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Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss $3.00
Average Rating:3.9 / 5
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Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
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Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Stephane G. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/15/2017 18:58:02

This book in my opinion is good if you want some tips on how to set up a basic structure for your adventure, whether you wan to submit it to a publisher or just for yourself, but may not be worth the price.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Arto S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/10/2017 04:12:37

It's a solid ballsy guide to what you are expected to write that qualifies as a good adventure.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 08/04/2017 17:45:48

I've been a GM/DM since in the 1980s, and I found this booklet to be well worth the read. It has made me reflect on how I ran my past adventures, and there's information in there that I can apply to future adventures for my campaign. This is a great resource for new and experienced GMs. Highly recommended.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Marc P. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/26/2017 17:58:41

So, earlier this year I had a moment of realization. I came to see that while I'd been ignoring the written adventures of both yore and today I'd been missing out on learning design from other people's effort. It's not that I can't run a game, or write an adventure for myself, but going through the process of writing one for other people made me realize where I tended to say "fuck it" and just improvise. Not a bad thing, but not a great thing for published product.

So I've been looking at various bits of advice in this regard. The latest of which is "Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss" which is a title that really says something about the confidence level of the author...

What's In It?

Advice that strips out most of the bullshit. Seriously, there's very little pretension here, which is a good thing. Hell, it's probably the best part of this product that it doesn't treat itself as being too far "above the reader." In what amounts to about 9 pages of text if you strip out the art, cover, and credits the author lays down the foundations of adventure writing. As a GM for decades there's not a lot here that's "new to me" but it's refreshing to see it all laid out and bare.

The content is broken out into fifteen sections ranging from about 3 paragraphs to a dozen or so. The author starts off by detailing why you may want to write your own adventures. OK, fair enough, but probably anybody who has gotten this far already made that choice. It then goes into the idea of the elevator pitch as a metric for good and bad ideas. This is pretty reasonable, if you cannot sum up an idea into 2-3 interesting sentences it's probably not an idea that will yield an interesting adventure. Or it's too much, and you need to consider breaking it up into smaller parts; perhaps your epic idea can become fodder for a series of adventures instead. From there we get some advice on finding your own writing style and trying to make the best of it. There are some words of wisdom here in regards to over-writing.

Next we get a discussion of the adventure rails. Ah, to railroad, or not to railroad, that is the question! Actually, no, screw that, NEVER railroad. But, to the author's point, knowing when to toss in "guardrails" to keep the adventure from going entirely ... ahem ... "off the rails" ... is wise. Players are ... unpredictable creatures, and having mitigating factors in place to help keep the session from going bananas is good. Most GMs simply cannot keep up improvising after a certain point without abandoning the original adventure, which sucks.

At this point we're on page four and getting into the meat. First we get "Anatomy of an Adventure" breaking down the basic (and classic) structure for storytelling. Then the author dives into scenes and starts discussing each component therein. The fact that adventures and scenes have the same basic structure is makes this all the more valuable.

From here out the product fires on all cylinders for me, right up until the last section, which just didn't float for me, but hey, that's cool, it's only one page. The writing keeps being punchy and direct, and breaks down how to build a scene up without getting overwrought. It's presents the idea of a "Trailer Test" to help prune scenes much in the way the Elevator Pitch helps prune out bad adventure ideas. This is just the fractal nature of things in my opinion.

After scenes we get a quick hit of the three most basic aspects of gaming (and storytelling) and how these should all be present in some form to make for a good session. Lastly there is some advice for "moments" or interludes, the stuff between scenes that adds color, as well as the idea of callbacks.

The layout if functional, the art is minimal (which is fine) and of a good quality, but I couldn't stand the full color version with these angry red veins rimming each page. It added nothing, and it detracted plenty. Thankfully there's a printer friendly version without that. I will say the cover is quality, and I imagine that's just good marketing to put an attractive eye catching cover onto any product. Duh.

Closing Thoughts

I'd say that if you're new to GMing, and new to writing up your own adventures this is a pretty damn good purchase for $3. If you've been at it a while it may make for a nice refresher course, and the clean and bullshit free presentation of the writing does help make this a nice reference or refresher. Will this make you a "fucking boss" at adventure writing? I'm not sure about that, but it sure as shit will help prevent you from making an ass of yourself. There's plenty more to writing good adventures than structure, but if you don't have good "bones" the flesh won't matter for shit.

Score: 85% - Pretty good for those wanting a refresher course or those who are new to adventure writing. Maybe not what you're looking for if you've been GMing for a while.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Elizabeth R. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/21/2017 19:04:08

This is a pretty good booklet, well worth the cost. I'm only halfway done, but it's helping me make a lot of connections between fiction writing and creating scenarios for player-directed RPG.

But, seriously, guys, do we need the F word in the title?



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Timothy B. [Featured Reviewer]
Date Added: 07/21/2017 12:32:29

Originally posted here: http://theotherside.timsbrannan.com/2017/07/adventures-with-venger-asnas-satanis.html

Have you ever wanted to make your own adventures? Do you want to be like Venger and write them like a fucking boss? Well, this is the book for you then. Overtly the book is focused on people writing their own adventures for the first time, but the advice given is so solid that even old veterans like me kind find it useful. Some of the advice is common sense, but never underestimate the value of stating something plainly. There are no groundbreaking revelations here, no paradigm shifts and no occult insights. And that is perfectly fine by me. Adventure writing is not supposed to be Shakespeare, it's supposed to be Poe. The advice given though is rock solid, and it provides easily repeatable to create fun, entertaining adventures that don't feel like a railroad. Honestly I would package this up with his How To Game Master Like a Fucking Boss to give GMs a full toolbox of advice and tricks to help any adventure; whether they wrote it themselves or grab one off the shelf. Venger really should bundle this with the Character book and call it the "Be A Fucking Boss Bundle". I have a Trek game coming up. I know what I want to do with it, but I am going to run my ideas through this book and give them a test. So far all the advice has panned out well and I believe that this will be a better adventure because ot it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Adam D. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/11/2017 12:28:30

I didn't like this product. I liked Venger's last products, so I was surprised that this one left me unimpressed.

It's short. There's 9 pages of real content. Most of one of those pages is a direct script quote from Reservoir Dogs. He spends half a page justifying why you might write an adventure in the first place ("Virtually no censorship." "No budget!" No "nervous studio executives"). That leaves really just about 7 1/2 pages of advice for three bucks.

What's that advice? I am fighting with myself here, feeling like just listing the points of advice spoils the product. That is, why spend $3 if I'm just gonna tell you the advice. But if I give you just the highlights -- just the section headers, that is -- that should not value of the product's paragraphs in between, right? The problem is that there's not a lot of substance between those headers.

In those pages, there are a few things that I think are useful. Build a sandbox; eschew railroad adventures. Some basic story arc structure and advice about driving to conflict. This is rudimentary writer stuff, but it's useful. Nuance your adventure with a second or third layer. Up the ante; raise the stakes. Imagine your adventure's "movie trailer" and make sure it's cool. Use callbacks (and foreshadowing, presumably).

The rest is pretty lackluster. The first two pages left me confused. Am I writing this adventure for my own use or for publication? If for myself, why does it matter if I write with style? Later on, in the section called "Starting a Scene," he reminds you that a scene needs three elements (who? where? what's the conflict?) and then regurgitates dictionary.com's definitions of conflict for two paragraphs. The last page about details (and the Reservoir Dogs quote) are nearly incoherent.

The writing style lacks Venger's usual over-the-top flair. I feel like he phoned this one in. I do love the art, which is what you'd expect from Venger, though it's entirely unnecessary and does not connect to the writing in any way.

At the end, I feel like this should have been titled "Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Newb." A true Boss is going to need more detail, more specific advice, and deeper insights than what can be gleaned from the table of contents from any writer's advice book. There's some basic, basic, basic advice here, but it's hardly a master class. Venger might know how to write an adventure like a boss, but he hasn't really shared that expertise in this product.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Publisher Reply:
I'm sorry Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss didn't live up to your expectations, Adam. I agree there are precious few pearls of wisdom and nothing mind-shatteringly revolutionary. Great writing is about mastering the fundamentals, and you'd be surprised how many people are ignorant of them. This book is the way forward. To quote another favorite movie, "I can only show you the door. You're the one who has to go through it."
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Justin I. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/10/2017 11:21:55

You've got to give it to Venger Satanis, he definitely knows how to get your attention with his advice books. His newest is Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss. I was given a pdf copy and I'd like to share my thoughts.

First I'll talk about the physical aspects of the pdf. It is 13 pages (10 that give advice). The cover has a bad ass dragon. There are three pieces of art in the book, which give a you a good sample of the art style in Venger's books. The text is in a standard two column layout with the occasional sidebar. As a final note, there are several random tables, because let's be honest, this wouldn't be a Kort'thalis Publishing product without them.

But I know you're asking, what about the content? It's very practical. To sum up and paraphrase the book, if you want to write adventures like a fucking boss you have to think of yourself as a movie writer and director with an unlimited budget. Obviously there's more to it than that and Venger gives us plenty of exposition and insight into the deeper workings of the process, but ultimately that comparison is very fitting. While the pdf isn't long there is no wasted text. Every example and tip Venger gives is insightful.

I don't write adventures. I honestly don't think I've ran D&D without a module in years. Venger's advice makes me want to change that. I want to take a stab at writing an adventure (perhaps Rumspringa in Space! for Alpha Blue). To me that is a sign that the book does what it sets out to do.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Andrew M. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/09/2017 21:16:20

Venger was kind enough to provide a copy of "Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss" to me and I am glad he did. In short, for a low price you not only get writing advice but a suggested framework for how to structure your adventure and GM tips for running it. Highly recommended.

This guide will not take you from "Zero-2-Hero" in terms of adventure writing. What it will do is help you to start an adventure and run with what you have, basically "Zero-2" part. The rest, "-Hero", is up to you to hone your craft. In terms of content, after words of encouragement, Venger takes you from the initial idea to expanding that idea into a full blown adventure. No Venger Satanis product is complete without some random tables, and yes, even this guide has a few. Using these random tables, you can find ways to further fleshout your adventure or get unstuck creatively. Once the adventure has been layed out and some people would call it "done" at this point, Venger continues with suggestions and tips to go back over your adventure to add more polish. The GM'ing advice gets more prevelant towards the end of the guide to help you run and test the adventure you created. While GM'ing is the second half of adventure writing, it did get a bit confusing for me to find where the writing advice ended and GM'ing advice began. Which is really the only negative thing I can say about "Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss".

A great product that is genre neutral and one I will be using extensively.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Eric F. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/06/2017 00:32:14

I'm doing this review as a favor to Venger Satanis, because I got sent a copy of 'How To Write An Adventure Like A F@#@ing Boss'. This is a part of an O5R product line by Venger which is really a set of guidelines where Venger lays out his philosophy of old school gaming & advise, guidelines for game preparation, dungeon mastering the Satanis way, & now how to write an adventure. So we get 'How To Write An Adventure Like A Fucking Boss' which is an on the ground practical guide contained within fourteen pages. This book doesn't fool around it gets right into the heart of the process and walks you the prospective DM step by step from inception to practical completion. This is a system neutral book & there's not a lot of B.S. in this book its straight up advise and practical hands on process & operation. The tone is easy, the layout straight forward, & the end result isn't half bad for three dollars. The ideas here are workable, consistent, & have been done by someone whose actually run an old school campaign or two. This isn't necessarily going to be for the great & powerful DM's out in the wild but there's some very practical and time saving ideas here. Is it worth the three dollar price tag? I think so actually here's why:

This book takes the DM by the hand and leads them step by step through the adventure writing process. Real advise for at the table and on the ground adventure writing right from the ground up. In depth take down from resources to practical table top prep work.

If I have any real complains its that there's not enough background material on the part of the writer. Venger is a more is less kinda of guy which is fine but this is a system neutral book & I'm an OSR guy who wants a bit more explanation in certain areas especially in the departments that newbies to the hobby are going to need such as fleshing out background, working in more adventure exposition during play, & following through with dovetailing in the adventure into fully fleshed old school campaigns. But this is probably going to be the next book 'How to Run A Campaign like A F$#ing Boss'. In my humble opinion this should have been what we've seen in another section of this book. Fourteen pages isn't enough when your taking about writing adventures from start to finish.

Is this a bad book? No its quite good at what it does and does it well with common sense advise and at the table commentary. The book is selling for three dollars and its well worth the price tag but this needs to be a fully fleshed out book on its own so its going to get four out of five stars from me tonight. Get this book if you want a no nonsense common sense at the table approach to writing good adventures with a practical process for creating adventures that are going to get you players at the table. Eric Fabiaschi Sword & Stitchery Blog Want to See More OSR Original Content For this and other OSR titles? Subscribe to https://swordsandstitchery.blogspot.com



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Adventure Writing Like A Fucking Boss
Publisher: Kort'thalis Publishing
by Russell T. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 07/05/2017 13:33:01

There's nothing groundbreakingly new here, but that's not a criticism. After all, the key elements of storytelling - and what makes a good story (or adventure) have been discussed for a very long time. That's a lot of what you get here, but it's packaged in a concise, easy-to-read, relevant format for those wanting to write/run their own adventures.

With that said, the emphasis seems to be much more on the run side of that equation, although that just be my take on a first quick read. A lot of the advice given - while excellent advice - seems geared more toward what the GM might do while running an adventure than to someone actively writing an adventure for others to run, and that is actually addressed in the very first section of this guide, so maybe it's not a quibble even worth mentioning. It's just that - for me (I can't speak for anybody else) - this would be better titled "Running Adventures Like A Fucking Boss", but I guess that strays a little too close to the author's GMing guide (which I do plan to buy after reading this short guide)

Anyway - good guide with solid, timeless advice on structuring adventures, scenes, conflict, and making it all more exciting. Recommended.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
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