusion

In the end I'm still looking for a written hard-sci-fi setting (because I'm lazy and don't want to research for one on my own), but if you are not picky this game easily allows you to just ignore FTL and artificial gravity, because that's something your characters wouldn't understand or work with anyway.

The game does what it itself promises very well, I don't regret buying it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Those Dark Places: Industrial Science Fiction Roleplaying
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Lion Rampant
by David T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/25/2021 10:49:54

Great rules, very playable. Purchased as part of a bundle of holding, so excellent value for money.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Lion Rampant
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On the Seven Seas: Wargames Rules for the Age of Piracy and Adventure c.1500–1730
by David T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/25/2021 10:48:50

pirates, what's not to like? Purchased as part of a bundle of holding so excellent value for money.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
On the Seven Seas: Wargames Rules for the Age of Piracy and Adventure c.1500–1730
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Those Dark Places: Industrial Science Fiction Roleplaying
by Patrick C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/28/2021 12:57:39

The CASE sytem for character creation is wonderful for quick pickup and play. The rules take all of five minutes to learn and pressure is a great method to add tension to a game. I have run it a few times and hope to run it at some conventions in 2021-2022.

I am wish there was some more content out there.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Those Dark Places: Industrial Science Fiction Roleplaying
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Jackals: Bronze Age Fantasy Roleplaying
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/08/2021 12:42:17

This is the game that I have always wanted, but never thought that I would actually be able to obtain or play.

I know that sounds rather hyperbolic, (and it is), but the honest truth is that so few fantasy Roleplaying games break away from the classical Medieval or Medieval adjacent setting styles that it can feel like a slog trying to find something that captures the feeling of a different age of our own history. While those firmly planted in the Sword & Sorcery genre are often little more than specific affectations of Conan or other Howard works. That is not intended as a slam or a form of disrespect on those games at all, I enjoy those a great deal. However, It seems rarer and rarer to me personally that things beyond those sources are used for inspiration.

This is not a concern with Jackals in my humble opinion.

Jackals is a Roleplaying game that is inspired by classical Bronze Age societies, cultures, and tales. In particular those of the ancient near east. Taking cue from sources like Homer’s The Iliad, The Torah/Old Testament, the Epic of Gilgamesh, and other tales of Bronze Age and before era peoples and places within our history. What you get is a world dripping with the all important feeling of history, lore and depth. Combine that with the classical Sword & Sorcery aspects of a realm of perilous danger and adventure, of the Forces of Law and Chaos working against each other, and nestled within its own Fantasy realm of Bronze and you have a recipe for excitement that screams to the Heavens its rallying cry of sheer gripping wonder.

In terms of system, Jackals utilizes a simple and easy to comprehend and utilize D100 system modeled on the 2nd Open Quest SRD. Meaning the overall rules are easy to understand. On top of that Jackals introduces what it calls the Clash Mechanics for combat, and I have to admit that this is something I wish more people would steal or iterate on for their own games. In my opinion the Clash system makes combat gripping and engaging in a way that few others actually manage to uphold. From my experience there are a whole host of games that claim to be cinematic in their scope and action, but still manage to be either cumbersome or very static in terms of how things actually handle at the table. Even just watching Jackals in play from the various sessions/videos is engaging in a way that I couldn't have thought possible. All as characters clash against one another in contests of action where the victor is the one that deals their damage. A system that to me evokes the best aspects of those classic duels found in movies and stories, where two warriors bear all their weight and skill behind their attacks. It also provides a robust yet functionally simple method of tactical play at the table and allows caster like characters an opportunity to not feel as if they are left in the dust or high and dry with wasted turns even if their spells don’t go off, but still makes sure everyone feels useful at the table through the use of initiative "slots" as opposed to static sequential order, with other uses for clash points to allow those power attacks and multi opponent hitting swings.

However, combat is not the only aspect of the mechanics that stood out to me. No adventurer can wander the War roads forever, and the game not only acknowledges this, but has systems built into it to handle that. With renown mechanics that deal with how the world perceives the characters and their deeds, and also how chaos begins to seek out these more renowned individuals to make an example out of. To actions taken to strengthen bonds of connection with places across the Zaharets through Seasonal Actions, as well as mechanics to handle retirement of characters should they survive their journeys and the almost inevitable scars they are likely to endure along the way: physical, mental, and emotional- with mechanics to deal with physical scars, and corruption.

I rarely write reviews for anything. Mostly because I always feel that my words will not encapsulate what it is I really want to say. Every so often though something comes along that calls me to action, and Jackals is it. I love this game. Pure and simple. As soon as I purchased it I wanted to sit down and play. I bought the PDF copy first and within less than a week of ownership I turned around and bought a physical copy because I needed to hold this book in my hands. Never before have I so quickly went from PDF to physical without some sort of crowdfunding involved. I cannot wait to start up games of my own of Jackals.

I hope to see you out on the War Road some day.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Jackals: Bronze Age Fantasy Roleplaying
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Those Dark Places: Industrial Science Fiction Roleplaying
by Daniel C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/30/2021 23:10:42

I picked this up on a recomendation from a friend. I really liked the core mechanics and the setting felt true to the source material. While I found some elements slightly odd (how fast everyone turns into a useless ball of comotose nothing) overall I found th egame fun to play and worth people's efforts to try it out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Those Dark Places: Industrial Science Fiction Roleplaying
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Righteous Blood, Ruthless Blades: Wuxia Roleplaying
by Darren P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/09/2021 12:00:02

For transparency, I was a reader of earlier drafts of this game. I have been a fan of the writer's work for several years and Righteous Blood Ruthless Blades that is my favorite. The organization flows well, the signature abilities seem to hit the right amount: not overwhelming and not sparse. The Occult Power signature ability and the Magic Skill are a great way for GM to scale magic or supernatural to their liking. Also, with signature abilities, and the base skill system you can create various character types which frees it from being just a fighting game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Righteous Blood, Ruthless Blades: Wuxia Roleplaying
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Romance of the Perilous Land: A Roleplaying Game of British Folklore
by Vernon F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/19/2020 00:30:03

This is a beautiful game book! The artwork is in color throughout the book and the layout is superb with all the rules well-organized and easy to find. The rules are elegantly simple, using a d20 to resolve actions however, rolling low is good so, a 1 is a crit and a 20 is a fail. Being used to d20 roll high mechanics, I'm having a bit of trouble adjusting to this paradigm but, the system is well thought out and flows smoothly. The magic system is based on folklore, so spells are more of the curse, scrying, conjuration, healing variety with few direct damage spells. The feel of magic is closer to what is seen in the movies Excalibur or Dragonslayer than the typical flashy magic in most fantasy games.

I have only one complaint. While the book gives a lot of detail about the countries of the Perilous Land, there is no map! It would be nice if one could be produced for download on the Osprey Games website or made available here on DriveThruRPG.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Romance of the Perilous Land: A Roleplaying Game of British Folklore
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A World Aflame – Interwar Wargame Rules 1918–39
by Colin M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/22/2018 15:34:46

I'm very new to this hobby, and after going through this ruleset, I'm excited to try this out. Great illustrations, easy to understand rules, and the author sets the tone very well for the kind of games he intends you to play with this. (i.e. fun, friendly games for people who are interested in the period. Info packed, digestible, and straightforward. Now I'm wishing I had ordered a hard copy.

"Crowned heads, wealth and privilege may well tremble should ever again the Black and Red unite!" CNT/FAI forever!!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
A World Aflame – Interwar Wargame Rules 1918–39
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Frostgrave: Hunt for the Golem
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/19/2017 22:25:18

A nice mini-campaign with a bonus hurdle in the form of a sentient golem that is a little tough. I only wish that there were a selection of extra magical items that were more diverse in their use.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Frostgrave: Hunt for the Golem
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Frostgrave: Fantasy Wargames in the Frozen City
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/19/2017 22:23:54

I played Warhammer Fantasy because a friend of mine enjoyed it and in exchange he played Warhammer 40,000 because I enjoyed that. All was well (despite my Bretonnians never receiving a new army book) until the Warhammer End Times hit. My friend didn't want to play 9th Age or Age of Sigmar and our gaming group's Warhammer Fantasy sessions were no more. Fortunately my friend found a new game to use all of those Fantasy miniatures- Frostgrave!

Definitely not the same game as Fantasy, but simple and fun enough to get your wizards and warriors fix in. This is a skirmish game (similar to Mordhiem) that has a cheap buy in, plays fast and can accommodate multiple players. Of course the game isn't perfect (after a few sessions it became apparent that some of the spells have far more utility than others and the extreme numerical range provided by the twenty-sided die makes some of the armor, stats, etc. a moot point) and you could research online to read reviews that critique the system and the issues with the Experience Point systems in campaigns, but overall me and my friends are thoroughly enjoying the game.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Frostgrave: Fantasy Wargames in the Frozen City
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Frostgrave: Sellsword
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/19/2017 22:22:25

This is great companion book for the simple miniature skirmish game of Frostgrave. Introducing the option of hiring a Captain for your war band (with the ability to level and earn bonus powers or increased stats) is great way to branch the game out a bit from its wizard theme. The scenarios that are included are not too bad either (I like the Null Pits one).



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Frostgrave: Sellsword
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King Arthur
by Frank L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/09/2016 08:33:53

This is a fun book touching on some of the basics of King Arthur and his many legends. It is short, and nearly half the book covers the idea of searching for a historical Arthur. That part didn't appeal to me nearly as much, especially because the talk of his legends and stories stopped being referenced or expanded upon in this section. So all in all, a little light on content for 10 bucks, but otherwise a nice text.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
King Arthur
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Frostgrave: Into the Breeding Pits
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/05/2016 10:15:44

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The second expansion to the cool wargaming/RPG-hybrid Frostgrave clocks in at 62 pages, minus 3 if you do not count editorial, etc., leaving us with59 pages of content.

This book was moved up in my review-queue due to me receiving a print copy of the book.

All right, let's begin this review with a kind of template, the most unique modification to the wizard you may achieve while using this supplement. The dungeons below Frostgrave, the eponymous breeding pits, were the haunting ground of the beastcrafters...and their tradition can be experienced in a novel manner: Provided the wizard finds the right grimoire, he may attempt to brew the elixir of the beastcrafter via the Brew Potion spell. In order to benefit from it, the wizard basically has to have 100 experience points for a level-up ready and expend these; an apprentice has to drink alongside his wizard. Successfully drinking the elixir nets you bonuses to cast certain spells and adds new Animal Companion options...however, you also take on bestial features, increasing the cost of all soldiers hired but war hounds. The elixir needs a minimum level of 5, with stage 2 and 3 of the transformation, with progressively better benefits increasing the minimum required level by +5 respectively. And yes, higher levels net special benefits like wings, scales, etc. The pdf also introduces two school-less beastcrafter spells and may only be cast by beastcrafters. Effect-wise, they allow for the temporary or permanent mutation/modification of animals.

Speaking of spellcasting: The book increases the dynamics of spellcasting significantly with so-called reaction spells; as long as the spell's conditions are met, it may be cast at any time...but upon the next activation, the respective spellcaster is considered to have already cast the spell in question. 5 of these are provided -and frankly, I wished we got more...and a new out-game spell of a now extinct magic tradition that allows you to penalize experience points gained. Yup, your foes will hate you for it. Yup, it is incredibly gratifying to cast. Now I already mentioned the eponymous breeding pits being subterranean...and this is basically what this is about: This book allows for DUNGEON-EXPLORATION!!!

Yep, you read right - a whole new gaming experience. The book concisely defines underground exploration: The effects or lack thereof from Crumble to Plane Walk are covered and setting up walls, doors and doorways and ceilings are concisely presented alongside restrictions of lighting. Burrowing creatures can make for nasty surprises...and speaking of which, the book presents rules for the vast amount of traps - a total of 20 unique and evocative traps are provided and yes, depending on the character affected, they may gain bonuses to resist the nasty effects of these obstacles. Traps are sprung, btw., when someone rolls a 1 on an initiative roll...and said player may CHOOSE who is affected by the trap! This can turn a dismal frown to cheers at the table and is extremely rewarding. From magic-cancelling waves to gaining a personal demon, they are very diverse and, more importantly, fun.

Speaking of fun - on the other side of the spectrum, rolling a 20 on an initiative roll means that the player's squad has discovered a secret passage. When any figure of the player's choice is activated, said figure may move THROUGH dead space like walls etc. - but only alone, unless used in conjunction with group activation. Cool: Both of these work in conjunction with both regular AND dungeon set-up, taking spells and options into account.

These two amazing subsystems also tie into the new soldiers: Trap Experts are superb at resisting traps and extends the "trap range" from rolling a "1" to also applying when rolling a "2", but only 1/game. Tunnel Fighter similarly extend the "secret passage found"-range to also apply on 19s, but only for the tunnel fighter. Costs and stats are well-balanced, considering the effect of these abilities.

The book also features new magic items, including a proper table - a total of 17 such items are provided and they actually leave the game better balanced than before, with e.g. chronomancy gaining some seriously cool options via items. A random encounter table for the breeding pits can be found herein alongside 12 critters - from hyena and gnolls to poisonous amplipedes, petrifying basilisks, the book has some classics, including nasty giant worms, minotaurs and hydras - the latter of which come with modifications that represent rare strains and rules for multiple headed hydras. Finally, there are devourers - huge, nasty and very powerful beetles that are harmless...until angered, when they become a superb force of burrowing destruction. In the hands of the right player's schemes, they can be utilized in game-changing manners.

Anyways, the book also features scenarios that make use of the amazing rules presented herein: The Moving Maze represents the exploration of a maze f fungoid structures - it's alive and the player with the lowest initiative may actually move terrain! This is exceedingly rewarding and can lead to amazing games. "Here comes the Flood" is similarly cool: Exploring a canal, there is a flood approaching; after a couple of turns, there is a chance every round for the flood to hit...with devastating consequences if you're caught...and yep, this can make for a perfect "RUN!!!"-moments. The Breeding Pit is less interesting - basically it is a random monster-spawn scenario, mainly here to get a Book of the Beastcrafter. "The Rats in the Walls" spawns giant rats near treasures and dumps them on characters instead of trap effects for a simple, but efficient tweak of the engine. My favorite scenario herein would be "Breeding Season" - basically, it's the devourer showcase - they get a modified "AI" and move towards one another...but when ANY of them is damaged OR when they get close to one another, they start berserking! This can allow you to royally screw over the other player...or have all wizard parties caught in a nightmarish fury of killer beetles!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, though not as precise as in the other Frostgrave supplements; I noticed a couple of small hiccups, but none pertaining the exceedingly precise rules-language. Layout adheres to Frostgrave's neat 1-column full-color standard and, once again, we get cool evocative flavor test in sideboxes. Artwork features both photography of full-color minis and excellent full-clor artwork. The physical version is a nice softcover with high-quality, thick, glossy paper. I can't comment on the electronic version.

James A. McCullough's "Into the Breeding Pits" is one phenomenal supplement; I mean it. If you get any of the expansions, get this one. Where "Thaw of the Lich Lord" added to the options, this one MULTIPLIES them. From the amazing trap and secret tunnel rules (which you can easily modify to happen more often, if you wish to) to the concise presentation of subterranean adventuring, the book is glorious. Reaction spells and the new soldiers add further tactical depth to the game and after you've added these rules, I guarantee you will never want to play a Frostgrave game without them ever again. This is a great game-changer for the engine of the game and superb in every way....though the RPG-dude in me wished it had a campaign. Then again, who cares? The scenarios, with one filler-exception, are fresh and cool and the book, as a whole, is worth every cent. If you play Frostgrave, then you NEED this book. My final verdict will be 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Frostgrave: Into the Breeding Pits
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Frostgrave: Thaw of the Lich Lord
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/02/2016 09:06:12

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The first expansion-book to Frostgrave clocks in at 62 pages, minus 4 if you subtract editorial, ToC, etc., leaving us with 58 pages of content, so let's take a look!

This supplement/expansion is the first big campaign for Frostgrave, and it is a cool one (pardon the pun) - but before we go to the linked scenarios, let's take a look at the supplemental material, shall we? The first of these would be the bard - at 100 gc, he clocks in at the upper end of the soldier cost-spectrum, and at Fight +2, Armor 11, he looks like a pretty sucky choice; however, he has a phenomenal Will +4 and conveys a +1 bonus to Will to all soldiers within 6'' of him, but only if they have line of sight. Nice: These benefits cannot be stacked. The Crow Master is just as expensive,, but has both Fight and Shoot +0, armor 11 and +2 Will...so why get him? Well, each crow master comes with a domesticated blood crow that has Move 9, flies, armor 14 and +3 Will...but only 1 Health. So yeah, deadly skirmisher-potential held in check by low Health...and by the restriction that your base needs to have one Blood Crow Roost per such soldier hired...and these restrictions better should be in place, for the blood crow does not count towards the soldier maximum.

Can't afford an archer or crossbowman, but need ranged capability? The javelineer, for only 25 gc delivers that. These guys can use their weapons in melee and ranged combat, but only have a range of 10'' and +0 Fight and SHoot - you get what you pay for, but a couple of these guys still can wreck your day. Finally, for 20 gold crowns, you can recruit a quasi-noncombatant with only a dagger and +0 in all relevant stats as well as armor 10. This would be the pack mule and his draw is that he may carry up to three items and hand them to other characters as an action. Wizards may use actions to take the item from the mule as well....or exchange it. All soldiers presented here have in common that they enrich the tactical options of the game in pretty interesting manners - Blood Crows can e.g. easily follow wizards abusing the Leap spell.

Speaking of spells - in that regard, the book offer three out-of-combat options: Witches may create homunculi; these miniature versions of the wizard decrease his health while in existence, but if he dies during survival checks, his homunculus grows to full size; this is basically an extra life. The other two spells pertaining the ascendency to lichdom; these guys are VERY powerful, but pay for that with increased experience point requirements to level...and, well, obviously, being undead. Thirdly, soldiers that died may be reanimated as revenants by necromancers...though that wrecks the reanimated corpse's Will down to +0.

The book also features a new treasure table alongside 23 new magic itens...some of which become relevant in the aforementioned campaign...while others simply allow for something pretty cool: Crystal Roses that help survival, a book that allows for the recruitment of a rangifier (think savage, undead-hating elk-humanoids introduced in the book's bestiary that are pretty badass: At M 7, F +2,A 12, W +3 and H 12 plus attacks count as magic versus undead and are made at +1.) or the eyes of amoto deserve special mention. The latter is a set of two amulets that allow the caster to cast 1/game through the line of sight of the wearer of the other amulet.

As already mentioned, the pdf does have a new bestiary, including random encounter table - the bestiary spans 10 creatures, two of which I have already mentioned; beyond death cultists (who have a REALLY good Will - +5!), the rest, surprise, would be undead of various powers...including zombie trolls or wraith knights. And yep, several are immaterial and may move through obstacles...which can be really painful. The most impressive creature here, obviously, would be the lich lord, though: His "AI", i.e. his priority list, contains no less than 9 conditions, which makes facing him surprisingly difficult. That being said, the book does suggest to get a player/GM-like entity to play the part of the monsters in the finale of the campaign and I get why.

Now how does the campaign play out? Are the scenarios worthwhile? Well, it all begins as ominous as it gets - in scenario 1, there is a timer running down towards a total eclipse that is accompanied by a significant surge in magical power...but which also limits line of sight while in progress, allowing for some cool tactics and gameplay - this one's mechanics can easily be scavenged and yes, there are bonus experience points for actually being on the table when the eclipse happens, so wizards have a reason to wait at least until it happens before vacating the premises. Scenario number 2 is slightly more complex in its set-up: It takes place on the Meregile, the frozen river; the first 6'' from the tables edge are land---beyond that, you have the river's unsure footing. From a barge on that river, a spellcasting servant of the lich lord sooner or later will emerge and taking the guy out before he can flee would be the primary goal here...though it's easier said than done in the nasty terrain. Scenario 3 is simpler: The PCs basically attempt to loot a caravan of death cultists that had bad luck and a broken down wagon; while reinforcements arrive, they proved to be not too big of a hassle in my tests.

Scenario 4 ups the ante and is called "Storm of Undeath"; not only is a magically charged snowstorm reducing sight, the goal is also risky - in the middle of the table, there'll be pylons with corpses. Each round, there is a chance for magic lightning to hit the pylons, with potentially lethal consequences...of, and the dead may be animated...but being in the area is also the way to gain the big experience points here. Just be careful to not die, or you'll have a revenant on your hands. In #5, the evocative rangifers are in the center - and they are deadly...and it's up to the wizards to prevent them being killed by a deadly wraith knight...problem is, that the rangifers are NOT nice guys...they prioritize destroying undead...but are not above splitting some wizard skull...

In Scenario #6, you best have a second table or cordoned area - the second are, ideally 1' by 1', represents a treasure room: Arcs and doors placed have a chance of teleporting those passing through to the second area, the fallen house's treasure room...problem is, you can also be teleported out of the game or killed by the attempt...risky and interesting. Oh, and if you botch it, you may well end up facing death cultists all alone in the room... One of my favorites in the campaign, however, would be #7, the "lair of the ghoul king": Situated in a vast underground chamber, the players are trapped in the ghoul king's throne room. On his throne are levers that may allow for escape...but you have to get there first. The chamber is also dark and limits sight and makes for an amazing playing experience. Scenario 8 and 9 are somewhat similar - they focus on one unique aspect: In #8, you have the Black Cauldron in the middle, which continuously spawns zombies: Tipping it over is the goal here. In #9, the center of the scenario would be a bone wheel with sacrifices to be in the middle; freeing these guys and getting the treasure is hard, as the wheel is ever turning...oh, and there are the banshees.

After all of that, the lich lord has had enough: Exerting his magical might, he lets his castle fly above the city, held in place by taut chains; escape is not an option and lethal (unless you have the amulet to slow falls...) and the lich lord is a deadly foe...oh, and if you kill him, a generous countdown's running down...be too slow and you die. Yes, DIE. This one has a very real chance of failure and is really epic in its feel. If the wizard persists, he does get bragging rights and cheaper recruitment from there on out, though.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches in either formal or rules-language criteria. Layout adheres to a beautiful one-column full-color standard and the pdf sports several evocative pieces of fluffy sideboxes. Artworks are the usual blend of amazing artworks and color-photographs of minis. I can't comment on the electronic version, since I don't have it, but the softcover is a nice little book with high-quality, glossy paper.

James A. McCullough's "Thaw of the Lich Lord" is an evocative expansion - the new soldiers in particular are great paradigm-changers and the scenarios allow for cool tweaks that can easily be combined, changed, modified - but it is also here that the campaign varies a bit in its set-up: You see, there are a couple of scenarios that play like truly unique, interesting experiences...while a few feel a bit more like filler or don't make maximum use of their modifications. The bone wheel is cool, but it's engine tweak could have, for example been expanded upon. The book improves the base Frostgrave, though, and playing the campaign certainly is a rewarding experience. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Frostgrave: Thaw of the Lich Lord
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