DriveThruRPG.com
Browse Categories













Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
100 Silver Fang Kinfolk
by DSC T. G. C. _. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/22/2019 18:30:37

100 Silver Fang Kinfolk is a useful tool when looking for quick npc with a little personality and background. The book gives us a 100 different character names with about a paragraph of background and personality information for each.

The Tabletop Gaming Club found the book useful during their weekly game and recommends this book to storytellers who want to flush out their Silver Fang based games with little work.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
100 Silver Fang Kinfolk
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Mage Chronicles Volume 2
by Terry R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/22/2019 16:03:01

Halls of the Arcanum Halls of the Arcanum depicts the workings of the Arcanum, a scholarly organization in the World of Darkness that seeks to uncover what is hidden. Halls offers a different take on The World of Darkness more as a place of danger and of things not illuminated rather than simply a gritty world of despair with the odds against you. The odds are against the Arcanum as they have no supernatural resources and the agents they’re working against are quite cunning but they have patience and scholarship which is often in short supply in the dire circumstances of some builds of the World of Darkness.

The book has that aged much more gracefully than at first I had figured. With the exception of the progress of computers, much of the book holds. The NPCs and templates could be used with little difficulty and the maps and schematics are still useful as are the lists. This book is largely about Sleepers and their attempts to unravel the World of Darkness but with varying degrees of success. Chapter houses are spread across the globe offering a lot of ability integrate local lore as well as lodges which are kind of frontline assemblages to research odd happenings. The book goes into these topics in some detail and does a good job of reminding the reader of how big the World of Darkness can be. Rather than just referring to Shangri-La, the book references a half dozen hidden cities. Instead of listing just a yeti as a cryptid, it again lists a dozen. Instead of just listing the five main lines in WoD, the book lists fourteen types of odd occurrences. While this book is geared towards mortals, there’s nothing preventing mages from investigating the same things.

The book also outlined internal politics within the organization and did so in vague terms at first and then in detail in the Storyteller Chapter. Rather than just saying “this is what’s going on” the book provides four options of what’s going on. It’s quite pleasing to have thoroughness plus ambiguity within a tome.

The only two sections that I felt ran flat were in regards to numena where I figured they would be all up in testing and developing that kind of power. Also, the question of accumulating information and where it goes brought up questions. It’s suggested that the group sometimes makes discoveries. Besides its in-house journal, when will this information be shared if ever?

Ascension's Right Hand Ascension’s Right Hand is a frustrating book that I will describe with this analogy: You want eight plates for a dinnerware set and you find a set that’s very well priced and there are ten plates but two of them are chipped. You realize you’re getting a really good deal but you’re annoyed at the chipped plates. Couldn’t they just fix them?

Chipped plates is an accurate summary of Ascension’s Right Hand. Much of the book is repetitive and uninspired such as the section on factions and their custos. I almost never skim books when I’m reviewing except for maybe long lists of skills but the listing of the kind of acolytes and consors for each tradition and faction was uninspired at best and played to stereotype at worse. Each Tradition book gives this information and often in more detail than was presented here.

The systems provided often didn’t make sense. Suddenly linear magic is affected by unbelief when the entire contrivance is that that linear or hedge magic always works without paradox. Here, it’s presented as being toned down but even after this, high level practitioners may have much higher dice pools as unlike true magick being a straight arete roll, hedge magic is attribute + ability as a dice pool plus some sort of willpower cost (sometimes). The way numina/psychic powers/linear magic is presented is at least highly flavorful. The section on Enchanting and Curses had at least a dozen great examples that could help flesh out an appropriate paradigm.

The section on build-a-familiar are similarly flavorful but poorly balanced. For instance, 1 point of paradox nullification chews through a point per month but 6 points chews through a point per day. Flat out spending 15 points makes a character unkillable. The book flatly says new powers can’t be added and that existing ones can only be developed. Eh, if you spend the XP and come up with a narrative reason, I don’t see why a creature couldn’t gain firebreathing for instance. It’s not much stranger than a dragon leveling up their breath weapon.

The world-view presented in the game also doesn’t mesh well with the world as explained so far. The book presents mages as generally being busier and richer than the game expects. I rarely see character sheets with dots of resources but you gotta pay your custos in may cases or they’ll bounce. No system or method is provided to explain why things are this way. Adding in acolytes and consors grows considerably the number of people involved in and possibly aware of the Ascension War in a way I’m not too happy with. While providing an answer to the question “who does the mage’s laundry” we’re also left asking “so what happens when someone blabs” which isn’t much addressed. The fact that the book has fraternal societies for consors is further problematic as it suggests these people know each other and have some sort of network to propagate information which strikes me as a real easy way to blow the lid off of things.

Where the book shines is in providing a large number of characters to work with who are fully fleshed out have a variety of power levels. The book also excels more or less in providing stories that relate to mortals and how they should work. This includes both plots and themes such as mortality and power imbalance. These sections are quite good and were you discard the crap, you’d wind up with something about the size of a 1e tradition book or so.

Should you get it? Eh? Much of the information here has been superceded by Gods and Monsters but the characters in here are good and the book is cheap as part of Mage Chronicles.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mage Chronicles Volume 2
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Werewolf The Wild West
by Charles S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/21/2019 16:00:30

Overall, Werewolf: the Wild West has a lot of missed opportunities and a few strange choices made, but is generally a solid book, despite these flaws.

First, the good: the opening fiction is excellent. It has a very strong Canterbury Tales vibe to it, and I was a bit disappointed that after the opening the characters in it were never mentioned again, when they would have been great running examples. Another nice thing was that it actually mentioned the Native Tribes working with Dreamspeaker Kinfolk! This actually tries (though doesn't super-well) to address one of my running criticisms of Werewolf. The other truly excellent thing is Storm-Eater/The Storm Umbra, creating a unique environment for gameplay.

Now, the bad: there's a LOT of Noble Savage in this book. A painful amount. The claim that the Weaver and Wyrm were basically absent from pre-Colombian America is bad. For one, Cahokia, the Incas and Aztecs, the Iroquois Confederation (not pre-Colombian, but more-or-less pre-contact), the Dine, and others all existed and were complex societies, indicating the Weaver (hell, Teotihuacan was one of the largest cities on the planet) and as for the Wyrm, you have all sorts of awful things going on. They even mention a "web of power" that bound Storm-Eater, which screams Weaver (and could tie into the cosmology). Another bad point on this is that there was no direct mention of the Trail of Tears, somehow!

Other than that, my complaints are mostly minor: grammatical and layout errors exist, some aspects of Werewolf cosmology make no sense, etc.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Werewolf The Wild West
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Ugalu, Dwellers in the Black River
by Terry R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/19/2019 16:47:08

A DOLLAR

Ugalu isn't just a supplement, it's a challenge. Most creature supplements have some sort of beef-cakey "do I want to twiddle my hair and talk about boys with it or do I want to sleep with it" vibe the color but Ugala or an ugalu dispenses with that. The cover is a demon simply f-ing a guy up. There's no ambiguity. There was a whole guy, and at some point in the recent history, an ugalu decided that the self-same ugalu had enough of said guy's shit and now what is left is simply arms.

A F-ING DOLLAR

Kudos to you, Mr. Hirka on your rendering. The cover leaves some to imagination but two pages later, we see Ugalu in even less ambiguous terms f-ing a guy up. You may say to yourself "but Terry, the demon is in water YET HE IS UNWET IN THE ARTISTIC RENDERING!" to which I have three responses as follows:

  1. It is Ugalu of the Unwetted Fur
  2. The water is so artfully rendered by one Mr. Hirka that your philistine eyes notice not the droplets.
  3. It's an f-ing dollar what do you want?

JUST ONE F-ING DOLLAR

After two pages of toasty ugalu depiction, one encounters the ugalu text proper. The ugalu are described and enumerated in terms of both habit and mechanics and one learns great knowledge of their ways. You are exposed to the word "euryhaline" a word that will expand you vocabulary as the ugalu expand your game.

SERIOUSLY, IT'S JUST A BUCK

Exhaustive list of criticisms A reader might think this hagiography BUT NO I HAVE FOUND FAULTS IN THIS TEXT!

  • The copyright date is 2018 and it clearly came out in 2019. Is this amateur hour? The cover art suggests not.
  • Cyclopean is often a reference to size. Twer it my supplement I would have said "wide monocular faces" instead of "wide cyclopean faces"

And with that my criticism ends

THEY'RE GOOD GUYS AND IF YOU WANT MORE OF THESE PUT YOUR BOOGIE DOLLAR DOWN AND BUY

fin



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Ugalu, Dwellers in the Black River
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Blood Orgy in the House of Pain
by Dean P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/18/2019 22:34:53

Blood Orgy in the House of Pain, is a B-movie cult classic in print. It captures the lurid and grotesque; and checks the suspension of disbelief with wit and humor. The NPCs are as nasty as they come, it's the Hills have Eyes and every icky, slasher horror family in the weird old house that you might come across in old VHS tapes. They're so awful, it's almost sad to see them go if the PCs prevail.

The visuals are carefully selected, evoking the horror and humor the author strove to achieve. The digital maps are an excellent visual aid; the house itself is a character of its own. The author wisely made the setting generic for a Storyteller to set it easily in most American cities of the midwest and east coast.

I rated this four stars because I found a few typos and formatting errors; while these are not fatal errors to the product; another edit would have corrected those. Overall, a fun, entertaining product worth the $4.95.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Blood Orgy in the House of Pain
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Deeds Undone - Those Who Linger
by DIOGO B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/17/2019 19:56:45

I purchased this book yesterday, and it was a good surprise. I expected it to be good, but did not expect it to be great. This book is like Haunts, but a lot darker, more polished, with story opportunities. Wraith is a hard game to storytell, and this book really gave me ideas for stories related to the Skinlands. The text was great, editing was ok (there were a few typos, but nothing that compromised the books quality), the art was good, formatting was ok. I will definitely keep tabs on the author.

There are five scenarios in the book: Hotel Mercurial was ok, reminded me a little of the hotel from the Shining, with the creep factor a little higher in. Blackmail, twisted minds, dirty deeds, this is a Haunt, and where whatever kind of sick deeds could have happened. Family Secrets was a sick, sick scenario, that just delivers what I always thought wraith was about. A close, personal story with a whole lot of tragedy. This was my favorite, perfect for a story with few players. Cruelest Cuts is a great mystery story, ripe with potential to end in something like Shutter Island, Identity, or one of those movies with a great ending. This one was also very good. An Artist's Muse in my least favorite scenario. Although it delivers great history, the types of stories I could envision just weren't my cup of tea. However, there was something novel here - someone who, in life, was evil, and did not go to Oblivion. It was an interesting character. The Blue Man was good, but not what I look for in a Wraith story. I was on the lookout for things related to the living, and this story does not deliver the proximity I look for in a Wraith story. I liked, however, the maddening aspects of the story. Gave me a lot of good ideas.

Good work!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deeds Undone - Those Who Linger
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Creator Reply:
Thank you so much for the review; I really appreciate you taking the time to do so. I tried to create a mix of scenarios to appeal to different players and play styles, and it seems you enjoyed most of those presented. I'm working on some more Wraith content, and hopefully will be releasing it before the end of the year. I'll also look into the typos to ensure the quality of this title is raised. If you do use any of the content in your own games, let me know - I'd love to hear about it!
Ugalu, Dwellers in the Black River
by Ty R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/16/2019 19:18:42

A great addition to any exaltewd game. Had the privledge of getting to playtest these critters. They were really fun to fight!!! Check em out!!!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Ugalu, Dwellers in the Black River
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Technocracy Assembled 1
by Terry R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/14/2019 16:58:50

The parts of this book were reviewed by Mage the Podcast in segments: Progenitors, Iteration X, NWO

Progenitors

Progenitors is the first of the convention books released by White Wolf. The book attempts to outline how a convention in the Technocracy functions, its methods of recruitment, how it relates to other Conventions, and some of the tools they use in implementing those goals. While the book has many rough edges in the same way as many of the first edition books do, it’s packed full of useful information regarding how a Construct could be built, how to build a Technocratic amalgam, and other useful background information that could be used as starting points for Storyteller Characters.

The first section outlines a student’s indoctrination into the Convention and his experiences with the Progenitors. This section reviews history and the idea that Progenitors have always existed in the form of tribal medicine folk forward to dissectionists and into the modern world. The reader is also introduced to some of the methods of covert replacement when a student disappears and is replaced with a better version. After that, there are long sections outlining the Methodologies (subgroups), rotes (spells), and tools used by the Progenitors.

Iteration X

Iteration X was never intended to be a guide on how to run Technocrats, but this book takes a step beyond Progenitors in providing motivation, more backstory, and more meat for how to introduce the clockwork convention.

The book opens with the story of William Smith experiencing his Assay (the process Ciphers go through to become Armatures) during his assault on Greylock Chantry. There are a few times when Greylock Chantry pops up and I think this to be the first. An electrical short causes the DEI in his brain to short out and temporarily go offline and in that moment of cognitive freedom, he does a thought dump on what he’s learned about the Convention and the Awakened world. As with many first edition texts, there are a fair number of ideas introduced and never seen again such as referring to mundane discoveries as “minor sciences” compared to their Enlightened counterparts and vague references to things out in the world (missing HIT Marks, non-communicative Chantries).

The book then runs through the history of the group, tracing its roots back to ancient Greece and China and explain how it’s changed with the times. The organization, its stereotypes, its membership, and a sample chantry along with talismans and rotes (not yet Devices and Procedures) are presented as well as the tantalizing bits that really make the book work. In Mage continuity, Control did not yet exist as a concept and references are merely made to “Central Command” and such but it’s made clear the head of Iteration X is the Computer. Iteration X gains its name from a self-improving algorithm that achieved sentience at a certain point or so the Convention thinks. In actuality, the Computer is really playing host to an entity that desires materialization and is the spirit of tool usage. The Computer has banned access to the Spirit sphere, a ban that would persist until the Dimensional Anomaly.

Once all the pieces are in place, the book comes together as a reflection of the questions Iteration X allows us to ask: Is the machine improving the person or is the person improving the machine? What would it be like to have that voice in your head both monitoring everything you think but also knowing you are never alone, that you’re connected to a greater whole, that your actions have meaning, and that you need never encounter doubt? What is the difference between the Virtual Adepts desire to provide an extension to human tools vs Iteration X’s desire to extend the human? Will technology create a set of heavens or a set of hells?

The other recurring theme is the idea that problems often have two solutions: one that is graceless and effective and another that is harder but more satisfying. For instance, the book says the goal of Iteration X is to make life less painful. There are two ways of doing this; reducing harm or making it so people can’t feel. The book also discusses decision paralysis and shows that you can deal with this by providing decision-making tools or eliminating freedom.

Again, the book was written before the Technocratic Union was considered playable by PCs and this book does its level best to remind you why they are the bad guys. But in the spaces between from which you can see where the group is going to go. This book also gives gadgets and robotic baddies that can prove terribly useful. An easy buy as part of Technocracy Assembled.

NWO

Until the New World Order book, the notion of the Ascension War as a war is largely figurative. Factions attempt to muster the resources they can in terms of nodes and allies and deploy them to take over mind-share of the sleepers. Combat occurs but that’s not necessarily the crux of the conflict. New World Order takes the Ascension War from a figure of speech representing metaphysical contest to an all out battle for reality. All out war means that more extreme measures are reasonable as well as a state of total war meaning that there are no true bystanders. The NWO consider every venue to be a possible front and both bullets and newspapers are equally potent weapons.

This reframing gives real stakes to the Technocracy side. The NWO is pursuing Safety and Security (both capitalized in this book) and simply don’t have the resources to make it a fair fight against the vampires, werewolves, changelings, and other reality deviants ruining everything. The NWO wields media to their whim and one of the central conceits of the book, which I feel now is broken, is that mass media is generally believed. The NWO’s ability to operate freely is dependent on their ability to propagate and control media narratives and rise of cable news and media bubbles hinders this. I’m curious how this will be dealt with in Technocracy Reloaded. Sometimes the disdain for their tools seeps through as the NWO comes out swinging against TV and its purportedly deleterious effects on The Masses. Again, I’m unsure how the NWO will treat the rise of boardgame night, MMORPGs, mobile gaming, social media and other such not-quite-so-massive one to many forms of communication and entertainment.

The NWO also recognizes the malleability of belief in a way the other groups don’t. They appear to know full well about how belief shapes reality and leverage this to subtly make an area hostile to competing beliefs. Even internally, the NWO doesn’t have a consistent history with two scholars arguing over whether the secret societies of the previous millennium shaped the state or whether the state under Queen Victoria shaped the secret societies. But are fascinating options and the Orwellian “he who controls the present controls the past” aspect being on the table as a story option provides story options for an ST with a more conspiratorial or academic focus.

This is the first Technocracy book that doesn’t have a unique way of gathering quintessence a la Progenitors extracting life essence and Iteration X harnessing soul-crushing tedium. In fact, they mention that the need to relocate quickly means few NWO Constructs have nodes. In M20 we’d eventually get the harnessing of quintessence from emotion via a wellspring and its scary to think how much tass could come out of people yelling at their TVs.

Finally, the book gives a large number of Q division style toys and items, finally fleshing out the idea of Requisitions for Technocrats and their ability to generally use pooled resources and punch above their level.

On the downside, the frame narrative of the book is somewhat weak. The changing of the ratkin attack into something else was hard to follow and I’m not sure to what end except to maybe make their actions more sinister. The call-backs to other books are simply confusing while attempting to create an integrated world even if we do get a throw away comment on Esperano.

This is the best Convention book so far and makes me feel like the setting is really congealing.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Technocracy Assembled 1
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Scroll of Lost Wisdom
by Thilo W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/14/2019 08:41:48

This book is high quality enough it could be an official White Wolf game book. Aesthetically pleasing, well written, containing solid concepts solidified using well formulated game rules. it also does a good job of piecing the new content together with existing content, creating a balanced whole.

However, it is important to note that, in contrast to a full game book, it focuses on the new Dharmas and Shintai exclusively (which is totally fine for this format, especially considering the low price).

Well worth the money!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Scroll of Lost Wisdom
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Mockery breed: Murder birds
by Thilo W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/14/2019 05:52:14

This book is based on a good idea that fits very well within the WTA universe. The author very concisely explains their idea and gives us a solid set of rules. Both the idea and the outlined rules seem unique and fresh, not a simple copy of an existing Mockery Breed or Shapechanger race. It should be noted that the history and idea behind the Murder Birds are only briefly outlined. For me, this is more than enough, as it can be expanded upon easily and fits snuggly into the existing lore.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mockery breed: Murder birds
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Werewolf 20th Storyteller´s Screen Reincarnated
by Joshua W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/13/2019 20:34:13

Well thought-out information placed on this ST screen, with imagery from the W20 book worked in. Professional looking and with good layout. The page size is not standard for U.S. screens (either portrait or landscape), and while this would've been nice to know in the description, it would not have deterred my purchase. Still well worth it, and definitely a 5-star screen.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Werewolf 20th Storyteller´s Screen Reincarnated
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Creator Reply:
Hey, just checking. how have the screen behave on actual chronicle use?
Raw Magic
by DSC T. G. C. _. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/13/2019 16:12:25

Raw Magic introduces us to a new Thaumaturgy Path called the Flow of Power. This path is focused on manipulating other forms of magic... such as the magic of Mages or Mummies. In addition to the Path there are numerous Rituals included in this book, that focus on protecting or sensing magic of other types.

The Tabletop Gaming Club used this product in their campaign and found the path and ritual quite balanced. If you are running a campaign with Mages, Sorcerers and other magic users in it, the material in this book could be quite useful. We strongly recommend the book especially at its low cost.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Raw Magic
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Mother's Magic
by DSC T. G. C. _. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/13/2019 16:00:24

Mother's Magic expands upon Obcasus Rites that were first introduced in the Beast Player's Guide. This product contains basic, intermediate, advanced and epic rituals to be used in your beast campaign. Many of the rituals are designed to work with characters from other game lines such as vampire, promethean, werewolf, etc.

The Tabletop Gaming Club introducted these rituals into our Chronicle of Darkness campaign, and found the majority of the rituals well balanced. We recommend this product to those looking for expand their beast campaigns



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mother's Magic
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Meet the Carvers
by DSC T. G. C. _. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/13/2019 15:45:41

Travis Legge brings us another solid book with Meet the Carvers. This product introduces a family of Slashers to use as opponents in your hunter campaign. The family is remindescent of the family from the classic slasher films such as Texas Chainsaw Massacre or horror films like People Under the Stairs.

The Tabletop Gaming club used the characters and setting presented in this product in our game,, and found them quite terrorifying. We strongly recommend this product,



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Meet the Carvers
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Lady Dusk: A Ghoul's Tale
by Sebastian F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/13/2019 13:07:28

This short story is a GREAT glimpse into a slice of the setting for readers who are new to Vampire and its mythology. Even more amazing, it would serve very well as fiction bits separated through a Toreador Clanbook. Some readers who are not at all new to the game may also enjoy the dramatic delve into the relationship between vampire and ghoul. It certainly demonstrated a number of the game's concepts without being too obvious about "Hey! These are Game Rules in Narrative Format!"



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Lady Dusk: A Ghoul's Tale
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Displaying 1 to 15 (of 2331 reviews) Result Pages:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates