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Starfarer's Companion
by Jen D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/20/2017 04:35:14

This is the best Starfinder Supplement released so far (a few days after Starfinder Core Rules release). Well written, Races are given a place in RGG's Starfinder Universe. Artwork is decent and enough is there for this to feel like a finished product. Well worth the cost.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Starfarer's Companion
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Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers
by Arto S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/17/2017 06:36:06

Excellent guide and while (or especially as) I'm not native in English I can benefit from this a whole lot in my own writing.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers
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Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers
by Stephane G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/15/2017 19:17:52

I find this book a more complete guide to writing for those of you who wish to submit your work to a publisher or even if you want to self-publish. At 44 pages, it cover many of the elements needed for the RPG style. He gives us examples and suggestions on phrase stuctures, run-on sentences, word use, participles, player-text versus GM-text, etc.

If you're submitting your work, he even recommends asking the publisher if they have a ''Style Guide''. Something I didn't even know existed, but then, I'm not a professional writer nor did I study journalism.

Ray does a very good job of showing us the little thing need to write with style. Venger's book mentions this only briefly, were as Ray goes in depth.

I believe that both of these books would well together, but that if you can only chose one, then go with ''Writing with Style''. For only 2$ more you get more bang for your buck.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers
by Eric L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/10/2017 11:07:04

If you're a freelance RPG writer, aspiring writer or just want your fan material to read better, do yourself a favor and get this. It's easy to read, there are many good tips and the examples are clear. It makes so much sense.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Veranthea Codex: Radical Pantheon 2.0
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/08/2017 19:25:02

An Endzeitgeist.com review

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The revised edition of the massive first expansion for Veranthea clocks in at a whopping 123 pages (for this price-point!), 1 page front cover,1 page editorial/ToC, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 117 pages of content - quite a lot, so let's get to it!

Veranthea Codex is a truly massive book - and still, there are a lot of components that simply, by virtue of their unique ideas, deserved more coverage. Well, this would be the first book doing just that. If you require a brief one-sentence summary - think of this as the setting's Inner Sea Gods...though, admittedly, the focus is somewhat different.

In the first chapter, we get information on the respective deities - from ever sleeping Verahnus to Death and the Nightmare Gods - and, much like Inner Sea Gods, we receive information on the priest's role in the respective society, aphorisms, holy texts, holidays, etc. - basically, we get the full fluff-write-ups, though, considering the comparably somewhat lesser page-count, obviously the entries are not as extensive as in Inner Sea Gods - still, what is here can be considered fun and sports information on (anti-)paladins for the respective deities. And yes, this includes paladins with an anti-chaos focus instead of the anti-evil focus, for example. Here, you'll also encounter one of the major improvements of this revised edition: The book now actually contains obediences for each and every deity herein.

If you're looking for full-blown redesigns of aforementioned classes though, you won't find them here. As a nice nod towards the game's traditions, we have a couple of Easter eggs here that should certainly put smiles on the faces of quite a few GMs: Death's holy text, for example, would obviously be the Libris Mortis.

The flavor of these deities is excellent - I will e.g. never stop chuckling when reading about the deity of capitalism that puts a smiling face to the world, purporting to be LG when he's actually LE. (And no, for your info - I am NOT anti-capitalist. Quite the contrary, actually.) Cool regarding new ideas: Wanna sell your soul for random mythic templates? Yup, possible.

The chapter is also suffused by pieces of crunch - nath, as a material, has a low chance of generating wild magic, for example. Another material, Kenta, temporarily becomes harder when it's hit (cool mechanics!) and also increases AC etc. - that being said, for the copious benefits the material provides, it is underpriced. Streas, as a material, is also nice: It converts energy types, though it does confuse "Fire" with "Flame" in a minor hiccup. Wealb is slightly problematic - the material nets you a bonus to damage after being critically hit; while you can kitten the bonus, it is an ineffective strategy...but yeah, I think that could have used a slightly smoother design. There also is an interesting dust that allows for the substitution of Str for the key ability modifier of spellcasting - while I'm not a big fan here, the costs keep this in check. The pdf, while cleaned up in comparison to the first iteration, still features "page @@"-glitches here and there. Both Aleana and Andrletha now receive dedicated paladin-tenets for their knights.

On the plus-side: Studying some of the dread holy texts of Nightmare Gods can cause (conveniently hyperlinked) insanities - but also convey significant bonuses. The pdf now has a note on the recent emergence of psychic magic in Veranthea and a feat that allows cultists to infiltrate other churches and society at large...nice. Worshiping the dread Nightmare Gods can cause serious insanities and mutations for those foolish (or self-destructive) enough to heed their calling. 3 new occult rituals with slightly modified rules have been added for your gibbering delight, causing unpleasant insanities for your adversaries.

The pdf also sports a vast array of player options for the devout, beginning with Religion-traits. These traits generally are pretty powerful, but not in a way that would render then overpowered; as a cosmetic complaint, they should be denoted as subtype (Faith), but its trait subtype is evident, so yeah. For example, gaining +10 to Perception while asleep is interesting. Similarly, extending your darkvision (or getting it) a limited amount of times per day is cool.

The pdf also sports a selection of spells, and they are interesting in some of their concepts: Arcodivinity takes a whole round to cast and emulates an arcane spell of 4th level or lower from the magus or sorc/wiz-spell lists or a divine spell from the cleric/druid-list of 4th level or lower when cast by an arcane caster. This is generally a cool idea, but it should be noted that this has system-immanent hiccups the more spells you allow in your game, allowing for a very strong wild-card spell that may be balanced by the increased spell-level for all but ranger and paladin and the 1 round casting duration, but still - GMs should probably impose some limitations on spell-selection here. The revised edition now has a GM-caveat to acknowledge that, but still - not the biggest fan. In my game, with a ton of options, this will not show up.

Not all spells fall into this high-concept category - blazing insight, for example, allows for an immediate action reroll of Int- or Wis-based skill or attribute checks made in the last round and allows for rolling twice on the reroll. Other spells are pretty intriguing - divinely intoxicated is interesting: Double your spellcasting attribute modifier's time, the target has to roll twice any d20 - and then use the results in the following sequence: Better result, better result, worse result. Capital Capitalist lets you haggle exceedingly well - but the reduced price may result in the merchant decreasing his starting attitude towards you. Forcing targets to reroll damage just caused may be okay, but more interesting would be Gift of Undeath - which provides continuous healing for a couple of minutes...and then slays the imbiber and resurrects him as an undead. Ouch, but it can't be force-fed to unwitting dupes, thankfully...a damn flavorful for fanatic death-cultists! As a very minor complain, making the target "one WILLING living creature would be a bit more elegant for that caveat. Touch of the Alien has been properly balanced and is no longer a broken mess.

The pdf also contains an array of magic items, including a magical lantern and a theurgist's mace - basically a mace that grants you the option to smite 1/day; if the character is a caster, he may smite 2/day spellcasters opposed to your tradition (i.e. arcane casters get smite versus divine casters and vice versa). If a character can cast both types of spells, the character may use the smite 4/day...but here, the update is a bit inconsistent: How does psychic magic interact here? Not 100% sure. This smite penalizes saves versus the wielder's spells and SPs. Still, there are damn cool ideas here - an artifact-level blowgun flute? Yes! A coin that acts as a shuriken and lets you convert metal coins while also enhancing your Sleight of Hand? Yep, pretty awesome. Dreksler's Unending Tap is pretty fun and allows for the conversion of fluid to magical beer. A whip that may petrify foes if they fail the low-DC-save...pretty neat.

The pdf also sports some archetypes - the divine drunkard brawler, for example. When these guys consume alcohol, they accumulate drunk points, which they then can expend to duplicate one of 3 randomly determined effects. The effects are interesting and generally make for a chaotic experience well in tune with Dreksler's nature. The Holy Innovator gunslinger basically is a gunslinger who can utilize contraptions from the Veranthea Codex base book - nice. The paladin-archetype merchanteer is reprinted in this book, complete with tithed healing, magnetic channel and transformation to antipaladin. The Tian Ti-Ang Agent bard can be considered to be the heralds of the mythic vampire lords and as such receive an assortment of interesting vampire-abilities.

Then, however, one of the coolest chapters in the book begins - after the chosen template (CR +1), we get heralds for the gods - all of them! From an impossible slug swarm to more traditional executors of the will of the respective deities, these unique and powerful beings (clocking usually in at around CR 15) make for a truly inspired, interesting chapter and feature appropriate and cool unique tricks as well as information on planar allies available. The 3 immortal demigods of Urethiel, Boris and his entourage are covered/reprinted and we also get the CR 25/MR 10 Sciemaat the shattered, who seeks to repair the shield that once kept the nightmare gods at bay. Similarly, the last irrational Carambal can be found here. H'gal, the grand lich of Proxima Alterra (CR 17/MR 7), on the other hand, was a rather interesting penultimate critter herein. Oh, and the revised version now has full stats for Yawvil, master wizard of Vernathea: CR 37/MR 10. No, that is not a type. He is built with hypercorps rules and a hyperscore of 10, meganaut 2/hypernaut 2 - though you can run him as printed, this means that he does not use the default mythic rules.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting have improved since the original iteration of Radical Pantheon, but still are not perfect - I noticed a few glitches and relics here and there. Layout adheres to Veranthea's two-column full-color standard and the book sports a vast amount of full-color artworks, with new pieces added in. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Mike Myler, with contributions from Luis Loza, Michael McCarthy and Nicholas J. Giebel, has written a massive expansion here - and while there is some overlap with the content already featured in the Veranthea Codex, there still is ample material herein to justify the very low asking price for this amount of content. The revised edition of radical pantheon sports more information for all the deities, which means, ultimately, that everything feels a bit more concise, that the respective, previously somewhat neglected entities now also shine. So yes, radical pantheon's revised edition is superior to the original iteration. At the same time, however, some of the new pieces of content, while thematically neat, can prove to be a bit problematic. In the end, the book has improved and thus warrants a final verdict of 4.5 stars...but I cannot round up for it.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Veranthea Codex: Radical Pantheon 2.0
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Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers
by Joseph D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/05/2017 15:56:38

Buy this. Read it. Read it again.

Ray Vallese has written the TTRPG equivalent of Strunk & White's "The Elements of Style" or Truby's "The Anatomy of Story." It is a book I never expected to see, and one that I am incredibly glad now exists.

As the Managing Editor of a 3rd party publisher, this text hits close to home. I have already sent it to my Lead Writer, and it will be required reading for all of our contractors. It is plain, simple, and forthright. But most of all it is applicable to our work where so many texts of this sort aren't.

So buy this book. Keep it close. Revisit it often. You will become a stronger writer as a consequence.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers
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The Genius Guide to the Talented Bestiary
by Robert M. J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/04/2017 16:52:07

This book is one of the biggest best monster tomes available for Pathfinder or 3.5 edition! And with a few simple conversions it illw be ggegegtaeg to add to my 5th edition arsinal!

I joined the Kickstarter and got the PDF but I an old school and love books! It is well worth the price!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Genius Guide to the Talented Bestiary
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Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers
by Ehn J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/31/2017 16:12:08

An Ehn’s Gaming Foundry review:

Ah, Writing with Style: An Editor’s Advice for RPG Writers. This…this is a book that I initially did not want to buy. To give you a bit of history on me, I’m prideful and handsome, and I don’t like admitting that there’s places I can improve, especially in places where I believe I am talented. Because of this, this book sat in my cart for about 4 hours while I went back and forth before finally swallowing my pride and getting it.

I am very glad I did.

The thing about this book is that I can’t really review it like I normally do, because it’s not my normal type of book to review. I can’t really run it down, because really, this book is a sum of its parts. No one part of it is going to completely fix your writing, and the author goes out of their way to tell you this. What it will do is give you a clear path on problems that you may be having with grammar, delivery, extraneous words, and all sorts of other things that even the best writers still do. And the thing is, having each one of these placed into its own section is like a targetted guide on how to properly fix your problems.

Out of any book I’ve owned, I may say this is the one for which I am most thankful for proper bookmarking, giving me a checklist to go through when I write something, so that I can check off each individual section, and double check the ones I know are problems for myself. Each section gives solid advice in a tone which doesn’t feel condescending (that was one of my biggest fears here) along with clear examples of what the author is talking about. This alone makes the book worth the price of admission, as like some of you, I require examples instead of just explanations to be able to grasp a concept.

The tone of the book as a whole is warm and welcoming, something that I very much appreciate, and there feels as though there’s a genuine desire by the author to educate their audience. Despite the book being 40+ pages, it’s an incredibly easy read (I might have taken about 30 minutes to go through it once before giving it a second read), and it has become an indispensable resource for me since picking it up.

Mechanics: X/5

Doesn’t really apply, but I’d give it a 5 if it did.

Thematics: 5/5

The only way I can rate the thematics is by the tone of the book, and that was enough for me to give it my highest rating. The terminology used and the tone of the book are just what I would want from something like this, and I just…I really like it.

Final Thoughts: 5/5

To give you an idea of my thoughts on this book, the file’s saved in my computer as “Designer’s Bible”, and that sums up my thoughts on it. Writing with Style by Ray Vallese is concise in getting across very important issues in writing, and really the worst thing I have to say about this book is that it didn’t come out sooner.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers
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Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers
by David J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/29/2017 12:34:27

I run my own RPG publishing company, so I rarely review products from other companies. I don't want to give other publishers the idea that I'm playing favoritism if I like a product or more importantly, in the event that I don't like a product (or have a similar product), writing the review to discourage others from buying it.

This book demands a response.

Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers, is quite simply one of the best writing guides I've read. The PDF gives established writers and aspiring writers alike a wealth of information on grammar, style, word usage; I could go on and on.

Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers has already helped me refine a manuscript I'm currently working on, and I'm not even finished reading the pdf! I encourage anyone seeking to hone their wordsmithing skills to buy this product immediately.

If I could ask for one thing, it would be to get this book into Print on Demand as soon as possible.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Writing With Style: An Editor's Advice for RPG Writers
by M.T. B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/28/2017 01:21:23

This is the book I've spent the last few years looking for. Clear, simple, style advice with a focus on tabletop gaming. Every creator who is publishing on DTRPG or the DMs Guild should buy and read this book. It really is that good.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Skill Challenge Handbook
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/17/2017 11:23:30

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This handbook clocks in at 79 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 2 pages of SRD, 3 pages of advertisements, leaving us with 71 pages of content, so let's check this out!

This book was moved up in my reviewing-queue as a prioritized review at the request of my patreons.

It is no secret that I never liked D&D 4th edition. I tried the game and I'm not trying to discredit it or its playstyle - it just wasn't what I considered to be enjoyable and in contrast to PFRPG and 5e, it didn't let me tell the stories I wanted to tell. That is not to say that I think it's a bad system. I get why people like it and it has its definite merits. One such merit outshines, at least for me, pretty much all others, and that would be the concept of the skill challenge. In short, this represents a cooperative, dangerous endeavor undertaken by the group, based mostly on skill use - preventing a raft from going down the waterfalls, stopping a trap-room slowly filling with sand, chases - there is a vast plethora of different applications of the original system. However, at the same time, its implementation wasn't always as smooth as it could have been...but that's a topic for another rant.

Ultimately, skill challenges addressed an issue with skills that has been with us for quite a while, namely that, for such an integral component of the game, skills tend to...not be as fun as they should be. When 101 New Skill Uses hit sites back in the day, I was ecstatic. Similarly, the idea of rank-based Skill Unlocks was one I cherished and thankfully, more and more modules differentiate between degrees of success and failure when it comes to skills. All of these, however, do not necessarily change the structure in which skill-use works. To take perhaps one of the most maligned and disliked components of the game, namely traps: Mechanically, they're usually 2 - 3 rolls: Perception to see them, Disable Device to disarm them. Or an attack roll by the trap. Or a saving throw. It took a while, and then publishers like Raging Swan Press etc. realized that this was not necessarily the most fun incarnation of such challenges and thus began crafting more interesting traps that involved the whole group. Similarly, whether via conversion (e.g. in the Zeitgeist AP) or even via the big dog Paizo, which has, by other names, used similar mechanics in chases and the like - a complex series of tasks that would be resolved, a series of tasks that does not hinge on just one roll, but multiples and that engages the whole group, as opposed to just one characters. You know, emphasizing the cooperative aspect that makes roleplaying awesome.

The downside and caveat that ultimately comes with these tasks would be that, at least right now, they have not had a proper engine to run on; their mechanics had to be clarified, which cost words...you get the idea. This is where this book comes in. The Skill Challenge Handbook's goal, hence, would be to codify rules that allow you to set up any type of cooperative, non-combat task as a group-based endeavor.

The mechanics for this are interesting, to say the least: We begin with the so-called "Skill Challenge Cycle", which behaves basically like a combat round: You roll initiative and retain it throughout; you get your turn and may even begin with a surprise cycle and you may be flat-footed until you act. Here's the thing that sets it apart: While you can easily assign a cycle of 1 round and run a skill challenge even during a combat encounter, there is no requirement for doing the like: You can run skill challenges in pretty much any temporal interval you'd like: Want to depict a grueling, weeks- or even months-spanning overland trek/escape from a hostile army? Well, you can simply define the cycle as hours, days, months...or conversely have two brilliant strategists try to outthink one another in a manner of seconds! While the default cycle-lengths, called frequency, are defined tighter, as a whole, there is nothing keeping you from expanding these - the system retains its modularity.

Similarly, the spatial factor can diverge wildly - squares of movement, from the local to the global, are covered - in theory, you could play skill challenges with kingdom or settlement stats with a minimum of fuss! More important for most groups, however, would be that both targeting, riding and vehicles, all those dicey types of movement, are covered within the frame of this modular base that sits at the heart of this book.

A skill challenge has, obviously, per definitionem, an inherent chance of failing it, but the completion of the challenge may be just as modular - in fact, multiple parties, characters or otherwise active participants may have wildly different success conditions! Beating a skill challenge is called "Completion" and is achieved, ultimately, by making "progress." Progress is made y using the applicable primary or secondary skills associated with the skill challenge - secondary skills decrease the die-size used to roll progress by one step. Wait, what? Yep, if you have a lot of ranks (based on hard ranks, thankfully!), Skill Focus or class skills used here, you'll roll a larger die than those who have less expertise in the field, allowing you to actually become better in the way you succeed. And before all those munchkins start complaining: Your carefully minmaxed skills still yield bonus progress if you beat the DC by 5 or more. Oh, and 20s may become crits when confirmed, while 1s are always failures - akin to combat.

Speaking of which: The book takes class abilities, ability checks, feats and spells into account, covering and codifying in concise terms the way in which such abilities are used in the context of the skill challenge system. So, how does it work? Actions are defined as pertaining the cycle, differentiating between cycle and half-cycle actions - this allows for the easy integration of all action types of PFRPG easily and yes, swift/immediate actions are codified properly as well. Beyond these, there are some special actions: Aiding others, creating an advantage in a movement-based skill challenge...oh, and an important aspect: How do players or PCs know what they can do in a given challenge? A concise system for actually realizing how such a challenge works has been included: Relevant Knowledge versus a DC that scales with the CR of the skill challenge at hand.

The skill challenges as a base system can easily be modified by optional elements - from languages to skill bonuses, time pressure, backlash for failures, demerits (deteriorating benefits the longer it lasts) to failure tolerance - the modifications are all concisely defined and present perfectly defined key elements to customize the base system. These are further expanded with optional SQs that allow for critical fumbles, individual completion, limited completion or perhaps the challenge takes place in a magically imbued area - all of these frameworks are defined in the clear and precise manner we have come to expect from Everyman Gaming. Beyond these, an engine for obstacle creation for movement-based challenges can be found - including unavoidable or magical obstacles! Oh, and I should mention thresholds - with this system, you could create multi-step rituals the PCs must complete, with escalating and different conditions and tasks in each of the steps, separated by thresholds.

All of this sounds highly theoretical, but if you prefer examples, from babysitting to powering up runestones, making a meal for a dragon, cracking encoded spellbooks to gaining an audience with the king or staying the course in a brutal storm - the system's applications are, without any hyperbole ENDLESS. But perhaps you're a GM who does not like to bother with the nit and grit of math and all that stuff? Well, in that case, you'll ADORE the massive, massive tables of sample skill DCs by CR, the progresses, obstacles etc. - basically, if you don't want to bother with a variety of customizations, you can simply take one of these rows from the table and run them as is.

Okay, so this would be the base engine - it is titanic in its vast potential...and it becomes more awesome from here on out. You see, from here on out, we move to the subchapter that take a look at specific implementations (and modifications) of the system: The first of these would be the chase challenge, which includes rules for forced marches, tracking quarries and obfuscating trails. You're the couriers, trying to warn the kingdom of the impending invasions, with killers and soldiers at your heels? There you go - here are the rules to depict your heart-pounding escape! Whether chased or chaser, the system works. The second system covers something I have been waiting for: Contests. From Poker to Chess to pretty much any athletic of other form of competition is covered: Grapple contests, momentum contests, those featuring nets/walls, competitive recollections and stochastic/strategy contests -all are concisely and precisely defined - subcategories and point-based completion...all included. The actions, from blocks to fake outs, catches, passes, pushing self etc. are provided. Want to play Fantasy Soccer or Football or Bloodbowl (yep, dogpiling rules...) or Quidditch in PFRPG? There you go - the rules are here! If you once again encounter the challenge of playing chess in-game, you won't have to whip out the board and bore your players or resolve it as a banal series of roles - you can actually make it INTERSTING and EXCITING. The sample challenges include, fyi, baseball, chess, horseshoes, poker, rope-skipping (!!!) or trivia contests...the options are as infinite as our tradition as a species to make games. Heck, you could go meta and have your PFRPG-characters play a simplified RPG in-game...

Now, all of this is cool, but personally, I gravitate to complex plots - as such, influence challenges of e.g. diplomatic tasks during banquets, backroom dealings, courtly intrigues, hashing out deals with merchant consortiums - all of these and infinitely more can be realized with the chapter focusing on them, adding a vast array of playability to any intrigue scenario - I certainly know I'll use the hell out of that in a certain, upcoming Taldan AP...and speaking of which: Verbal Duels tie in perfectly with the former, acting not only as a stand-alone chapter, but also as a kind of extension: From an influence to a verbal duel and back, you can stack these upon another in a variety of genius ways - since discovering a bias, seeding audiences and gaining edges are all provided, you can basically run a whole campaign focused on senates, hearings and the like if you so choose! Various strategies and the like can be found, with skills being assigned to tactics...and yes, before you're asking, countering a tactic with the same tactic, repeating one over and over and the like all come with repercussions! And yes, this retains, obviously, full compatibility with Ultimate Intrigue.

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Everyman Gaming's two-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked with nested bookmarks for your convenience. The full-color artworks throughout are full-color and well-made, provided by Brett Neufeld and Jacob Blackmon. The softcover print copy is nice, though it does not sport the name on the spine, which is a bit of a pity.

Alexander Augunas' Skill Challenge Handbook is an extremely versatile...oh who am I kidding? Let me spell it out clearly:

THIS IS PERHAPS THE MOST IMPORTANT RULEBOOK I HAVE READ IN YEARS. Perhaps, it is even the most important 3pp-PFRPG book - period. Are you playing Pathfinder? Do you want to do more than killing things? Then this is a MUST-HAVE PURCHASE. Scratch that, even if you just want to kill things, this'll make the combats more exciting!

I am not kidding, nor engaging in the slightest kind of hyperbole when I'm saying that:

-This should have been Core. Seriously. If I had to choose one 3pp-book to add to PFRPG's core-rules, this would be it.

-This book makes EVERY single PFRPG campaign better for using it.

-This is a MILESTONE and vastly improves the game.

-I have NEVER seen a supplement, regardless of rules system, enhance the number of stories I can tell to this extent.

The skill challenge handbook is, even among Alexander Augunas' impressive cadre of amazing books, a shining example, a paragon of its kind. Didactically-concise, well-presented and easy to grasp, yet incredibly modular, the system presented herein unlocks innumerable, nay, infinite options to tell fantastic, engaging stories. Heck, I even used it for stuff it was never intended to do - like portraying conflicts between settlements! The system is so incredibly modular and versatile, it can literally depict anything in an exciting manner.

Nail-biting in-game chess-duels for the souls of fellow adventurers? Check! Backstabbing courtly intrigue? Check. Over the top fantasy bloodsports? Check. Venturing into the depths of the earth? Check. Scaling a giant beanstalk? Check. Flying a ship through the deathstar's/SIN's defenses? Check. Navigating the Eye of Abendengo? Check. Leading the Chain of Dogs through the desert? Check. Playing Quidditch? Check. Making traps that engage the whole group? Check. Diffusing a magical reactor? Check. Finishing a ritual to banish a demon lord while he tries to eat you? Check. Catching enemy spies? Check. Running down couriers? Check. Ben Hur-style chariot races/combats? Check. Doing the Cicero in Senate? Check. Going fantasy Ace Attorney? Check. Ride an Avalanche? Check. Scaling a Kaiju? Check. Riding the gigantic tsunami-wave of crystallized shards from the heavens? Check. Deciphering a grimoire before the THINGS get you and your comrades? Check. Negotiating with the cannibals about to eat you and yours? Check. Navigating the dragon's hoard sans waking the wyrm? Check. Depicting guild warfare? Check.

...I could literally go on all day long and just add to this list. I am not kidding when I'm saying that this is the single most important 3pp PFRPG-rule-book I know and own. I cannot stress enough how incredibly, incredibly inspiring this book is. The base engine is deceptively simple-looking and elegant and can be tweaked by even the most novice of GMs to deliver pure, unadulterated awesomeness. All those situations that some players sat out, all those high tension scenes that deflated by being reduced to a single, bland roll now extend to the whole group - and by virtue of the structure of the system, they engage all players and deliver the high tension of comparable scenes from other forms of media.

There is no other book out there that delivers a similar increase in quality and versatility for the game. If you are a GM, BUY THIS ASAP and never look back. If you're a player, buy it as well. Keep a copy and gift one to your GM. No matter how good your GM is, chances are that your game will be better with this book in your life.

In fact, even if you do not play PFRPG and thus can't sue the math aspects of the game, as long as you have actions you take in combat and some sort of skill system, you can use a big portion of this system with some modifications!

If the sequence of superlatives was no clear indication: This belongs on the shelves and HDs of literally EVERY PFRPG GM. No exception. This book is fantastic, a one-of-a-kind masterpiece that is supreme, no matter the scale you apply: If I had 10 stars, this would be 10 out of 10 and I'd complain about not being able to award it 11. This book is an apex-level toolkit of raw potential and excitement, 5 stars + seal of approval, is a candidate for my Top Ten of 2017 (who am I kidding - this has a very high chance of getting the number 1-spot!) and also gets my designation as an EZG Essential, as one of the books I'd consider to be absolutely required reading.

Do yourself a favor and get this dazzling, resplendent gem of a book today.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Skill Challenge Handbook
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Veranthea Codex: Adventurer's Handbook
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/17/2017 05:39:57

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive compilation of player-centric material for Veranthea clocks in at 197 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial,1 page ToC, 1 page of SRD, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 190 pages of content, so let's take a look!

Okay, so we begin this book with a brief timeline and introduction to the setting of Veranthea and its distinct continents, with detailed (and really nice!) 1-page maps of the continents in question. The pdf explains the continents and leitmotifs in a concise and player-friendly manner, including the information on the Forever Dark, the collector cabal and a basic outline of the tesseract called the Veil - though here at least the main thing going on, metaplot-wise, is clearly spelled out for PCs, which is NOT something I would have wanted in a player-book. Pretty big SPOILERS there...

From here on, we revisit the various gods of Veranthea - you have at this moment seen those guys in the campaign setting, radical pantheon, etc., so I'm not going to reiterate the information once again. The section also contains various special materials for items, which can generally be called creative, though a few of them could use some minor finetuning - a material that absorbs energy, for example, and converts it to reflexive damage for the attacker, inflicts untyped damage that should probably be typed according to energy absorbed. Another material increases the damage output of weapons after being critically hit. Additionally, we can find dust that allows for the substitution of Strength as a spell's governing attribute. It should btw. be noted that the occult rituals depicted in e.g. the Forever Dark book, have been included here. The gods come with obediences etc.

The pdf then goes on to recap the global rules Veranthea employs - the firearm recoil, the tweaks to psionics, the magic attunement rules, the rules for mirror weapons and fractal armor, the wild magic outcome-table, the rules for the scarring that defines the abilities of those born in Urethiel and the magic styles used there. Notes for playing monstrous parties, the Pilot skill, vehicles...you get the idea.

The player-section collates all the races of the setting, mentioning and explaining the distinction between people types, the divergent stats goblins and strix have in the setting and then going on to provide the racial stats of the Alterrans from "Into the Veil" (including all supplemental material like FCOs, equipment, etc.) and a stat-less mentioning of dread H'gal. Pantako, mongrelmen and leugho have been reproduced here with their associated material, while the previously only sketch-like feylves now get a proper racial presentation, with names, nomenclature, racial traits and associated material - they btw. get +4 Dex and +2 Int and Cha, -2 Str & Con, -4 Wis, making them pretty lopsided for certain builds. They are Small, have low-light vision, get +2 to CL-checks to overcome SR and +2 to Spellcraft to identify magic items as well as 1/day glitterdust and +2 to Perception. They also get quite a bunch of supplemental material, like new pieces of equipment and a racial archetype, the glitterbomber, who decreases bomb damage but blinds targets of direct bomb hits, with bombs that glitterdust foes and higher levels yielding immunity to being dazzled and several glitter-themed spells that they can cast by expending bomb-uses. They also inflict more damage versus targets subject to negative conditions associated with glitter-stuff: Blinded, dazzled or dazed characters, that is. Limited personal flight is locked beyond racial feats and enhancing drakones (animal companion and monster stats included!) they ride etc. make, as a whole, for a fabulous option.

The dengu and pengu variants of the tengu-race have been similarly expanded, though their racial trait modifications could have used highlighting - they are buried in a pretty long text at the beginning, but that remains an aesthetic formatting complaint. The half-doppelganger race is a but lopsided, gaining +4 to one attribute, -2 to another, darkvision, light blindness, immunity to the effects of the trekth's architecture and free alter self with dynamic forms, which can be VERY potent in the hands of the right player. Flesh pockets, armor that is absorbed when changing forms and the like can be found as complimentary material here. A minor complaint: A feat that morphs your hand in a natural weapon of your choice does not take sizes into account and does not specify whether the weapon formed is primary or secondary - and considering the feat's flexibility, there is no default to fall back on. This is a bit puzzling, considering a magic item that nets you bone claws gets the type classification right. The other options here, though, are pretty damn cool and include sound imitation and limited, food-powered fast healing that cannot be cheesed, though the Dexterity-check to negate AoOs when eating in combat can be considered to be a bit clunky.

The strange shokusei notoku halflings also get a proper, full depiction, at +2 Wis, -2 Str, Small size, low-light vision, keen senses DR 2/ slashing or bludgeoning as well as immunity to paralysis, poison, polymorph and sleep effects as well as stunning. They also get +8 to Stealth to hide in vegetation. All in all, pretty powerful. The god tear artifacts, their language, etc. are provided and the racial feats emphasize grappling via unarmed strikes, something that taps in their unarmed ranger archetype and its unique combat style options. They also get a variant, vine-based grappling hook, not unlike that used by the leugho, magic ropes and whips and the spells are interesting, allowing for the assuming of pod-forms, etc. The sun-gryphons have also been included. However, none of the races get an age, height and weight table, which is a bit sucky.

The pdf then reprints the conduit base class, first presented in Amora Game's excellent Liber Influxus Communis, and the Betzekorps Attack on Titan-style PrC as well as the Dragonminded psionic PrC. Entr entrapper, green avenger and lycanthropic icon have been collected here. Similarly, the archetypes collected herein sport the academy trainee, the adversarial armorist, the bird rider, the conexcron investigator, the drunk brawler, the gobchopper skirmisher, the goblin pistolero, the iron fury, the merchanteer, the monstrous minstrel, the nightmare assassin, the nightmare prognosticator, the oni sworn, as well as qinggong ninja, scientific innovator, swarm minder, the tian-ti ang agent, wild mage and wild scholar. The nightmare assassin, just fyi, is a tweak of the blood candle mechanics of the gitwerc, using the candles fashioned from the dead to enhance death attacks.

Alchemist discoveries, general feats and tech like chain swords have been collected here as well, alongside tech items (Veranthea has its own tech-rules, btw.) and the stats of snow orms. The pdf also presents a selection of Veranthean traits and collects the spells associated with the various deities in one handy chapter. After the spells and sans header or the like, we immediately move on to a collection of magic items associated with the deities of the radical pantheon.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good on a formal level - I noticed no significant accumulation of hiccups. On a formal level, the rules-language is concise, if not always perfect - it should, over all, not generate undue problems, though e.g. when I read something like "class bonus" or "reaction" to denote an action, I cringe a bit. Layout adheres to Veranthea's busy 2-column/1-column standard, depending on the content on the page, and crams a ton of information on each page - this is a dense book. Artworks are a blend of full-color original pieces, stock-art, etc. - fans of Veranthea will be familiar with the pieces used. The pdf comes fully bookmarked with nested bookmarks for your convenience.

Mike Myler, with contributions from Michael Allen, Jacob Blackmon, Larry Dixon, Nicholas J. Giebel, Jeffrey Hersh, Luis Loza and Michael McCarthy, has collected a metric ton of player-material here, which is a good thing, as far as I'm concerned: I hate handing out campaign settings and all their juicy GM-specific secrets to players and this book helps in that regard, big time. At the same time, it represents a great way for those of you who are not interested in the setting and more intrigued by the crunch - while deeply situated in the context of the setting, this still represents a great way to get exactly that.

That being said, if you don't want this as a player handout book or as a stand-alone, divorced from the setting, then this will do significantly less for you - for the most part, you will be familiar with the material herein if you own the other Veranthea books. To me, the book does represent a bit of a missed chance - hiccups in the original iterations of options are still herein, though e.g. the page-numbers are correct.

If you get this book for its own virtues, be aware that Veranthea is a pretty high-powered world and as such, this is not made for gritty games; there are a couple of options that are pretty potent, though still, as a whole, within the realms of the classic paradigms. As a whole, this is worth getting if you don't have the other Veranthea material. From an organization-perspective, I think the special materials, mirrored weapons etc. should have all been collected in their own sub-chapter, mainly since looking for them in the deity write-ups can be somewhat hard to keep in mind. I also consider some notes presented here to be slightly SPOLER-y, with e.g. the nature of a certain god and the metaplot of the Veil being examples for information that should have been redacted. As such, this is not perfect, but neither is it anywhere close to mediocrity - my final verdict will hence clock in at 4 stars -a good offering and a nice way to get Veranthea's crunchier bits to players.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Veranthea Codex: Adventurer's Handbook
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Racial Prestige: Kyubi Paragon
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/15/2017 11:05:00

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Racial Prestige-series clocks in at 17 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 5 pages of SRD, leaving us with 10 pages of content, so let's take a look!

This review was moved up in my reviewing-queue as a prioritized review at the request of my patreons.

If you're somewhat of a Japanophile, you'll certainly appreciate the pdf specifying the origin of the word "kyubi" as a bastardization stemming from "kyuubi no kitsune" - and btw., if you're looking the currently by far best take on the kitsune race as a proper race with options galore, be sure to check out the Dynastic Races Compendium.

Anyways, let's move on to the racial paragon class: To qualify, you must be a kitsune with the Kyubi Awakening and Magical Tail feats and either have 5 ranks in a skill, BAB of +5 or higher or the ability to cast 3rd level spells. The class nets 4 + Int skills per level, nets no armor or weapon proficiencies and a 3/4 BAB-progression as well as no good saves. It should be noted that, at 3rd level, you get to choose two saves and gain +1 in them, which increases to +2 at 9th level, evening out at two medium save progressions at the higher levels.

The Kyubi Awakening feat, just fyi, nets you a kyubi trick, though you still have to meet the prerequisites of the trick.

Here's the thing, though - Everyman Gaming Racial Paragon PrCs have a so-called aligned class: Upon taking the PrC, you select one class and treat kyubi paragon levels thereafter as though you had progressed in that class for the purpose of its class features. This cannot let you exceed your character level, though, and does not yield new class features that would have been gained: Basically, scaling abilities are not crippled by taking the class, which is something I enjoy. In case you were wondering, the class nets Magical tail as a bonus feat at 2nd level and every 3 levels thereafter, with alternate choices being covered as well.

The class begins play with a so-called chakra reservoir equal to 1/2 PrC level + the number of Magical Tail feats possessed. As a swift action, the kyubi paragon may expend a number of such points to cast a spell-like ability gained from Magical Tails or use a kyubi trick without this counting against the daily limit of that SP. The cost is equal to the spell-level duplicated. The reservoir replenishes after rest. The astute reader may have noted that this allows for some serious action-economy tricks, which is pretty potent from the get-go.

Starting at 3rd level, the paragon may spend 1 point from this reservoir as a swift action accompanying the casting of a Magical Tail SP or kyubi trick to add the benefits of Conceal Spell, with 8th level unlocking the option to spend 2 such points to gain the benefits of Improved Conceal Spell. Furthermore, 3rd level and every 3 levels thereafter unlock a Metamagic feat chosen from a list, which can hereafter be applied to the SPs and tricks, but at the cost of a number of points equal to the spell level increase of the feat in question, minimum 1.

Now, I have been mentioning kyubi tricks before - these basically constitute the talents of the class and the first one is gained at 1st level, with an additional trick every 2 levels thereafter. They are categorized and differentiated further by being grouped in tail-categories: There are tricks that require 2, 5 and 9 tails to learn. Saving throw-wise, we use either 1/2 HD or spell-level to calculate the saves, with Charisma being the governing attribute for these tricks. The kyubi tricks allow for a variety of different options: From improving upon Realistic Likeness with benefits of vocal alteration and more control over age, height etc. to using Occult Adventure's Chakra system to disguise other, point-powered Arcane Strike, rogue talents to gliding and gaining darkvision, these are interesting and sufficiently versatile. It should be noted that all those examples were from the first category of kyubi tricks, for the talents differentiate between 2-tail, 5-tail and 9-tail tricks . guess what the prerequisites for taking them are. Yeah, self-explanatory.

Using tails for simple tasks, gaining Psychic Sensitivity or the ranged legerdemain feature rank among the more intriguing ones and the strong leitmotif of magical trickster is also represented by the potential to gain access to ranged legerdemain.

Starting at 4th level, the class gains the shapeshift shaman hex, using the aligned class + PrC levels as shaman level and is treated as a racial shapechanging ability for the purpose of ability interaction. This is relevant, since quite a few kyubi tricks blend the shapechanging and trickster themes, offering e.g. a means to greatly increase the chance to escape bonds via shapeshifting or use shapeshifting while in your natural form to temporarily adapt to e.g. water etc.. Similarly, at higher levels, we do get the more potent plant/vermin shape and form of the (exotic) dragon/giant form options added to shapechanging with the right talent. And yes, the level prerequisites/unlocks of this trick make sense. Similarly, the potent Acrobatic Pounce is well-placed with an additional minimum-level caveat.

It should also be noted that the 5 tails-option potentially ties in with the Everyman Mini: Kumiho, allowing you to assume kumiho or pipefox shapes, with all required rules represented herein. Quick change and reservoir-based telekinesis can similarly be found. The highest-level and most potent of tricks, from screen to constant greater age resistance, are obviously the 9-tails options. Speaking of age: Really cool: We get modified age tables for kitsune with more than one tail! See, that is really thinking through the subject matter, going the extra mile. And before you're asking: Yes, you can gain an extra kyubi trick via a feat introduced herein. For your convenience, the contagious suggestion and form of the exotic dragon-spells have been btw. reprinted here, so no, you do not need those Player Companions to get all out of this pdf.

The class has more to offer, though: At 2nd level, the kyubi paragon chooses the embodiment he wishes to pursue - this choice cannot be changed once made and determines the abilities gained at 2nd, 6th and 10th level. 3 of these are provided: The Embodiment of magic allows the paragon to continue gaining new spells with the aligned class, allowing for basically 9/10 spell-level progression, with 6th level allowing for the use of chakra reservoir points in conjunction with the spells of the aligned class, which is VERY potent, even at 11th level, the earliest you can have it. This is thankfully balanced by double costs for doing so, reigning in the ability to strong, but sensible. The capstone here provides the option to employ multiple Metamagic feats in conjunction with his options. The Embodiment of might turns the class into a full BAB one with d10 as HD and also provides either a bonus feat or proficiency with all simple and martial weapons. 6th level nets a further bonus feat and makes PrC-levels count as fighter levels for prerequisite purposes and as a capstone, we have transformation for 3 points.

The third embodiment, embodiment of skill, nets 8 skill ranks at 2nd level and an additional +4 at every level thereafter. Additionally, if he's trained in a skill or uses an ability check, even if it's not his turn, the paragon can expend a point from the reservoir to add PrC levels as an insight bonus to the check - even when taking 10 or 20, but the decision must be made beforehand. 6th level allows for a reroll instead and allows for the use of all skills untrained (and the reservoir-based boost on them, conversely, may also now be used on untrained skills). The capstone lets the paragon take 10 or 20, even when prohibited from doing so, but at the cost of chakra reservoir points. These embodiments are genius, as they actually make the class feasible for pretty much all base classes - big kudos there!

One final thing to mention: At 4th level, the kyubi paragon gains the racial paragon vigilante talent, using class level plus aligned class level as vigilante level. He gains this talent a second and third time at 7th and 10th level, respectively. What does this talent do? Well, as a move action, the vigilante can gain access to a chosen feat that corresponds to his race for 1 minute, but still must fulfill the prerequisites. This can be used 3 + 1/2 vigilante class level times per day, with limited use feats taking away from the uses of the talent instead. Taking the talent additional times, the character may choose to either get one more racial feat or decrease the action required to activate the ability. Big kudos: This gets duration, interaction of wildcard feat-trees etc. right.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch on both a formal and rules-language level. Layout adheres to Everyman Gaming's two-column full-color standard and the full-color artworks are nice indeed. The pdf has no bookmarks, but doesn't necessarily requires them at this length.

Alexander Augunas' kyubi paragon is AMAZING. A) It is feasible for all types of character. B) It represents the iconic trickster style of the kyuubi no kitsune better than any other take on the trope I have seen so far and c), it does so while also providing a distinct and rewarding resource-management mechanic. In short: If there were more PrCs of this caliber, they wouldn't have such a bad rep. The balancing is also rather precise, with the limited resources putting hard and sensible, but not crippling caps on the most potent of tricks available. In short: 5 Stars + seal of approval, given sans hesitation.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Racial Prestige: Kyubi Paragon
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Everyman Minis: Yroometji
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/14/2017 04:37:41

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Everyman Minis-series clocks in at 10 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of SRD, 1 page advertisement, leaving us with 5 pages of content, so let's take a look!

This review was moved up in my review-queue as a prioritized review. Furthermore, I received an advance copy in order to have the review done on release day.

So, what are the Yroometji? Kangaroo-folk. They gain +2 Con and Cha, -2 Int, are Medium, get low-light vision, +2 to Acrobatics made to jump (and are always treated as having a running start, +1 natural AC and a natural slam attack (cosmetic complaint - you need to resort to default - it does not specify being primary or secondary) at 1d4 bludgeoning and piercing damage and a crit-range of 19-20 when using their feet, or 1d6 bludgeoning damage with the tail. Readied attacks with the tail deal double damage versus charges, as though it had the brace quality. Additionally, they have a pouch that can hold up to 1 cubic foot volume or 10 pounds and if no armor or clothing restricts access to the pouch, transference of an item to or from it requires a swift or move action. Armor that grants pouch access costs slightly more and what constitutes restrictions to pouch access is concisely defined. All in all a solid race that should not provide any problems, regardless of campaign tone or power-level.

Now, as has become the tradition with Everyman Gaming's take on races, this is not where we leave off - the yroometji depicted here are more than what you'd usually expect, with notes on physical descriptions, life cycles, cultures, religion, etc. all being depicted in surprising and neat depth for a pdf of this size. Favored class options for brawler, skald, shaman and druid have been included.

Speaking of brawler: The first of the racial archetypes within this pdf would be the Five-Strike Slugger for yroometji brawlers. These guys reduce their proficiency regarding weapons to simple weapons and may not use monk or close weapons as part of their flurries, but may use their slam attack in conjunction with it and also deliver abilities that require unarmed strike use with it. Nice: Instead of maneuver training, these guys can choose combat or psychological maneuvers from a list and add them to the effects of slam attacks, with 3rd level unlocking the first of these and every 4th level thereafter providing a new one. This ties in with the ability that replaces weapon mastery, namely to gain an unarmed strike or slam attack at full BAB minus 5 after affecting a target with a psychological or combat maneuver. And no, it can't be abused in combination with flurries or the free maneuver added to slam attacks, thanks to an explicit piece of rules-language.

The second archetype would be the ancestral hunter for, bingo, the hunter class. Instead of animal focus, these hunters get to choose from a wide array of spirit foci, ranging from knowing the way to communication, blur, etc. - 8th and 15th level provide upgrades for the spirit choices. 3rd level yields the shaman shapeshift hey, with minutes of spirit aspect being usable to shapeshift, but nice vice versa. Additionally, the companion may be thus transformed into a Medium or Small humanoid while under the effects of spirit aspect. This replaces the bonus feat gained at 3rd level. Flavorful and interesting, rather cool tweak of the hunter class!

The race also comes with a 2-feat mini-feat tree based on Vital Strike: hop on the tail and execute a particularly potent feat slam, with Acrobatics acting as a means to increase damage - but thankfully capping via the weapon damage dice rolled. pretty interesting -while I'm usually not a big fan of this type of feats, it does work rather well here. The follow-up feat, Disembowling Kick, adds Con bleed to such assaults - ouch!

Really cool would be the 2 spells included: Handy pouch makes your pouch act as a variant handy haversack and pouch ally lets you shrink down allies and carry them in your pouch! Amazing!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch on both a formal and rules-language level. Layout adheres to Everyman Gaming's two-column b/w-standard and the pdf features a neat full-color artwork. The pre-release copy I have has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Alexander Augunas' yroometji are actually a mechanically interesting race that also comes with an interesting flavor and theme; I haven't seen the kangaroo folk done well before and the visuals of the race are compelling, juggling complex concepts. The spells in particular are gold and I really like the race - in fact, I like it so much I hope it'll get full Compendium treatment with details galore on these unique fellow and their culture. You see, my only gripes regarding this pdf ultimately are due to the format: We don't get age, height and weight tables, alternate racial traits and the like and while we do receive a glimpse at a compelling race, that's all there is, all that this humble pdf can provide - when the race is so cool it deserves more. Don't get me wrong - it is amazing to see how much content and flavor can be found within this mini, but it still left me wanting a bit more and I hope a lot of you will check this out, so we do get a massive book on the race. Still, my final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded down to 4 stars for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Everyman Minis: Yroometji
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Everyman Minis: Kumiho
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/14/2017 04:34:03

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This Everyman mini clocks in at 10 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 4 pages of SRD, 1 page advertisement, leaving us with 3 pages of content, so let's take a look!

Well, first things first: After the introduction, we learn what a kumiho is - in the context of the game, it is a take on the fox spirit that is neither benevolent, nor malevolent, blending the different takes on the trope from real world mythology.

The Kumiho is also something you should FEAR. It is Tiny. You'll stop laughing once you take a look at the impressive defensive capabilities of this CR 17 shapechanging magical beast that can stop time, has a breath weapon, sneak attack and may rip the heart out of the breast of unsuspecting beings...oh, and they are both kami and kitsune, which provides a wholly unique array of class skills, making the build as a whole a rather impressive affair indeed! Have I mentioned that, while casting spells as a sorceror, they may substitute emotional components for their spells, but still have them count as arcane?

Really cool: The pdf goes the extra mile and sports notes on how to make less potent kumiho, by listing the abilities and when they're gained based on the HD of your custom kumiho. Really cool!

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no hiccups. Layout adheres to Everyman Gaming's two-column b/w-standard for the series and the full-color artwork of the creature, as seen on the cover, is cool. The pdf has no bookmarks, but needs none at this length.

Alexander Augunas' take on the kumiho blends the different mythologies well, creating a deadly and worthwhile nature spirit that can easily stand in for "THE fox-spirit", as opposed to a playable kitsune. The kumiho makes sense, is deadly and should put the fear of Tiny threats into the hearts of players. The scaling notes add further oomph to the appeal of the pdf. Well-done, cool and evocative, this delivers all you can ask of such a humble pdf. 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Everyman Minis: Kumiho
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