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Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss $3.00
Average Rating:3.8 / 5
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Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
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Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Benjamin S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/14/2017 11:23:34

It misses details and elaboration, especially on the actual writing part. However, what can you expect for $3? It is a good start, nothing more, nothing less. If you get more into adventure writing you might leave some of it behind and explore the depths and possibilities of adventure writing that are out there. I for myself don't like writing adventures in the form of scenes. The scenes are something which happens in my game, not on the planning table. I have to be honest - the author implies that his guide is for GMs how want to play the adventure after they have written them. I do it the other way around, first I play the adventure, then I might bother to write it down for others, will the input and insights I gathered from playing. I think it is a waste of time to write adventures in this way befor you play them. Especially with that in mind the book doesn't get in the art of rewriting and redacting your adventure.

So, in the end I give a solid 3 out of 5. It won't change my game, but it wasn't a waste of time or money either. Maybe I will even try to write one of my next adventures exactly like it is recommended in the guide.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Jeff C. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/14/2017 04:54:11

I like to read/collect books about adventure writing and GM'ing. I stayed away from similar titles from this line of books because I think dropping an "F-Bomb" in your title is a bit juvenile, crude, ill-mannered, unprofessional, makes you sound uneducated and is done strictly for shock value. While I don't advocate censorship, I advocate responsible, sensible writing and editing. I have been known to drop foul language in front of my kids, old people, etc, just not when writing gaming material. I started gaming when I was 10. Do I really want my 11 year old son picking this up?

That said, I could have just walked away from this pdf all together. Then curiousity took hold...

It's really short, including a big logo, several sidebars, a full page illustration and a long quoted scene from Resevoir Dogs. I think this might have made for an okay-ish article in a fanzine or the like, but I'm not sure it was worth much to me in terms of the money I spent.

Shameless plugs are okay in moderation. I think this author went out of his way to include them.

Some of the advice was good, maybe even great with some polish. Some of the examples made me chuckle. There's a lot of potential here, but I feel it was mired in the author's personal opinions and negative examples. Some of this advice was redundant with other sources such as "How to Write Modules That Don't Suck" and basic writing advice you would get in any given course. However, it was done in the author's very distinctive style, which merits mention.

Good effort and intentions, just needs a lot of work on revision and substance.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 09/11/2017 05:12:01

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This advice booklet clocks in at 14 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page kort’thalis glyph, 1 page editorial, leaving us with 11 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Okay, so this advice-book for adventure-writers and, as one born from the pen of one of the OSR’s more controversial writers, its very first section is titled “No Limits” – it is a rallying call versus censorship and, to a degree, something I absolutely agree with. Why? Because someone, somewhere, is bound to be offended by what you write, no matter how carefully you phrase your material. That being said, the pdf does draw a line in the sand that very much echoes my sentiment – never force PCs to harm children, even if they are make-believe children. It is a line in the sand I share…but it brings me to an aspect of the book that should be mentioned first:

This book is about writing modules for your group, and not for public consumption.

This is important, for the aforementioned no-limits-aesthetic falls apart pretty quickly once you have to navigate the harsh realities of closed IP, compatibility-licenses, etc. That being said, even when writing for your own group, there are limits – we have wildly diverging levels of tolerance for the descriptive portrayal of the less pleasant potential aspects of the condition humana, and what may be totally fine for guys like me could be utterly horrific for other players – so my expansion of the thesis, which arguably focuses more on theme rather than levels of violence/sex/etc., would be “No Limits within the boundaries that your group considers palatable.”

But that may just be me and is much less catchy and edgy. It should also be noted that this pdf does not, not even once, note the mathematical principles and difficulty-gauging process, which may not be required for Kort’thalis pretty simple d6-based game-engines, but which is very much a huge stumbling block for more complex games. Getting rules-language right is similarly not touched upon, probably due to the same reasons. Heck, many OSR-writers would benefit seriously from taking a close look at the system for which they’re writing. Simple rules don’t mean that they’re not supposed to be precise. (Check out Necrotic Gnome’s Complete Vivimancer for a gorgeous example of how to write incredibly precise OSR-material that loses none of the cool outré wildness we all love…) Sorry, I’m rambling.

So, you decided to write your own module, righty? Venger’s first advice regarding structuring would be the elevator pitch and it won’t remain the only one: Sections of the adventure are likened to scenes and their anatomy is treated as such: Concise questions allow you to get a grip on them and the use of random tables and dressing choices as means to make things more interesting is similarly touched upon. The book also helps you establish a grasp on what happens between the scenes (and breathers) and the use of the callback reference as a narrative device that you can employ as alternate storytelling means or to make things fall into place – we often see that used to great effect in the smarter horror/thriller movies, so yeah, kudos – I just wished it would provide some ideas to make the callback work smoothly. If we remain in the realm of those movies – they turn into duds if you can see the reveal/callback coming from a mile away, so some advanced guidelines would have been neat to see. The ultimate expression of these movie-analogues would be the trailer test – can you make a trailer that’s compelling out of the scenes assembled?

From a structural point of view, the trinity of combat, interaction and exploration are covered. The general structure of an adventure is discussed with a classic 5-act structure and, as conflict is at the heart of most adventuring, depicting interesting conflict, upping the ante for a scene, etc. can be found and all such aspects are presented in an easy to grasp manner.

Structure-wise, the importance of sandboxing versus railroads…and where the difference lies between railroads and guardrails, are mentioned. After all, as a consequence of the limited nature of the medium words versus our imagination, a degree of railroading is hard to avoid. The pdf also advises the prospective reader regarding finding a style – whether terse or detail-oriented or in-between and the respective aesthetics. Personally, I would have loved if the pdf actually mentioned tips for these styles; tricks; means to develop them. It remains, for the most part, a pretty basic discussion of the standards.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a nice two-column full-color standard with reddish veins and the pdf comes with a second, more printer-friendly b/w-version. The pdf sports some really nice b/w-artworks and comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

So, here’s the big question: Should you get this guidebook by Venger As’Nas Satanis?

The response, ultimately, depends on your motivation and your level of expertise. If you’re already a veteran and cognizant of most pitfalls of adventure-writing, then this will not do much for you.

Similarly, this will not provide any new insights if you have a background in an academic field that studies, in some form, the structures of a given form of media. If you’re looking for a concise how-to-guide to get published by the “big players” (in as far as these exist in RPGs in the first place), then this won’t necessarily help you there either. This is a book for writing adventures for your home group, first and foremost. It is not a book that teaches you to write for the rules of a given system, doesn’t help you extrapolate success-chances, etc. This is not about “DESIGNING”, this is only about writing.

This guide does not discuss the pitfalls of structural variations, how to generate modular investigations, truly free sandboxes (ironically enough) like hex crawls. This is very much a vanilla adventure writing pdf, blended with a kind of written form of pep-talk, telling writers to stand up for their vision – and in a field where many brilliant writers suffer from anxiety, impostor syndrome, etc., this has some worth in itself.

What this does, however, is to outline an easy way to think with a certain structure about not yet fully gestated adventure ideas, a guidance that particularly newcomers to the arena of writing are likely to appreciate greatly. Additionally, the book can be seen as a kind of submission guideline for Venger’s adventure-writing contest for Kort’thalis Publishing, which, obviously, makes the aforementioned potential issues with submission guidelines different from those herein, moot.

Is this worth the low and fair asking price? If you want to submit a module to Kort’thalis, then absolutely! If you love Venger’s modules and his distinct style and structure, then this makes for a nice introduction to the subject matter. Now, my advice for veterans or those looking for advanced advice would be to skip this; personally, I got no new knowledge whatsoever out of this pdf and frankly, my own adventures tend to gravitate towards more difficult structures than what this covers. (Same holds true for some of Venger’s modules, fyi – this is a starting point, after all!)

At the same time, I can see this pdf perfectly fulfilling its role as a first guidance booklet for prospective authors, which is to say, that yes, I do believe that this has a raison d`être. For me as a person, this did literally nothing, but as a reviewer, I need to take its value for a part of its demographic into account – even if, to me, this is less “writing like a fucking boss” and more “n00b writing basics for home use 101.” You won’t find extensive pacing guidelines, the mechanics of setting up sequels, establishing leitmotifs and using them – the pdf does not cover the depths of the subject matter and remains a place to start from.

Ultimately, this booklet is less widely useful than it should be and misses a significant part of its potential demographics; but it also does what it sets out to do rather well. A novice GM sans theoretical experience regarding module creation should consider this to be a solid offering. If one of the caveats I listed above apply to you regarding your knowledge, experience, goals, etc., then skip this – this is not for you.

In the end, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, but honestly, I can’t round up for this one – it may be a twist or irony, but to me, Venger’s guide to GMing like a Fucking Boss has more salient advice that can be extrapolated to adventure-writing; his discussion of how to structure narratives and sell them to the players, how to improvise, helps significantly with the DESIGN-aspect of the adventure and the material covered is significantly broader in the way it can be applied. So yeah, veterans, take a look at that one instead. Chances are you’ll find at least something cool in that tome!

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Ben W. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/02/2017 07:53:59

I've been a GM for 25 of the 27 years I have been roleplaying. I am always looking for new gems and morsels to leverage for aiding my adventure design and play. This is not the greatest ever read on the subject (how can it be at only 11 real pages of content?), but especially for $3.00, it is a very good document to have on hand to refresh yourself on the basics. It reminds me of the KISS principle (Keep It Simple, Stupid). How often do I fall into that trap of trying to over do it, trying to make it more and more awesome, when all I really need to do is take a breath and remember the basics. This book helps you center on those basics, helps you focus on the important story elements, and does so without innundating oneself with too much extra superfluous crap. It reminds you of how to focus on the important elements of the story and of that fact that GMing is 50% prep and 50% improvisation. I give it 4 starts because I found it useful, informative, and reasonably priced. I didn't give it 5 starts because I think there is a bit of waste at the beginning with the entire first page dedicated to "no limits" and primarily because there is a bit of hype/marketing (good on you - wink, wink) with the title and plugs for other documents by the same publisher within the content. No big deal and understandbly part of the content, but just a bit much for me. Still, a good, short read to have on hand when you need a refresher course on the basics and for a reasonable price. I do wish there would have been more, but hey, I didn't rate it "perfect" for a reason.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Mark N. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/30/2017 15:16:24

I went into this with my eyes wide open. I knew the author has a destinctive style, and I wasn't dissapointed. I picked upsom great tips and it is a bargain at the price.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Stephane G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/15/2017 18:58:02

This book in my opinion is good if you want some tips on how to set up a basic structure for your adventure, whether you wan to submit it to a publisher or just for yourself, but may not be worth the price.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Arto S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/10/2017 04:12:37

It's a solid ballsy guide to what you are expected to write that qualifies as a good adventure.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/04/2017 17:45:48

I've been a GM/DM since in the 1980s, and I found this booklet to be well worth the read. It has made me reflect on how I ran my past adventures, and there's information in there that I can apply to future adventures for my campaign. This is a great resource for new and experienced GMs. Highly recommended.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Marc P. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/26/2017 17:58:41

So, earlier this year I had a moment of realization. I came to see that while I'd been ignoring the written adventures of both yore and today I'd been missing out on learning design from other people's effort. It's not that I can't run a game, or write an adventure for myself, but going through the process of writing one for other people made me realize where I tended to say "fuck it" and just improvise. Not a bad thing, but not a great thing for published product.

So I've been looking at various bits of advice in this regard. The latest of which is "Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss" which is a title that really says something about the confidence level of the author...

What's In It?

Advice that strips out most of the bullshit. Seriously, there's very little pretension here, which is a good thing. Hell, it's probably the best part of this product that it doesn't treat itself as being too far "above the reader." In what amounts to about 9 pages of text if you strip out the art, cover, and credits the author lays down the foundations of adventure writing. As a GM for decades there's not a lot here that's "new to me" but it's refreshing to see it all laid out and bare.

The content is broken out into fifteen sections ranging from about 3 paragraphs to a dozen or so. The author starts off by detailing why you may want to write your own adventures. OK, fair enough, but probably anybody who has gotten this far already made that choice. It then goes into the idea of the elevator pitch as a metric for good and bad ideas. This is pretty reasonable, if you cannot sum up an idea into 2-3 interesting sentences it's probably not an idea that will yield an interesting adventure. Or it's too much, and you need to consider breaking it up into smaller parts; perhaps your epic idea can become fodder for a series of adventures instead. From there we get some advice on finding your own writing style and trying to make the best of it. There are some words of wisdom here in regards to over-writing.

Next we get a discussion of the adventure rails. Ah, to railroad, or not to railroad, that is the question! Actually, no, screw that, NEVER railroad. But, to the author's point, knowing when to toss in "guardrails" to keep the adventure from going entirely ... ahem ... "off the rails" ... is wise. Players are ... unpredictable creatures, and having mitigating factors in place to help keep the session from going bananas is good. Most GMs simply cannot keep up improvising after a certain point without abandoning the original adventure, which sucks.

At this point we're on page four and getting into the meat. First we get "Anatomy of an Adventure" breaking down the basic (and classic) structure for storytelling. Then the author dives into scenes and starts discussing each component therein. The fact that adventures and scenes have the same basic structure is makes this all the more valuable.

From here out the product fires on all cylinders for me, right up until the last section, which just didn't float for me, but hey, that's cool, it's only one page. The writing keeps being punchy and direct, and breaks down how to build a scene up without getting overwrought. It's presents the idea of a "Trailer Test" to help prune scenes much in the way the Elevator Pitch helps prune out bad adventure ideas. This is just the fractal nature of things in my opinion.

After scenes we get a quick hit of the three most basic aspects of gaming (and storytelling) and how these should all be present in some form to make for a good session. Lastly there is some advice for "moments" or interludes, the stuff between scenes that adds color, as well as the idea of callbacks.

The layout if functional, the art is minimal (which is fine) and of a good quality, but I couldn't stand the full color version with these angry red veins rimming each page. It added nothing, and it detracted plenty. Thankfully there's a printer friendly version without that. I will say the cover is quality, and I imagine that's just good marketing to put an attractive eye catching cover onto any product. Duh.

Closing Thoughts

I'd say that if you're new to GMing, and new to writing up your own adventures this is a pretty damn good purchase for $3. If you've been at it a while it may make for a nice refresher course, and the clean and bullshit free presentation of the writing does help make this a nice reference or refresher. Will this make you a "fucking boss" at adventure writing? I'm not sure about that, but it sure as shit will help prevent you from making an ass of yourself. There's plenty more to writing good adventures than structure, but if you don't have good "bones" the flesh won't matter for shit.

Score: 85% - Pretty good for those wanting a refresher course or those who are new to adventure writing. Maybe not what you're looking for if you've been GMing for a while.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Elizabeth R. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/21/2017 19:04:08

This is a pretty good booklet, well worth the cost. I'm only halfway done, but it's helping me make a lot of connections between fiction writing and creating scenarios for player-directed RPG.

But, seriously, guys, do we need the F word in the title?



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 07/21/2017 12:32:29

Originally posted here: http://theotherside.timsbrannan.com/2017/07/adventures-with-venger-asnas-satanis.html

Have you ever wanted to make your own adventures? Do you want to be like Venger and write them like a fucking boss? Well, this is the book for you then. Overtly the book is focused on people writing their own adventures for the first time, but the advice given is so solid that even old veterans like me kind find it useful. Some of the advice is common sense, but never underestimate the value of stating something plainly. There are no groundbreaking revelations here, no paradigm shifts and no occult insights. And that is perfectly fine by me. Adventure writing is not supposed to be Shakespeare, it's supposed to be Poe. The advice given though is rock solid, and it provides easily repeatable to create fun, entertaining adventures that don't feel like a railroad. Honestly I would package this up with his How To Game Master Like a Fucking Boss to give GMs a full toolbox of advice and tricks to help any adventure; whether they wrote it themselves or grab one off the shelf. Venger really should bundle this with the Character book and call it the "Be A Fucking Boss Bundle". I have a Trek game coming up. I know what I want to do with it, but I am going to run my ideas through this book and give them a test. So far all the advice has panned out well and I believe that this will be a better adventure because ot it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Adam D. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/11/2017 12:28:30

I didn't like this product. I liked Venger's last products, so I was surprised that this one left me unimpressed.

It's short. There's 9 pages of real content. Most of one of those pages is a direct script quote from Reservoir Dogs. He spends half a page justifying why you might write an adventure in the first place ("Virtually no censorship." "No budget!" No "nervous studio executives"). That leaves really just about 7 1/2 pages of advice for three bucks.

What's that advice? I am fighting with myself here, feeling like just listing the points of advice spoils the product. That is, why spend $3 if I'm just gonna tell you the advice. But if I give you just the highlights -- just the section headers, that is -- that should not value of the product's paragraphs in between, right? The problem is that there's not a lot of substance between those headers.

In those pages, there are a few things that I think are useful. Build a sandbox; eschew railroad adventures. Some basic story arc structure and advice about driving to conflict. This is rudimentary writer stuff, but it's useful. Nuance your adventure with a second or third layer. Up the ante; raise the stakes. Imagine your adventure's "movie trailer" and make sure it's cool. Use callbacks (and foreshadowing, presumably).

The rest is pretty lackluster. The first two pages left me confused. Am I writing this adventure for my own use or for publication? If for myself, why does it matter if I write with style? Later on, in the section called "Starting a Scene," he reminds you that a scene needs three elements (who? where? what's the conflict?) and then regurgitates dictionary.com's definitions of conflict for two paragraphs. The last page about details (and the Reservoir Dogs quote) are nearly incoherent.

The writing style lacks Venger's usual over-the-top flair. I feel like he phoned this one in. I do love the art, which is what you'd expect from Venger, though it's entirely unnecessary and does not connect to the writing in any way.

At the end, I feel like this should have been titled "Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Newb." A true Boss is going to need more detail, more specific advice, and deeper insights than what can be gleaned from the table of contents from any writer's advice book. There's some basic, basic, basic advice here, but it's hardly a master class. Venger might know how to write an adventure like a boss, but he hasn't really shared that expertise in this product.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Publisher Reply:
I'm sorry Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss didn't live up to your expectations, Adam. I agree there are precious few pearls of wisdom and nothing mind-shatteringly revolutionary. Great writing is about mastering the fundamentals, and you'd be surprised how many people are ignorant of them. This book is the way forward. To quote another favorite movie, "I can only show you the door. You're the one who has to go through it."
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Justin I. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/10/2017 11:21:55

You've got to give it to Venger Satanis, he definitely knows how to get your attention with his advice books. His newest is Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss. I was given a pdf copy and I'd like to share my thoughts.

First I'll talk about the physical aspects of the pdf. It is 13 pages (10 that give advice). The cover has a bad ass dragon. There are three pieces of art in the book, which give a you a good sample of the art style in Venger's books. The text is in a standard two column layout with the occasional sidebar. As a final note, there are several random tables, because let's be honest, this wouldn't be a Kort'thalis Publishing product without them.

But I know you're asking, what about the content? It's very practical. To sum up and paraphrase the book, if you want to write adventures like a fucking boss you have to think of yourself as a movie writer and director with an unlimited budget. Obviously there's more to it than that and Venger gives us plenty of exposition and insight into the deeper workings of the process, but ultimately that comparison is very fitting. While the pdf isn't long there is no wasted text. Every example and tip Venger gives is insightful.

I don't write adventures. I honestly don't think I've ran D&D without a module in years. Venger's advice makes me want to change that. I want to take a stab at writing an adventure (perhaps Rumspringa in Space! for Alpha Blue). To me that is a sign that the book does what it sets out to do.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Andrew M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/09/2017 21:16:20

Venger was kind enough to provide a copy of "Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss" to me and I am glad he did. In short, for a low price you not only get writing advice but a suggested framework for how to structure your adventure and GM tips for running it. Highly recommended.

This guide will not take you from "Zero-2-Hero" in terms of adventure writing. What it will do is help you to start an adventure and run with what you have, basically "Zero-2" part. The rest, "-Hero", is up to you to hone your craft. In terms of content, after words of encouragement, Venger takes you from the initial idea to expanding that idea into a full blown adventure. No Venger Satanis product is complete without some random tables, and yes, even this guide has a few. Using these random tables, you can find ways to further fleshout your adventure or get unstuck creatively. Once the adventure has been layed out and some people would call it "done" at this point, Venger continues with suggestions and tips to go back over your adventure to add more polish. The GM'ing advice gets more prevelant towards the end of the guide to help you run and test the adventure you created. While GM'ing is the second half of adventure writing, it did get a bit confusing for me to find where the writing advice ended and GM'ing advice began. Which is really the only negative thing I can say about "Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss".

A great product that is genre neutral and one I will be using extensively.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Eric F. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/06/2017 00:32:14

I'm doing this review as a favor to Venger Satanis, because I got sent a copy of 'How To Write An Adventure Like A F@#@ing Boss'. This is a part of an O5R product line by Venger which is really a set of guidelines where Venger lays out his philosophy of old school gaming & advise, guidelines for game preparation, dungeon mastering the Satanis way, & now how to write an adventure. So we get 'How To Write An Adventure Like A Fucking Boss' which is an on the ground practical guide contained within fourteen pages. This book doesn't fool around it gets right into the heart of the process and walks you the prospective DM step by step from inception to practical completion. This is a system neutral book & there's not a lot of B.S. in this book its straight up advise and practical hands on process & operation. The tone is easy, the layout straight forward, & the end result isn't half bad for three dollars. The ideas here are workable, consistent, & have been done by someone whose actually run an old school campaign or two. This isn't necessarily going to be for the great & powerful DM's out in the wild but there's some very practical and time saving ideas here. Is it worth the three dollar price tag? I think so actually here's why:

This book takes the DM by the hand and leads them step by step through the adventure writing process. Real advise for at the table and on the ground adventure writing right from the ground up. In depth take down from resources to practical table top prep work.

If I have any real complains its that there's not enough background material on the part of the writer. Venger is a more is less kinda of guy which is fine but this is a system neutral book & I'm an OSR guy who wants a bit more explanation in certain areas especially in the departments that newbies to the hobby are going to need such as fleshing out background, working in more adventure exposition during play, & following through with dovetailing in the adventure into fully fleshed old school campaigns. But this is probably going to be the next book 'How to Run A Campaign like A F$#ing Boss'. In my humble opinion this should have been what we've seen in another section of this book. Fourteen pages isn't enough when your taking about writing adventures from start to finish.

Is this a bad book? No its quite good at what it does and does it well with common sense advise and at the table commentary. The book is selling for three dollars and its well worth the price tag but this needs to be a fully fleshed out book on its own so its going to get four out of five stars from me tonight. Get this book if you want a no nonsense common sense at the table approach to writing good adventures with a practical process for creating adventures that are going to get you players at the table. Eric Fabiaschi Sword & Stitchery Blog Want to See More OSR Original Content For this and other OSR titles? Subscribe to https://swordsandstitchery.blogspot.com



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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