DriveThruRPG.com
Browse Categories
 Publisher













Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
You must be logged in to rate this
Warlock!
by KEVIN D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/28/2020 04:03:09

POSITIVE ELEMENTS:

Simple, Unified Mechanics:

It's an interesting mash up of two of the older British RPG systems hacked together. If you're a fan of either system or looking to have the feel without overcomplicated mechanics, and boasting a unified system this book will serve you well.

The Author had managed to achieve a simple mechanics system that still retains some of the traits beloved in both systems. Do not discount a simpler system for not having depth: The system satisfies a lot of that traditional feel both derived systems have without overcomplicating things.

Character Creation Easy and Unique:

The characters, while simple to create, have some nice random options to give them some distinction to avoid them becoming clones of each-other, while the simple skill system gives a player a mix of point-buy and dice rolls to make their character more unique.

Characters can Try Anything:

Like the more traditional approach with OD&D, characters can try anything and are not hampered by their class choice. Every character a player uses will have some skill in the usual challenges they will face, depicted succinctly on their character sheet.

This system relies on a simple skill list to indicate to the player what chance of success they may have, rather than relying on DM fiat and interpretation of their signals for the success.

This style may not suit all readers who prefer a huge list of skills or a more fluid style of Gamemastering but it works quite well, hearkening back to the system's influences.

Careers, not Classes:

One of the best things about the system is the progression a player can make. Starting in their initial career, they can multi-class and delve into Advanced Career options, each providing unique options to attain expertise in certain skills.

By blending the concepts of skill and class, the Career system takes the best of both to allow players to define their characters easily, while still providing unique traits. As the characters grow, they can branch off in interesting directions, mixing Careers to produce memorable figures for the players every time.

Opposed Combat Tests:

Another favorite mechanic derived from the British style is the opposed roll. Allowing every combatant attacking to possibly receive damage from their opponent in melee makes things very active and dangerous. It allows a player to pull a Conan, mowing down weaker creatures in one round but also makes other, more powerful creatures far more dangerous as entering conflict is always dicey.

It's a good system that keeps players and the Gamemaster actively involved in the combat rounds without playing the 'wait till my turn to do something' game that can kill the excitement of many encounters. The result is a great approach to the chaos of combat without overburdening it with complicated rules.

Attrition & Criticals:

I'm not a fan of having a player who has done everything right, receives an critical insta-kill, due to a bad dice roll result.

The system uses Stamina as hit points but does have critical results that worsen once the player's Stamina amount run out. It's a good blend of strategy with the potential for players to be tactical but also potentially hobble away at the end of combat with lasting scars or worse. There is also a rare potential of the player or opponent achieving a Mighty Strike for double damage, to keep everyone on their toes with unexpected consequences.

Players can be somewhat heroic but will be faced with times when running for their lives is the smart choice. No safety nets here like some more modern systems. Players should approach combat more creatively than just wading in every time and whittling down the monsters which can get quite boring.

This is not D&D:

It's nice to see a system that breaks away from being yet another D&D clone. Employing unfamiliar characteristics and mechanics could be a welcome change, paying well-deserved homage to some of the less known older British systems.

POTENTIAL DRAWBACKS:

Details, Details:

While the writing is very evocative, do not expect a full set of rules for wilderness travel, journey rules, etc. and tables to roll for tackling every occasion. There are no elaborate tables of treasure or a fully fleshed out world. There is certainly some flavour and a semblance of the world and how it works, but the many details are left up to the reader to elaborate upon.

There is some Tolkien influence, but it is somewhat sparse. Don't expect pages of detailed history, elaborate treasure tables and a descriptive, established game world. The Bestiary is also decent but not overflowing with hundreds of choices like other systems.

No Mechanical Distinction for Player Races:

Surprisingly, while the Careers and Advanced Careers are plenty, the same cannot be said for this trait. In the system, depicted as 'Communities', the traditional classic choice of races, based on older B/X D&D are depicted. Humans are the most common and established, Elves and Dwarfs can see in moonlight, and Halflings are quiet and stealthy; a traditional fantasy approach.

However, there is no system mechanic differences between them. There are no rules or similar bonuses to dice rolls associated with any class, rather it is descriptive and left up to the Gamemaster to decide.

While this may be liberating for those wishing to avoid players who choose a character's kin, solely for its potential bonuses and not for how they fit into the fantasy landscape, it does again leave it up to the Gamemaster whether to incorporate the flavour text as specific rules.

Unexpected Class Archetypes:

The system breaks away from some of the stereotype traditions of the fragile Wizard and the healing Cleric archetypes. There is no real distinction between the two, other than some extra skill limits and are essentially interchangeable. The spell list is unified where a Wizard could be the one that heals and banishes undead, rather than the Cleric, which may confuse new players.

While a somewhat brief pantheon of Gods is described, again there are no bonuses involved with which a Cleric-style player chooses to follow so it really doesn't matter. However, it does mean that if one wants to be a sword-wielding, armour wearing Wizard, they are free to do so. Indeed, one of the advanced skills for a Wizard is 'Brawling' which I found unexpected but amusing. I suspect the Author may also be a bit tired of overdone Class tropes.

CONCLUSION:

Solid Framework to Build Upon:

The system is tight, unified, and simple. While it lacks in detail in some areas, it shines in many others. Thankfully, the areas it crucially shines are the core rules and a solid foundation to build and customise a framework upon. It will take an adept and creative Gamemaster to get the most out of the system for a campaign but it it is flexible enough to simply serve as an entertaining one-shot night with minimal preparation needed to get playing.

The flexibility of the system allows one to graft on as much complexity and house-rules as one desires, without breaking the core rules. I think those that like tinkering with systems mechanics and enhancement designs will enjoy making this system in their own distinct style.

I feel Warlock! certainly deserves 5 stars for breaking from the OSR traditional options, delving into new areas of Old-School play, producing an enjoyable core system with great potential for expansion.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warlock!
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Creator Reply:
Hi Kevin, thanks for the review, much appreciated!
Warlock!
by Matthew G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/23/2020 07:03:35

I've always been interested in things that where non-D&D old school games. I looked at games like Troika! and found it trying to reinvent something that wasn't really broken( that's just me though.) and the setting/style wasn't for me. Warlock! however, was something special, and while not perfect, it is pretty close to a copy of old school gaming.

with that said, I loved what I read so far, and I'm willing to run this game at some point for a group of friends as a one night dungeon crawl or a short campaign.

Good job here.

Edit: Fixed the error once Greg pointed it out about professions, that was my mistake and I corrected it. Once everything is edited and squared away, I will buy a P.O.D. version of this game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Thanks for the review! To clarify, you don't roll a d66, you roll four d6 which gives you four selections (one from each of the d6 lists). You then choose the one you like. So there's a random element, but of the four randomly-generated careers, you get to pick the one you fancy. I hope that makes sense!
Warlock!
by Andrew M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/19/2020 17:54:04

Obvious from the most cursory reading:

  • A solid, elegant, and easily hacked skill-based game written with clarity by Greg Saunders and illustrated very well by Mustafa Bekir, Denis McCarthy, JM Woiak and Heather Shinn.
  • Rock-solid layout with clean lines, ample whitespace and an excellent choice of font (some species of the typewriter font Letter Gothic). Well done by designer Paul Bourne.

Great work. This game is based on several of the more ancient games popular in Britain in Roman times or something. The only knowledge of FF or WHFRP I come to this with is that I own and have read Zweihander, and I am itching to play this. Right now my friend is running a game using a system we're not too crazy about and I've been recruited to choose the new system. I'll likely be choosing Warlock.

The single resolution mechanic, the Skill Roll, is simple. The Skill Roll is executed by adding your rating in Skill X to a d20 roll and try to match or beat the number 20.

What gives a lot of flavor to this simple mechanic is the Career system, with which many will be familiar. There are 32 Skills which will initially range from 4 to 6, whatever way you choose. After that, you choose a Career, which choice dictates the skills package you have, and thus which skills, and their maximum value, you can increase during the Career. And a design bit I love is that the Career itself is a skill, with a rating of the average of all the skills under its rubric. So if I am a Soldier, and I have ratings of Command 8, Bow 6, Dodge 10, Large Blade 8 and Polearm 6, that's 8+6+10+8+6 = 38/5 = 7.6 or 8, for a Soldier skill of 8. What's that good for? Well that's for when your Skilly skills don't exactly apply but you think for example "I'm a Soldier, I should be able to judge the worth of this unit tactic" or whatever. If it's important and another skill doesn't cover the act, and most importantly if the GM agrees, your "appraise tactic" skill is 8.

It's hard to describe, I guess, why this game balances (on a read, at least) so well on the simplicity - challenge axis. For those of us who tend to more simple frameworks upon which to erect our game stories, this is just plain good simple design, both in the game and in the book. Still too many typos in it for me to buy the hardcover just yet, but whatevs. 5 Stars, easily.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warlock!
by Chad K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/19/2020 17:35:15

Really fun, evocative game. Rules light- 2 stats - Luck & Stamina, and then Skills. Flavors of Warhammer, Fighting Fantasy and "choose your path" adventure books. Different bits in the character creation process really spark the imagination with d6 lists of " What you have seen" and " Who is after you" along with others. Wizards Apprentice (Magic-user), Initiate (Cleric) and many other flavors of the "Thief" (Beggar, Footpad, others) and "Fighter"(Mercenary, Militiaman, more) types. Open to hacking. I would add basic firearms and give more style to Wizard/Priestly magic and some other small twists. But this is a great game to add your own house rules to. Five stars from me.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Warlock!
by Sean W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/19/2020 01:46:24

Well done Greg, it’s not just a well-blended greatest hits of British gaming rules (AFF stats, WFRP careers), it’s that you've got a simple but sound task resolution system and lots of neat ideas throughout (like the initiative system, the background flavour for the careers), written with an appropriate and appealing tone. Also, great cover, good choice of interior art, fonts etc. Really fits with the old school British gaming aesthetic.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Thanks for the review Sean, much appreciated!
Warlock!
by Nick K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/18/2020 11:10:51

Warlock! was a practical insta-buy for me. The name and the subtitle (inspired by british tabletop roleplaying) drew my attention and the price was really low. At worst I would be bying the creator a beer. At best... Well this is actually what happened.

Warlock! is a love letter to both warhammer fantasy and the fighting fantasy playbooks. My love for fighting fantasy is great, my only concern being the clunky damage dice and the fact that skills are increased without any thematic consistency. Warlock! fixes both issues. Damage is based on regular expressions as in most rpg (1d6, 1d6+1, 2d6 etc) and advancement is based on careers, which the player is supposed to actually change over the course of his adventures.

Furthermore, every career has interesting bits of information for the character which provides hooks for a more sandboxy campaign and also vaguely outlines an implied setting which has my attention.

The only disadvantage in the system lies in the way it handles shield. Personally I would advice everyone to use the rule from Dragon Warriors (another lovely British rpg) On a roll of 6 on a d6 the attack is ignored.

I rate the game 5/5 and encourage everyone to purchase, hoping that the creator provides further support for it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Thanks for the review! Yep, one of the things I tried to do with Warlock was make it easy to hack, so if the Dragon Warriors (great game) shields rule works for you, go for it!
Warlock!
by Ilias L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/18/2020 09:07:58

AMAZING work, as usual, from Greg Saunders. I don't know why I came to this with so few expectations. I have enjoyed immensely every one of his books so far. This might prove to be one of my go-to systems, especially for medieval stuff.

A nice amalgam of ideas and systems from AFF, WHFRP, and others that seems to solve most problems of the old systems. This looks like it will run like hell.

Highly recommended.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Thanks for the review, much obliged!
Golgotha - Engaging Player Characters
by Jim C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/15/2020 22:49:36

Advice here should be reasonably familiar, but well put together. New specialties look useful for each class to make an important contribution to a scenario.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Golgotha - Engaging Player Characters
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Golgotha
by Gregory H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/02/2019 10:53:16

When I had originally found out about this game through kickstarter, I had gotten through enough of the explanation to read 'based on d20'..., then I checked out. But one thing haunted me and caused an itch in my mind. It's the concept of a sci-fi dungeon crawler. I had been party to the whole dungeon crawl routine before, but in sci-fi? Sci-fi for me conjures the image of space operas, so needless to say, I was intrigued. So I figured I would hook myself up with it to see where it was going to go and just hack it into a more useful system. Receiving the game though had exceeded my expectations.

The game itself shares only a passing glance at the d20 system. You have 4 classes that share the whole fighter, bard, thief, and mage templates. You have the standard stats one would expect from a d20 system. It does use a d20. Then the game goes completely off the rails from there and does its own thing. The system is a deceptively simple system. Very easy to build characters, super easy system to learn and run through, easy equipment and skills/talents system. But it is in that ease that, in my opinion, its strength lies. There isn't a lot to learn and keep track of, so you can devote more time to your characters, the world, and actually build a story arc around these simple 'dungeon runs' that might even rival a space opera if you want to. The simplicity of the system allows complex tasks to be handled easily and and quickly without having to resort to going back into a book,thereby putting you back into the action before you know it.

The world and mythos you are dealing with in this universe is painted in broad enough strokes to give you the information you require for what is going on behind the scenes, while not stifling creative juices. It isn't so codified into concrete that I couldn't imagine how I could tweak and/or morph the universe to my own ends. You have enough data about how everything around the players work, and can build your own things from around what they gave you.

All around, I would suggest this simple offering. Don't let the simplicity fool you though. Take it for a test drive for something different, and see if it is something you would want to build on from there. As jaded as I am, I am impressed with this offering to the role-playing gods.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Golgotha
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Esoterica
by Konstantin R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/26/2018 16:47:50

I was a kickstarter backer and i am more than happy with the outcome of this project. The description of the world and the way magic works is great and fills my head with ideas for plots and adventures. The system sounds interesting and should work well from reading, but i have to admit i mainly use it as a supplement for other contemporary horror games. The first used influences were received well by my group. The artwork is stunning, and therefore the PDF version is fine, but the hardcover is a work of art. Strongly recommended.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Esoterica
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Summerland Second Edition
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/03/2018 17:44:14

I really love the setting and concepts in this game. You get a bit of that, "what the heck is going on" feeling that a person in a post apocalypic setting would get, especially one that seems to have happened not too long ago in the lifetime of everyone except very young children.

The vehicle rules take up several pages, but don't seem like a good fit. Trees are everywhere and have broken up roads, runways, etc. However, example vehicles include sports cars and fighter jets as well as rules for vehicle chases. The setting material makes me think you might get a Jeep through, but a motorcycle (dirt bike type) would probably be the best choice for motorized vehicle... if you even have fuel. Aircraft rules could be left out altogether as well as chase, ramming, and vehicle mounted weapon rules. I don't get the Mad Max road warrior vibe from the rest of the setting. I dare say the vehicle rules could probably be left out altogether.

The game tries to deemphasize gear, but a little more detail on common gear, what communities value, etc, would be useful.

Overall a really interesting game. Even if you don't want to use the system, this would be really easy to convert to another system and use the setting ideas.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Summerland Second Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Summerland Second Edition
by Charles D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/25/2018 20:29:09

Full review: Summerland Second Edition review

Overnight a vast forest sprang up ancient and full grown. It devastated the works of man. Foreboding and somehow alive, the Sea of Leaves is a wild place permeated by the Call, a siren-song that lures the majority of humans into the woods never to return. Survivors know that tight human connections strongly binding communities together provides resistance to the Call. A small number of people, survivors of terrible trauma, are able to resist the Call to journey between settlements and enter the ruined cities. You are one of these damaged people. You are a Drifter.

Drifters have a Trauma scale, numbers of d6s that describes how the event in their past affects the character’s relationship with other people. The aim of the game is to reduce the value to zero, whereupon the character becomes acceptable into what remains of human society. A Stress scale records how close a character is to losing control. Drifters must face their Trauma to reduce it but suffer Stress while doing so. This Stress requires rest in a settlement to heal and that settlement will then require the Drifters to perform a needed task for them in the forest, starting the cycle anew.

Summerland Second Edition is a comprehensive, well put together, beautiful RPG with all the resources needed for players and GMs to explore their own version of the Sea of Leaves. Summerland is about survival and horror but also hope and redemption. Drifters yearn to be welcomed into a community, but they must risk everything in the Sea of Leaves to redeem themselves and cure the wounds of their past. The question for players is how much are you willing to risk to make this happen?



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Exilium Core Rules
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/26/2017 13:34:58

In einer düsteren Science-Fiction-Welt werdet ihr aus dem Paradies geworfen und erwacht in einem fremden Körper. Eure Erinnerung ist bruchstückhaft, doch eines ist klar: Ihr wollt zurück nach Elysium. Kommt mit in die Flame Worlds und findet heraus, ob euch das gelingt.

In Exilium erwarten die Spieler keine Helden mit hehren Zielen und Weltrettungskomplex. Die Verstoßenen wollen lediglich nach Hause. Dafür müssen sie dem „Envoy“ dienen und für ihre Verbrechen büßen.

Die Spielwelt

Die Spielwelt basiert auf dem Rollenspiel In Flames von Cubicle 7. Sie wurde überarbeitet und Exilium beinhaltet sowohl In Flames, als auch die Ergänzungsbände Uplifts und Chimera.

Der Ort des Geschehens ist ein Zwillingssternsystem namens „The Flame System“ und besteht aus fünf Planeten, die um den kleineren der beiden Sterne kreisen. Des Weiteren gibt es vier Monde um den Planeten „Steel“ und die „Splinter Moons“, auf denen sich die Piraten verkriechen. Die Erinnerung an die ersten Siedler von der alten Erde ist vage, lückenhaft und von geringem Interesse für die Bewohner der „Flame Worlds“. Die Bevölkerung der Planeten besteht aus genetisch veränderten Menschen, Tieren, die ebenfalls durch genetische Modifikation vermenschlicht wurden („Uplifts“) und Künstlichen Intelligenzen („Puppets“).

Parallel dazu existiert eine nicht-physische Welt namens Elysium, in der die Numina leben. Die Numina träumen sich in ein Lebewesen der Flame World und erleben, ohne dessen Wissen, alles mit, was der „Host“ erlebt. Das dient ihrer Erholung und ihrem Vergnügen, soll aber auch böse Einflüsse fernhalten, indem Gelüsten wie Gier und Neid in der materiellen Welt nachgegangen werden kann, wodurch Elysium davon befreit bleibt. Einige werden süchtig, übertreiben es und gefährden bzw. destabilisieren die Flame World – die „Shadows“. Der Envoy, eine Art Führer für die Numina in der materiellen Welt, ist dafür verantwortlich, die Flame World zu sichern und das Träumen zu gewährleisten. Hierfür bedient er sich der „Exiles“, deren Rollen die Spieler übernehmen. Die Exiles sind Numina, die ein Verbrechen in Elysium begangen haben und dafür in die Flame World verbannt wurden – gefangen in Hosts. Der Ausweg aus dem Gefängnis ist die Jagd auf Shadows. Um befreit zu werden, muss ein Shadow eine starke Stresssituation erfahren, die direkt mit seinem Host zusammenhängt. Ein gewalttätiger Host muss vielleicht getötet werden, bei einem Mechaniker muss eventuell die Maschine zerstört werden, die er so obsessiv gebaut hat.

Die Spielwelt ist vielfältig und umfangreich beschrieben. Es gibt flüssige Atmosphären, Null-Schwerkraft-Gebiete, kleine, große, kalte und heiße Orte. Jeder Planet hat eine eigene Geschichte, Flora, Fauna sowie technologische Besonderheiten und besondere zivile Begebenheiten. Das politische Gesamtgefüge wird genauso beschrieben, wie dessen Zusammensetzung. So gibt es einzelne Regierungen, die sich übergreifend von einer Institution namens „Fire Council“ vertreten lassen, deren Hauptsitz die Raumstation „Ember“ ist. Auch die militärischen Kräfte sowie die technologischen Errungenschaften sind aufgerührt, differenziert und erklärt. Alles in allem nimmt die Spielweltbeschreibung den größten Teil des Regelwerkes ein und liefert genügen Material, um die Welt lebendig und vielgestaltig wahrnehmen und bespielen zu können.

Negativ fällt auf, dass durch die Beschreibung vieler einzelner Aspekte, der große Zusammenhang verloren geht. Während der Lektüre verliert man sich zunehmend in Details und an einigen Stellen fehlt Crunch, um die Beschreibung im Spielverlauf gut umsetzen zu können. Hier ist ein erfahrener Spielleiter gefragt. Außerdem muss man feststellen, dass während einige Informationen oft wiederholt werden, es an anderen Stellen nur wenige gibt. Ein Beispiel dafür ist das Fehlen von Städtenamen auf einigen Planeten.

Die Regeln

Die Regeln basieren auf dem Open D6 System von West End Games. Früh im Regelwerk wird darauf hingewiesen, dass ein höherer Detailgrad der Spielmechanik erreicht würde, wenn man sich das Open D6 Space-Regelwerk ansähe. Das ist verwirrend und die 145 zusätzlichen Seiten sind, auch wenn sie gratis sind, nicht unbedingt hilfreich.

Es fällt schnell auf, dass die Anordnung der Regelerklärungen nicht ganz durchdacht ist. Viel zu oft finden sich Verweise auf spätere Stellen, alle ohne genaue Seitenangaben, und insgesamt wirkt vieles recht vage. Die Empfehlung, nur zu würfeln, wenn Erfolg und Misserfolg des Wurfes eine signifikante Änderung der Situation bewirken, was auf einen eher erzählorientierten Stil hinweist, hilft sicherlich dem einen oder anderen Spieler. Dafür spricht auch, dass Zeit sehr variabel gehandhabt wird.

Zum Spielen benötigt man lediglich sechsseitige Würfel, davon am besten einen in einer anderen Farbe. Alle Proben werden mit diesen gewürfelt. Der andersfarbige oder separat gewürfelte Würfel ist ein so genannter „Wild Dice“, der bei einer Sechs weiter gewürfelt werden darf. Alle Augen werden zusammengerechnet und mit den „Pips“, den feststehenden Werten des Attributes oder der Fähigkeit addiert. Daraus ergibt sich das Würfelergebnis, das mit dem Schwellenwert verglichen wird. Dieser liegt zwischen fünf (sehr leicht) und 30 (sehr schwer).

Es gibt zwei Arten von Würfelwürfen: „Standard Tasks“ sind Handlungen, die gegen Dinge gerichtet sind oder bei denen keine Gegenwehr zu erwarten ist. Ein Schloss knacken oder einen unaufmerksamen Gegner überraschend mit dem Knüppel K.O. schlagen können hier als Beispiele dienen. Der Spieler beschreibt dabei seine Absicht und der Spielleiter legt dafür eine Schwierigkeit zwischen sehr leicht und sehr schwer fest. Außerdem werden die Konsequenzen für einen Misserfolg benannt. Möchte der Spieler dann trotzdem handeln, wird gewürfelt.

Ein Beispiel: Der Straßenjunge möchte eine schlafende Wache bestehlen und der Spieler beschreibt, wie er hinschleichen und den Schlüssel aus der Tasche fischen möchte. Dafür verlangt der Spielleiter Proben auf „Stealth“ und „Pickpockets“ und teilt dem Spieler mit, dass bei einem Scheitern, die Wache geweckt wird und Alarm schlägt. Das Hinschleichen ist sehr einfach, weil die Wache schläft, womit der Mindestwurf bei fünf liegt. Da der Straßenjunge auf seinem Charakterblatt einen Stealth-Wert von drei Würfeln und zwei Pips hat, schafft er diese Probe in jedem Fall, weswegen auf den Wurf verzichtet wird. Der Schlüssel ist aber schwer und klimpert, außerdem ist er an dem Gürtel der Wache befestigt. Der Mindestwurf hierfür wird mit 25 als schwere Probe festgelegt. Der Spieler stimmt zu und würfelt. Für die Pickpockets-Probe hat er fünf Würfel zur Verfügung. Er würfelt insgesamt 21 Augen, wobei der Wild Dice eine Sechs zeigt und noch einmal gewürfelt werden darf. Beim zweiten Wurf zeigt er eine fünf. Insgesamt erreicht der Straßenjunge damit eine 26 und der Spieler darf nun beschreiben, wie sein Charakter das Kunststück fertigbringt, den Schlüssel zu entwenden. Wäre der Straßenjunge gescheitert, hätte der Spielleiter die negativen Konsequenzen geschildert.

„Resisted Tasks“ funktionieren prinzipiell genauso wie Standard Tasks und kommen immer dann zum Einsatz, wenn zwei gegensätzliche Aktionen stattfinden. Das kann eine Diskussion sein, ein Angriff, oder auch ein Wettbewerb im Kampftrinken. Der Schwierigkeitsgrad der Probe hängt hier vom Wurf des Verteidigers oder der „Static Defense“ ab, die während der Charaktererstellung berechnet wird.

Das Regelwerk befasst sich auch mit Mehrfachaktionen, verschiedenen Schwerkraft- und Atmosphärenzuständen, sowie Heilung und Fahrzeugherstellung. Sogar Größenunterschiede werden behandelt. So erhalten größere Wesen und Objekte einen Bonus auf ihren verursachten Schaden und ihre Widerstandskraft, wohingegen kleinere Ziele ihre Gegner besser treffen und ihnen leichter ausweichen können.

Das Belohnungssystem läuft über „Characterpoints“, von denen pro Auftrag drei bis sieben erhalten und die zur Weiterentwicklung des Charakters ausgegeben werden können. Zusätzlich verteilt der Envoy manchmal schwarze Pillen, die einen Punkt auf der „Dislocation Scale“ wiederherstellen, die ein Indikator für die Verbindung zwischen Numina und Host ist. Sollte diese Skala null erreichen, bedeutet das den Tod für den Numina. Eine besondere Belohnung sind die langsam zurückkehrenden Erinnerungen an Elysium. Das große Ziel, die Senkung der „Guilt Scale“ und damit der Weg zurück in die Heimat, erreicht man darüber, dass man einen anderen Numina in seinen Körper einlädt. Das kann die Dislocation Scale senken und den Tod des Charakters herbeiführen, aber auch die Schuld verringert sich. Kein Sieg ohne Risiko...

Charaktererschaffung

Charaktere werden in sechs Schritten erstellt, eine Zufallserstellung durch Würfeln gibt es nicht. Man beginnt mit einem grundsätzlichen Charakterkonzept inklusive Namen, Vorlieben und Vergangenheit. Daraufhin werden die vier Attribute („Might“, „Agility“, „Wit“ und „Charm“) mit einem Wert von einem bis fünf Würfeln versehen. Die Würfel werden im Folgenden mit „D“ für „Dice“ abgekürzt. Insgesamt stehen dafür zehn Würfel zur Verfügung. Wie oben beschrieben, können auch Werte mit Pips gewählt werden, wobei ein Würfel drei Pips ergibt. Uplifts können, durch ihre besonderen physischen oder mentalen Eigenschaften, andere Limits für gewisse Attribute haben. Ein Jakkar zum Beispiel hat einen Might-Wert zwischen 4D und 7D, kann aber maximal eine Agility von 3D+2 erhalten.

Im dritten Schritt verteilt man die „Skills“ auf die gleiche Weise, wofür man 7D zur Verfügung hat und maximal 2D auf einen Skill verteilt werden dürfen. Das wirkt anfangs viel, doch wird der 7D-Pool auch für Spezialisierungen und „Perks“ verwendet. Für Spezialisierungen darf man 1D gegen drei Spezialisierungswürfel tauschen. Diese zählen nicht zu den maximalen 2D pro Skill. Die Spezialisierungen können nicht für Kampftalente gewählt werden und wie spezifisch sie sein müssen, ist nur grob beschrieben. Perks sind Vorteile, die ein bis zwei Würfel kosten und dem Charakter ein besonderes Gedächtnis oder ein Quäntchen Glück bescheren. Im Gegensatz zu den Perks sind die „Complications“ gratis, bringen aber signifikante Nachteile. Als Gegenstück zu den Perks stammt das Alter Ego dann vielleicht aus der Unterschicht oder folgt einem „Personal Code“. Abgesehen davon, dass es den Charakter lebendiger erscheinen lässt, wenn er Fehler hat, erhält man für jedes Mal, wenn der Nachteil zum Tragen kommt, einen Character Point. Zuletzt werden in diesem Schritt statische Werte errechnet: „Block“, „Dodge“, „Parry“ und „Soak“. Soak wird später noch einmal überarbeitet, weil der Panzerungswert dazugerechnet wird und die Ausrüstung erst später folgt.

Schritt vier ist interessant, weil man sich bei diesem das erste Mal richtig in die Welt hineinversetzt. Es wird der erste Teil des Verbrechens bestimmt, das einen zum Exile gemacht hat. Dieser Anfang à la „Ich stahl ...“ oder „Ich tötete...“ wird im Laufe der Spielgeschichte zum vollständigen Satz.

Danach befasst man sich mit der Ausrüstung. Die ziemlich frei gehaltenen Richtlinien geben wenig vor. Man wählt also aus, was zum Charakter passt und der Spielleiter absegnet.

Den Abschluss bildet die Bestimmung der Werte für die beiden Scales und die Verbesserung mit „Hacks“ und „Loci“. Hacks sind DNA-Veränderungen, mit denen man Attribute steigern oder Perks erhalten kann. Implantierte Computer, die Loci, verbessern einzelne Skills.

All das trägt man fein säuberlich auf dem durchaus überschaubaren Charakterbogen ein, auf dem es übrigens weder Lebenspunkte noch eine anders geartete Verwundungsskala gibt.

Zwar versteht man das Konzept recht schnell, doch muss man unglaublich viel hin- und herspringen, um selbst einen einfachen Charakter zu erstellen. Puppets und Uplifts sind dann noch einmal eine ganze Ecke komplizierter.

Für einen menschlichen Charakter braucht man zu Beginn also unnötig lange und erlebt ein Déjà-vu, wenn man sich das erste Mal an einer Puppet oder einem Uplift versucht. Über 30 Minuten zu Beginn, für eine wirklich überschaubare Anzahl an Möglichkeiten, können mit etwas Übung und Kenntnis des Systems jedoch auf wenige Minuten gesenkt werden.

Das Powerlevel der Charaktere variiert unglaublich stark. Das liegt zum einen an den unterschiedlichen Voraussetzungen der Völker, vor allem der Uplifts, zum anderen an der völlig frei wählbaren Verteilung von Ausrüstung.

Spielbarkeit aus Spielleitersicht

Als Spielleiter hat man in Exilium viele Freiheiten. Das ist Segen und Fluch zugleich. Ein Segen ist es, weil man die Welt an die Gruppe anpassen und „aus der Hüfte schießen“ kann. Zum Fluch wird es dann, wenn das Regelwerk keine Anhaltspunkte für wichtige Situationen des Spielgeschehens gibt. Tabellen und Werte sind unübersichtlich verteilt und nicht immer vollständig. Anfänger dürften sich hier überfordert fühlen, doch ein erfahrener Spielleiter kann das als reizvoll empfinden und durchaus Spaß daran haben.

Spielbarkeit aus Spielersicht

Die Spieler jeder Runde beschreiben Elysium vor dem ersten Spielabend gemeinsam. Jeder trägt einen Aspekt dazu bei. Dadurch, und durch ihr Verbrechen, gestalten sie einen wichtigen Teil des Spielhintergrundes mit. So sind sie eingebunden und haben einen schnellen Bezug dazu. Die Regeln sind für Spieler leicht umsetzbar und sehr einfach, wodurch auch Spieleinsteiger schnell Freude am System entwickeln. Würfelwürfe sind flott gemacht und verschiedenartig einsetzbar, dabei aber nicht zu häufig. Durch Puppets, Uplifts und vor allem die, zur Eigeninitiative ermutigende, Charaktererstellung, können ganz unterschiedliche Charakterkonzepte verwirklicht werden. Nur die Grundmotivation aller ist immer dieselbe, nämlich der Wunsch nach Elysium zurückzukehren.

Spielbericht

Das System wurde mit einem One-Shot getestet. Die Gruppe bestand aus fünf Charakteren, die jeweils eine Funktion erfüllten. Der kriegerische Jakkar spielte den Kugelfang, ein menschlicher Soldat den Taktiker. Ein Straßenjunge war das soziale Chamäleon und die Pilotin wurde von einem medizinisch gebildeten Roboter unterstützt. Gemeinsam wurde Elysium beschrieben und nach einer kurzen Einführung in die Flame World hatte der Envoy auch schon einen Auftrag parat: Eine Piratengruppe würde von einem Shadow geführt, welcher ausgeschaltet werden sollte. Die Gruppe hat sich sehr schnell eingefühlt. Während der Straßenjunge seine kriminellen Kontakte aktivierte und die anderen sich Karten und Ausrüstung besorgten, waren nur wenige Würfelwürfe nötig. Die Spieler sammelten Informationen, verfolgten Spuren, handelten sich ungewollt Ärger ein und erpressten den Standort der geheimen Basis. Diese Basis infiltrierten sie dann mehr oder weniger geschickt. Wenige tote Feinde später hatten sie den Shadow aufgetan und stellten fest, dass ein Gegner mit viel Soak auch viel Arbeit bedeutet. Bis zu diesem Zeitpunkt hatten alle am Tisch unglaublich Spaß, viel mehr als erwartet. Durch eine kleine Improvisation konnte die beginnende Frustration, die durch den stark gepanzerten Gegner entstand, aber getilgt werden.

Das Fazit des langen und lustigen Spieltages war einstimmig: Die angenehme und simple Würfelmechanik ist ein großer Pluspunkt für das System. Die Schadensberechnung aber wirkt unausgereift und seltsam. Genauso fehlten den Spielern Kernfähigkeiten, allen voran Wahrnehmung. Besonders die sozialen Möglichkeiten des Spiels wurden aber hervorgetan.

Erscheinungsbild

Das Regelwerk wurde mit der deutlich erkennbaren Intention gestaltet, direkt und klar aufzutreten. Das ist ein Konzept, das durchaus aufgehen kann, in diesem Fall aber schiefgelaufen ist. Über viele Seiten hinweg wird man von Text erschlagen, die wenigen Tabellen sind nur manchmal hilfreich und teilweise sogar verwirrend. Das spärlich gesäte Artwork schwankt zwischen düsterer Science-Fiction und comicartigen Zeichnungen, trägt aber durchaus zur Atmosphäre bei. Auf dem simplen Charakterbogen fehlen Felder für die Verletzungszustände und einiges mehr. Immerhin ist ein Index vorhanden, der erstaunlich durchdacht daherkommt. Auf knapp unter 160 Seiten bekommt man zwar visuell nicht viel geboten, für den geringen Preis sollte man die Latte aber auch nicht zu hoch hängen.

Bonus/Downloadcontent

Ein Verweis auf das Open D6 System im Regelwerk ist vorhanden, insbesondere die D6 Space-Variante (DriveThruRPG) wird zur Erweiterung empfohlen.

Es gibt Charakterbögen zum download (DriveThruRPG) und einen kostenlosen Kurzüberblick für Spieler (DriveThruRPG).

Für je 1.29 USD können bereits drei Missionen im Sandboxstil erworben werden: Ruyang, the Shattered City (DriveThruRPG), HX11, Forward Observation Bunker (DriveThruRPG) und Blue Veil Union (DriveThruRPG).

Fazit

Exilium ist ein kurzes Regelwerk ohne Pomp und Gloria. Weder durch eine exklusive Gestaltung, noch durch extrem detailliert ausgearbeitete Regeln tut es sich hervor. Doch wird eine schöne, abwechslungsreiche Science-Fiction-Spielwelt beschrieben, die in den richtigen Händen begeistern kann. Das Regelsystem hat zwar seine Lücken, lässt sich aber schnell begreifen und macht gerade durch die Einfachheit unglaublich viel Spaß. Für wenig Geld bekommt man ein Grundlagenwerk, nicht mehr und nicht weniger, das mehr Spaß macht, als man anfangs denkt.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Exilium Core Rules
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Exilium Core Rules
by Jerry G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/16/2017 11:28:59

Exilium is a great game with a very cool concept backing it. What makes this game stand out, and what I appreciate about it, is the singular perspective and cool concepts Exilium manages to cram in so few pages. Greg Saunders has a gift I admire and wish I had.

Most D6 games follow a pack. They simply want to graft the system onto their favorite homebrew D&D or sci-fi (Star Wars) game and never dive any deeper into what the system should offer or what the game world content can highlight. Greg Saunders managed to do both in a package that’s very well presented.

well done



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Exilium Core Rules
by Patrick H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/17/2017 22:12:12

I'll be honest, I don't even remember backing this Kickstarter, but I am so glad that I did. This is like Nephilim in space. Or you could run a government campaign and it would be like Kult in space. Either way, it's a glorious combination of tropes. It's written for D6, which is a perfectly functional system, or you can convert it into just about anything, because the concepts that make it so brilliant aren't system-dependent at all. Highly recommended.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Displaying 1 to 15 (of 21 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates