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I2 Tomb of the Lizard King (1e)
by Nat S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/14/2021 14:13:05

This is fantastic. For an old adventure, it still suits the sensibilities of modern d&d players quite well. Also, who doesn't want to fight a vampire lizard king?!

The maps are high quality, the text is easy to read, and if you're running a different edition, conversion is about as simple as it gets. Most of the 1e monsters have pretty intuitive 5e replacements. If you're comfortable adjusting damage and hit points behind the screen to keep things balanced, you can just replace the monsters with whatever makes sense.

The setpieces are evocative - a troubled lord in his hall, a burned village, a murky swamp, an ancient tomb! The monsters are fun and classic: cultists and dragons and vampires! There's opportunity for social classes (bards and rogues and paladins will shine in the opening scene and the village) as well as more boot-and-loot styles (most of the module IS a dangerous dungeon). Really something for everyone and a lot of fun.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
I2 Tomb of the Lizard King (1e)
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Planescape Campaign Setting (2e)
by michael g. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/12/2021 12:10:40

This is such a classic campaign setting, I was happy to get it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Planescape Campaign Setting (2e)
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Star Frontiers: Alpha Dawn
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/12/2021 10:17:43

Originally posted here: https://theotherside.timsbrannan.com/2021/05/review-star-frontiers-alpha-dawn-and.html

Gamma World might have been TSR's first big entry into sci-fi gaming (Warriors of Mars and Metamorphasis Alpha non-withstanding), but it was not their biggest. While I don't have any hard numbers in front of me, I am going to have to say that Star Frontiers edges out the later Alternity in terms of popularity. It was certainly built at the height of TSR's fame with the first edition, simply Star Frontiers, published in 1982 with the new edition and trade-dress Star Frontiers: Alpha Dawn and Star Frontiers: Knight Hawks. Certainly, in terms of fans, Star Frontiers has Alternity beat. But more on that soon.

For this review, I am considering the PDFs and Print on Demand versions of both Star Frontiers: Alpha Dawn and Star Frontiers: Knight Hawks. I am also going to go with my recollections of playing the game when it first came out.

The Alpha Dawn book is designed by "TSR Staff Writers" but we know ow that a huge bulk of the work was done by David "Zeb" Cook and Lawrence Schick. Knight Hawks was designed primarily by Douglas Niles. The cover art in both cases was done by Larry Elmore with interior art by Elmore and Jim Holloway with contributions by Jeff Easley, Tim Truman, and even some Dave Trampier. Keith Parkinson would go on to do some other covers in line as well.

While originally boxed sets (gotta love the early 1980s for that!) the PDFs break all the components down into separate files. Handy when you go to print the counters or the maps. The Print on Demand versions put all the files together into an attractive soft-cover book for each game. The maps are published in the back, but you will want to print them out for use.

Both books are easy to read and really nice. They have been some of my favorite Print on Demand purchases ever.

Star Frontiers: Alpha Dawn

Alpha Dawn is the original Star Frontiers game. The box game with two books, a Basic and Expanded game rules, some maps, counters, and two 10-sided dice. The rules indicate that one is "dark" and the other "light" to help when rolling percentages, but mine were red and blue. Go figure.

The Basic Game is a 16-page book/pdf that gives you the very basics of character creation. There are four stat pairs, Strength/Stamina, Dexterity/Reaction Speed, Intelligence/Logic, and Personality/Leadership. These are scored on a 0 to 100 scale, but the PCs will fall between 30 and 70. Higher is better. These can be adjusted by species and each individual score can also be changed or shifted.

The four species are humans, the insect-like Vrusk, the morphic Dralasites, and the ape-like Yazirian. Each species of course has its own specialties and quirks. I rather liked the Dralasites (whom I always pronounced as "Drasalites") because they seemed the oddest and they had a weird sense of humor.

We are also introduced to the worm-like Sathar. These guys are the enemies of the UPF (United Planetary Federation) and are not player-characters.

The basics of combat, movement, and some equipment are given. There is enough here to keep you going for bit honestly, but certainly, you will want to do more. We move on then to the Expanded rules.

The Expanded Rules cover the same ground but now we get more details on our four species and the Sathar. Simple ability checks are covered, roll d% against an ability and match it or roll under.

Characters also have a wide variety of skills that can be suited to any species, though some are better than others, Vrusk for example are a logical race and gain a bonus for that. Skills are attached to abilities so now you roll against an ability/skill to accomplish something. Skills are broken down into broad categories or careers; Military, Tech, and Bio/Social.

Movement is covered and I am happy to say that even in 1982 SF had the good sense to go metric here.

There are two combat sections, personal and vehicle. These are not starships, not yet anyway, and were a lot of hovercars and gyro-jet guns.

There is a section on creatures and how to make creatures. I am afraid I took that section a little too close to heart and most of my SF games ended up being "D&D in Space" with the planets being used as large dungeons.

The background material in the Frontier Society though is great stuff. I immediately got a good just of what was going on here and what this part of the galaxy was like. While Earth was never mentioned, you could almost imagine it was out there somewhere. Either as the center of UPF (Star Trek) or far away, waiting to be found (Battlestar Galactica).

This book also includes the adventure SF-0: Crash on Volturnus.

When it comes to sci-fi some of the rules have not aged as well. Computers still feel very limited, but the idea that as we approach the speed of light we can enter The Void has its appeal.

The price for these books is perfect. Grab the PDF and POD combo. Get some d10s, load your gyrojet gun and get ready to make the jump to the Void. There are new planets to discover!

Parts of Star Frontiers, in particular the species, would find new life in D20 Future, part of the D20 Modern line.

Both games are fun, but suffer from and/or benefit from the design principles of the time. Newer players might find some of the game elements dated. Older players of the games will find them nostalgic. Personally reading through them now some 40 years after first reading them I get a lot more enjoyment from the rules. Back then I was really too D&D focused to really enjoy what I had in front of me. Today, well I can't wait to stat up a character or two and a starship.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Star Frontiers: Alpha Dawn
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Star Frontiers: Knight Hawks
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/12/2021 10:17:37

Originally posted here: https://theotherside.timsbrannan.com/2021/05/review-star-frontiers-alpha-dawn-and.html

Gamma World might have been TSR's first big entry into sci-fi gaming (Warriors of Mars and Metamorphasis Alpha non-withstanding), but it was not their biggest. While I don't have any hard numbers in front of me, I am going to have to say that Star Frontiers edges out the later Alternity in terms of popularity. It was certainly built at the height of TSR's fame with the first edition, simply Star Frontiers, published in 1982 with the new edition and trade-dress Star Frontiers: Alpha Dawn and Star Frontiers: Knight Hawks. Certainly, in terms of fans, Star Frontiers has Alternity beat. But more on that soon.

For this review, I am considering the PDFs and Print on Demand versions of both Star Frontiers: Alpha Dawn and Star Frontiers: Knight Hawks. I am also going to go with my recollections of playing the game when it first came out.

The Alpha Dawn book is designed by "TSR Staff Writers" but we know ow that a huge bulk of the work was done by David "Zeb" Cook and Lawrence Schick. Knight Hawks was designed primarily by Douglas Niles. The cover art in both cases was done by Larry Elmore with interior art by Elmore and Jim Holloway with contributions by Jeff Easley, Tim Truman, and even some Dave Trampier. Keith Parkinson would go on to do some other covers in line as well.

While originally boxed sets (gotta love the early 1980s for that!) the PDFs break all the components down into separate files. Handy when you go to print the counters or the maps. The Print on Demand versions put all the files together into an attractive soft-cover book for each game. The maps are published in the back, but you will want to print them out for use.

Both books are easy to read and really nice. They have been some of my favorite Print on Demand purchases ever.

Star Frontiers: Knight Hawks

Ah. Now this game. Star Frontiers was great, but this game felt like something different. Something "not D&D" to me.

In fact I have often wondered if Knight Hawks had not been a separate game in development by Douglas Niles that they later brought into the Star Frontiers line. I also think that TSR was also suffering a little bit of what I call "Traveller Envy" since this can be used as an expansion, a standalone RPG, and as a board game!

Like Alpha Dawn, this game is split into four sections. There is a "Basic" game, and "Advanced" or "Expansion" rules (and the bulk of the book), an adventure, "The Warriors of White Light", and all the counters and maps.

As far as maps go, that hex map of empty space is still one of my favorites and fills me with anticipation of worlds to come.

The PDF version splits all this into four files for ease of printing or reading. The Print on Demand book is gorgeous really. Yes...the art is still largely black and white and the maps and counters are pretty much useless save as references, but still. I flip through the book and I want to fire up the engines of my characters' stolen Corvette, the FTL Lightspeed Lucifer. Complete with the onboard computer they named Frodo.

The Basic rules cover things like ship movement, acceleration, and turning, along with ship-to-ship combat. By itself, you have the rules for a good ship combat board game. It works fine as long as you don't mind keeping your frame of reference limited to two-dimensional space.

The Expanded rules tie this all a little closer to the Alpha Dawn rules, but I still get the feeling that this may have started out as a different sort of game that was later brought into the fold of Star Frontiers.

Ships are largely built and there is a character creation feel to this. Their 80's roots are showing, no not like that, but in that, the best engines you can get for a starship are atomic fission. Of course, no one just gets a starship, you have to buy it and that often means taking out a loan or doing a bunch of odd jobs to raise the credits. Often both. I don't think I ever actually bought a ship. The Lucifer was stolen.

There is also quite a bit on the planets of the UPF, Frontier Space, and the worlds of the Sathar. It really had kind of a "Wild West" meets the "Age of Sail" feel to it.

The last part of the POD book is the adventure "The Warriors of White Light" with its various scenarios.

Minus two d10s everything is here for an unlimited number of adventures in Frontier Space. Rereading it now after so many years I can't help but dream up various new adventures. I also can't help to want to use the Sathar in some of my other Sci-fi games. They have such untapped potential.

The price for these books is perfect. Grab the PDF and POD combo. Get some d10s, load your gyrojet gun and get ready to make the jump to the Void. There are new planets to discover!

Parts of Star Frontiers, in particular the species, would find new life in D20 Future, part of the D20 Modern line.

Both games are fun, but suffer from and/or benefit from the design principles of the time. Newer players might find some of the game elements dated. Older players of the games will find them nostalgic. Personally reading through them now some 40 years after first reading them I get a lot more enjoyment from the rules. Back then I was really too D&D focused to really enjoy what I had in front of me. Today, well I can't wait to stat up a character or two and a starship.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Star Frontiers: Knight Hawks
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Volo’s Waterdeep Enchiridion (5e)
by Cindy B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/11/2021 22:50:45

Contains the exact enchiridion from the book, which is good to give to players or print and keep for reference. I would have appreciated it being cheaper (or free as part of the hardback purchase), but it was still helpful and good.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Volo’s Waterdeep Enchiridion (5e)
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Unearthed Arcana (1e)
by Edward C. O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/10/2021 16:43:12

the POD is good. this adds to your 1E book and probably broke the balance, if you know, you know.

overall good book to add to the collection!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Unearthed Arcana (1e)
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S3 Expedition to the Barrier Peaks (1e)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/10/2021 15:55:54

Originall posted here: http://theotherside.timsbrannan.com/search/label/Classic%20Adventures%20Revisited

One of the first adventures I ever bought via mail-order was S3 The Expedition to the Barrier Peaks. I had already latched onto the idea that the S series of adventures were going to be mine to run in our extended group of players that crossed many DMs and groups. I grabbed it without really knowing a lot about it. I knew there was crashed spaceship central to the adventure and I knew that it was a larger adventure. Since I was spending my limited paper route money on my new D&D addiction I had to make every dollar count. S3 had two booklets, at 32 pages each, and color inserts. There were two covers with maps. So even my young mind all of this was more valuable than a simple adventure that only had half that material. I got it in the mail one summer and took with me on a family trip to the fish fry my parents loved to go to every year. It was hot, and July and all I wanted to do was sit in our van and read my adventure. This was also the first time that I encountered what I would later call the "Gary Gygax" effect. This would be the "E.G.G." on the map of Level II. I remember not liking it at the time because if this was a real spaceship then why was that there.

Sci-Fi gaming was not new to me. I had picked up Traveller and I knew about Gamma World. I also had learned that Gamma World and S3 had a shared parentage in Metamorphasis Alpha, though I will admit I wasn't 100% clear on what that meant at the time. Without knowing much about the size of the Warden (MA) we always assumed this was the Warden. Given the shape of the ship that landed on Greyhawk and it's size this was more obviously some sort of smaller scout ship with a prison or brig. One thing everyone in my groups agreed on was this is how Mind Flayers came to Greyhawk.

S3 Expedition to the Barrier Peaks

For this review, I am considering my printed copy from 1982 or so (not my original sadly, lost that one years ago) and the PDF from DriveThruRPG. This adventure was written by Gary Gygax himself and was the official Advanced Dungeons & Dragons Tournament scenario at Origins II in 1976. The adventure was updated and published in 1980. Cover art and art book art by Erol Otus, interior art by Jeff Dee, David "Diesel" LaForce, Jim Roslof, David Sutherland III, Gregory Flemming, and Erol Otus.

The adventure comes in two 32-page black and white booklets. The first covers the adventure and the second covers all the weird animals, plants, and gadgets found on the ship. There is also four pages in the center of book two with full-color art of the animals. I have one copy where they are glossy and another where they are matte. I have no detail on what the differences mean.

Book 1 covers the adventure. The preface sets up what this adventure is about and gives some background on how this adventure came to be. The rest sets up the adventure, placed in the Grandy Duchy of Geoff in the World of Greyhawk. There is a bit of explaining the nature of this "dungeon," really a crashlanded ship, and how to read the maps.

While one could call this a funhouse dungeon it is a bit different than the other Gygax funhouse, Tomb of Horrors. There are a lot of new and weird monsters here and some older ones (like the Mind Flayer) that are given a new life so to speak. What is most interesting to us, and to the players, were the new tech provided. The tech items were designed not really to be functional, but to confuse the players as much as possible. There really seemed to be a fear that D&D characters would run around with laser rifles. Of course the design makes no sense from a human perspective, so we tried to figure out how they might been created. One idea was that these make sense if you are a Mind Flayer.

The adventure itself is a pure dungeon crawl into an unknown structure.

Book 2 covers all the visual aids for this adventure.

The adventure is a must-have really to say you have had the complete D&D experience. My oldest hated it though, saying he hates mixing sci-fi with his D&D. My youngest loved and wanted lasers for everyone.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
S3 Expedition to the Barrier Peaks (1e)
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Gamma World (1e)
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/07/2021 14:14:49

Originally posted here: https://theotherside.timsbrannan.com/

There is an important piece of my 40+ years of D&D anniversary that I have neglected and I thought I must rectify that as soon as I can.

1981 was a banner year for D&D. I FINALLY got my real copy of the game, the Moldvay D&D Basic Set which I have talked about ad nauseam here for years. Within that "Gateway to Adventure" catalog there was another game that I knew a little about and would also soon be part of my ever-growing desire for a good sci-fi game. That game was TSR's own Gamma World.

Over the next few years, I'd spend time with this game and other editions of it, but it was this first edition that really grabbed me like no other.

I am going to review Gamma World here and talk a little about what I did with it and what I will do in the future. For this, I am considering my original Gamma World book (the box and dice are long gone), the Print on Demand version, and PDFs from DriveThruRPG.

Gamma World (1978, 1981)

Living thru the Nuclear Scare was an interesting time. I vividly recall having conversations with kids my own age about how they saw no future because the Russians were growing to blow us all up any day. Regan was president and I was convinced he was going to do something stupid to get us all nuked. Instead, he just destroyed the middle-class. But the threat was there all the time. The news, the movies, even all the music videos, to quote Frank Zappa, used all the same cheesy atom bomb explosions. Yup we were going to all die and the world become a nuclear wasteland where people drove around Mad-Max style in supercars and fought for the remaining resources.

I suppose then given that environment a game like Gamma World was inevitable. Gamma World was our world, but very different. It is always interesting to read an older game describe how the world of their future and our present would turn out. Gamma World paints a nice picture of the early 21st century as a time when we stopped polluting the Earth and taking resources from it. Science Fiction indeed. With that, let's delve into this book.

Gamma World original print vs new PoD

Introduction

There is a lot of interesting thing going on here. We know this is a (maybe even THE) Post-Apocalyptic game. This said apocalypse began in 2309 going to 2322. We get some world-building here with various wars leading up to the attack against a group known as The Apocalypse by what remained of the various governments and groups and The Apocalypse fought back. While it is not said to be a nuclear disaster, that is certainly how it feels. We know that due to this event that some life-forms were completely wiped out and others were mutated into new and strange forms. It is stated that many of the weapons were biological in nature too. So we have a heady stew of alchemical death raining from the skies. The year is now 2471 (450 years from now). There are humans and other things here and that is where our adventures begin. I can't help but draw parallels between this and the Buck Rogers in the 25th Century TV series which came out at the same time. Gamma World predates the TV show, but not Buck Rogers. The TV series takes place in 2491, so 20 years after GW. With TSR's later dangerous flirtation with Buck Rogers, I wonder if any attempt was made to bring the two lines together? I certainly would have tried if I had been into GW as much as I was into D&D.

How to Use This Book & Designing Gamma World

An overview of what this book is about and how to use it. If you ever played an RPG then you know what is here. If you ever played AD&D then you might even have this section memorized. Gamma World uses the same dice as D&D.

The designing part covers what you are likely to encounter in a typical Gamma World setting. It is a broad overview meant only to introduce the players. Details will come later.

Creating Characters

If you can create a D&D character then you can create a Gamma World character; they are largely the same and makes you wonder why there was no unified game system used at TSR. Well...I have my guesses. You have three "races" Pure Strain Humans, Humanoids, and Mutated Animals. Your attributes are Mental Strength, Intelligence, Dexterity, Charisma, Constitution, and Physical Strength. I am sure these are recognizable. Pure Strain Humans are just that, but Humanoids and Mutated Animals can have mutations. These are rolled randomly of course and some are beneficial others are defects. You can have a physical and/or a mental mutation. Mental ones can even include psionic abilities. Plants can also have mutations. This covers quite a bit of the book, but that is not really a surprise I suppose.

Since the tables in the game are based on various ability scores they are more important in normal play than they are in (A)D&D. Levels and experience points use does not even come up until page 42.

Play of the Game

This covers the rules of the Gamma World game. We start out with what happened a lot in GW; moving from place to place and searching for things. Combat is the next section with weapons from clubs all the way to fusion rifles. We get some combat matrices that look like they were cribbed from D&D Basic. This is a good thing. There is even something here that I always an improvement, the Mental Attack Matrix. I mean this could have, should have, been ported back to AD&D and been better than the psionics system used there.

Encounters

Gamma World is a Gygaxian fun-house dungeon writ large. That doesn't mean everything you encounter will try to kill you, but that is a good assumption. The creatures are not as evocative as say the creatures from the Monster Manual but they are compatible with each other so if your really want an orc in Gamma World game it is easy.

Also presented are various alliances. These are the groups, factions and tribes you can encounter. Only a few are presented here and the Game Master is encouraged to make more.

Artifacts and Equipment

Maybe more so than D&D there is a good reason for all these "treasures" to be laying around. But there is always the chance that something will fail. Gamma World takes the device flow charts from Expedition to Barrier Peaks (it's "cousin" adventure in AD&D) and dials it up to 11.

This section also covers trade, the value of goods, and robots. I wonder how many Gamma World games changed the importance of robots after the Terminator movies came out?

The last few pages cover an example of play and there are some charts (random encounters) and hex grids that can be removed for use. They look right at home next to my D&D charts of the same period.

Print on Demand

The Print on Demand version might be one of the best ones yet. Yes, the maps from the box set have to be printed out, but that is not a big deal. The new PoD is clear and easy to read.

Nothing is lost in the translation. Plus the new pod uses the box art for the front and back covers so everything is here. All that is missing is dice.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gamma World (1e)
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The Shattered Circle (2e)
by Nigel P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/07/2021 06:59:24

Often overlooked because it came at the tail end of 2E, this is simply one of the best dungeon adventures that TSR/WotC ever published. It makes sense. It has mystery. It has great locations. It's a reminder of just how good Bruce Cordell used to be at designing adventures. Buy it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Shattered Circle (2e)
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DL16 World of Krynn (1e)
by Tom K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/06/2021 18:19:09

PDF Scan Quality Review: This is a retyped module with placed images that are a little fuzzy. Text is very clear and easy to read.

  • +1 for being Dragonlance.
  • Bookmarks included
  • +1 for clear easy to read text
  • pages are centered with a good clean margin all around.


Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
DL16 World of Krynn (1e)
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DL15 Mists of Krynn (1e)
by Tom K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/06/2021 18:15:52

PDF Scan Quality Review: The scan quality is a little blown out. They dropped the background and lost some of the softness of the print. Hard to determine some letters from others for example C and E all look the same to me. In this case the print is readble unlike some of the other DL modules. However a quick copy paste of the OCR text into notepad and it appears the text is rather clean.

  • +1 for being Dragonlance.
  • Bookmarks included
  • pages are centered with a good clean margin all around.


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
DL15 Mists of Krynn (1e)
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DL14 Dragons of Triumph (1e)
by Tom K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/06/2021 18:13:58

PDF Scan Quality Review: The scan quality is a little blown out. They dropped the background and lost some of the softness of the print. Hard to determine some letters from others for example C and E all look the same to me. In this case the print is readble unlike some of the other DL modules. However a quick copy paste of the OCR text into notepad and it appears the text is rather clean.

Included 3 books

  • +1 for being Dragonlance.
  • Bookmarks included
  • included BW Map 22x28 (in book 3)
  • pages are centered with a good clean margin all around.


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
DL14 Dragons of Triumph (1e)
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DL13 Dragons of Truth (1e)
by Tom K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/06/2021 18:05:10

PDF Scan Quality Review: The scan quality is a little blown out. They dropped the background and lost some of the softness of the print. Hard to determine some letters from others for example C and E all look the same to me. In this case the print is readble unlike some of the other DL modules. However a quick copy paste of the OCR text into notepad and it appears the text is rather clean.

  • +1 for being Dragonlance.
  • Bookmarks included
  • included hex map 22x34 one page
  • pages are centered with a good clean margin all around.


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
DL13 Dragons of Truth (1e)
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DL12 Dragons of Faith (1e)
by Tom K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/06/2021 18:03:03

PDF Scan Quality Review: The scan quality is a little blown out. They dropped the background and lost some of the softness of the print. Hard to determine some letters from others for example C and E all look the same to me. In this case the print is readble unlike some of the other DL modules. However a quick copy paste of the OCR text into notepad and it appears the text is rather clean.

  • +1 for being Dragonlance.
  • Bookmarks included
  • included color map 22x34
  • included 22x34 poster mini-maps
  • included color tokens are somewhat-aligned for duplex printing
  • pages are centered with a good clean margin all around.


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
DL12 Dragons of Faith (1e)
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DL11 Dragons of Glory (1e)
by Tom K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/06/2021 17:59:35

PDF Scan Quality Review: The scan quality is a little blown out. They dropped the background and lost some of the softness of the print. Hard to determine some letters from others for example C and E all look the same to me. In this case the print is readble unlike some of the other DL modules. However a quick copy paste of the OCR text into notepad and it appears the text is rather clean.

  • +1 for being Dragonlance.
  • Bookmarks included
  • hex map split over (2) 22x34 pages
  • included color tokens are aligned for duplex printing
  • pages are centered with a good clean margin all around.


Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
DL11 Dragons of Glory (1e)
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