DriveThruRPG.com
Browse Categories











Back
Other comments left by this customer:
Letters from the Flaming Crab: Puppet Show
Publisher: Flaming Crab Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/14/2017 08:26:54

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the unique „Letters from the Flaming Crab“-series clocks in at 22 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of SRD, leaving us with 18 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

We begin this pdf with, as always, a nice, letter from the eponymous planes-hopping vessel, before diving right into the crunchy bits – which, this time around, would be a new hybrid class – the marionetteer, whose parents would be both summoners and vigilantes. Interesting combination, right? Well, chassis-wise, the marionetteer gets d8 HD, 6 + Int skills per level, proficiency with simple weapons and light armor, ¾ BAB-progression and good Will-saves.

The marionetteer can conceal the animated nature of a puppet – checks to Disguise marionettes as regular, inert puppets receive a +20 bonus; dual identity pertains the puppets. The marionetteer begins play with a Tiny puppet, the marionette. This puppet has hardness 3, 5 hp, 3lbs. weight and is bonded to an entity who brings it to life at the marionetteer’s command. In effect, the marionette is two things at once: The inanimate puppet receptacle and the animating spirit – these are referred to as the inert and animate forms. Calling the spirit into a puppet requires 1 minute. At 14th level, the marionette may be animated as a full-round action and the marionetteer doesn’t have to touch it – it just has to be within 100 ft.

Unless chosen otherwise, the puppet is inconspicuous and attempts to scry on the puppet work only when the puppet’s form is what’s searched for. The marionette is not a summoned creature, but may be forced into the inert state by being subjected to dismissing effects à la banishment etc. It acts on the same initiative as the marionetteer. It requires commanding, which is a move action that provokes AoOs. The commanding process, however, is pretty subtle, requiring a challenging Sense Motive DC and observation of both marionetteer and puppet – the DC scales with class levels and Cha-mod of the marionetteer. Marionetteers can only command marionettes up to 100 ft. away and they require line of sight; a marionette sans commands doesn’t act, but is not helpless – pretty important, there. Replacing an inert marionette takes 12 hours and class level times 10 gp and replenishes ½ maximum hit points. The marionetteer may only have one active marionette at any given time.

Since marionettes and eidolons work similarly, the rules for eidolons, including table, have been reprinted here for your convenience, which is nice. Now, where marionettes and eidolons differ in how they work would be the base form available – there are two base-form chassis types available for the marionette, the Arsenal and the Proxy. Both get a different set of accessible evolutions, allowing for different playing experiences – the Arsenal is Medium, the proxy is Small – both get claws, arms and legs, but the proxy also gets precise strike (basically a 1d4-sneak analogue that may be taken multiple times); the proxy is basically more subtle; they do not gain share spells. Arsenals get good Fort and Ref-saves, Proxies get good Will-saves. Arsenals have a base speed of 20 ft., proxies have a base speed of 30 ft. The claws inflict appropriate damage (1d4 for Arsenal, 1d3 for Proxies). Evolution points are reassigned at a newly gained level or when the marionette is replaced. Starting at 8th level, the marionetteer no longer needs line of sight to control marionettes within 100 ft.

At 1st level, 4th and every 3 levels thereafter, the marionetteer gains a social talent, using his class level as vigilante levels for the purpose of prerequisites. Marionetteers are always considered to be in their social identity. At 1st level, they add ½ class level as a bonus to Perform when using the inert marionette – I assume minimum 1 here, a minor oversight. Starting at 2nd level, they gain +1/2 class level to either Perform or Bluff. At 7th level, 1/day a marionetteer can cause those watching his performance cause suggestions for those watching the performance.

Starting at 3rd level, the marionetteer can repair damage done to the marionette 3 + Charisma modifier times per day as a standard action. This restores 1d8 hp. At 6th level and every 3 levels thereafter, the healing increases by +1d8. The ability can only used while the marionette is in inert form. Returning a marionette into inert form, just fyi, takes a standard action.

Starting at 5th level, a marionetteer can, as a standard action, animate Tiny, non-magical, unattended objects within 100 ft., as if using animate objects. The animation period spans 3 + class level rounds and at 7th level and every odd level thereafter, the number of puppets or their sizes increase. Multiple objects thus animated may be commanded with the same move action. At 6th level and every 6 levels thereafter, the marionetteer can maintain an additional marionette – only one may be active, but the marionetteer may basically switch through them, which is surprisingly cool!

At 12th level, as a standard action, the marionetteer can cause a humanoid target within 100 ft. within line of sight to make a Reflex save (DC governed by Cha-modifier); on a failure, the creature is dominated by Charisma modifier rounds; the dominated creature can be commanded as a move action that provokes AoOs. Creatures thus ensnared by the commanding strings of the marionetteer can attempt to escape the mystic bondage via Strength or Escape Artist checks. Nice one and, due to the lack of limitations apart from duration, a powerful tool.

As a capstone, the class gains either the option to split the animating force into 2 marionettes at once (both of which suffer -3 to all d20-rolls while the animating force is split thus) and may command them at once, or the marionetteer may share senses with the marionette and command them as a swift action.

Evolution-wise, we get full movement while using Acrobatics and Stealth and the option to make startling attacks when unaware of the marionette, rendering the target flat-footed versus the marionette (gets uncanny dodge interaction right); we also get increased speed. Scaling DR to represent the constructed body, firearm training, a second life (banishment to a home plane) – all in all, a nice array. The class gets archetypes: The performer replaces social talent with bardic performance and social grace with +1/2 class level to Diplomacy – basically, an archetype for less social-heavy games.

There is more, but, unlike what you might have expected, we go one step beyond: The pdf now proceeds to contextualize different, interesting puppeteering traditions; these are represented in more than one associated archetype; take Bunraku, one of the traditional Japanese traditions: We get the Phantom Puppeteers bardic masterpiece, which creates buffing mirror image-like shadow assistants – pretty cool! The marionetteer archetype here would be the Joruri: The puppet they use to animate needs to be bigger and as such, is more conspicuous: The puppet is as tall as the animated marionette (remember: The puppet for the regular marionette is Tiny!) – the archetype loses the animate objects-ability tree in favor of 3 + Cha-mod make whole, the ability to have the animated, sentient marionette guard them while sleeping and allow the puppet to heal them when dropped to 0 hp or below via Heal. At higher levels, we have a puppet that heals class level hit points per night. At 13th level, the marionetteer may accept the damage taken by the puppet and he may, 1/round, take a condition inflicted upon the marionette. 15th level nets the ability to share senses and commanding the puppet no longer requires hand movements. 17th level allows the puppet to drain spell-completion objects held to gain fast healing temporarily; at 19th level, the puppet gains temporary hit points and a buff against the caster upon succeeding a save against a single-target spell. Additionally, reduced effects on a success are completely negated.

Amazing: We dive into Afghan Buz-Baz, puppetry accompanied by music, next: The bardic masterpiece associated here would be the Bolero of Obedience, which allows you to issue commands or murderous commands, but lets the target retain mental and verbal command of his actions…now here’s a creepy visual for you… The archetype provides would be the Markhor Maestro, an archetype for the druid, which gains a modified class skill list and modifies the skill bonuses gained by nature sense to apply to perform (string) instead. They use Charisma as governing spellcasting attribute and are locked into a ram companion. They also gain inspire courage as a bard of their level, but only apply the benefits to the companion and summoned creatures. Flavorful one.

Giant puppetry comes with the Manipulation of the Massive masterpiece, which allows you to penalize the saves of bigger creatures or buffs allies to ignore size modifiers or restrictions based on size against creatures taller than you – this one can, depending on your campaign, be potentially be really overpowered – in e.g. an anti-dragon/giant campaign, I’d ban this masterpiece. The archetype presented for the marionetteer replaces the ability to have multiple marionettes at the ready with a single marionette that grows in size – space/reach, modifiers etc. are provided.

Chinese/Taiwanese glove puppetry (Du Dai Xi/Po Te Hi) is represented by the Battle of Sheng Mountain, Final Act masterpiece nets 1-hour per class level inspire courage sans performing, and targets may, as a swift action, end the effect with moment of greatness –cool. There also is the puppet partnership spell, which ties a puppet with an ally, allowing you to buff the ally while concentrating on the spell – per se a standard buff made cool by the visuals, which render the spell unique. The puppet protector is basically a figurine type that animates as a puppet fighter – three variants are included.

Indonesian Ondel-ondel comes with the Invocation of the Guardian masterpiece, that calls forth a protective ancestral spirit. The ondel-ondel sentinel would be basically a costume/puppet that you enter – you can sense evil inside and may merge with the puppet – think of it as a non-scifi-ish paladin-y power armor. Really cool! Punch and Judy are represented by Slapstick Reaction can cause targets to attack allies on failed saves; the Punchman bard archetype replaces well-versed with increased demoralize durations; lore master’s 5th level use is replaced with an immediate action option to grant allies rerolls versus enchantments/compulsions by expending bardic performances. They replace suggestion with dispel magic. Shadowgraphy is represented by The Nightmare Revue masterpiece – which can be brutal. AoE phantasmal killer…OUCH! And yes, minimum level etc. make that okay…and yes, I can picture that being one cool story angle… The archetype associated with this tradition would be the umbral pupetteer summoner: The eidolon gets the shadow creature template, but the creature can only be called in darkness. Summon monster is replaced with shadow conjuration, which expands to greater shadow conjuration at higher levels.

Ventriloquism comes with the Phantom Voice masterpiece allows you to hijack the utterances of other creaturesm which can be used for all kinds of cool shenanigans. The focused arcane school associated with necromancy that is presented here, gastromancy, lets you listen to the stomachs of the dead, listening to their wishes. (Yes, that’s a thing!) The final tradition of puppetry depicted herein would be Mua Roi Nuoc – Vietnamese water puppetry. The masterpiece we get here would be The Crocodile and the Farmer’s Daughter combines communal water walk with the option to gain, as a swift action, expeditious retreat for 1 round while still on the water. We also get a spell here – water dancer – basically the significantly improved and amazing version of water walk: You can walk up steep inclines, and even up waterfalls! Water elementals don’t get water mastery against you, etc. – cool!

Now those of you who, like myself, tend to enjoy researching other cultures may be aware that quite a few of the puppetry traditions here are associated with rituals/festivals – well, guess what? There actually are kingdom-edicts for kingdom-building rules herein: Glove puppetry, ondel-ondel and flood festival all come with their own edicts that helps the respective kingdom. Really cool!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, though not perfect – there are a couple of minor hiccups (like “arionette”), but those don’t influence the integrity of the rules. Layout adheres to Flaming Crab Games’ two-column full-color standard and the pdf features several really nice public domain artworks and photographs that do a better job at conveying atmosphere than bad stock art could. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

J Gray, Jeff Lee, Neal Litherland, Michael McCarthy and Anthony Toretti are all experienced designers – and it shows here. Siobhan Bjorknas and J Gray in development certainly did a good job unifying narrative voices. For one, while this is most certainly a very, very crunchy book, its crunch is constantly grounded in cool ideas, flavorful descriptions, etc. – even in engine-tweak-style archetypes, there is some soul, some unique identity and cultural context, which does a lot to endear these concepts to me. The marionetteer class is GLORIOUS – it is not necessarily a great class for mega-dungeon exploration, but for e.g. Ravenloft-esque adventures, intrigue/social/city-campaigns or those focusing on the occult (or on explorations of different cultures!), this is GOLD. The hybrid class manages to retain the influence of both parent classes without being just a collection of recombined parts and ranks as one of the most flavorful examples for hybrid classes I know – it has a distinct and unique identity I enjoy.

The grounding of class options in the diverse puppetry traditions covered is a great idea and opened my eyes to some cultural traditions I wasn’t aware of – in a manner, this pdf actually ended up educating me, which is something I love. The diverse options for the traditions kept me glued to the screen, and frankly, in spite of this review having been more work than the average letter, I was honestly bummed when I reached the end of the pdf – the concept of puppetry and the notions explored herein, these cool traditions, they inspired me more than I expected and I’d frankly love to see more. What more can you ask of a short pdf like this? Excellent job, 5 stars + seal of approval, in spite of minor blemishes here and there – the totality of concept, flavor and crunch is too cool to rate it any lower.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Letters from the Flaming Crab: Puppet Show
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Deadly Delves: Reign of Ruin (PFRPG)
Publisher: Jon Brazer Enterprises
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/14/2017 08:24:59

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This module from Jon Brazer Enterprise’s „Deadly Delve“-series for experienced groups clocks in at 40 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 35 pages of content. It should be noted that the pdf comes with an extra-pdf that contains properly-sized, big versions of the maps – these are key-less and generally player-friendly – with one exception: There is a “S” denoting a secret door left on one of them. The PFRPG-version comes with a second, more printer-friendly version.

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.

..

.

All right, so this adventure begins with a ranger collapsing, talking about the village of Northam being razed to the ground – one of multiple settlements adjacent to swampy terrain. Trying to warn other settlements and find out more, the PCs will soon, in Mistlevy, happen upon their first massive fight – with the lizardmen of the Ixtupi tribe – a somewhat quasi-Aztec vibe accompanies them and their culture as a leitmotif, but more on that later. To their shock, the PCs will encounter a deadly black dragon crash into the clash between the elite Stormhammer guards and the Ixtupi – thankfully, this dragon, quite possibly the commander of the lizardfolk, does retreat – and she has an agenda.

You see, once, this whole area was rules by a black dragon named Nyrionaxys – the draconic being enslaved all it could find and killed the warmbloods. When the dragon was slain, the victors failed to notice one of the dragon’s eggs – this hatchling, fostered by the Ixtupi, grew into Nyrionaxys II, brainwashed to believe herself the reincarnation of the ancient draconic overlord by being raised by the Ixtupi. To complicate matters further, some more benevolent lizardfolk, tired of being salves to draconic whims, have since then split off, becoming the Tsiikil tribe, who was trying to keep the Ixtupi at bay – but with dark whispers in the dragon’s mind, her time seems to be drawing near: She heeds the call of Tlaloc, who has promised her power – all it takes is a blood sacrifice in her home, one of powerful individuals. And suddenly the blatant provocation of the dragon makes sense – the PCs are walking right where the dragons want them to go…

Still, this leaves the PCs without much recourse – they need to stop the black dragon, asap! Thus, they venture deeper into the marshlands towards the temple of the Ixtupi. Tsiikil lizardfolk can provide support and directions, should the PCs help them. The temple of the Ixtupi is a foul stone pyramid surrounded by a great moat – to even get to it, the PCs will need to deal with potent, dragonblooded lizardfolk; the presence of stormwyts, an alkaline-spit-using wyvern-variant adds a further danger – and woe if the PCs start using elemental magics: The taint of the place causes such magic to spawn tainted elemental spirits that employ a modified unholy template – stats for all 4 variants are included, just fyi. The PFRPG-version, just fyi, employs both variant templates (here: unholy) and archetypes in the respective builds, making the opposition generally an interesting cadre.

Breaching the temple is already a feat in and of itself – but exploring the dungeon will not be simple, either: Here, Ixtupi warpriests, mud-caked lizardfolk zombies, mummies and spirits, kobold trappers and even a dire venus flytrap, stand between the PCs and progress – but to reach further below, the PCs have to pass the mosaic pillar chamber – where multiple unique beasts spring forth from the pillar…and that’s before the traps, which make this transitional area a really nice gauntlet.

The bulk of Ixtupi resistance can be encountered in the lower temple – here, the most potent of the tribe await – alongside glass golems, demons, evil idols boosting the foes of the PCs…and even a half-dragon gynosphinx – and yes, she comes with sample riddles. Ultimately, past all the traps, the PCs will have to delve deep into the place where caustic water and grueling sights await and face Nyrionaxys II…if they don’t fall prey to the hatchling ghosts of her brood mates or the half-draconic anaconda. Or the stormwyts…and yes, all of this doesn’t sound so bad, right? Well, here is a big difference to almost all adventures featuring dragons: Nyrionaxys II doesn’t wait to be slain. A full page is devoted to tactics of the mighty dragon – who btw. actually has class levels as a standard bearer cavalier, making her a potent commander!

Speaking of which: Beyond the numerous variant monsters mentioned, I enjoyed the variety of the builds: From the numerous variants of monsters to the archetypes and templates employed in their creation, the respective critters are interesting, challenging and fit the thematic angle of the tribe. Also relevant: The module does not break the WBL-assumptions: While the hoard of the big boss is massive, the majority of coins are copper – it’ll be a logistics-challenge to get the coins to civilization…

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good. I noticed no serious accumulations of either formal or rules-language glitches in the module. Layout adheres to a really nice two-color full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked with nested bookmarks for your convenience. The maps featured for all major sites are solid and full-color; apart from the minor tarnish of the remnant secret door-relic mentioned before, the inclusion of player-friendly maps is another big plus. Artwork deserves special mention: The module sports a couple of really nice full-color artworks.

Richard Moore’s “Reign of Ruin” was an honest surprise to me: You see, there are two basic dragon-module set-ups (not counting random encounter dragons): The long, epic one, wherein you defeat a dragon at the end, after much hardship, and with the exact goal of defeating the draconic threat; and the briefer one, where a dragon at the end is basically the boss. The first tends to be represented by mega-adventures, campaigns, etc.; the second by smaller modules. Both have one thing in common: Most of the time, the dragons in them are DUMB, character-less engines of destruction, when ostensibly, they are supposed to be really smart. This module, thankfully, gets that aspect right: The dragon herein is an interesting character, embedded in a dungeon and social environment with an interesting leitmotif; she makes sense. Her proactive strategies can allow the Gm to unleash hell upon the PCs and vanquishing her doesn’t break ongoing campaigns – the rewards are significant, but won’t break the game.

In short: While this does not reinvent the wheel, it’s one of the few anti-dragon modules that did not cause my brain to hurt at one point – and that’s a big, big plus. The PFRPG-version of this module does a lot right: It doesn’t break the WBL-cap and can be inserted as a fun. Challenging module into any campaign without breaking its power-level. All in all, this is a well-made anti-dragon crawl with a smart foe. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Deadly Delves: Reign of Ruin (PFRPG)
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Deadly Delves: Reign of Ruin (13th Age Compatible)
Publisher: Jon Brazer Enterprises
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/14/2017 08:23:43

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This module from Jon Brazer Enterprise’s „Deadly Delve“-series for experienced groups clocks in at 34 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 30 pages of content. It should be noted that the extra-pdf that contains properly-sized, big versions of the maps is not included in the 13th Age-version.

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.

..

.

All right, so this adventure begins with a ranger collapsing, talking about the village of Northam being razed to the ground – one of multiple settlements adjacent to swampy terrain. Trying to warn other settlements and find out more, the PCs will soon, in Mistlevy, happen upon their first massive fight – with the lizardmen of the Ixtupi tribe – a somewhat quasi-Aztec vibe accompanies them and their culture as a leitmotif, but more on that later. To their shock, the PCs will encounter a deadly black dragon crash into the clash between the elite Stormhammer guards and the Ixtupi – thankfully, this dragon, quite possibly the commander of the lizardfolk, does retreat – and she has an agenda.

You see, once, this whole area was rules by a black dragon named Nyrionaxys – the draconic being enslaved all it could find and killed the warmbloods. When the dragon was slain, the victors failed to notice one of the dragon’s eggs – this hatchling, fostered by the Ixtupi, grew into Nyrionaxys II, brainwashed to believe herself the reincarnation of the ancient draconic overlord by being raised by the Ixtupi. To complicate matters further, some more benevolent lizardfolk, tired of being salves to draconic whims, have since then split off, becoming the Tsiikil tribe, who was trying to keep the Ixtupi at bay – but with dark whispers in the dragon’s mind, her time seems to be drawing near: She heeds the call of Tlaloc, who has promised her power – all it takes is a blood sacrifice in her home, one of powerful individuals. And suddenly the blatant provocation of the dragon makes sense – the PCs are walking right where the dragons want them to go…

A big plus for fans of 13th Age would undoubtedly be the inclusion of notes on how the respective icons and Nyrionaxys II’s agenda interact, providing some proper contextualization for that aspect of the game. This level of attention to detail also is represented by a sidebar talking about creature sizes and their more abstract meaning in 13th Age.

Still, this leaves the PCs without much recourse – they need to stop the black dragon, asap! Thus, they venture deeper into the marshlands towards the temple of the Ixtupi. Tsiikil lizardfolk can provide support and directions, should the PCs help them. The temple of the Ixtupi is a foul stone pyramid surrounded by a great moat – to even get to it, the PCs will need to deal with potent, dragonblooded lizardfolk; the presence of stormwyts, an alkaline-spit-using wyvern-variant adds a further danger – and woe if the PCs start using elemental magics: The taint of the place causes such magic to spawn tainted elemental spirits. Here would be a good job to comment on the 13th Age stats – the book does a rather good job at converting to the system – from creature-type classification to internal consistency, the creatures presented make sense – when something should have a draconic ability like resist acid 16+, it does. Both natural even and uneven hits, damage types, etc. can be found in the respective entries and builds of the adversaries encountered. Some of the critters also make good use of the escalation die, which is another mechanical big plus.

Breaching the temple is already a feat in and of itself – but exploring the dungeon will not be simple, either: Here, Ixtupi priests, mud-caked lizardfolk zombies, mummies and spirits, kobold trappers and even a dire venus flytrap, stand between the PCs and progress – but to reach further below, the PCs have to pass the mosaic pillar chamber – where multiple unique beasts spring forth from the pillar…and that’s before the traps, which make this transitional area a really nice gauntlet. As a minor complaint regarding design aesthetics – while the optional cover rules covered are nice, terrain-wise, the adventure could be a bit more dynamic in 13th Age – you can tie cool effects to the escalation die…but that’s just me complaining at a high level.

The bulk of Ixtupi resistance can be encountered in the lower temple – here, the most potent of the tribe await – alongside glass golems, demons, evil idols boosting the foes of the PCs…and even a half-dragon gynosphinx – and yes, she comes with sample riddles. Ultimately, past all the traps, the PCs will have to delve deep into the place where caustic water and grueling sights await and face Nyrionaxys II…if they don’t fall prey to the hatchling ghosts of her brood mates or the half-draconic anaconda. Or the stormwyts…and yes, all of this doesn’t sound so bad, right? Well, here is a big difference to almost all adventures featuring dragons: Nyrionaxys II doesn’t wait to be slain. A full page is devoted to tactics of the mighty dragon – and no, she is not a simple black dragon; she actually has more than 300 hp, making her less prone to being killed off too quickly, an issue that dragons in 13th Age tend to have.

Big plus, btw.: Instead of focusing just on treasure, the conclusion-section here talks about the repercussions for the champion tier into which the PCs undoubtedly have ascended at the end of this module.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good. I noticed no serious accumulations of either formal or rules-language glitches in the module. Layout adheres to a really nice two-color full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked with nested bookmarks for your convenience. The maps featured for all major sites are solid and full-color. The 13th Age-version of the module, as per the writing of this review, did lack the player-map bonus pdf, which makes that aspect a comfort detriment. The 13th Age-version comes with a second, more printer-friendly version with a white background. Artwork deserves special mention: The module sports a couple of really nice full-color artworks.

Richard Moore’s “Reign of Ruin” was an honest surprise to me: You see, there are two basic dragon-module set-ups (not counting random encounter dragons): The long, epic one, wherein you defeat a dragon at the end, after much hardship, and with the exact goal of defeating the draconic threat; and the briefer one, where a dragon at the end is basically the boss. The first tends to be represented by mega-adventures, campaigns, etc.; the second by smaller modules. Both have one thing in common: Most of the time, the dragons in them are DUMB, character-less engines of destruction, when ostensibly, they are supposed to be really smart. This module, thankfully, gets that aspect right: The dragon herein is an interesting character, embedded in a dungeon and social environment with an interesting leitmotif; she makes sense. Her proactive strategies can allow the GM to unleash hell upon the PCs and vanquishing her doesn’t break ongoing campaigns. The 13th Age conversion of the module has been handled with care and is well-crafted.

In short: While this does not reinvent the wheel, it’s one of the few anti-dragon modules that did not cause my brain to hurt at one point – and that’s a big, big plus. The well-done mechanics help as well, which is why my final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars – though I have to round down for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadly Delves: Reign of Ruin (13th Age Compatible)
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Deadly Delves: Reign of Ruin (Swords and Wizardry)
Publisher: Jon Brazer Enterprises
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/14/2017 08:21:35

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This module from Jon Brazer Enterprise’s „Deadly Delve“-series for experienced groups clocks in at 34 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 30 pages of content. It should be noted that the pdf comes with an extra-pdf that contains properly-sized, big versions of the maps – these are key-less and generally player-friendly – with one exception: There is a “S” denoting a secret door left on one of them.

As you can glean from the cover, the OSR-rule-set employed in this version of the module would be Frog God Games’ Swords & Wizardry. We get both ascending and descending AC-values.

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.

..

.

All right, so this adventure begins with a ranger collapsing, talking about the village of Northam being razed to the ground – one of multiple settlements adjacent to swampy terrain. Trying to warn other settlements and find out more, the PCs will soon, in Mistlevy, happen upon their first massive fight – with the lizardmen of the Ixtupi tribe – a somewhat quasi-Aztec vibe accompanies them and their culture as a leitmotif, but more on that later. To their shock, the PCs will encounter a deadly black dragon crash into the clash between the elite Stormhammer guards and the Ixtupi. Thankfully, this dragon, quite possibly the commander of the lizardfolk, does retreat – and she has an agenda. Which brings me to a problem that’s somewhat inherent in the system and the faithful version to the system: In S&W, dragons can be pretty fragile – and compared to her servants, the dragon boss of this module unfortunately adheres to this formula; here, a deviation from the standard rules to account for her boss-nature would probably have made sense.

You see, once, this whole area was rules by a black dragon named Nyrionaxys – the draconic being enslaved all it could find and killed the warmbloods. When the dragon was slain, the victors failed to notice one of the dragon’s eggs – this hatchling, fostered by the Ixtupi, grew into Nyrionaxys II, brainwashed to believe herself the reincarnation of the ancient draconic overlord by being raised by the Ixtupi. To complicate matters further, some more benevolent lizardfolk, tired of being salves to draconic whims, have since then split off, becoming the Tsiikil tribe, who was trying to keep the Ixtupi at bay – but with dark whispers in the dragon’s mind, her time seems to be drawing near: She heeds the call of Tlaloc, who has promised her power – all it takes is a blood sacrifice in her home, one of powerful individuals. And suddenly the blatant provocation of the dragon makes sense – the PCs are walking right where the dragons want them to go…

Still, this leaves the PCs without much recourse – they need to stop the black dragon, asap! Thus, they venture deeper into the marshlands towards the temple of the Ixtupi. Tsiikil lizardfolk can provide support and directions, should the PCs help them. The temple of the Ixtupi is a foul stone pyramid surrounded by a great moat – to even get to it, the PCs will need to deal with potent, dragonblooded lizardfolk; the presence of stormwyts, an alkaline-spit-using wyvern-variant adds a further danger – and woe if the PCs start using elemental magics: The taint of the place causes such magic to spawn tainted elemental spirits…

Breaching the temple is already a feat in and of itself – but exploring the dungeon will not be simple, either: Here, Ixtupi priests, mud-caked lizardfolk zombies, kobold trappers, spirits, mummies and even a dire venus flytrap, stand between the PCs and progress – but to reach further below, the PCs have to pass the mosaic pillar chamber – where multiple unique beasts spring forth from the pillar…and that’s before the traps, which make this transitional area a really nice gauntlet.

The bulk of Ixtupi resistance can be encountered in the lower temple – here, the most potent of the tribe await – alongside glass golems, demons, evil idols boosting the foes of the PCs…and even a half-dragon gynosphinx – and yes, she comes with sample riddles. Ultimately, past all the traps, the PCs will have to delve deep into the place where caustic water and grueling sights await and face Nyrionaxys II…if they don’t fall prey to the hatchling ghosts of her brood mates or the half-draconic anaconda. Or the stormwyts…and yes, all of this doesn’t sound so bad, right? Well, here is a big difference to almost all adventures featuring dragons: Nyrionaxys II doesn’t wait to be slain. A full page is devoted to tactics of the mighty dragon. Still, while S&W obviously uses smaller numbers and her AC and defenses are impressive, at 32 hp, the dragon still remains comparatively fragile.

Speaking of monsters – the stat-conversions to S&W are solid, as far as I’ve seen. Spell-names are adjusted, etc. Big plus, btw.: The hoard of the dragon, while massive, is WBL-appropriate and shouldn’t pose a problem for ongoing campaigns. In fact, being mostly copper, transportation may yet pose some interesting problems…

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good. I noticed no serious accumulations of either formal or rules-language glitches in the module. Layout adheres to a really nice two-color full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked with nested bookmarks for your convenience. The maps featured for all major sites are solid and full-color; apart from the minor tarnish of the remnant secret door-relic mentioned before, the inclusion of player-friendly maps is another big plus. The OSR-conversion to S&W is solid and generally well-crafted.

Richard Moore’s “Reign of Ruin” was an honest surprise to me: You see, there are two basic dragon-module set-ups (not counting random encounter dragons): The long, epic one, wherein you defeat a dragon at the end, after much hardship, and with the exact goal of defeating the draconic threat; and the briefer one, where a dragon at the end is basically the boss. The first tends to be represented by mega-adventures, campaigns, etc.; the second by smaller modules. Both have one thing in common: Most of the time, the dragons in them are DUMB, character-less engines of destruction, when ostensibly, they are supposed to be really smart. This module, thankfully, gets that aspect right: The dragon herein is an interesting character, embedded in a dungeon and social environment with an interesting leitmotif; she makes sense. Her proactive strategies can allow the referee to unleash hell upon the PCs and vanquishing her doesn’t break ongoing campaigns – the rewards are significant, but won’t break the game.

In short: While this does not reinvent the wheel, it’s one of the few anti-dragon modules that did not cause my brain to hurt at one point – and that’s a big, big plus. A minor issue of the S&W version, at least if your PCs are lucky, may be the relative fragility of the boss – but that’s something inherited from the system. Still, compared to the other versions, I feel that this version is slightly less compelling – mainly since the versions for the other systems work so well due to the mechanics; to make up for their brevity, more flavor and/or bonus-content for the OSR-version would have been nice. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadly Delves: Reign of Ruin (Swords and Wizardry)
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Shunned Valley of the Three Tombs Collector's Edition
Publisher: Raging Swan Press
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/10/2017 11:43:39

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The collector’s edition of Shunned Valley of the Three Tombs clocks in at 40 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page designer’s foreword (including stats by CR etc.), 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 32 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

All right, so what do we get here? Well, first of all, we begin with notes on how to use the adventure properly as well as a page of advice on how to read statblocks – particularly useful in this module, since, let’s get that out of the way, this makes for a great first module – both for a new campaign and for completely new players. That out of the way, we get a massive page on general notes pertaining the eponymous valley: These include lore DCs for the PCs to unearth, a couple of hooks to make the PCs get into the action and 6 sample whispers & rumours for further hooks. Similarly, traveling to the valley from Dulwich, with different base speeds, and a couple of flavorful minor events during the journey can make for great supplemental material.

We also get an incredibly gorgeous b/w-map of the Duchy of Ashlar: The cartography by Simon Butler, Dan Dyson and Tommi Salama employed herein is...well glorious. Oh, and guess what? If you're like me and get a LOT of Raging Swan Press books to supplement your gaming experience...you'll notice something. The map tells you, which direction the lonely coast is, where Deksport can be found - and indeed, in this duchy, you can see Wellswood, Longbridge, Kingsfell, Ashford -some of the unique villages and places my groups have visited and come to love (or abhor) - oh, and the map also sports a wide array of as of yet unexplored places. And, in case you're asking - this whole region, contextualized, can easily be dropped into just about any campaign setting, though theme-wise, settings like Greyhawk, The Lost Lands or the like probably work best - and yep, the Shadowed Keep of the Borderlands is also mentioned.

Now, in the collector’s edition, we also get the complete Dulwich Town Backdrop penned by John Bennett – I wrote a review for this gem, so feel free to check it out, if you require further guidance. I should also note that the absolutely glorious Gloamhold region map can be found herein. So pretty…

This module is explicitly made for (relatively) new players and with the potential to use it with minimum preparation in mind- Core is assumed to be known, but that's basically about it. Hence, the challenges in this adventure are somewhat less pronounced than veterans would expect. At the same time, it should be noted that this pdf does not necessarily feature themes explicitly designated as "kid-theme" - it is not gory or grimdark or anything...it is just fantasy. I tested this module with kids and ran into no issues. This is very much an adventure that allows the GM to utilize tropes of adventuring and fantasy, but sans being inappropriate. So yes, I'd consider this appropriate for all but the youngest and most sensitive of kids. That as an aside, though – this is very much a traditional fantasy adventure intended for the usual demographic – but since some of you out there tend to ask whether “easier” modules are child-appropriate, I figured I’d point that out.

The pdf also provides extensive scaling advice for each encounter - by +1/-1, which means that you can also run this for more seasoned adventurers sans the players becoming bored. One more thing - while this module introduces PCs and players to some of the classic tropes, its structure allows the GM to include ample options for rest...or not, allowing for pretty concise control over the pacing of the module itself. And no, thankfully my most loathed adventuring clichés, the shadow and ogre bosses are absent from these pages. Thank Gygax!

All right, this is as far as I can get sans diving into SPOILERS. Potential players of this module should jump to the conclusion NOW.

...

..

.

All right, only GMs around? Good.

The valley itself can be pictured as one that sports, obviously, multiple tombs - said tombs are the mini-dungeons in this book, but they are not the only graves there: Cairns can be looted and a table of items can be found there. Similarly, an 8-entry dressing table for the valley allows you to customized the dressing and generate more atmosphere. From the small waterfall to tracks, the valley has several interesting locations as such - but the interesting component, at least to me, would be that the mini-dungeons (usually only a couple of rooms) sport unique challenges: In the tomb of the stone woman, one can, for example, face an animated statue, with some traps that are painful, but not necessarily lethal, teaching this component of adventuring. And yes, from chests to sarcophagi, the level of detail provided in this pdf is excessive and makes running this very easy. This detail also extends to NPCs, with attitudes, distinguishing features, etc. all included.

The tomb of the champions features unique adversaries and has a completely different flavor - inside lie the now undead remains of two erstwhile champions of the hobgoblins, emphasizing the component of combat in the exploration here. Finally, there would be a third mini-complex, wherein an owlbear and its young lair - these caves can be seen as introductions to animals and terrain - with bat guano, a bat swarm, uneven footing and the like, the focus here is admirably different. It should btw. be noted that the owlbear is part of the dynamic aspect of the adventure: We get several “planned” random encounters that can be used to further control the pacing of the adventure.

This, however, is not nearly the extent of adventuring the pdf contains - the module also sports a rival adventuring group that can act as a major complication for the PCs, feigning friendship and loyalty, while waiting to backstab them. Beyond these low-lives, there is another optional encounter that will introduce the necessity of ROLEplaying to PCs and players alike: The ghost of a perished adventurer haunts this valley's lake and putting her to rest is one of the more unique and rewarding challenges in this pdf. It's not hard, mind you - but it makes it clear that sometimes, words are more powerful than thrown spells and drawn swords. The aforementioned add-in-encounters, including the potent owlbear, obviously can also be used to save the PCs - if the aforementioned adventuring group's too much to handle, for example...well, then the arrival of a pack of wolves or said owlbear may act as a save...and teach the valuable lesson of considering that the world is dynamic and that actions have consequences.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press' elegant two-column b/w-standard and the pdf features copious b/w-artworks (some of which I've seen before). The cartography is excellent, though no map-key-less versions are included. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience and in two versions - one optimized for screen-use and one for the printer. Kudos!

Creighton Broadhurst’s Shunned Valley is a great introductory module – it is a bit creepy, but not overly so; it introduces a wide variety of challenges from all walks of the adventuring life and allows for sufficient control regarding the components of the pdf. The insertion of John Bennett’s Dulwich in the collector’s edition adds additional, quality bang for buck to the offering. Now, this module is honestly beautiful in its simplicity and level of detail. This is a great introductory module for the game we all know and love - and for this purpose, it should be considered to be a 5 star+ seal of approval module. Veterans and grognards who have seen it all may be slightly less intrigued, though the old-school vibe and aesthetic employed here may tug at one's heart's string. Still, for experienced and jaded audiences, this may be slightly less compelling and should be considered the equivalent of a 4 star module.

It should also be noted that fans of Raging Swan Press’ supplements and Duchy of Ashlar/Gloamhold meta-backdrop will certainly adore getting a nice way of starting the adventuring career in the duchy. What will be my final rating? Well, ultimately, I have to take all audiences into account, which is why my official final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Shunned Valley of the Three Tombs Collector's Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Creator Reply:
Thanks very much for this review, End. I'm glad you liked the adventure!
To Slay A Dragon
Publisher: EN Publishing
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/10/2017 11:41:00

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This mega-adventure clocks in at 150 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of ToC, 1 page monster/NPC-index (handy), 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 143 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

This review was requested as a non-prioritized review by my patreons.

The focus of this module is something that should provide no surprises for the GM or players – it’s to kill a dragon. The adventure comes with notes on character advancement and tables of Quest Xp-awards for the PCs, conveniently collated in a table. The module takes place in the rural county of Holdenshire and starts in the village Hengistbury, which comes with proper village stats, though these do sport a formatting deviation from the standard – but that as an aside. We begin this adventure with basically a gazetteer of the village, which goes into details, including tavern menu for the Bleeding Heart tavern, notes on locations of interest and fluffy write-ups of the NPCs featured – these btw. include a good hill giant, Ugg, who is a kind of mascot for the village. The massive cast of characters here is impressive and their full-color mugshots are nice – however, if you’re planning on running Zeitgeist, then these may irk you: Not only is there overlap in the nomenclature of NPCs, the art assets employed here have also been used in the Zeitgeist AP. It’s a purely aesthetic thing and will not influence my final verdict, but it is something that irked me.

After a brief bit of introductory prose, the adventure becomes pretty free-form, with several (11) quests and a full page of rumors providing plenty of adventuring potential.

However, to go into details here, I’ll have to dive into SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.

..

.

All right, only GMs around? Great! So, the quests per se are interesting – they e.g. deal with an evil fey dubbed spring-heeled jack, kidnapping kids. They feature a werewolf; dealing with a troll under a bridge, caravan duty, dealing with some lizardfolk and a green hag, a retribution for a prank that went too far, dealing with a manslayer particularly fond of traps, accompanying someone on chimera-safari – the quests, idea-wise, are interesting and feature copious amounts of read-aloud text – they are, thankfully, not the basic and bland ogre/shadow-slaying standard level 1-quest. That being said, they do, at one point, start feeling like filler – the quests are all very brief and while they mention terrain, skills, etc., they don’t sport encounter maps or the like and almost always boil down to: “PCs venture forth, find villain, dispose of villain.” – They are basically a series of boss fights. They are a good series of boss fights with interesting foes, but yeah – structurally, I would have loved to see a bit more variety. Though there is one interesting task: Finding a poltergeist and freeing her requires a bit more than brawns and the quest is supplemented with a basic map of the ruined keep that’s haunted – this quest is also pretty much non-optional, for it provides one of the tools the PCs will definitely need...

As soon as the PCs have reached 3rd level, they will hear of kobolds kidnapping a girl – hunting them down provides the catalyst for the main-quest – Lord Pemberton bestows the sword secured in the ruin-adventure to the PCs. The sword is called Dragonbane and is a +3 wounding dragon bane greatsword. Which nets +4 to saves against breath weapons, SPs and spells cast by dragons. And critical hits cause an additional “2d10 holy damage” against dragons – this damage type does not exist in PFRPG. On a nitpicky, aesthetic side, the weapon’s write-up also lacks some italicizations. On a less nitpicky side, you can probably glean one issue of the module. That’s a 90K weapon for 3rd level characters. For comparison: The suggested 3rd-level PC-value is 3K gold. And unlike many a artifact, the blade does not come with a drawback or the like – apart from the promise to slay the red dragon Cirothe.

This leads into Act II of the mega-adventure, the section that is about doing the eponymous deed. In order to defeat the dragon, the PCs will have to explore through the massive wilderness, collecting 4 items: The coward’s map (so named for the dwarves that fled Cirothe), said to be in the hands of the Fedap clan. The hammer of vengeance remains in the dwarven fortress Deephall Point – Cirothe devastated the fortress and left it to giants – ostensibly due to this mighty weapon. The quiver of the dragon’s bane is said to have been developed by the elves of Greendell Forest – though their sage has been lost in dubious circumstances. Finally, the PCs will need to find Cirothe’s true name – something only known to the by now mad fairy queen of Greyfell Forest. Each of these quests sports three steps – progress in them is measured by stars. The further the PCs are, the more stars they’ll have assembled. Here’s the issue: You roll the dragon die each day, which simulates Cirothe’s actions – this would be a d20 and you add the total number of stars and consult a table: On 20+, Cirothe flies forth, which means that the PCs will at least encounter more kobolds; from 21 to 32, each entry in a corresponding table denotes one or more areas utterly destroyed by the dragon. While this is intended to simulate the assault of the dragon and the devastation caused, it does come with a bit of an issue: What if the PCs are in the respective town? There is a solid chance for that to happen and the adventure tens to relegate these instances to off-screen events, replacing destroyed places with ruins inhabited by kobolds.

The chapter also employs injury and illness rules – which are tacked on and make not much sense within the context of PFRPG. Illness reduces, for example, maximum hit points – and oddly, both types can’t be healed with magics. Which makes no sense within the context of the system. The wilderness section also introduces a decent way of tracking overland supplies. As a whole, I considered both to be a bit cumbersome and, ultimately, superfluous. The settlements featured, just fyi, lack settlement statblocks.

Anyways, the quests themselves are pretty interesting in their concepts: For the coward’s map, the PCs will have to break an alliance between orcs and bandits and liberate the town; after that, the PCs will have to break the orc horde besieging Halfpoint and finally wrest a mace from nasty ogres to trade for the map. It should be noted that this quest’s first segment also represents the start of the quiver-questline.

The quiver quest focuses on aforementioned elven sage, one Sonina, getting the unicorn king kidnapped – freeing him from the goblinoids is not easy. Once he has been freed, the problem remains – the sage needs the poison of the intelligent queen of a race of smart spiders!

In order to secure the hammer, the PCs will have to test their mettle by presenting the head of a troll elder to one Theobod – he tells the PCs about a route to Deephall Point, which is now held by a few cave giants. Ultimately, the PCs will have to destroy a rift crystal and thus secure another tool.

The quest for Cirothe’s true name deals with the PCs first trying to rescue an elf from the mad plant-creatures within Greyfell forest – if they do, the elf’s master will tell them where to find the mad fairy queen’s castle – in order to get there, the PCs will have to pass a drowhold and finally convince the queen to tell the PCs Cirothe’s true name.

Okay, so what do these items do? The Coward’s Map can show the PCs the way to any place noted – and conceals them from Cirothe and her minions; the quiver coats arrows in dragonvenom – this means that hits auto-crit and “lower all of the creatures defenses by 5” – whatever that is supposed to mean. Rules-language this is not. The hammer auto-dispels all spell effects on the dragon on a failed DC 25 Will-save and costs the dragon 1d8 spell-levels per hit. When the dragon’s true name is spoken, the speaker can dictate the actions of Cirothe for one round. Each speaker may only use the name once and never relearn it. The quiver is btw. a “back slot” item – guess what doesn’t exist in PFRPG? Bingo. A back slot.

This section is btw. also complemented with a massive array of random encounters, treasure generation tables, etc. You may note one thing: From this vast amount of quests and their ideas and a quick glance at the page-count, you’ll notice that all of these cannot possibly e fully detailed. You’d be correct. There are no maps provided for them and while different plans and PC-actions are noted, all aspects of the adventure remain sketch-like – the module presents a cool idea, a couple of suggested strategies and stats – the rest is up to you. Personally, I don’t mind that too much, but it’s something to bear in mind. The wealth of ideas may be, at least a bit, too much – one quest less and instead more details regarding the quests themselves would have probably done the adventure good.

Act III, finally, is about climbing the active volcano Skull Mountain, entering the dragon’s lair and slaying Cirothe. The volcano comes with a great, full-color side-view and venture down skull mountain. There also is a really nice isometric map – but unlike many comparable maps by EN Publishing, this module does not sport a layer that lets you turn off the annoying numbers, secret door indicators, etc. – that would be a comfort detriment. Now, to give the adventure credit: Cirothe is a fearsome beast. At CR 14, we have an adult red dragon here. She is significantly more powerful than anything the PCs could hope to deal with sans the artifacts. Speaking of which: They cause their wielders to fail the first save against a red dragon’s breath – and said breath destroys them. While this allows the GM to get rid of them easily, an autofail save can mean instant death for many characters. The dragon’s superior power in the final encounter is offset by the name – basically, the PCs get 1 round per character knowing the name of free pot-shots…which makes the final encounter anticlimactic rocket-launcher tag. If the dragon can kill off the PCs before they lock her, she wins; if the PCs manage to lock her, they can potentially have a pretty easy battle on their hands – a decent sniper can, with the autocrit quiver, take down the dragon in a round, provided the “defense lowering” applies to AC. In short: Instead of an epic battle, we get a briefer altercation. If the artifacts focused more on defense instead of offense, the whole battle would have imho been more exciting.

On the plus-side: We get a COLOSSAL dragon’s hoard spanning multiple pages. The pdf also provides a couple of notes for dealing with the colossal wealth, though, frankly, that train’s probably gone, considering the potent blade. I strongly suggest keeping this a contained one-shot campaign.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting on a formal level, are very good. On a rules-language level, the same can’t always be said – from some wonky subsystems to a couple of issues with terminology that directly influence the integrity of the rules, there are some issues here. Layout adheres to a nice, two-column full-color standard – the pdf is layered, allowing you to take away the used-paper look and making the pdf more printer-friendly. Artworks are a combination of stock and re-used assets. The modules sports a few maps that range from really cool (Act III) to decent – they are in full-color, but we get no player-friendly versions for any of the maps.

To Slay a Dragon, penned by Russ Morrissey, Jacob Driscoll and Christopher J. Herbert, with additional text by Brian Casey, is per se an epic take on the “Kill the super-powerful dragon” trope. That being said, it is one that falls short in a couple of the details: The adventure shows in several instances a disregard for some rules of the game, which is annoying; the WBL-breaking, if used in a continuous campaign, can be problematic. More jarring, at least to me, would be that the adventure, ultimately, feels almost like it’s…not really done? It’s a strange feeling, but from the lack of maps of a majority of the environments to the massive scope, I couldn’t shake the feeling that this tries to provide too much.

Don’t get me wrong – the respective quest-lines in Act II are really cool and fun…but they remain sketch-like, opaque, and require serious GM-work to fully flesh them out. Significantly more so than in the big APs by EN Publishing. When run as written, a significant amount of this module will feel like a sequence of montages. Cool ones, yes – but ultimately, this adventure feels like it could, and probably should, have spanned more pages – 50 to 100. Act III is more detailed; Act I, ultimately, is lead-in level-up filler and doesn’t really contribute that much to the overall proceedings. Structurally, this falls short of the promise that its ideas deserve. I also have an issue with the way in which the final encounter will boil down, at least to an extent, to rocket-launcher tag, courtesy of the artifacts assembled. A properly-built ranged weapon specialist could theoretically solo Cirothe when handled properly and getting halfway lucky. I get and applaud that the artifacts allow the PCs to deal with a proper dragon – I like that! I just maintain that defensive artifacts would have made the final showdown much more rewarding. Speaking of which: If you’re lucky/unlucky, the dragon die-mechanic, while interesting, can really screw over the PCs. A more nuanced cat and mouse game between PCs and dragon would have probably been more rewarding.

Is this module bad? No! If you want a cool set-up for an against-the-dragon campaign, then this should provide what you’re looking for; just be aware that you’ll need to do some serious work fleshing things out – and redesign the artifacts/rules-relevant components. I will rate this module for what it is; if you want go-play/minimum fuss adventuring, detract another star. My final verdict will hence clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up due to in dubio pro reo.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
To Slay A Dragon
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

The Genius Guide to the Cruorchemist
Publisher: Rogue Genius Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/10/2017 11:38:13

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This base-class clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 3 pages of SRD, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

All right, the cruorchemist class gets d8 HD, 4 + Int skills per level, proficiency with simple weapons and light armors, though they do suffer from arcane spell failure. The cruorchemist gains ¾ BAB-progression and good Fort- and Ref-saves. The class has a pretty unique spellcasting engine: Cruorchemists distill their own, potent blood and store it in small vials, producing so-called distillations. The cruorchemist can consume a number of distillations equal to 1 + 1 + the cruorchemist’s Intelligence modifier as a swift action. Like spell components, they are consumed as part of casting a spell. At 1st level, the cruorchemist gains 3 + Constitution modifier distillations, with 5th level and every 5 levels thereafter increasing the distillations by +1. Preparing a distillation requires 1 hour – quite long. Not sure if that isn’t supposed to mean distillation process in total.

Okay, so these tie in with two other components of spellcasting etc.: The cruorchemist chooses a sorceror’s bloodline at 1st level. The cruorchemist doesn’t get bloodline spells or bonus feats and may not activate bloodline powers, unless consuming a distillation. The cruorchemist does gain the class skill associated with the bloodline. The cruorchemist gains spellcasting drawn from the sorcerer/wizard list of up to 6th level, using Intelligence as governing attribute. However, unlike in most cases, the cruorchemist gets spontaneous spellcasting in spite of using Intelligence as governing spellcasting attribute. However, the distillations do allow for more flexibility – the cruorchemist can consume distillations to cast spells known. In order to do so, he must consume a number of them equal to the spell’s level. The spell must be known, obviously. Minor complaint: The engine should mention that distillations can only be used to cast spells gained from the cruorchemist class, otherwise, the front-loaded distillation can allow for a bit of a strong synergy with some classes.

At 2nd level, the cruorchemist gains distill mutagen, which can be drunk as a standard action. One physical ability score is chosen: Strength, Dexterity, Constitution. This ability score gains a +4 alchemical bonus, the cruorchemist gets +2 natural armor bonus and the cruorchemist takes the usual -2 penalty to a mental ability score. As always, other characters shouldn’t drink this stuff. Effects last 10 minutes per class level…and the ability unfortunately does not specify how many mutagens the cruorchemist can brew per day – while it’s easy enough to default to the alchemist’s rules, it’s still a flaw.

Starting at 3rd level, the cruorchemist can use his distillations to pay for the spell level increase instead. While it is clear from the context how this is supposed to work, it should be noted that the ability’s wording is a tad bit wonky. 9th level allows the cruorchemist to apply the effects of metamagic feats to bloodline powers…which may be non-functional, depending on the bloodline chosen. A tad bit weird as well: 4th level and 7th as well as every other levels thereafter yield a metamagic feat – but aforementioned distillation/metamagic ability is gained at 3rd level, which means there’s a solid chance the ability won’t do anything for 1 level.

Starting at 6th level, the cruorchemist gains a metaspell slot: These are quasi-spellslots that allow for the use of metamagic to enhance spells beyond the level the cruorchemist could usually cast. At 6th level, a cruorchemist could e.g. cast a sickening magic missile. The metaspell slot itself is not expended, however, the ability cannot be cheesed – why? Because the cost for distillation still acts as a limiter and since this hypothetic spellslot is not consumed, it requires the consumption of distillations and regular spell slots in a combination that would sum up to the costs. 8th level and every other level increases the ability to cast thus metamagically enhanced spells by +1 – at 20th level, they could e.g. cast a quickened level 6 spell via a hypothetical 10th level metamagic spell slot. This ability is pretty complex and its presentation could be slightly clearer, but yeah – interesting.

7th level provides a homunculus, as via Craft Construct, and uses a distillation to activate it – one distillation keep it active for 24 hours. Starting at 10th level, the cruorchemist gains the ability to enhance the homunculus. They include extra eyes, acid breath, SP, spitting poison, better hides, etc. – these are nice and require distillations to activate. They last for 10 minutes per caster level and an additional such enhancement is learned at 14th and 20th level. Okay…so what action is feeding the homunculus the distillation? Unfortunately, the ability doesn’t specify and the alck of an ability type means that I can’t even resort to a default.

The pdf does sport a couple of supplemental options: 4 feats are included: Aspect of the Homunculus lets the cruorchemist temporarily assume characteristics of a homunculus. Problem: The rules-text implies that the feat transfers the abilities from a homunculus, but prerequisite-wise, the feat only lists distillation, which makes it a bit confusing. Extra distillation nets you +1 distillation (and may not be taken multiple times). Enhance Familiar allows you to use distillations to enhance familiars as though they were homunculi and Craft Advanced Homunculus nets homunculi you make the advanced creature template at +50% cost.

The class also comes with an archetype, the cruormorph. These guys lose spells, but may use distillations to cast bloodline spells as SPs in addition to the usual bloodline power activation. At 3rd level the archetype replaces metadistillation with the ability to apply metamagic feats to bloodline powers or bloodline spells. More on this particular aspect in the conclusion. 7th level replaces the metaspellslot with the ability to craft a specific distillation that allows her to apply the effect of a homunculus enhancement to herself, lasting 5 minutes + 1 minute per class level. 10th level and every 3 levels thereafter yield an additional enhancement. Okay, do these cost additional distillations? Or are the additional homunculus tricks part of the one distillation? At 10th level, the cruormorph can apply metamagic feats known to self-enhancements. Wut? Also: ALL abilities of the archetype lack ability types and are improperly formatted.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good on a formal level. On a rules-language level, the pdf feels…rushed. While the class is mostly intact, it does suffer from being rather hard to grasp, in spite of its brevity. Some cleaning up would have greatly enhanced this. The pdf comes with a solid 2-column full-color layout and decent stock art. The pdf is fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Frustrating. That’s pretty much how I’d describe the experience of reviewing this class. Why? Because the engine of the class, with all its complexities, is REALLY cool and interesting. Tim Hitchcock’s cruorchemist looks like a class that can actually make metamagic matter more.

That being said, the class also is very rough around the edges, so let’s go through it: Beyond item activation not being properly noted for some abilities, the pdf also sports a couple of seriously rough patches regarding the explanation of how the components of the class work. However, that alone wouldn’t suffice to bring it down. However, we also have some issues in formatting…and then there is the elephant in the room.

You see, the class endeavors to treat bloodline powers like spells. As though they could all be enhanced like spells. That is clearly not the case. While basic metamagic and condition-addition etc. work well enough, bloodline powers can cover a VERY WIDE range of different tricks. And many of these tricks and how they interact with metamagic get really, really wonky. Really fast. As in: I wouldn’t ever want to decide the precise effects while behind the screen. Now, there are complex rules-syntax constructs that could have covered them all – I’ve seen it done, more than once. Heck, I’ve done it myself. However, this pdf leaves you alone with this HUGE problem.

Okay, so you get a damaging aura. How do conditions apply? Hmm? How do natural weapons and the feats interact? How do action economy changes work? A significant component, perhaps THE most significant component of the class, doesn’t work and needs copious amounts of GM fiat. That’s no good.

There is also the aspect of the homunculus. It feels tacked on. As a pet, it is an afterthought at best compared to other classes. It’s gained VERY late and doesn’t really bring that much to the table – why not have a pet from level 1 or 4 onwards? Or, you know, none and instead more customization? The archetype is basically non-functional as written.

Damn, this breaks my heart. This pdf sports several red flags that tell me that something went wrong in a revision, that it wasn’t playtested sufficiently or that it was rushed. Gaining abilities that may quite frankly be useless for a whole level, for example. Or the hand-waved bloodline power/metamagic-interaction. The whole class doesn’t feel like a final release, but like a draft. You know, the thing you send to the publisher for feedback, then expand and clean up into the finished product. It’s sad, really, for I can see the 5-star potential that the class undoubtedly has. As written, though, I cannot recommend it. My final verdict will clock in at 2.5 stars, rounded down. I hope for a revision.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
The Genius Guide to the Cruorchemist
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Everyman Minis: Way of the Eight
Publisher: Rogue Genius Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/09/2017 04:48:55

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Everyman Minis-series clocks in at 7 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page advertisement, 1.5 pages of SRD, leaving us with 2.5 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

On the first page, next to the introduction, we are greeted by supplemental material – this time around, that would be 3 new feats: Eight Steps Acolyte, Eight Steps Initiate and Eight Steps Master.

But before we can take a look at them…what is this “Way of the Eight”? Well, it basically is a philosophical concept that revolves around transcending the physical limitations – it is thus geared towards martially-inclined characters. Only characters with ki, martial flexibility or stamina may attempt climbing the 8 steps – note that Combat Stamina does not suffice. Additionally, the character must have the Endurance feat. Beginning to ascend the Way of the Eight costs a swift action and 1 point ki, 1 use of martial flexibility, or 2 stamina. Stamina thus spent may not be recovered until the character has finished 8 hours of rest. On subsequent rounds, the character may expend additional uses/points and actions to ascend further. Alternatively, a character may ascend multiple steps at once as a full-round action, with costs being cumulative. A limitation regarding steps would be the base attack bonus (cool!) – in order to ascend to a step, the character’s BAB must be twice the step’s number. Step 3 would hence require a BAB of +6 or higher. Each round while the practitioner has ascended at least one step, she takes nonlethal damage equal to twice the number of steps ascended – 8 while on 4th step, for example. When using a full-round action to hasten along the journey, the character takes nonlethal damage equal to 10 times the step ascended to. Nonlethal damage thus incurred can’t be reduced or redirected, nor can they be healed unless the character has been reduced “below 1st” (here, “step” is missing) and rested for 10 minutes. Creatures immune to nonlethal damage can’t ascend on the way.

Ascending on the way grants a number of special abilities, dependant on the step, and a practitioner can remain ascended for a number of rounds equal to the character’s Constitution score – after that, it requires further ki/martial flexibility/stamina expenditure to remain ascended. If lethal and nonlethal hit point damage exceed maximum hit points, the character similarly crashes down. After losing the steps, the character remains exhausted for a number of minutes equal to the highest step reached.

Okay, that out of the Way: The Initiate feat lets you ascend as a free action, but not more than once per round. You can use it in conjunction with the usual activation actions (allowing you to take 2 steps sans the full-round action extra nonlethal damage). The Acolyte feat decreases the rank of the step by one for purpose of nonlethal damage incurred. Okay, does that mean no damage from step 1? Not sure there. The Master feat lets you retain the abilities unlocked for Constitution score minutes, with nonlethal damage only once per minute.

Okay, so what do these steps net you? First, a HD-governed atk and damage boost; at 2nd level damage die increase for weapon attacks, as though affected by lead blades/gravity bow. Step 3 nets more movement, short-burst Fly (must end on surface) and slowed falls. Step 4 nets an AC and Reflex-save boost governed by steps, as well as a DR (which is halved versus adamantine – interesting!). Step 5 nets supernatural versions of scorching ray (free) and cone of cold, fireball, lightning bolt (cost ki/martial flexibility/stamina) that deal force damage. These are SUs, with CL based on BAB and Constitution as DC-governing attribute. Step 6 nets haste. Step 7 makes movement instantaneous – the practitioner disappears and reappears at the place in question. No AoOs from foes sans Combat reflexes. For double the usual activation cost (2/2/4), the character can grant himself the benefits of displacement. (Italicization is missing.) Step 8 provides basically advantage (rolling twice, take better result) for all ability and skill checks, attacks and saves. The practitioner doesn’t lose steps upon being reduced to 0 hp, gains ferocity and adds BAB to Constitution score to determine negative hit point thresholds before dying.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are pretty good, I noticed no glaring hiccups. Layout adheres to Everyman gaming’s nice two-column standard and the full-color art is ncie. The pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Luis Loza’s “Way of the Eight” is an interesting twist on the design-paradigm of chakras presented in Occult Adventures – the flexibility and relatively painless options to ascend make sense. In fact, I could see this concept carry a whole series of pdfs or a bigger file, all with different ways. This is an interesting, fun offering. Now, personally, I would have enjoyed slightly more unique benefits from the steps, but of well – can’t have everything, right? As a whole, I enjoyed this. My final verdict will hence clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Everyman Minis: Way of the Eight
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Belly of Rot
Publisher: Wayward Rogues Publishing
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/09/2017 04:47:21

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The fourth installment of the „Whispers of the Dark Mother“-series clocks in at 26 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 2 pages of SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 21 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

As before in the series, we do get a detailed write-up on one of the deities of Celmae – this time around, the deity in question would be “The Traveler” – a good deity of travel, void, etc. – 4 domains, 4 sub-domains are included. We get notes on priest’s role, shrines, etc. – while pretty close in themes to Desna etc., it is a solid write-up.

Now what’s kinda awesome: The complex map provided for the final encounter of this module actually is printer-friendly, takes up a whole page, and is player-friendly – big kudos there. I really wished the AMAZING side-view map of the complex, which is pretty vertical, would have been included in a similar manner. I really liked it, it’s nice – but my players will never get to see it. Still, a step up from the series’ standards.

All righty, this being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the final conclusion.

..

.

All righty, only GMs around? So, the PCs come to Brynndell, the capital of the nation, following the trail to Corvun Baerg, who has a hand in the machinations of Shub-Niggurath’s cult. To be more precise, the trail leads to an ossuary/museum, the Os Domus, where a properly lined up chase promptly erupts. Goons intervene as well, and their statblock shows that…well, there are glitches and the annoying formatting deviations from statblock formatting standards are back. It’s puzzling to me to see errors in a fighter 1/rogue 1 statblock. sigh the glitches could be worse, but still. Sooner or later, the PCs will properly come in contact with the Grey Maidens and ultimately deal with “Corvun Baerg” – a double, as it turns out. PCs that did their homework will know that he recently purchased climbing equipment.

The trail leads into the wilderness, passed farmsteads where cultists anointed their journey in blood, to the grotto known as the Eternal Womb; a horse pyre, a ditched campsite, a hole in the ground – getting down into the hole will show a quasi-sub-terraneous grove, where dryads can be found – ostensibly corrupted by Shub-Niggurath’s influence, they strangely still have their CG alignment… Cool, on the other side: As seen on the cover, there is a giant, fey-touched snallygaster; there are sickly moss strands and tunnels – there is serious atmosphere here, including a doom-prophesying pillar that hints at the shape of things to come for the Shattered Skies setting. Crossing polluted water across a stagnant lake, the PCs will have to once again deal with a graven guardian as the PCs make their way towards the subterranean temple of the Dark Mother – where the aforementioned, cool battle-map-style map comes into play: Cultists chant around the Maw, a bottomless hole containing an avatar of the elder god; above which another cultist is held by ropes; the forlarren concubines of Corvun lack stats…but the satyr slayer boss does gain stats. While we get 3 cultist stat-blocks, the module isn’t very clear regarding the nature of which to use when. Unfortunately for the PCs, Corvun has already ventured forth towards the Bright Mountains, his apotheosis complete – so, at least for now, stopping that man will be the next stop on the path of the PCs trying to foil the machinations of the cult.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are okay – while there are annoying discrepancies and deviations from the standards, the statblocks are generally in a usable state. Layout adheres to a 2-column full-color standard that is rather nice. The artworks herein are a blend of neat original ones and a few stock pieces. The pdf comes fully bookmarked, which is nice. The module sports really nice cartography – one map comes in a nice, full-page player-friendly version, but I wished the same could be said of the cool overview map. As always, it is rather annoying that selecting text/cut-copying text, has been disabled.

Rodney Sloan, Robert Gresham and Simon Peter Muñoz deliver, content-wise, my favorite installment in the series so far: We have diverse challenges. Flavorful, atmospheric write-ups…and more importantly, the vertical mini-dungeon and the cool final encounter sport a lot of neat environmental hazards – this has, by far, the coolest environments in the series so far; unique, flavorful backdrops.

There are downsides to the module, though: Beyond the weak editing/formatting components, the adversaries, after the last, rather challenging two modules…are a cakewalk. The final boss is a horrid wimp. At level 4, my players would one-on-one the fellow, in spite of the environmental hazards. If the characters don’t all fail their saves against the save-or-suck low-level spells. Additionally, some of the opposition in the encounters could be defined more concisely. If the editing was tighter, then this would most assuredly be a module I could recommend more warmly. As provided, this is one of the better installments in the series, though, and may be worth getting for the low price-point for the environments and ideas.

In the end, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars. If the, at times, opaque nature of the module is something that would annoy you, round down. If you don’t care about that and are willing to work with the module, round up. My final verdict will round up due to in dubio pro reo.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Belly of Rot
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

The Doom-Cave of the Crystal-Headed Children
Publisher: Lamentations of the Flame Princess
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/09/2017 04:46:22

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This module clocks in at 58 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page back cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, leaving us with 55 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

This review is mostly based on the physical version of the book (36 pages – layout was redone for the pdf!), which was kindly provided by one of my friends/supporters. It was thus moved up in my queue as a nonprioritized review. The physical version of the module comes with a detachable cover – on the inside is the full-color map of the dungeon featured within this module.

There are a couple of different things you need to know about this module to understand it. The previous FreeRPG-offering by Lamentations of the Flame Princess, the absolutely PHENOMENAL “Better than any man”, was met with some obvious misunderstanding; it was partially boycotted etc. for its mature content in both violence and the few, subdued sexual themes. It was designated as a module for adults, ages 18+. I don’t get it. At all. Anyway, this is not where things stopped – instead, there were some seriously messed up claims about the, admittedly, dark themes of the module – it was supposedly about “killing children.” It was supposedly extremely random, unfair, etc. – the claims kept piling up. While BTAM is hard and unforgiving, as anyone who has actually read the module can attest, these claims have in common that they’re patently FALSE.

Well, you know what happens when you poke the bear, right? So, this time around, we get a module that is based on all the things that folks complained about. An unforgiving, merciless, extremely random module that is, in a way, about killing children. Kind of. But not really. That being said, this is NOT a module that takes itself seriously. It’s perhaps the most ironic, sarcastic module I have ever read. If the basic premise, its adult content (it’s 18+ for a reason), sounds like something you’d hate, then steer clear. Similarly, if you don’t have a sense of humor and if your player can’t get into a mindset of playing a ridiculously lethal, highly random meat-grinder, of experiencing “funny” deaths, then you should probably stay away.

If you’re still undecided or repulsed, please continue reading:

One of my basic tenets in RPGs is that I simply don’t want to see kids being slain. In the end, we’re playing a game, and while the death of children can make for high stakes, the PCs should have at least a chance to save them. I usually strongly object to PCs being faced with kid “enemies” – i.e. adversaries that primarily exist to be vanquished.

In this case, I am okay with the premise, though – and you’ll soon see why, when I’m discussing the storyline. In order to do so, though, I have to go into SPOILER-territory. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.

..

.

All right, only referees around? Great!

So, in a small town, something weird happened – women from the age of 14 to 48 suddenly all freak out. Andrew is missing. Who is Andrew? Well, no one seems to really know – the women claim that they gave birth to a blond, blue-eyed kid named Andrew. Their families and other kids have never hear of Andrew and confrontation of multiple women exhibiting the same phenomena does not yield help either. The premise is eerie, horrific and gloriously weird and could easily be scavenged in a variety of cool ways. The women are, understandably, distraught about the loss of “their” individual Andrew – so, in order to reestablish peace, it’ll take some investigation on behalf of the PCs.

The truth is pretty much guaranteed to end any discussion of whether you should take this module seriously: Arthur Presterton Stuart-Lethbridge, former member of the clergy, found himself enamored with the dark arts of sorcery. He found a cave with strange crystals and found a neural interface, using his mystic powers to tap into the crystal. Which proceeded to dump 22 centuries of knowledge right into his brain – basically, he had our world’s internet and more downloaded straight into his brain, leaving his identity in tatters. In its place, there was the powerful Wiki Dot Pod, an amalgamation of entities worshipped by the “aliens” (aliens or…well, you know, impossibly futuristic versions of us…) who left the crystal there. His brain is suffused with useless trivia, brands, basic urges – you name it. His demeanor changed to reflect an amalgamation of all bad super villain/dictator tropes. He did not gain wisdom, alas – and so he did what you’d expect with the crystalline machinery, considering its potentially gene-altering powers – he proceeded to…how to put that delicately…hump one of its valves. The eponymous crystal children began appearing. And so, now he plots for WORLD DOMINATION! Of course!

You see, the telepathic computer inside the crystal can splice together DNA – it can create owlbear-like things and has some norms that it adheres to. If only one sample of sexual reproduction is provided, it will begin scanning the vicinity – once it finds a genetic match, it telepathically extracts a DNA sample from the living match and generates – bingo, a crystal-headed kid. Andrew.

How could anyone take this seriously?

Okay, okay, so, the kids – they actually have an interesting mechanic – namely a tree: As long as many of them exist, they are individually weak – but the more crystal-headed kids your PCs elect to murder-hobo, the tougher the survivors become – the more hit points they’ll have, the more HD and the more mêlée damage they’ll inflict. Which is an interesting set-up, critter idea-wise. (Easy to reskin, if the concept of crystal-headed children offends you and yours…)

Anyways, here’s the thing – neither Wiki, nor the crystal-headed children are per se hostile – short of attacking him and/or messing with his stuff/private rooms/etc., Wiki will be…kinda nice. As far as completely bonkers guys go. The only crystal-headed children that are hostile would be some mutated rejects – the early prototypes, if you will – 4 of them can be found, locked away in one room of the dungeon. Fun fact: The crystal-headed children will obey their parents (who recognize them as “their” Andrew) flawlessly. You can make that a statement on stifling creative impulses, a scathing commentary on both private and public education – or you can just take it in-game and use the distraught mothers to solve the adventure without having to deal with killing them. Yes. That’s generally possible. Unlikely, but yeah.

Sooo, the dungeon. The dungeon actually has next to nothing to do with the story, the children, or Wiki. It basically is the rebuttal to the claims of randomness. Cranked up to 11. In the dungeon, there are colored buttons. A ton of them. At the end of dead-ends. There are 10 (!!!) tables of random effects for pressing them. These include getting an alien implant – upon exiting the cave, basically unbeatable super-aliens arrive. Two factions of them. They vaporize everything. There’s a chance that the planet’s destroyed. Why? Because random. The button pressed also influences a room, where liquid boils – and, you guessed it, random effects for vapors and contact, depending on color. Yes, the majority of effects are not benevolent. There is also a sentient gas that can generate a direct link to a deity for believers. Oh, and the gas thinks that character number 1 entering it is the standard – after that, it tries to adjust other life forms. A PC may also inadvertently fuse his head with a 15-ton disk of crystal, becoming the crystal king – who may command all crystal-headed beings. Hey, another way to solve the module sans killing everything! (Okay, you’ll be stuck with a massive, crystal disk on your head…but yeah…)

The random encounters are similarly weird and potentially may offend devout Christians – the crystals, at one point, try to soothe the PCs, generating a comforting image to lead them – Jesus Christ. Who bleeds bread and fish when cut. Yes, there’s an image. There are also a couple of beings in containment crystals – a fighter, a lizard-beast without heads, but two rear-ends (cue insert Futurama jokes…) and a being that constantly exudes glue. Because…you know….That’s why!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no serious issues. Layout adheres to a nice two-column b/w-standard. The pdf sports color maps, the print copy only has the overview map in color. The artworks by Gennifer Bone in b/w are well done. The pdf comes fully bookmarked and with customization layers as well as internal hyperlinks to the map. That being said, none of the layers allow you to turn of the annoying numbers on the map – which means that there’s no real player-friendly version of it. Cartography is btw. not bad – it does its job.

James Edward Raggi IV’s adventure is significantly less grotesque and horrible than I frankly figured it’d be. Seriously, after all the complaints and screaming online, I thought that this would be a grimdark monster of a module, something stomach-churning, something despicable.

It’s none of these things. If your PCs are inclined to murder-hobo everything…then yes. Then this will be a pretty dark affair. Heck, it can turn out that way, even if you don’t plan it. Because: Random! That being said, it is so hilariously outrageous and over the top in its characters, the premise, etc. that I really don’t get why anyone would take it at face value.

Which brings me to the more relevant point: Is this a good module? HECK NO. It’s random as all hell. The premise is mired, at least RAW, in intentionally atrocious design-choices. The dungeon is, by design, so random that it’s nigh unbeatable. If you value your characters, game world, etc., then steer clear of this module. Would I pay for the print version? Nope. Sorry. I’m a collector, yes, but just for its shock-value and funny moments? Nope.

That being said, at the same time, this does have its merits, if only for a special set of audiences: Do you and your group share a really black sense of humor? Can you enjoy deliberately dickish design, laugh about it on a meta-level? Can you laugh about ridiculous, potentially really unfair PC deaths? Then this may be worth checking out – the electronic version is PWYW, after all! I can see myself enjoying this module under very specific circumstances: Namely, when I’m playing a one-shot at a con, am really drunk and playing with a group of likeminded, similarly inebriated and fun-seeking individuals. In such a context, this may be a hilarious blast. In a sober state, personally, I did not consider the module per se funny – the premise? Yeah, you can work with that. Even some aspects of the dungeon. But the dungeon itself is so mired in utterly random ridiculous events and actions that it would annoy the heck out of me in a sober state.

In a nutshell: This is not the antichrist of modules; considering its genesis, it’s more playable than anticipated. But its flaws make it hard to recommend this as anything more than a curiosity. If you want excellence, get “Better than any man.”

How to rate this? Well, honestly, I should probably rate it lower regarding its design, but since I can see value in the farcical nature of the module, my final verdict will be 2.5 stars, rounded up due to the PWYW nature of the pdf.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
The Doom-Cave of the Crystal-Headed Children
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Archdevils of Porphyra
Publisher: Purple Duck Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/08/2017 05:19:32

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Porphyran books on potent entities clocks in at 18 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of SRD, leaving us with 15 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

All righty, this pdf should come as no surprise to anyone who read the Caster Prestige Archetype series – much like the installment on Demon Lords, there is a class in that series that ties directly into the portrayals herein. The archdevils within this pdf come with full Inner Sea Gods-level of support – this means that we get a reprint of the Deific Obedience feat as well as 3 boons per archdevils to add some customization options to the respective worshiper.

The respective archdevil entries mention not only favored weapon, but also favored instrument and favored animal. Domain-wise, the Big chief Sathax gains 4 (as well as 4 sub-domains), with the other archdevils gaining 3 domains and subdomains, respectively. There is one exception to this rule, but I’ll get to that later. It should also be noted that each of the respective archdevils comes with a spell-preparation ritual and, obviously, an obedience. But yeah, Sathax – this fellow, the Grand Archdevil, the snake in a robe is elitist – and in the grand tradition of archdevils, his cult and worshipers emphasize quality over quantity – no wonder, the 3rd boon lets you 1/month, on full moon nights, beseech the archdevil for a wish – not a big fan of making this a Diplomacy check with just a single DC – a more modular DC would have been more elegant here, but that is just a design-aesthetic complaint – since the boon is restricted, I have no issues with its massive power.

The Chained Queen, born from a tryst between Sathax’s deceased wife and the god Kamus, the divine child has become ruler of her own empire, courtesy of Sathax’ grace in the face of pristine logic. Subversion, self-flagellation and “just following orders” are leitmotifs for the lady. Nice dressing: A rosary-type linked chain that acts as a means to depict rank in the church.

Duke Melektus is all about seeming; about appearances over substance; the fellow is the tarnished child of light, twisted to lead the mortals astray – from blood-letting to other quak-remedies, he is also the patron of healing – though of healing that is tainted; the boons reflect that really well, with e.g. parasitic powers. Truly unique and flavorful write-up!

Duke Mastema, Khan of the Asherake, is the second son of Sathax – bold where, Melektus is subservient. He chose to rise through the ranks of devilkind and sports only contempt for mankind, preferring more powerful races – he is the concept of merit blended with elitis on a racial basis. Nice!

Duchess Hadriel is the firstborn of Sathax, mistress of domination. Her mere presence enslaves mortal minds and she prefers females to males, causing some consternation in hell’s hierarchies. Ambitious beyond belief, she hopes to claim proper demi-goddess-status…and she is slowly getting there, with calculations and a focus on myth/planning serving as a backdrop to her boundless ambition. Ibolis is Sathax’ ally – at least as far as that is possible for a being of pure darkness, the master of singularity. Mysterious, intriguing and shrouded in a veil of secrecy, the arch-devil is not part of the family of Sathax, but he is sufficiently strange to act as an intriguing wildcard. Now, I did mention the offspring of the grand lord of hell’s wife before – this demigod and archdevil would be Kram-Hotep. He is really interesting, embodying the fear of dying, of being lost in the fabric of history. Mortality, to be remembered – his Twilight-Pyramid and unique flavor most assuredly make him stand out – he seeks not souls, but slaves. Courtesy of his status, he does gain 4 different domains, not just 3. All in all, I enjoyed all of the archdevils presented herein.

The pdf then proceeds to depict a variety of infernal magic items – framed by some prose, we get 8 different items: Books of Infernal Extortion contain names – monsters and beings identified can then be commanded, even at range via e.g. whispering wind – on a failed save, we have a curse on their hands…nasty! At 8K, pretty inexpensive, but the evil nature should keep it out of PC hands. Hopefully. Cloaks of fiendish recovery allow the wearer to crouch down, becoming invisible. They can reveal themselves in a puff of smoke and provide limited spell recovery. While only usable once per day, I wished that the activation action was more precise than “crouching down” – not a big issue, since you can research that, but yeah. Coins of corruption are lucky for LE beings and hamper the healing received by others. Really cool!! The Cube of Kram is a twist on the Hellraiser-cube, tied to Kram-Hotep’s domain – it can be cheesed…by intention! You see, that’s part of the fun here and actually comes fully codified in rules regarding responses taken. Cool!

Flails of humiliation cause nonlethal bonus damage versus foes with resistance and immunity to electricity – nice one. I can see devils enjoying this. Rod of cynical duality heals targets, but also shatters objects – and it MUST alternate. There’s a price to be paid, I guess… The Sceptre of Seven Circles is an artifact – the rod of the king of devilkind and allows the wielder to command legions of devils. Finally, superior’s rings are really creative: You designate a target in sight before initiative is rolled; Your initiative is set at +1 higher than the target. Amazing! While very potent in mythic contexts, it can actually help NPCs defeat the rocket launcher tag-strategy. In regular contexts, it most assuredly can be a puzzling, fun item to stick on foes. All in all, a really cool magic item section.

The pdf also contains new spells: The Blessing of Sathax fortifies your d20-rolls with Charisma-modifier 1/round. Commision Pergensia Bodyguard nets you a powerful bodyguard – not to fight for you, but to keep you from harm. Well. Devils. You’ll better shore up on your logic skills. Enforce fate can only target a foe once per 24 hours: The caster rolls 5 d20s and the target has to use the results in the order determined by the caster. NASTY! Hard darkness is basically a darkness and solid fog crossover. Hotep’s Inexorable Pyramid is a REALLY creative variant of forcecage. Love it. Odious betrayal is also really creative: It penalizes teamwork sharing and similar support with damage and negative conditions – powerful, but requires the set-up of a creature under a compulsion. Really cool. Summon petitioner slave is self-explanatory. The spells cover the occult and ACG-classes as well, just fyi.

Next up are two new subdomains: Betrayal is a subdomain of Evil – it allows you to steal the AC of allies. Nice idea. The blackmail subdomain of the knowledge domain ties in with lorekeeper and allows you to penalize foes. Caps for the subdomain abilities prevent abuse. Nice. There also is the cold domain, with a numbing touch and later, an aura of cold. Nice. Next up is a whole page of traits. These include 1/day causing a target to lose 1 point of initiative. Bonus types are, with one exception, concisely codified and the traits are meaningful without being overpowered.

The final page of this pdf is devoted to the Suppligon devil, a CR 8 goat-thing with 5 flaming eyes in pentacle-form. Yeah, damn creepy! The stats are solid as well – huge kudos!

The pdf also comes with a bonus-pdf, also penned by Perry Fehr, which depicts the Rancor Daemon (CR 14): Warlords with huge, mantis-like claws, whip-like tongues and massive swords, they look incredibly badass, are commanders that get better when supported by nearby daemons– and sport neat, solid stats – big kudos for a really neat bonus critter!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch on both a formal and rules-language, I noticed no true glitches herein. Layout adheres to a printer-friendly 2-column standard with purple highlights. The pdf sports a ton of artworks: Full-color symbols for all archdevils and the monsters also get amazing, full-color artworks – all original and damn cool! The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

When Perry Fehr takes his time to properly craft his material (or when his glorious ideas are properly streamlined by a good developer), something beautiful happens. This is a prime example of such a case. This pdf is refined, professional and amazing – the archdevils all sport at least one unique angle; they breathe the proper flavor. The obediences are creative.

Creativity. That’s something you can find in pretty much all of Perry’s pdfs, but here, the creativity is paired with proper, careful execution, marrying the art and craftsmanship aspects of design. In short: This is an inspired, amazing pdf I wholeheartedly recommend. Oh, it’s also, much like all of PDG’s books, open content. In short: This deserves being supported. If you enjoy the infernal and need some great tools, then check this out. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Archdevils of Porphyra
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Star Log.EM-001: Exocortex Options
Publisher: Rogue Genius Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/08/2017 05:16:21

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This small supplement for Starfinder clocks in at 8 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of advertisement, 1.5 pages of SRD, leaving us with 2.5 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

So, this time around,w e take a look at new options for the exocortex choice of the mechanic – at 2nd level or higher, mechanics get 3 new choices for mechanic tricks: Enemy database builds on combat tracking: When you’re tracking a foe, you may substitute Computers to identify the tracked creature instead of using the usual skill; however, failed attempts can only be retried after 10 minutes, at which point you may take 20 on the skill as though accessing a database. The Exocortex datajack makes the exocortex count as a datajack with an item level equal to your mechanic level, allowing for combination with a custom rig. If connected to a network or data set, you may make Computers to recall information related to a variety of skills. As per the clarification-request of one of my readers: The exocortex gains the ability to work as a datajack, freeing your brain augment slot. This exocortex datajack may by used with custom rigs, etc.

Improved combat tracking lets you attempt an identification of a tracked creature when attacking with a special property or small/long arm – on a success, the attack deals + class level damage. This stacks with Weapon Specialization. Only one target takes this bonus damage, if multiple ones are targeted.

There also are 3 tricks unlocked at 8th level – the first would be AI Usurpation: The exocortex must have access to the system to hack and uploading the exocortex into the system is a move action – a total of 2d4 rounds need to be expended thus, and the exocortex uploaded behaves like an AI using your social skills and only obeys your spoken command. While thus uploaded, you lose all exocortex abilities and mechanic tricks tied to the exocortex. Instead, you gain an untyped bonus on all Computer, Engineering and Piloting checks involving the hacked vessel. Additionally, this bonus extends to starship stunts and crew actions and you may spend 1 Resolve Point at the start of the round to gain an additional crew action. If unused, said action is lost, as is the Resolve Point. Downloading the AI again also takes time, and losing it lets you replace it without much hassle. While uploaded, the AI can’t fill a starship crew role.

Martial rewire lets you treat your mechanic level as BAB for prerequisite purposes of combat feats. You select 3 combat feats for which you meet the prerequisites. As a move action, you can have your muscle memory rewired, gaining one of these feats until you spend a Resolve Point and have a 10-minute rest to regain Stamina, at which point you can change the feat you have access to. Upon gaining a level, you can change the combat feats in question. Enhanced memory lets you reroll Int-based skill checks, even if not recalling. You may also spend 1 Resolve Point as a reaction to failing such a check, gaining a reroll at +5.

Finally, there are two tricks that are unlocked at 14th level – the first of these would be construct usurpation, which does what it says on the tin, thankfully with a CR-cap and a temporary duration – this duplicates control machines (not italicized) in a way, with the AI handling concentration, allowing you to act normally. Nice balancing tool: 1/24 hour caveat. Enhanced martial rewire nets you a second set of 3 combat feats to choose from, and allows you to access two of your pool of 6 at once.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting, on both a formal and a rules-language level, are very good. No complaints here, apart from a missed italicization. Layout adheres to a nice, colorful two-column full-color standard. The artwork featured is nice and the pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Alexander Augunas’ exocortex options makes sense to me – while the added crew action is potent, it makes sense to me – so do the virtual feats. Note that RAW, martial rewiring does not allow you to stack combat feats due to the prerequisite fulfillment caveat, which prevents abuse of feat trees there – breadth instead of depth. As a whole, I enjoyed this supplement and consider it to be a sensible addition to the mechanic’s options. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Star Log.EM-001: Exocortex Options
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Genies (5E)
Publisher: Tribality Publishing
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/08/2017 05:14:37

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This supplement clocks in at 22 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, leaving us with an impressive 19 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Know what’s curiously underdeveloped in 5e so far? Well, d’uh, genies. As such, we begin with a summary of the psyche and social organization of genie-kind, speaking of the addictive qualities of genie-power (if you’re fluent in German, the underground-rockband Caputt made a whole album on the concept: “Djinndustrie”, which translates to genie-industry…); genies are potent, but as you can e.g. tell from the efreet as depicted in Catherynne M. Valente’s second book of the Orphan Tales saga, their interaction with mortals is more complex than you’d expect – the boundaries of master and slave are fluid and their elemental natures have, for a long time, made them significantly more interesting, at least to me, than most other denizens of the elemental planes.

After a brief general overview, we begin with short descriptions of the ruling bodies/organizations of the genies: From the blazing citadel (get City of Brass’ boxed set if you can!) to the Earthen Court, the House of the Tempest and finally, the Vigilant Council, these organizational contexts help elucidate the alien nature of genies – it may be a small thing for you, but I absolutely love that we get some proper lore to contextualize them. The write-ups on the respective ideologies are inspired indeed. From this context, we move on to not just some paltry, general stats (which would probably become invalid as soon as WotC publishes “official” genie material) – instead, we focus on unique NPCs, one for each of the elements.

One of the sultans serving the pasha of the Earthen Court gains the title “Armor of Mercy” – in this instance, that would be mighty Khem-Nefer, who clocks in at an impressive challenge 16. He is frickin’ EPIC. He comes with legendary actions and is nigh unstoppable. Why? Not only can he turn into sand to pursue his foes, he also gains massive healing when he does not expend all of his legendary actions. Oh, and resistance to physical damage when he acts that way. Really cool, though, apart from a very minor formatting hiccup, the clinging sand ability: I get that creatures can pass it on (which is cool!), but what does “become inundated with clinging sand” mean, rules-wise? As written, it seems to be just a set-up for his petrifying legendary action, but sense-wise, the ability feels like it could inflict a condition like restrained. Just sayin’. On the plus-side, we actually also doe get lair actions for his earthen keep! These are cool, though a spell-italicization is missing.

Nafurat Min Al-Atham would be the Fountain of Misdeeds, who also clocks in at a mighty challenge 16. Once again, we have cool interactions with legendary actions – this time around, the option to target creatures adjacent to the target of his attacks. Now, as I am a hardcore bastard, I will make this bonus damage drench targets – something that RAW only the geyser ability does (which, oddly, deals cold damage). Why? Because drenched targets may be drowned via a legendary action that costs 2 of them. And it makes more sense in game. I get the rationale for the design as written, but personally, I think water bursts and torrents strong enough to cause damage should qualify as drenching foes. We get lair actions as well – beyond missed spell-italicization, one duplicates a spell that has at-higher levels variants and thus may have warranted a note there – just as a cosmetic observation. This would be as well a place as any to note that, while as a whole the average damage-values can be found herein, they are not present everywhere – they are e.g. missing from one lair action of Khem-Nefer, Nafurat Min Al-Atam’s torrent bonus damage…you get the idea. This does not impede the functionality of the genies, but yeah. Something to be aware of.

The champion of fire depicted herein would be Nahas Al-Aizdira, the Lady of Clanging Bells (once again, you guessed it, challenge 16), follows a similar design: We get a reflexive fire shield for retaining legendary actions, and one of them costs 2 legendary actions for a particularly nasty effect – but requires the setting-up via another feature, namely immolate. Problematic here, from a rules-integrity perspective: “A creature that is immolated..:” is the requirement – and RAW, the immolate ability does not “immolate” targets – it just renders them frightened and deals continuous fire damage. Yes, it’s clear what’s meant, but still. As the other genies, she can turn into her element while moving, but unfortunately, this movement, oddly, does not cause fire damage to targets. Here, a bit less redressing and more customization would have made sense. This would be as well a place as any to note that “attacks of opportunity” do not exist in 5e – the correct terminology is “opportunity attacks.”

The final of the mighty genies, Murat Al-Huzn, the Mirror of Sorrow, follows the same design paradigm established for the other genies. One of his legendary actions, alas, is a mess: He creates copies of up to 3 different creatures he can see. Okay, where? Next to him? Next to the creatures? At any place? These copies mimic the actions of the copied targets. Okay, do they roll their own attacks or use the ones of the characters they copied? No idea. I get what this tries to do, but RAW, this doesn’t work. That being said, the 2-action cost legendary action of this fellow is properly codified (though missing average damage values).

The second chapter of the pdf is devoted to exclusive spells of the genies: 4 cantrips are provided, which include a conjured bow that fires arrows of lightning, an earthen shield that protects against mundane missiles, a lance of fire that you can hurl or wield in melee and a maul that deals cold damage and grants temporary hit points. These cantrips are interesting and suggested classes are noted – though it should be said that all are pretty potent. Big plus: Each spell comes with a flavor-paragraph that makes it feel more than just a collection of rules. We also get 1st and 4th level spells for each of the elements. Cool regarding the 1st-level spells: They interact with the cantrips! They have regular benefits and basically allow for the buffing of the cantrips for a combo choice that enforces player agenda – in the example of the lightning arrows, you create e.g. static fields of lightning. Pretty cool concepts! That being said, the spells note “The next [insert cantrip name] you cast before the end of your turn (the spells can be cast as bonus actions) creates xyz…” – does this mean that only one such cantrip spell is enhanced during the 1-hour duration? Or does this apply to ALL of them? The latter would be pretty overkill…A discharge/end-wording-caveat would have made sense here.

The self-buffs gained at 4th level are pretty cool, sporting 3 benefits (one has 4): One resistance, and one or more special action/bonus action/reaction options. The final spell, blessing of the wind princess, fails to specify to what the reaction-use applies, though. Power-wise, they are all pretty potent.

The final chapter deals with 11 genie-themed magic items. These are pretty cool: The armor of the martyred Khedive sports three defensive abilities, powered by its charges; beads of miracles generate major illusions (spell slot properly noted!), which is cool. The sentence: “typically, 1d4+1 beads of farce[sic!] are bound together.” Is, however, symptomatic of the editing glitches that haunt this pdf. Carpets that burst into flames, heavy dinnerware that can be used as weapons (inflicting what type of damage?), a gem that can add fire damage to bows…interesting. Pretty potent: There is a globe that nets advantage on initiative and lets you swap initiative with the target, over which the globe hovers. Okay, so how far can it hover? Is it restricted by boundaries? Do you get to choose your ally? What is the trigger-requirement for the reaction? Cool idea, problematic execution. Gloves that can grant necrotic damage claws or summon insect plagues, a cursed hat the nets stinking cloud, but penalizes your Charisma checks and saves, a weapon blessed by water, which helps versus ice…there are a lot of cool items here. On an aesthetic side, e.g. the spear of the earthen court lacks the bullet point type presentation of aforementioned armor, which was weird, but is not something I’d penalize this booklet for.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are the crux of this pdf – they feel rushed on both a formal and rules-language level. Layout adheres to a 2-column full-color standard and the artworks are the photography-stlye pictures I’ve come to expect from and like in Tribality’s offerings. The pdf lacks bookmarks, which constitutes an unnecessary comfort detriment.

Damn. You know, I love Colin McLaughlin’s genies for 5e. I really do. They OOZE passion, flavor and play well; the GM gets some nasty, cool tricks to pull off here. While all use the design design-paradigm, that may be intentional to create a sense of cohesion. It’s not what I’d consider problematic. However, I do believe that some modifications to account for elemental peculiarities would have made them shine even more. The spells and magic items, while not perfect, also breathe a deep love of the subject matter, and are, dare I say it, inspiring. This pdf has all the components of a 5 star + seal of approval gem. While there are no artworks for the genies, I have always preferred substance over shiny artworks; give me a cool critter sans art over a broken mess any day of the week.

Which brings me to the issue at hand: As inspired as this is, it seriously could have used a strict editor. I stopped counting formatting hiccups at one point. There are a lot of missed italicizations etc. More relevant and pretty grievous: There are issues in the rules-language that compromise the RAW functionality of the options herein, minor hiccups in the math…you get the idea. They accumulate to the point where I can’t unanimously recommend the pdf as much as I’d dearly love to. While the small glitches accumulate, it is the big ones that truly drag this down from the lofty rating-perches that it deserves.

Don’t get me wrong – I can totally see where all the raving reviews for this file come from: At $2.95, this offers a neat bang-for-buck ratio and oozes flair. I like to picture roleplaying game design as both an art and a craft: The artistry can’t be taught; you either have it, or you don’t. This pdf has this component, in spades. It does falter, however, in the department of craftsmanship – not in the general craft of the design itself, mind you. The overall impression a cursory analysis provided, was one of a file I’d celebrate for being amazing. But once you take a look at the details, the issues accumulate, the imperfections show. The good news is: This aspect can be learned rather easily.

This is, to my knowledge, the author’s freshman offering - it is thoroughly impressive for that. But at the same time, not even the freshman bonus that I grant new authors can make me round up here; for that, the obvious and often glaring minor hiccups are too numerous. My final verdict will hence clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded down. I hope this will be revised at one point. Dear author, if you read this: Please don’t be disheartened. Keep creating. You have potential.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Genies (5E)
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Starfarer's Companion
Publisher: Rogue Genius Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/07/2017 09:55:20

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive expansion-tome for Starfinder clocks in at 235 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 229 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

This review was moved up in my reviewing-queue as a prioritized review.

Okay, so the content herein is contextualized by the Xa-Osoro system – while we only get a brief introduction to this meta-setting, it does influence components of the following material – for example, the languages, which are noted in the beginning of the race section. Speaking of which: This is basically a massive crunch-book that takes care of several concepts that are beloved, yet not already covered by SFRPG; as such, we begin with races. A ton of them. As such, the respective racial write-ups note homeworlds, society and alignment, etc. I’ll be brief regarding the races, since most of them should be familiar to PFRPG players.

Aasimars: +2 to one ability, 4 hp, resistance to acid, cold and electricity (“resistance” is missing once, in a purely cosmetic hiccup) as well as SR equal to 6 + character level versus evil spells. They gain +2 to Diplomacy, Perception and Intimidate, have darkvision and can manifest a halo, which acts as a portable light with an item level equal to or less than the aasimar’s level. I assume that to be “character level” – minor hiccup in the rules here that happens twice – also in regards to the Daylight 1/day SP.

Catfolk gain +2 Dex and Cha, -2 Wis, 4 hp, +2 on Reflex saves (and 1/day roll twice, take the better result), low-light vision, +2 to Perception, Stealth and Survival and +10 ft. when charging, running or withdrawing.

The deoxyian race would be all new: They gain 6 hp and choose a player race at 1st level. They count as the chosen race and as deoxyians and develop a racial trait of the chosen race. More can be chosen by taking Expanded Deoxyomorphism as a replacement feature at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th or 18th level. They gain +2 Int, +2 to an ability of their choice and -2 to an ability of their choice that does not already have a “bonus from race.” 1/day, they can take 10 on a d20 roll or check (except those failing on a natural 1) and gain +1 to checks they take 10 in.

Dhampirs get +2 Dex and Cha, -2 Con, 4 hp low-light vision and darkvision and are dazzled in bright lights. They gain +2 to Perception and Bluff and when saving against disease and mind-affecting effects and take no penalties from level drain, though they still can perish from accrued negative levels.

Grippli (YEAH!) get +2 Dex and Wis, -2 Str, 2 hp, speed 20 ft. (plus climbing speed 20 ft.), +2 to Stealth, darkvision, +4 to Athletics made to jump (and are treated as having a running start). They also secrete poison 1/day as a swift action (which passes grippli armor to be on the outside of it – think semi-permeable membrane) and may coat their melee weapons in the poison.

Ifrit gain +2 Dex and Cha, -2 Wis, 4 hp, darkvision and may create the flashlight equivalent of flame as a free action. 1/day, as a standard action, the ifrit can generate a firebomb with an item level equal to the ifrit’s level (should be character level). They gain +2 to saves versus fire-based effects and +2 to initiative.

Of course, we also get Kitsune, who gain +2 Dex and Cha, -2 Str, 4 hp, +2 to Acrobatics and Athletics, change shape and Kitsune with Cha of 11+ gain at-will dancing light. They may choose Magical Tail as a replacement class feature at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th, and 18th level. They also gain low-light vision and their natural weapons deal 1d3 lethal damage and isn’t treated as archaic – analogue to the Vesk ability.

Kobolds get +2 Dex and Con, -2 Str, 2 hp, are Small, get +1/2 level (should be character level) to damage rolls with attacks and spells versus foes that are flat-footed, off-kilter or denied their Dexterity bonus. They get +2 Engineering, Perception, Profession and Stealth. They also gain a 1d2 natural weapon, otherwise analogue in function to the Vesk. They gain +1 resolve point at 1st level and have darkvision and are dazzled in bright light.

Mechanoi are sentinet constructs with the technological subtype. They have a size of Small or Medium, speed 20 ft. and have no Constitution score. Problem here: Having one ability score less does influences character creation/point assignment – the pdf should acknowledge that and provide alternate. The race gets +2 Str and Int, -2 Cha, 6 hp, +4 to saves versus mind-affecting effects (and no immunity). Spells that target constructs or robots and don’t allow for saves now do for the race, with an engineer. They take -2 to Sense Motive and such checks against them are also at +2 DC. They also get to choose to minor mods and a major mod, which work as basic drone mods. Once chosen, this can be changed via a mnemonic editor. Additional Mechanoi Mod may be chosen as replacement feature at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th and 18th level. Mechanoi have low-light vision.

Nagaji get +2 Str and Cha, -2 Int, 6 hp, +1 to AC, low-light vision, +2 to Perception, +2 to saves versus poison and mind-affecting effects. They can spit poison as a ranged attack versus EAC, 10 ft. range and one range increment. The poison temporarily blinds foes on a failed save and may be used 1/day.

Oread get +2 Str and Wis, -2 Cha, 8(!!!) hp, 20 ft. speed, darkvision, +1 to AC, 1d3 natural weapon (analogue to Vesk) and +2 to saves versus acid- and earth-based effects and attacks. They also get acid resistance 5.

Samsarans receive +2 Int and Wis, -2 Con, 4 hp, low-light vision, +2 to saves versus death- and negative-energy effects and to saves to remove negative levels, They also get +2 to Constitution checks to stabilize. They get one 0-level mystic spell as an at-will SP and may choose Minor Psychic Power sans meeting the prerequisite. They gain +2 to two skills of their choice and add them to their list of class skills.

Suli get +2 Str and Cha, -2 Int, 4 hp and low-light vision. They gain acid resistance, cold resistance, electricity resistance and fire resistance 5. As a swift action 1/day, they can shroud their arms in elemental energy (4 types mentioned before), for +1d6 damage of the chosen type to “all attacks made with their hands or weapons held in their hands.” – I think this is supposed to refer to melee weapons, but RAW, it holds true for ranged weapons as well, which is a serious difference regarding the power of the ability. The ability lasts for 1 round per character level.

Sylphs have +2 Dex and Int, -2 Con, 2 hp, darkvision, +2 to Acrobatics, Piloting and Stealth. They gain electricity resistance and +2 to saves versus air- and electricity-based effects. They can use Acrobatics to glide. They also increase their maneuverability by one step. Tengus get +2 Dex and Wis, -2 Con, low-light vision, +2 to Culture checks (and learn 2 languages per rank in Culture gained). They get +2 to Perception and Stealth and natural weapons (1d3); they are proficient with basic and advanced melee weapons and gain specialization with them at 3rd level.

Tieflings get +2 Dex and Int, -2 Cha, 4 hp, darkvision, +2 to Bluff, Slight of Hand, Stealth. They get cold, electricity and fire resistance 5 as well as SR 6 + character level against good spells. They gain a fiendish extremity and may choose to gain one as a replacement feature at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 12th and 18th level. These include a prehensile tail, scaly skin, natural weapons and vestigial wings.

Undine gain +2 Dex and Wis, -2 Str, 4 hp, swim speed 30 ft., can breathe water and doesn’t take penalties when fighting underwater. They are immune to the effects of depth and pressure and gain Athletics as a class skill as well as darkvision. They can quench up to 5 sq-ft. fire with a touch sans taking damage and 1/day may execute bull rush, disarm, dirty trick (blind/dazzle only) or trip with a 30 ft.-range. They can use their character level instead of BAB for the roll. Problem: The ability doesn’t specify the activation action – I assume standard action. They get +2 to saves versus cold-and water-based effects.

Vanara get +2 Wis, 4 hp, are shapechangers, with 30 ft. speed, 20 ft. climbing speed, may change size between Small and Medium and, while Small, they get +2 Dex and -2 Str, but their Dex in medium armor may not exceed 16. Longtails get +2 Acrobatics, Sleight of Hand and Stealth and have a prehensile tail that can hold +1 item at the ready. Whitecape vanara get +2 Athletics, Intimidate and Perception, Improved Unarmed Strike and +2 to KAC versus bull rush and trip. They gain low-light vision.

Vishkanya get +2 Dex and Cha, -2 Wis, 4 hp, get +5 Disguise to pass as humans, +2 to Acrobatics and Stealth, low-light vision, +character level as a bonus to saves versus poison. When they have taken at least 1 hp damage, as a swift action, they can 1/day apply their poisonous blood (saliva sans damage) to melee weapons. Wayang get +2 Dex and Int, -2 Wis, 2 hp, 20 ft. speed. I am not sure regarding their size – I assume Small. The race gets darkvision. They can, as a standard action 1/day use invisibility as a SP. Wayang can reverse spells that behave differently versus undead/the living as a reaction, counting as undead or living, respectively. This can be used 1/day. They gain +2 Perceptio and Stealth and +2 to saves versus illusions.

All right, as a whole, the race-chapter has me a bit concerned. While there is no really broken race herein, there are a couple of races that exceed in power what we get in the Starfinder core book. More relevant would be the numerous cosmetic hiccups in rules-language (level vs. character level – particularly weird, since some abilities (like natural weapons) taken directly from the SF core book’s abilities often specify character level in the core book… There are also a few instances, where the rules are a bit wobbly. Not to the point where I’d consider the section problematic, but it’s less refined than what I’m used to see from the authors.

Okay, so next up would be no less than 6 (!!!) classes for SFRPG: We get an adaptation of bard, cleric, magus, paladin, ranger and wizard.

In all brevity: Bards get 6 + Con stamina, 6 hp, 6 + Int skills, proficiency with light armor, melee weapons, grenades and small arms. Spontaneous spellcasting of up to 6th level (governed by the muse – may be Int, Wis or Cha), ¾ BAB progression and good Ref- and Fort-saves. Okay, so the class itself probably doesn’t need a discussion on how it works, so let me note what I enjoyed here: Even bardic knowledge has choices; bardic performance is properly codified (Audible/Visual) and the class gets talents to choose, an array of two classes of talents, which allow for PC customization. Definitely one of the best bard versions for d20-based games.

The cleric gets 6 + Con stamina, 6 hp, 4 + Int skills, ¾ BAB-progression, good Fort- and Will-saves, proficiency with light and heavy armor, small arms, deity’s favored weapon, grenades and prepared spellcasting governed by Wisdom. Now here is an aspect that may provide a bit of confusion at first: Unlike in Starfinder’s usual design paradigm, the spellcasting of the cleric goes the full 9 levels; granted, some spells of the mystic or technomancer note that the higher-level cleric spells behave as lower-level mystic spells; and yes, there are a ton of converted spells. Similarly, the class provides AoE-healing via channel divinity – basically, you don’t have to choose to be the healer mystic, you get this regardless of choices made. On the plus-side, domains and devotions allow for a ton of customizations for the class, which, choice-wise, is really cool to see.

The magus presented herein gets 6 + Con stamina, 6 hp, 4 + Int skills, ¾ BAB-progression, good Fort- and Will-saves, prepared Int-based spellcasting of up to 6th level. Spellstrike is tied to resolve and works with both melee weapons and small arms. The class does what you’d expect.

The paladin gets 7 + Con stamina, 7 hp, 4 + Int skills, proficiency with light & heavy armor, basic and advanced melee weapons, small arms, longarms and heavy weapons. They have full BAB-progression and good Fort- and Will-saves. At 4th level, they get spontaneous Cha-based spellcasting of up to 4th level, drawn from the cleric list. Lay on hands has nice limits and is tied to resolve. The customization comes in with different oaths and associated abilities. Solid version.

The ranger gets 7 + Con stamina, 7 hp, 4 + Int skills, proficiency with light armor, basic and advanced melee weapons, small arms, longarms, sniper rifles and grenades, full BAB-progression, good Fort- and Ref-saves. Beyond tracking, rangers come with a more complex modification – their styles allow for meaningful choices. Spells, for example, are spontaneous, Wis-based and drawn from the mystic’s list and are exclusive to one style. There also are a ton of talents, ranger methodologies that help, big time, to make the class feel unique.

Finally, the wizard gets 4 + Con stamina, 4 hp, 4 + Int skills per level, proficiency with light armor, basic melee weapons, small arms, grenades, ½ BAB-progression, good Will-saves, prepared Int-based spellcasting from the wizard’s list. Much like the cleric, the spell-levels go the full 9 levels of progression, thus deviating from Starfinder’s basic spellcasting engine. The wizard has a spellpad and the usual bond – object or familiar. There is a ton of customization via both arcane secrets and a massive array of arcane traditions. Notes for alternate or replaced class features are provided for all classes covered within this book.

The book does come with a nice companion-building engine that covers both biological and technological companions: Hit points scale up from 10 to 230; companions have ¾ BAB-progression, gain up to +18 AC; their good saves increase to +9, the bad saves to +5; 6 ability increases, up to 8 feats and up to 10 evolutions. Link, share spells, (improved) evasion, devotion – you get the idea here.

The book does contain a TON of feats – the table covers 3 pages on its own! Beyond the obvious ones (like Fox Shape, Magical tail, etc.) that supplement the races and those that supplement the classes, there are several rules-relevant ones beyond that. Though, much like in previous chapters, there are more editing hiccups here than usual for Rogue Genius Games or the authors – “as areactiont action”, for example. Options for paladins to revive those that have just died, better exploring of new environments – it should be noted that quite a few really cool options can be found in this chapter. There are quite a few feats here that allow for the use of limited racial abilities via Resolve expenditure. So yeah, this chapter, as a whole, is nice.

In the equipment chapter, things become really cool: We get not only various shields, we also are introduced to computers – to be used as basically a complex help or hindrance for the PCs – modules, basic functions, secured access, tier-rating,e tc. – all in all, a cool array with a ton of sample computers provided. I smiled from ear to ear when I read an expansion to the starship scale: Planetoid! It comes with a new frame and we also get a serious array of cool new frames. This is easily my favorite chapter in the whole book.

The final, approximately 60 pages, are devoted to a massive TON of spells. Since this book adds 9th level spellcasting to Starfinder, there are some explanations regarding variable level spells for the spells. The chapter, as a whole, provides a ton of the spell-classics we know from PFRPG – wail of the banshee, for example. It inflicts a massive 150 points of sonic damage, ½ on a successful save. If you are really picky about design-aesthetics, you will note that e.g. snuff life from the core-book follows a different design-paradigm that codifies damage for death effects by CR. On the plus-side, I really like that quite a lot of the spells have different effects for the different spell-levels – not just an escalation of numbers, but wholly different effects.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good on both a formal and rules-language level – as a whole, this book may contain quite a few hiccups, but most of them do not influence the rules-language. Layout adheres to a really nice two-column full-color standard with a lot of neat, original full-color artworks. The pdf comes fully bookmarked with nested bookmarks. Cool: The pdf comes with a second, more tablet-friendly, smaller version – kudos!

Alexander Augunas and Matthew Morris deliver a book that a select clientele will absolutely adore. This massive tome nets you all the options you’ve come to expect from the time playing Pathfinder – the favorite races of many folks, and, more importantly, also the classes – if you’re looking for a way to transition your PFRPG-game to Starfinder, then get this ASAP – this is exactly the book you’ve been waiting for.

The craftsmanship of the design for the class conversions is definitely high quality; the player agenda components, the choices, the engines of the classes – all of these are done with the expert skill-set that we’ve come to expect from these two critically-acclaimed designers. I can absolutely see why so many people (judging from the reviews) love this book.

At the same time, as a person, while I appreciated the skill that obviously went into creating this book, the supplement left me honestly concerned. As a book that deals with a lot of heritage options, it does exhibit a lot of design paradigm decisions that I could not extrapolate from the Starfinder core rules. It should be noted that I do not think that 9th-level spell-progression breaks the game; it allows for a finer-grained progression of power, obviously – but honestly, I’m not sure why this type of decision was required by the demands of the system or the design of the classes. Another issue I can see here would be the cleric’s healing abilities, which are very pronounced – more so than those presented in the Starfinder core book. Why do I consider the totality of these design-choices problematic? While they remain closer to PFRPG and thus easier to convert, they change the gameplay of Starfinder.

While, admittedly, my playtesting experiences with the Starfinder rules so far are not as excessive (the system is pretty young, after all), so far, it looks like the discrepancy between the power of martials and casters has decreased, courtesy, in part, due to the cap imposed on casting potency. This book subverts these pretty central tenets. There are a few remnants regarding references to bonus types that don’t exist in Starfinder, some references to AC bonuses that have not been properly recoded for SFRPG, but these instances remain relatively scarce. More grievous to me, there are, design-wise, some aspects in spells, etc., that feel closer in their design-aesthetics to PFRPG than SFRPG.

Okay, so rating this book, for me, is pretty much a reviewer’s nightmare. Sure, I can complain about the formal hiccups mentioned, but they are not that many really bad ones; they mostly pertain to smaller aspects and components. My issue as a reviewer is that this book covers options to make Starfinder closer to Pathfinder. It’s the goal of the book and, for what they are, I love a lot of the designs here – I enjoyed, for example, the converted classes more than I thought I would. Here’s the thing: As a person, I really, really dislike that. One of the aspects I love about Starfinder is that it’s not just PFRPG with a coating of scifi. New races, new classes – all different, shiny, new.

I think that, for a serious part of this book, you can see that, while it is definitely a Starfinder book regarding the totality of the rules, its design aesthetics in the smaller components, tend to have sprinklings of PFRPG inside. This is understandable; it’s not bad…but it rubs me the wrong way and that sense, particularly combined with the hiccups here and there, left me with this constant feeling of unease regarding, particularly, the full casters herein. In short: This book was, most assuredly, not made for me.

At the same time, it is my responsibility as a reviewer to acknowledge that it represents what a TON of people wanted and enjoy – and, while not perfect, it does achieve its mission statement in a rather admirable manner. That’s why, ultimately, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up for the purpose of this platform. If you wanted more of your favorite PFRPG options in Starfinder, feel free to add another star.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Starfarer's Companion
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Into the Wintery Gale: Wrath of the Jotunn
Publisher: AAW Games
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 11/07/2017 09:53:32

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive mega-adventure/sourcebook clocks in at 199 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages panorama/art-showcases of the front cover sans logo etc., 1 page editorial, 2 pages of ToC, 1 page SRD, 2 page KS-thanks, 1 page encounter contributors, 1 page rune-design sheet (more on that later), 1 page back cover, leaving us with 187 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Okay, so this module takes place in the Vikmordere Valley on the planet of Aventyr – in case you’re not familiar with the culture, let me give you a brief run-down: Picture a blending of the cultures of Native Americans and Vikings. Sounds badass? It is! One of the biggest strengths of AAW Games’ early offerings is the establishment of this culture, of depicting it in a way that is plausible, that feels real and yet fantastic and different. It is, at this point, no secret that I adore the Vikmordere as a concept. In this book, we take a look at their home, the majestic Vikmordere valley around serpent lake. In fact, a significant part of this book can be considered to be a sourcebook of life and survival in this region – there are really cool rules for 3-step hypothermia and frostbite that add the survivalist aspect for groups that enjoy a challenge in that vein – they are simple, yet rewarding and make seeking shelter, exposure etc. a significant aspect of the game. Big plus for these tundra survival rules. In these, e.g. Vikmordere winter outfits (completely described and explained), rations, boneskates and frossenpine (a wooden pole used to catapult iceskaters along), bear paws – the basic set-up is great.

Beyond that, we get an amazing table that lists all traveling distances from place to place – really comfortable for the GM and something we only see rarely in modules for the more modern systems. Now, I called this both an adventure and a setting sourcebook – there is a reason for that. You see, there are two magical hazards that render this massive adventure more of a challenge – the ice fog and the wintery gale: Ammo is swept by the winds, teleportation is cursed and snow-blindness due to whiteouts is a deadly threat. On the lake, sentient icebergs (!!) make for a fantastic, yet amazing “trap” – more of a skill challenge than just a simple trap or haunt, but yeah – hunting icebergs? Come on, that is amazing and oozes fantastic North from every pore, right? The book also features MASSIVE random encounter tables, with full stats of the creatures included for your convenience.

And there are special events. 30, to be more precise. These were sourced from the contributing backers and are thoroughly creative and diverse: Stalking yetis, dazzling ice rifts, bridges across chasms, where the gale is funneled into the depths, wells inhabited by Brunnmigi, hobbled hunters, ice trolls in a feud with the Vikmordere who actually want the conflict resolved, strange shrooms that bury into the unconscious to animate them, white wyrm riders – the encounters are GOLD and feel, very much, like the notes that you can read in an old-school hexcrawl – not exactly lavishly detailed, but thoroughly inspiring.

Now, there is an issue that particularly inexperienced GMs running a hexcrawl will be all too familiar with: How many descriptions of a landscape can you create before it gets dull? How many different ways do you know to describe an icy tundra? New school modules tend to deal with the requirement for lavish descriptions via read-aloud text, but that usually only works within the context of a linear structure, not a sandbox. The rebuttal to this problem that this massive sandbox provides is glorious in its simplicity and something I honestly expect to see from comparable modules from this point onwards. The solution is, simply, descriptions. Grouped by area. Open tundra, mountain base, mountain pass, glacier – all types of arctic environments featured herein come with a TON of glorious prose-descriptions for the wilderness. More than 16 pages, to be more precise. These descriptions really help to maintain the atmosphere, are easily scavenged and make sense in a ton of ways.

Which brings me to my central thesis regarding the analysis of this adventure: This is a blending of both old-school and new-school design aesthetics; the wilderness sections behave like an easy to customize point-crawl, driven by plot, but lavish in its freedom within the traveling experience. At the same time, both highly detailed adventure hooks, read-aloud texts etc. provide an engaging plot.

Okay, at this point, I need to start going into the details of the plot, so from here on out, the SPOILERS reign. The wintery gale will take intrepid players that read any further! Skip to the conclusion or incur the icy wrath!

..

.

All right, only GMs around? Great! We begin with potent symbolism – the PCs are surprised by a horrible snowstorm, only to be visited by an ash-grey owl that tries to lead the PCs further; as the blizzard seems too potent, the owl suddenly is wreathed in flames and guides the PCs – for they are the ones chosen by the demi-goddess Ningatha. As they make their way through the relentless cold towards Völsfiheimr, she introduces the PCs to the Northern Fury Council of the Vikmordere clans. Honoring the request of the ancestral spirit, the PCs get to participate in the gathering of jarls. You see, the Ohjaslange has approached once more and a vast evil stirs – 400 years have passed since the Vikmordere last managed to defeat, by the skin of their teeth, the dread Jötunn – and now, they and the curse of their gale has returned. In order to stop the dreaded undead, immortal frost giants, the PCs will have to reclaim the ancient artifacts that once provided the tools of the downfall of the giants – the sword Vlfberht and the shield Skojold Rustning – both, however, have fallen into deep obscurity, the bloodline that once guarded them fallen into obscurity. While the PCs are celebrated if they take the richly-rewarded quest (and may certainly engage in Glima!), they will first have to pass the unsafe waters of Serpent lake to find the old witch Arurún – and bypass her giant bear.

The PCs will have a chance to learn a unique spell from the witch and even the runepaining magic of the Vikmordere – the engine is pretty solid, if not too spectacular; as a supplement for an adventure, it is solid enough and adds some serious local flavor to the proceedings. More important would be that the witch provides an amulet that helps the PCs find the resting places of the artifacts long lost – here, I should comment on something thoroughly impressive: We get GORGEOUS top-down AND isometric maps of the dungeons – and yes, player-friendly versions included. The cartography provided for this module is masterclass – Tommi Salama at his best. Beyond the aesthetic component, it is in the dungeons that contain the artifacts that the design-aesthetics become pretty old-school: We have indirect story-telling; understanding the culture and values of the Vikmordere will make the exploration easier; similarly, the dungeons themselves feel like they have been taken straight out of the good examples of the heyday of RPGs – they ooze flavor, reward smart players and the dungeons also sport puzzles – while brute-forcing them is an option, as a person, I suggest trying them out – most groups like, at least once in a while, using their brain.

Returning with legendary Vlfbehrt to the witch, the PCs will witness a grim scene – the Jötunn are on their heels, the witch slain – and now, the deadly, undying Jötunn remain – though, at this point, the PCs may not yet know about the truth behind the undying nature of the Jötunn. Without a guidance, it is a benevolent haunt, a manifestation of the guarding ancestral spirits, that the PCs will be brought to the vault wherein Skjold Rustning lies – the dungeon will once again demand that the players use both brain and brawn to survive…And yes, the Jötunn are still on their trail…

That being said, the PCs have the artifacts – so it’s time to face the Jötunn and end this! This is where the module sports one of its weaker aspects: There is a traitor in the Vikmordere’s ranks and the wielder of the artifacts is slain; in spite of the presence of mass combat rules for PFRPG, we don’t get the like – instead, we get some regular encounters before Ningatha intervenes…as, while the Vikmordere seem to win, the Jötunn’s immortality kicks in – and the vanquished giants rise. The result is a horrible rout, one that the PCs and Vikmordere only survive due to Ningatha expending almost all of her divine powers.

All seems lost, as the evil ice maidens lend their powers to the forces of the Jötunn – and the PCs will have but one final chance to stop them: Within the tomb of the ancestors, there lies the only way to reach the isle of the maidens – the magic ship called Sorrow’s Snekkja. En route, the PCs will be shipwrecked by a mighty sea serpent…and that is not where it ends. However, it takes the sacrifice of both Ningatha and the guiding Vikmordere spirit to open the doors, as the erstwhile lovers are once again united, their love a symbolic sacrifice and hope for the PCs to claim. With the stakes that high, the exploration of the tomb makes the dungeons so far look like child’s play – the PCs will have to activate the well of lost souls in this legendary complex and sail the magic ship out of the complex!

After the deadly dungeon, the PCs will finally be able to arrive at the island – where the mighty ice queen and her wyrms remain – and where the PCs will have to destroy the Wintyrsyrd, breaking the potent magics of the dread lady. If they manage to survive this ordeal, there will be but one final task that remains. Rendezvous with the Vikmordere, then lead one final, desperate assault, wherein the forces of the noble Vikmordere will cleave a path through the Jötunn forces, allowing the PCs to make their way to the dread keep of King Krumma – if they can defeat the mighty lord of the Jötunn, they may yet stop the relentless, seemingly unstoppable horde of undead giants. He’s btw. CR 24. Yeah, good luck…the PCs will damn well need it…

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good, almost very good – there are a couple of instances where blank spaces etc. are missing, but not unduly many; as a whole, this book is pretty well-made in that regard. Layout adheres to a two-column full-color standard that is absolutely glorious – BJ Hensley and Daniel Marshall did amazing work here. The book sports a metric TON of glorious, original artwork with a uniform style – Mates Laurentiu really rocked this book; the cover by Jason rainville is similarly amazing. Cartography by Tommi Salama is AMAZING. Even better: We actually get VTT-friendly high-res versions of the maps. Master-class in the cartography department. I mean it. The electronic version comes fully bookmarked with nested, detailed bookmarks. I won the hardcover version of the book – and, frankly – if you have the choice, get the hardcover. It’s worth owning.

Justin Andrew Mason’s “Wrath of the Jötunn” seemed to be cursed; the author, at one point, lost a ton of his notes and had to recreate the saga. It is puzzling, considering this complication, that he managed to not only deliver a good mega-adventure, but a great one.

Let me elaborate: This is, in essence, a massive sandbox with a really strong narrative that resounds with themes of love, loss, glory; this feels like a larger than life tale, straight from a mythology that could have been. This module at once manages to evoke themes of old-school masterpieces, the sense of myth, the sense of plausibility and the new-school focus on a captivating narrative, with tons of read-aloud text, diverse challenges, etc. Now, personally, I was not necessarily too happy about some of the cut-scene-like sequences and how they can feel slightly too linear; at the same time, though, the book handles these in a smart way – it moves quickly in the sequences and provides the next awesome thing; the excellent prose helps the GM to navigate these slightly weaker spots in the otherwise inspired, epic narrative. Now, I would have loved for a few of the foes herein to have a few more unique tricks on their plate, but all of that is me complaining at a high level.

In the end, the exploration of the Vikmordere valley, from the inspired threats to the mythological items, the evocative dungeons – all of that makes this mega-adventure a thoroughly unique and evocative experience. The blending of new- and old-school design paradigms has been executed in a masterful manner that I absolutely loved. This may not be perfect, but it does a lot of innovative, convenient things for the GM; it is easier to run and navigate than comparable offerings; it tells a fantastic story resounding with the classic themes, adding a unique spin to the tropes. It is suffused with glorious cultural tidbits. It is a great read. The massive dressing-entries and sandboxy aspects add a further dimension of longevity to the module. In short: I adore this book. My final verdict will hence clock in at 4.5 stars (reflecting the minor imperfections), but I will round up (since this is excellent, not just good). I thoroughly LOVED this gem, which is why this gets my seal of approval. And for its blending of adventure-design-schools, for the convenience-aspects, the supplemental material, etc., for going one step beyond in pretty much all aspects, this also is nominated as a candidate for my Top Ten of 2017.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Into the Wintery Gale: Wrath of the Jotunn
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Displaying 31 to 45 (of 3372 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
Back
You must be logged in to rate this
0 items
 Gift Certificates