DriveThruRPG.com
Close
Close
Browse









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Doctor Who Roleplaying Game
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/19/2015 09:24:40

With a ruleset that regenerates as often as the Doctor does, here's the latest version of Cubicle 7's Doctor Who game, this time in a single hardback volume. Just in case you don't know anything about Doctor Who Chapter 1: The Trip of a Lifetime explains the scope of adventures that you can have and the roles that you can play... complete with Peter Capaldi (who plays the current regeneration of the Doctor) staring out at you. It also explains the basics of role-playing in case this is the first role-playing game you've picked up, a particularly wise move as Doctor Who fans will pick anything up if it bears those magic words or shows the Doctor, and it's a good introduction to the hobby for those who don't know about role-playing (I've even run it for church youth groups!).


Chapter 2: Old-fashioned Heroes from Old-fashioned Story Books then describes the process of creating a character for this game. If you are in a rush, or want to play characters from the TV show, there's a collection of ready-made characters including the Doctor, Clara (the most recent companion) and various other people who have turned up recently, as well as a few 'archetypes' - like a UNIT soldier or an archaeologist - that require only a little personalisation before they are ready for play. That thorny problem of who gets to be the Doctor is touched on in a side bar, but there's no easy answer... even if it does suggest that budding timelords bribe the GM with chocolate! Work it out as a group - maybe someone really knows the show well, or take turns each adventure, or even (in a long-running campaign) change players when the Doctor regenerates! - but don't let it get acrimonious. Of course, just because you are playing in the Doctor Who universe, you don't need to actually have the Doctor around. Maybe you are Torchwood or UNIT, or something else of your own devising. The Doctor might drop in occasionally as an NPC, or never be seen at all.


It's worth reading how to create characters from scratch even if you do not intend to do so - then you'll understand how they work. Characters are defined by Attributes, Skills and Traits, and you have points to distribute between these to work out what your character is like, what he knows about, and what he can do. You start, however, by working out who the character is and what they are bringing to the party, and only then start the relatively small amount of number-crunching involved. Everything is explained quite clearly, with examples and a walk-through of the creation of a sample character. There's also a lot of information about how to use skills and traits from a game mechanical standpoint, so reading through this gives a good overview of how to actually play the game.


Next, Chapter 3: I Can Fight Monsters, I Can't Fight Physics goes into the rules in detail. It all boils down to a simple rule: add Attribute + Skill (+ Trait if applicable) to the roll of 2d6, and if the result is higher than the Difficulty of the task you have managed to do, well, whatever it was that you intended. There's loads of detail about how to set Difficulties, how to do things when you don't have a relevant Skill, how to chose which Attributes and Skills you want to use and so on, but whilst the Gamemaster will need to understand them, players can get by with the basic formula. Complications, contested rolls, and more are there as well. The more everyone understands, the faster the game will flow during play as people can just make rolls without needing to ask or check the rules - but this comes with practice even if you find such details hard to learn cold. Unlike many games, out-and-out violence ought to be rare: it's just not how the Doctor does things.


In Chapter 4: Time and Time Again, we take a look at time travel and the problems that it can cause... all the way up to paradoxes like the classic one of going back to kill your grandfather when he was a little boy (hence your father never got born and where does it leave you...), something you could not do if you never got born in the first place. It can fair make your head hurt. Most of the time paradoxes get sorted, either naturally or by the actions of other time travellers, but if they don't all manner of trouble can arise. Of course, even if you do manage to tamper with the past, you may make it worse not better! So take care when you step into your TARDIS! There's some advice, fortunately, for the Gamemaster as to how to keep things (mostly) on track and cope with any issues that might arise. This chapter also contains information on the nature of a Time Lord including their biology, special abilities and even a section on the game mechanics of a regeneration. Likewise, the nature and operation of a TARDIS is also discussed at some length.


Then, Chapter 5: All the Strange, Strange Creatures provides an array of alien lifeforms. It's not really a monster collection, in the main it concentrates on sentient creatures. There's a lot about how to design and play them, primarily as NPCs but perhaps even as characters, as well... although this is something to be embarked upon with caution considering the nature of Doctor Who as a show.


This is followed by Chapter 6: It's a Rollercoaster With You, which explores what role-playing is in depth looking at what both players and Gamemasters can do to make it a thoroughly enjoyable experience for everyone. Very useful if this is your first role-playing game, but there are notes here on cooperation, staying in character and more which many seasoned gamers could benefit from reading. Some of it, of course, has particular reference to playing the Doctor Who Roleplaying Game but much is of general application. There's plenty of good advice directed at Gamemasters in particular as well.


Chapter 7: History is a Burden, Stories Can Make Us Fly is for Gamemasters, and following on from the more general ideas in the previous chapter looks at how to run adventures and how to create your own. There are recommendations about structure and elements that can be included to make a good adventure - and mention of the sheer wealth of material that over fifty years of the show has generated (although I'd take issue at the aside that 'unlike boring academic research' it's fun to go through it in its own right - academic research is far from boring and great fun!) Investigation, exploration, setting, climax - all these and more are discussed, then on to campaigns and personal story arcs.


Finally, Chapter 8: All of Time and Space is Waiting, Don't Even Argue (and how's that for a chapter title?) presents two full-blown adventures to get you off to a flying start. The first is Stormrise, the characters visit a coastal village as it is engulfed by a horrific storm and will need to find out what's going on - and put a stop to it. It's fast-paced and exciting yet quite complex, and should get any campaign off to a flying start. The second is Seeing Eyes which opens with the characters waking up in a strange and dangerous environment and having to figure out where they are, what is happening and what they can do about it. Plenty of excitement here, too...


Visually, the book is quite a treat with loads of excellent images from the most recent episodes of the show. The only problem is a lack of captions so unless you have a good visual memory and comprehensive knowledge of the show you are left wondering who they all are!


Overall, this is a masterful re-presentation of Cubicle 7's Doctor Who rules, well worth a look even if you own previous editions and certainly if you do not!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Doctor Who Roleplaying Game
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Kuro - Makkura
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/11/2015 01:14:00

http://www.tei-
lzeithelden.de/2015/12/11/rezension-makkura-japanischer-cybe-
rpunk-horror-stufe-zwei/


Weltretten mit Kami und Cyberware: Der Abenteuerband Makkura hebt den Cyberpunk-Horror von Kuro auf eine neue Stufe. Das ist zwar spannend, muss aber nicht jedem gefallen. Dirk genießt die gruseligen Abenteuer in Shin-Edo, hadert aber mit dem veränderten Setting und Metaplot.


Rezension: Makkura – Japanischer Cyberpunk-Horror Stufe Zwei


Wir schreiben das Jahr 2046. Japan ist sechs Monate nach dem Kuro-Vorfall, der unerklärlichen Explosion vor der Küste, noch immer von der Außenwelt abgeschottet. Nahrung wird rationiert, die Menschen beginnen die Beschwichtigungen der Behörden zu hinterfragen und das normale Leben bröckelt. Immer häufiger machen Gerüchte von übernatürlichen Phänomenen und Geistersichtungen die Runde. Da taucht plötzlich eine mysteriöse Liste mit Namen von „Potentialen“ auf. Auch der Name der Charaktere steht darauf und plötzlich erhalten sie seltsame Nachrichten und werden gejagt. Die seltsamen Vorkommnisse in Shin-Edo verdichten sich ...


Inhalt
Makkura enthält sechs Abenteuer für Kuro, das düstere Cyberpunk-Rollenspiel von Cubicle 7 Entertainment, das wir Teilzeithelden bereits Ende 2013 besprochen haben. Damals gefiel uns besonders die einzigartige Asia-Atmosphäre zwischen Horror und Near-Future. Der erste Abenteuerband dreht sich nun um die Geistererscheinungen in Shin-Edo (dem umbenannten Tokio) und erinnert tatsächlich an klassische, asiatische „Ghost-Stories“. Nicht umsonst bedeutet der Titel übersetzt „Tiefste Finsternis“. Die Abenteuer können einzeln gespielt werden, bauen aber stark aufeinander auf und bilden eine Kampagne, die das Setting weiterentwickelt.


Makkura schließt nahtlos an das Einstiegsabenteuer Origami aus dem Grundregelwerk an und ist daher auch für neu erstellte Charakteren geeignet. Die Spielercharaktere geraten dabei in das Zentrum der mystischen Vorkommnisse des Settings. Sie werden von den Ereignissen um die mysteriöse Liste getrieben und müssen sich am Ende direkt den Kräften des Yomi, der japanischen Unterwelt, entgegenstellen. Der Spielleiter erfährt derweil endlich, was es mit dem Kuro-Vorfall auf sich hatte und kann das Setting um einen ausgefeilten Metaplot erweitern. Regeltechnisch enthält Makkura vier neue Skill-Spezialisierungen, die aber kaum der Rede wert sind.


Die sechs Makkura-Abenteuer in Kurzübersicht


Fugu: Die Charaktere geraten auf die Spur eines Serienmörders, der seine Opfer gezielt anhand der Liste aussucht. Um ihn zu stoppen, führt der einzige Weg ins Kaijin-Viertel vor der Küste.


Mizuiro: Studenten verschwinden aus einem Wohnheim, in dem ein Student beim Erzählen von Geistergeschichten Selbstmord beging. Natürlich sind alle auf der Liste. Haben sie etwas Schreckliches erweckt?


Kujira: Ein Walskelett strandet an der Küste von Shin-Edo. Sein Schädel ist mit seltsamen Symbolen beschrieben, die eine Art Anleitung zu sein scheinen. Doch sobald sich die Charaktere mit dem Rätsel beschäftigen, macht ein mächtiger Oni (ein japanischer Dämon) Jagd auf sie.


Yukidomari: In einem Vorort von Shin-Edo ereignen sich seltsame Wetterphänomene und Zeichen. Hier können die Charaktere die Wahrheit über den Kuro-Vorfall erfahren und müssen mit einer seltsamen Mutation kämpfen.


Tsukurigoto: Sieben Agenten der Dunkelheit jagen die Schlüssel von vier mystischen Wächtern und die Spielercharaktere geraten in das Schussfeld. Als ein Stromausfall die Stadt heimsucht, müssen die Charaktere ihren Verbündeten zu Hilfe eilen.


Kami: Gefährliche Donnergeister versuchen ein Portal ins Höllenreich des Yomi zu öffnen. Die Stadt versinkt derweil im Chaos.


Für Spieler: Der Aufstieg der Geisterjäger
Spieler werden mit Makkura in eine Geschichte hineingezogen, die größer ist, als das gesamte bisherige Setting. Alles dreht sich dabei um die Liste mit Potentialen aus dem Einstiegsabenteuer Origami, auf der auch die Spielercharaktere stehen. Makkura geht dabei nur davon aus, dass die Charaktere einander kennen – mehr nicht. Wie im Grundregelwerk von Kuro beschrieben, sind sie normale Bürger der Gesellschaft von Shin-Edo, mit einem sozialen Netz und einem geregelten Alltag. Ihr Kontakt mit der Yomi-Geisterwelt soll gruseln, ganz in der Tradition des japanischen Horrorgenres.


Makkura aber ist nicht nur eine Abenteuersammlung im Stil des Grundregelwerks; es ist vielmehr ein Metaplot, der sich um die Charaktere entfaltet und dabei den Ton des Settings selbst verändert. In den sechs Abenteuern geht es um mehr als den Kontakt mit Geistern, nämlich darum, das „heldenhafte Potential“ der Charaktere freizulegen. Zwar bleiben die Geschehnisse im Horror verankert, erhalten aber einen epischen Anstrich. Naturkatastrophen oder rätselhafte Omen verleihen Makkura dabei einen bedrohlichen, fast apokalyptischen Unterton. Die Spielercharaktere sind dabei „auserwählt“ und erhalten zwangsweise Einblick in die Hintergründe des Settings. Das Potential lässt sie die Geister des Yomi sehen und mit ihnen interagieren. Das kann man mögen oder auch nicht: Es verändert jedenfalls das, was das Grundregelwerk ausgemacht hat. Der ungewohnte Asia-Zukunfts-Horror vermischt sich mit einer Rollenspiel-typischen Abenteuergeschichte; die Helden verwandeln sich dabei notgedrungen zu lösungsorientierten Geisterjägern.


Die Handlung ist dabei von Detektivarbeit geprägt und führt die Spieler an interessante Orte, wie eine bizarre Traumwelt oder das Unterwasser-Viertel Kaijin. Dabei stoßen sie immer wieder auf Spuren des Übernatürlichen und erschließen sich nach und nach die wahren Hintergründe des Settings. Das ist perfekt für Spielrunden mit Spaß an Rätseln und dem Okkulten; aber auch Action-Freunde kommen auf ihre Kosten und kämpfen bald mit uralten Waffen gegen wild gewordene Geister. Nur Fans von Cyberpunk gehen leer aus – Technologie und gesellschaftliche Dystopie spielen in Makkura nur eine untergeordnete Rolle. Mindestens zwei der sechs Abenteuer hätte man ohne Probleme in die Gegenwart verlegen können; hier wird das Kuro-Setting nicht ausgereizt. Auch, wer lieber bodenständige Geistergeschichten spielt und mit einem „Heldendasein“ nichts anfangen kann, hat in diesen Abenteuern das Nachsehen.


Für Spielleiter: Der gute Wille zählt
Die Makkura-Kampagne macht eines deutlich: Es geht den Autoren nicht darum, das Setting von Kuro mit erwartungsgemäßen Abenteuern zu versorgen, sondern darum, es zu erweitern und in etwas Anderes zu transformieren. Das Ganze erinnert stark an den Ablauf einer TV-Mystery-Serie: Jedes Abenteuer (Episode) ist in sich schlüssig, gibt mehr vom mysteriösen Hintergrund preis und führt neue Fraktionen ein. Der Spielleiter orchestriert und begleitet den Aufstieg der Charaktere von Normalbürgern zu Helden der Kami.


Neue Fraktionen (Vorsicht Spoiler!):


Die Digitale Demokratische Partei: Die politische Bewegung erhielt kurz nach dem Kuro-Zwischenfall massive Unterstützung in der Bevölkerung. Sie fordert die Gleichstellung von Androiden und stellt einen eigenen Androiden als Kandidaten für die nächste Reigerungswahl. Sie spielen für den Metaplot keine große Rolle, beeinflussen aber die Ereignisse zwischen den Abenteuern.


Die Shi-Tenno: Diese unsterblichen „Wächter der vier Himmelsrichtungen“ beschützen Japan und das Kaiserhaus seit Jahrhunderten vor dem Bösen. Sie erscheinen zwar als Menschen und verbergen sich in der Gesellschaft, sind aber in Wahrheit mächtige übernatürliche Wesen mit außerordentlichen Kräften. Sie sind die wertvollsten Verbündeten der Charaktere.


Die Furikazan-Sekte: Diese traditionelle Sekte dient den Kami und den Shi-Tenno. Sie suchen nach den Potentialen, in deren Blut sich die „Siegel der Kami“ befinden. Ihre Aufgabe ist es, diese zu prüfen, ob sie es wert sind, die Macht der Kami zu tragen. Dazu stoßen sie die Charaktere auf Ereignisse und versuchen sie aus dem Hintergrund anzuleiten. Sie spielen für den Plot eine zentrale Rolle.


Mr. Makita (und seine Schmuggler): Ein Sammler von okkulten Gegenständen, der Schmuggler in ganz Japan beauftragt. Kann er etwas nicht haben, bedient er sich illegaler Beschaffungsmethoden. Er spielt im Abenteuer Kujira eine Rolle.


Das Erwachen der Dunkelheit: Diese Weltuntergangssekte um den Potential-Träger Fujizake Nori fühlt sich durch das Kuro-Ereignis in ihrem Glauben bestärkt. Die Teilnehmer ziehen predigend durch die Straßen, werden in letzter Zeit aber von Unbekannten bedroht. Die Sekte kommt in Nebengeschichten vor.


Neue Komeito: Die nationalistische Partei Japans will die Isolation von der Außenwelt fortsetzen. Ihr Plan ist eine militärische Unterwerfung der Insel mit Hilfe eines Geistersoldaten-Programms des Zweiten Weltkriegs. Sie sind die Gegenspieler im letzten Kapitel.


Makkura schleust die Spielercharaktere nicht durch feste Abläufe, legt aber besonderen Wert auf die Einordnung in die Kampagne. Vor jedem Abenteuer finden sich die „Lektionen“, die die Charaktere daraus mitnehmen sollen. Die Abenteuer selbst sind gut aufbereitet: Personen und Schauplätze werden ausführlich beschrieben und sogar Gerüchte und alternative Vorgehensweisen für Spielercharaktere bereitgestellt. Kästen erläutern Spielleitern Zusatzinformationen oder stellen Personen und Gruppierungen genauer vor. Nach jedem Kapitel folgen Vorschläge für Zufallsbegegnungen und Nachforschungen, die sich leicht zu Zwischenabenteuern ausbauen lassen. Dieser Aufbau gibt dem Spielleiter genug Freiheit, auf unvorhergesehene Handlungen zu reagieren, lässt ihn aber auch mit einigen Fragen allein.


Ein Problem von Makkura ist die Forderung einer hohen Kooperationsbereitschaft der Spieler. Diese sollen Eigeninitiative zeigen, sich für die Potential-Liste interessieren und bestimmte Schlüsse ziehen. Die Aufhänger für die ersten Abenteuer sind daher etwas dünn: Warum sollten sich „normale Bürger“ in einen Mordfall einmischen und die Aufklärung nicht den Behörden überlassen? Warum sollten sie überhaupt zusammenarbeiten und nicht einander misstrauen, wo doch gerade ein Killer umgeht, der offenbar die Liste benutzt? Ein anderes Beispiel: Im zweiten Abenteuer sollen Spieler durch eine mysteriöse Nachricht („Das fordert ihre Aufmerksamkeit“, S.24) mit auf die Ereignisse gestoßen werden. Weiß man später um die Drahtzieher und Hintergründe, ergibt das Sinn, wirkt im ersten Moment aber zu forciert und wie eine Falle. Die Hilfestellungen der Abenteuers, etwa „eine Serie von seltsamen Ereignissen ließ die Charaktere sich für den Vorort Yukidomari interessieren“ (S. 65), sind dabei wenig brauchbar. Die Ereignisse in Verbindung mit dem Horror-Genre provozieren geradezu das Misstrauen der Spieler, welches wiederum den Ablauf der Abenteuer erschwert und viel Improvisation vom Spielleiter notwendig macht. Für einen Anfänger auf dem SL-Platz ist Makkura damit sicher nichts.


Ein anderes Problem von Makkura sind Unsicherheiten im Ton. So passen die Ereignisse der Kampagne nicht immer zum im Grundregelwerk vorherrschenden Horror. Visionen der Spielercharaktere von schattenhaften Samurais, die dazu auffordern „auf das Blut“ zu hören, wirken etwa kitschig. Dass sich einer der Shi-Tenno als professioneller Wrestler mit Namen „Phoenix“ tarnt, und so mit schwelender Haut in der Gesellschaft davonkommt, ist schlichtweg albern.


Erscheinungsbild
Das Äußere des Kampagnenbandes ist solide. Das Cover mit der japanischen Oni-Maske passt zum Inhalt des Rollenspiels. Das Layout ist sehr gut aufgebaut und wird durch erklärende Kästen aufgelockert. Unterschiedliche Schriftbilder und Größen erleichtern das Navigieren am Spieltisch. Die Illustrationen (etwa zwei pro Abenteuer) sind weitgehend stimmig und betonen die düsteren Aspekte der Handlung. Nur einige weichen vom Stil ab und hätten wohl besser in ein Anime gepasst. Karten und Bodenpläne fehlen leider und die Werte der NSC befinden sich nicht im Anhang, sondern in den einzelnen Kapiteln, was das Rauskopieren erschwert. Abgerundet wird das Ganze von einem ausführlichen und sehr brauchbaren Glossar von japanischen Fachbegriffen, die verwendet werden.


Bonus/Downloadcontent
Auf der Homepage von Cubicle 7 finden sich Ausschnitte des Grundregelwerks zum Download, darunter die Archetypen zum Charakterbau, eine Kurzbeschreibung der Welt sowie eine Übersicht der Kampfregeln. Diese können einer Spielrunde als Handouts dienen und bei der Vorbereitung der Makkura-Kampagne helfen. Für Spielleiter gibt es noch Werte zu Oni und Tengu, sowie eine Beschreibung populärer Kulte und Sekten. Auf RPGNow findet sich zudem das kostenlose Bonusabenteuer Last Stop.


Fazit
Makkura lässt mich unschlüssig zurück: Einerseits ist der Abenteuerband handwerklich gut gemacht und setzt auf Freiheit des Spielleiters mit zahlreichen Aufhängern für Nebengeschichten. Auch die Verneigung vor der japanischen Kultur, in meinen Augen eine Stärke von Kuro, wird ausgebaut. Kleine kulturelle Details wie das Kaidan-Fest oder Erklärungen zum Okina-Theter machen Makkura definitiv lesenswert. Die Geschichten greifen geschickt ineinander über, sind richtig spannend und teilweise mit gravierenden Twists versehen. Der Metaplot treibt die Charaktere dabei voran und verbindet die sechs Abenteuer zu einem epischen Ganzen.


Auf der anderen Seite wirken der Aufstieg der Spielercharaktere und ihr Kampf gegen die Geister des Yomi seltsam unpassend. Die Suche nach Artefaktwaffen, belagerte Klöster, Treffen mit dem Kaiser und böse Dämonen (samt Endkampf) erinnern mich zu sehr an typische Fantasygeschichten. Damit verändert sich Kuros Atmosphäre von japanischem Horror eines The Ring zu einem apokalyptischen Szenario eines Akira. Das ist zwar immer noch spannend, verliert aber den Charme eines pointierten Indie-RPGs und wirkt mehr wie ein punkiges Shadowrun mit Gruselgeschichten und japanischem Anstrich – eine Assoziation, die ich nach der Lektüre des Grundregelwerks so jedenfalls noch nicht hatte. Vielleicht ergibt das Ganze erst mit dem 2016 erscheinenden dritten Band Kuro Tensei wirklich Sinn, in dem die Charaktere als Verteidiger von Japan mit mystischen Kräften direkt gegen die Oni antreten. Scion in Japan? Ich bin ja mal gespannt. Was bis dahin bleibt, ist ein unabgeschlossener Metaplot, der das ursprüngliche Setting von Kuro stark modifiziert.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Kuro - Makkura
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Victoriana - The Spring Heeled Menace
by Ben S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/07/2015 06:19:25

This is a nice short adventure with interesting NPCs that tie into other adventures as well as a chance for the PCs to make a difference in their gaming world.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Victoriana - The Spring Heeled Menace
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

The One Ring - Tales from Wilderland
by Paul E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/23/2015 14:12:51

This is an amazing source, and I'm finding it quite easy to integrate to my Darkening of Mirkwood campaign, and will be adding in the first adventure to Darkening, and carrying on the remainder of Ruins of the North post-Darkening, as time allows. There really is not going to be enough lifetime, with the supplements already out (Tales, Darkening, and Ruins), to run this game in perpetuity, and the source material has been entirely out of this world, so far. Good on you, Cubicle 7, Francesco Nepitello, and Gareth Ryder-Hanrahan.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - Tales from Wilderland
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Lone Wolf Adventure Game
by Dave T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/13/2015 09:47:48

A Confession


Okay, so before I go into the actual review I have a confession to make. Way back in 1984 Joe Dever's Lone Wolf game books were my entry into roleplaying. I bought every book released and loved the world he created. The big advantage in my eyes his books had over others was their continuity, the fact you played as the same character and were able to carry forward your abilities and equipment through the whole series.


I love the Lone Wolf mythos so I am more than a little biased. But I think that could make me potentially more critical of any other product based in his world, Magnamund. There have been other ventures that tried to turn this 'Choose Your Own Adventure' series into a full blown RPG with mixed results. The weight of expectation was heavy during the Kickstarter for this new Adventure Game. I had the fortune to proof read initial drafts of the core books so when the physical product finally arrived on my doorstep I was aware of some of its content, but would the quality of the content be matched by the finish of the boxed set itself?


Unboxing


So, what do you get for your £20($30)?


Three softback books, Kai Training, Wisdom and Legends, a half dozen gatefold pregenerated character sheets (wonderfully illustrated I have to add), a double sided map, equipment list, a combat result chart, several blank character sheets and a sturdy set of card counters. The inside of the box lid also has a grid of random numbers between 0 and 9 and is used to choose Random Numbers. My only criticism of the content of the boxed set is that the loose pages could have been printed on a slightly heavier stock of paper, though I can understand that cost would have been a factor in Cubicle 7's decision to use the weight they did. That said, it is a very minor point and in no way detracts from what is in essence an extremely high quality product. The layout and art featured throughout the three core books and other contents of the box is of an exceptionally high standard, presenting a uniform feel to the set that helps bring the text of the books to life.


Rules


As the boxed set is designed to appeal to both new and experienced gamers alike, the game mechanics are presented in two distinct levels of complexity, the Initiate and Master level. Both have at their core the Random Number mechanic, a throwback to the original game books. Essentially every time a Hero needs to make some kind of test it is against a Target Number of somewhere between 1 and 9, with a TN of 6 being average. To make the test the player simply flips one of the card tokens into the box lid and whichever number the token lands on is their test result. Kai Disciplines give a bonus to the test as do a characters Skills and Traits in the Master level game.


The beginner, or Initiate level rules are essentially the same as those found in the original game books with the Heroes having two main abilities; Combat Skill (CS) and Endurance (END) ranked between 10-19 for CS and 20-29 for END. As well as these raw physical abilities, as a Kai Lord the Heroes have access to Kai Disciplines, innate powers that have been honed by years of training and devotion to the sun god Kai, patron deity of the Kai Lords and the ream they are sworn to protect Sommerlund. There are ten Kai Disciplines in total and as an Initiate the Heroes start out life having learned five of these powers, each with their own benefit.


For more experienced gamers, the Master level rules add Skills, Traits and advanced Disciplines along with a host of supplementary situational rules to cover things like fire, poison, falling etc. The Master rules are entirely optional and it is up to the GM to decide which rules they want to add and therefor how complex they want to make their game. Obviously, for those who want to make their games as realistic as possible all of the Master rules can be used to enhance all aspects of their gameplay, including combat which in the Initiate level functions in exactly the same way as the old game books, which is to say the Hero compares their CS against their adversaries and gets a Combat Ratio (either positive or negative), chooses a Random Number and consults the Combat Results Table which tells him how much Endurance both he and his foe have lost - repeat until someone dies.


While this is a quick and easy introduction to new gamers, especially younger ones, it doesn't present the players with many tactical decisions to make. The Master level rules allow for several different options to be bolted on to the core mechanic and do offer much more options to both players and the GM alike creating a more satisfying mechanic for both melee and ranged combat.


Conclusion


While I am biased, I will say the game has its limitations in its attempt to keep the overall feel of the game books - there is only so much you can do with what is in essence a d10 mechanic - however, I would counter that with the opinion that what the game might lack in raw mechanics more than makes up for with the way it DOES capture the feel of a world that has been growing in depth and detail for the last 30 years or so. I do feel that this is the most faithful and well executed version of the Lone Wolf RPG yet and with the release schedule I have seen so far, it appears it is going to be the best supported one too. Joe Dever and August Hahn (along with the rest of the Cubicle 7 team) have done a tremendous job with this boxed set and I have a feeling this is just the beginning for the next generation of the Wolf Pack.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Lone Wolf Adventure Game
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Yggdrasill Core Rulebook
by Sven A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/08/2015 08:55:33

I believe Yggdrasill is good attempt at capturing role-playing in the Norse or viking culture and mythology. The world overview is sufficient for a start but serious GMs will complement this with the other world books. My main issue with the setting is that it tries too much to stand on two feet. The authors have chosen to portrait a mix of both the historical and mythological Scandinavia and while the goal may be to allow players to emphasize the version they like best, I would have preferred if they had chosen either one and concentrated on that. Personally I either want to play in a gritty historical setting or in a high mythos viking saga, no a luke warm mixture.


I find the rules easy to learn and well suited for the setting. I especially like the fate system and believe they could have included more similar mechanics regarding fame, sagas, an other typical trappings of the Norse lore. When you chose a defined setting such as the viking one, I think it should make an even greater impact on the rules. The magic system deserves special mention for being well conceived and thematic.


Overall I think this is a nice product with some interesting ideas that unfortunately is somewhat bland.


(my views may be somewhat colored by the fact that I have been raised on Norse sagas and mythology)



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Yggdrasill Core Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Rocket Age - The Lost City of the Ancients
by Jeffrey V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/05/2015 12:44:30

Excellent beginning adventure, with all the "pulp" features you could want; lots of potential complications, a race for the maguffin, competing factions, aliens, Nazis...what else could you ask for? The adventure includes all the information you need to play, including details on the key NPCs and adventure spots, and it flows well while giving the players lots of choices to make along the way. Heck if you re-skinned it and set it in Africa or Central America in the 1930's you'd have a plot for the next Indiana Jones movie. Cubicle 7 has done it again! Plus, it's free.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rocket Age - The Lost City of the Ancients
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Rocket Age - The Lure of Venus
by David N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/16/2015 06:05:12

Alright, gonna say right now this is a great supplement. The new and varied Venusian cultures are all believable and compelling, the new creatures are fascinating and the earthling's interactions with the locals are excellent.


Just one thing, I've never really mentioned before, but has come up in the Mars book and Trail of the Scorpion campaign. They need more editing. They've left a couple of minor errors in, nothing major but rather annoying.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Rocket Age - The Lure of Venus
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Doctor Who - The Ninth Doctor Sourcebook
by Alexander O. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/13/2015 07:12:46

This review appears in full at http://armchairgam-
er.blogspot.com/


I approached the review of this sourcebook with some trepidation. After all, the Doctor Who: Adventures in Time and Space (DWAITAS) series of sourcebooks had been solid entries every time – with the Doctor series churning out astoundingly consistent source material in the tone and spirit of each of the eras, despite the volume (or paucity thereof) of actual episodes during that Doctor’s era.


However, this one was the incarnation of the Doctor that revived the franchise on TV -- and one that had eight sourcebooks preceding it. Was it going to live up to expectations? Or might it lapse into a boring re-tread of what had gone before?


A SOLID FRAMEWORK


Dedicated collectors and followers of this particular series of sourcebooks would, I’m sure, agree that some aspects of repetition are actually the strength of this series.


I’m very fond of the presence of the initial chapter of each of these books that give an overview of the peculiarities and strengths of this particular Doctor’s personality, and the character of the adventures during this era.


The roll call of protagonists and antagonists (statted out, with descriptions and explorations of their role during this era, of course) is also a given. But it’s unarguably essential to a sourcebook like this. It’s also very well done: character sheets for each with a great selection of iconic imagery for each. As always, I love that the TARDIS always has its own writeup.


UNIQUE CHALLENGES


This era only saw one Season / Series, meaning a quite a bit less source material in terms of episodes (we’ll come back to the Eight Doctor’s sourcebook as soon as I pick it up), but these episodes – in conjunction with the section tackling handling adventures in this era in greater detail – really give players a lot of options in running Doctor-y or Doctorless campaigns with the mix of personal drama, neo-pulpish adventure, and witty banter.


I really have to say that these synopses are well-written – and have been over this series of because. Concise, but filled with easy-to-follow details (useful for the GM who hasn’t quite reviewed every single episode in the given era, and may not have the time to do so). They also always raise concerns regarding continuity (that some sharp-minded GMs and Players will likely tackle in or out of play.


There’s also great notes on running your players through the episode as an adventure – fantastic I’m sure for the fans who’ve always wanted a chance to be a real companion of The Doctor.


Furthermore, the smaller pool of adventures does give the writing team an opportunity to really go in-depth and all-out in mining and milking these episodes for (a) adventures; (b) spin-off adventures; (c) motifs and leitmotifs of the Doctor’s adventures to reinforce the feel; (d) ideas on using location and enemies in different or expanded ways.


FOR THE FANS


There is some added benefit here for me as a fan – some of my favorite episodes can be found here (“The End of the World, Dalek, Father’s Day, and The Parting of Ways), along with the first appearances of some enigmatic continuing characters. Much of the analysis and extrapolation here helps feed that fan prediliction for speculation, and is a rich source for both theories, and possible adventuring in the continuum of Time & Space that the Doctor inhabits.


Highly recommended.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Doctor Who - The Ninth Doctor Sourcebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

The One Ring - The Darkening of Mirkwood
by Neal W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/04/2015 16:01:43

I would recommend this booklet, but only if you also get The Heart of the Wild. THOTW is the setting book and explains many of the people, places, and particular pieces of info you'll need if sticking close to the adventures in The Darkening of Mirkwood. Furthermore it gives details on some non-pertinent characters and places that don't directly affect the DOM adventures, but may get pulled into use depending on the players' actions. I'd highly recommend them as a paired set.


So far as an actual campaign goes, this one intrigued me since it's set up to span years, in-game, whereas I haven't really gamed with long-term ideas like that previously. I'm not sure if this is the norm for campaigns using The One Ring or not, since I use a home brewed system, but in any case it is a cool novelty and one which necessitates players thinking for the long haul. So far in our playing, that's working out.


The adventures herein are also pretty malleable for custom use. For example, I'm running these for two groups - one of them being good guys playing during the set up as told by The One Ring narrative, the other being bad guys playing the same adventures but after the One Ring is destroyed. The adventures are easy enough to flip or manipulate as needed, and can also be used for generic fantasy adventures - all you need to do is remove the specific Tolkien tags - Radagast is just some powerful wizard in the area, Sauron is just some nondescript dark power at play, etc. Nothing in here is VITAL to be in Middle Earth, which is nice.


Overall, solid and well-thought out adventures with plenty of space for GM and player creativity, and few typos or unanswered questions - so long as you have the accompanying settings book.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The One Ring - The Darkening of Mirkwood
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Yggdrasill Core Rulebook
by Roger (. L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/26/2015 04:14:50

Wenn der Name schwer zu schreiben ist, wird’s mythisch: Yggdrasill entführt in die Welt der Nordmänner und -frauen, und siedelt sich zwischen historischem Skandinavien und dem der Sagas und Legenden an. Eine eigene Regel-Engine und alles, woran Wikinger je geglaubt haben – klingt gut, aber gelingt der Mix?


Rezension:Yggdrasill RPG - Auf Kaperfahrt an der Weltenesche


Da ich zur Zeit selbst in einer Kampagne spiele, die von der Welt des hohen Nordens beeinflusst ist, hat mich die Neugier auf Yggdrasill gepackt. Eigentlich wollte ich mir das Quellenbuch The Nine Worlds besorgen, um mehr darüber zu erfahren, was man sich unter Niflheim, Asgard, Jotunheim oder Midgard vorstellen kann. Doch dann wollte ich doch wissen, ob auch das System was taugt, wenn das Basismaterial schon so vielversprechend klingt.


Die Spielwelt


Das Spiel siedelt sich in einem halbmythischen Skandinavien an. Es ähnelt dem Nordeuropa rund um das Jahr 800, ist aber mit Sagen und Mythen durchmischt. Die gewichtigste Abweichung ist bestimmt, dass alles, woran die Nordmänner und -frauen geglaubt haben, wahr ist. Also gibt es Trolle genau so wie die neun Welten auf der namensgebenden Weltesche Yggdrasill.


Worauf man sich einstellen kann, ist eine ziemlich gute Einführung in eine etwas angepasste und bereinigte Variante der nordischen Sagenwelt. Bis auf die Tatsache, dass viele Begriffe vor ihrer Einführung verwendet werden, liest sich das sehr gut und verschafft Überblick. Wie sich das auf das Spiel auswirkt, bleibt im Dunkeln. Es ist anzunehmen, dass das eigentlich Wichtige in The Nine Worlds nachgereicht wird.


Jenseits der anderen acht Welten beschreibt Yggdrasill die Landstriche Midgards sehr gut. Das Spiel zielt also eher auf Abenteuer in Scandia ab, vornehmlich im Ostseeraum, in den nordischen Königreichen und ihren unmittelbaren Anliegern. Für Kaperfahrten an weit entfernte Orte findet man hier nichts, und wer gerne Wikinger auf weiter Fahrt spielen würde, wird zu anderen Produkten greifen müssen. Yggdrasill ist einerseits quasi-historisch, aber auch mythisch, und wer sich für diese Region und Zielsetzung nicht erwärmen kann, dem wird Yggdrasill auch nicht gefallen. Ein Teil scheint in der Erweiterung Kings of the Sea nachgereicht zu werden. Bedauerlicherweise auch der Schiffskampf ...


Was mir weiter auffällt, ist, dass einerseits das Leben der Menschen in Scandia detailreich beschrieben wird, aber an anderen Ecken riesige Lücken klaffen. Die Monsterliste ist eher beispielhaft und passt auf zwei Seiten. Mundanere Kreaturen wie Wölfe habe ich da nicht mitgerechnet. Das ist ziemlich dünn für ein Spiel mit einer dicken Zauberliste, also mit deutlich phantastischem Anspruch in diesem Bereich. Das Magiekapitel bringt es ja immerhin auf 24 Seiten.


Um das Ganze noch etwas bizarrer zu machen, enthalten das Grundregelwerk und die beiden genannten anderen Veröffentlichungen jeweils Teile einer fortlaufenden Kampagne. Anstatt diese also separat zu veröffentlichen, zieht sich diese durch die Quellenbände. Dies erspart einem aber immerhin das umgekehrte Debakel, dass sich bei The One Ring, auch aus dem Hause Cubicle 7, die Kampagnen ohne die separaten Quellenbände nicht spielen ließen.
Die Regeln


In Yggdrasill führt man Tests durch das Würfeln eines Pools aus W10 aus:


1) Das Attribut (characteristic) bestimmt, wie viele W10 geworfen werden – zwischen 1 und 5.
2) Wird auf einem W10 die 10 erzielt, wird der Wurf wiederholt und das Ergebnis hinzuaddiert, der Würfel explodiert (wie bei Savage Worlds).
3) Aus den einzelnen Wurfergebnissen wählt der Spieler 2 bis 3 Würfe als sein Gesamtergebnis aus und addiert sie.
4) Bei Skillwürfen wird der Skillwert hinzuaddiert. Zu Beginn höchstens 7, kann dieser bis zu 20 betragen.
5) Hat der SL einen Modifikator vergeben, wird dieser auch aufgerechnet.
6) Verglichen wird dieses Ergebnis mit einer vorherbestimmten Zielzahl.


Dieser Ablauf ist in der Praxis relativ schnell abzuwickeln, aber nicht ganz simpel. Bestimmte Charaktereigenschaften wie die eigenen Schicksalsrunen, Gaben und Schwächen beeinflussen, wie viele Würfel man werfen darf, welche Werte man ins Ergebnis aufnehmen darf, und ob man mehr Wurfergebnisse in das Endergebnis miteinrechnen darf. Nimmt man dies alles zusammen, kommt man zu einem System der Probenabwicklung, das ähnlich komplex erscheint wie das von Marvel Heroic, jedoch ohne die gleiche narrative Stärke zu zeigen.


Was werf' ich nur?


Im Kampf erhält man so viele Aktionen wie der eigene Agilitätswert + 1. Die erste Aktion gilt als primär und alle weiteren als sekundär. Je mehr sekundäre Aktionen ausgeführt werden, desto höher werden die Abzüge. Hierbei gilt zu beachten, dass auch der Versuch zu parieren oder sich wegzuducken eine Aktion kostet.
Die Initiativreihenfolge wird einmalig mit W10 + Reaction festgelegt. Hier sind die Zauberwirker klar im Vorteil, haben sie doch im Schnitt den höheren Reaction-Wert, der auf geistig-mentalen Attributen basiert. Es kommt jetzt jeder einmal dran, weitere sekundäre Aktionen werden in weiteren Runden im Wechsel ausgeführt, bis keiner mehr will oder kann.
Es gibt nun drei verschiedene Attackearten:
1) Die Standardattacke, basierend auf dem Agilitätsattribut.
2) Die Power-Attacke, basierend auf Stärke.
3) Die präzise Attacke, basierend auf Wahrnehmung.
Variante 1) ist nur für Charaktere interessant, die keine besondere Stärke oder Wahrnehmung aufweisen können. Sie bringt nämlich keinerlei Bonus, nützt aber SC, die gerade dieses Attribut sehr hoch haben.
Variante 2) ist für Kämpfer, die mehr Schaden durch schiere Wucht erzeugen wollen. Sie können sich auch wahlweise den Wurf erschweren, um noch mehr Schaden zu machen.
Variante 3) ist für Kämpfer, die versuchen den Rüstungsschutz des Gegners zu umgehen. Auch hier kann man sich die Attacke erschweren.
Im Fernkampf kommen auch fünf Varianten zu tragen, wobei sich hier wahlweise auch das Attribut Instinkt auswirken kann. Generell wirkt das Ganze so, als wolle man nur möglichst viele Attribute mit verschiedenen Vorteilen bedienen, ist doch z. B. die Initiative gar nicht mit der Agilität verbunden – es geht also darum, schnell zu denken, nicht, sich schnell zu bewegen. Das wirkt mir etwas zu gewollt.
Es kommt dann zur Auswertung über Formeln:
Wurfergebnis (aus Attributspool) + Skill +/- Modifikator ist der Angriffswurf.



  1. Wird nicht pariert, ist die Erfolgsschwelle 14 + Abwehr (Physical Defence).

  2. Wird pariert, muss der Parierwurf übertroffen werden.

  3. Wird ausgewichen, muss der Ausweichwurf übertroffen werden.
    Bei Erfolg bestimmt der Angreifer die überzähligen Punkte. Hierbei wird entweder Schwelle 1) oder das Ergebnis von 2) oder 3) herangezogen, je nachdem, was besser ist. Danach wird die Waffe draufgerechnet, die Panzerung abgezogen. Power- und präzise Attacken beeinflussen die Schadensformel auch noch.
    Jetzt mal ehrlich – dieses Kampfsystem ist weder elegant, noch einfach, noch schnell auszuführen. Es hat schon ohne weitere Schnörkel wie Kampfmanöver zehn (!) mögliche Attackearten, wobei je nach Charakterkonzept kaum mehr als drei oder vier jemals zum Einsatz kommen dürften, wenn überhaupt. Auch die wunderschön wuseligen Erschöpfungsregeln für Berserker lass ich hier mal außen vor, und da sind ja auch noch Wundmodifikatoren und der Gesamtzustand des Charakters.
    Das Steigerungssystem ist Banane


Ich bin der Meinung, dass eine von zwei Bedingungen in den meisten Steigerungssystemen gegeben sein sollte:


1) Es wird regelmäßig und oft gesteigert.
2) Wenn es zum Steigern kommt, sollte sich etwas signifikant verbessern.


Savage Worlds vergibt XP pro Spielsitzung, und im Schnitt lässt sich da alle zwei Sitzungen eine spürbare Verbesserung am Charakter vornehmen. Dungeons & Dragons und seine Varianten zögern manchmal den Stufenanstieg eher hinaus, dafür wird man mit mehr Sprüchen, Trefferpunkten, gestiegenen Trefferchancen reichlich belohnt.


Und in Yggdrasill? Da ist keines von beidem erfüllt. Einerseits gibt es Legendenpunkte nur pro Abenteuer, ein sehr dehnbarer Begriff, der sehr viele Spielsitzungen umfassen kann. Wenn am Ende des Abenteuers der SL einen sauschlechten Tag hatte, gibt es vielleicht nur 2 Punkte, aber auch bis zu 10 sind möglich, wobei mal wieder wachsweicher Blödsinn wie „hat zum Spiel beigetragen“ und „hat toll rollengespielt“ eher an das Zeugnis der Grundschule erinnert. Gehen wir mal davon aus, dass zwischen 5 und 10 Punkten vergeben werden. Wohlgemerkt nur nach einigen Spielabenden.


Kann man sich davon was Tolles kaufen? Nö. Eine Steigerung eines Attributs kostet 5 x neue Stufe, also 15, 20 und 25 für die Werte 3, 4 und 5. Naja, Attribute geben ja auch viele Vorteile, also z.B. in den Sekundärattributen und über viele Skills hinweg. Kann man vielleicht hinnehmen. Aber was kriegt man sonst Tolles für Legendenpunkte?
`
Skills sind auch schweineteuer, wenn man es mal durchrechnet. Sie kosten 2 x neue Stufe. Wer seine +7 in „Langwaffen“ auf +10 steigern will, muss also 8 x 2 + 9 x 2 + 10 x 2 = 54 Legendenpunkte einplanen für einen festen Ergebnisvorteil von +10 (und eine Steigerung von gerade mal +3). Mit anderen Worten, niedrige Skills steigern schnell, hohe Skills nicht. Wer seinem Berserker den Ochsenführerschein (Drive Skill) verpassen will, kann das billig. Aber wer an den eigentlichen Stellschrauben für einen besseren Berserker drehen will, der muss viel Geduld mitbringen, und das finde ich öde.


Das System scheint auf sehr lange Kampagnen ausgelegt zu sein, oder einfach nicht durchdacht. Der Verdacht kommt mir immer wieder bei Systemen, wo nach neue Stufe x 2 oder neue Stufe x 5 Steigerungspunkten gefragt wird. Man will wohl nicht, dass die SC richtig gut werden. Warum dann überhaupt ein Steigerungssystem? Leute, die gern immer ein bisschen am Charakter feilen, werden hier überhaupt nicht bedient, jedenfalls nicht in den Kernkompetenzen des SC.
Charaktererschaffung


Der erste Schritt ist zugleich der systemspezifischste: Man muss drei Runen erwürfeln, die das Schicksal (fate) des Charakters mitbestimmen. Man darf diese dann in den Charakterhintergrund miteinweben. Außerdem muss man entscheiden, ob sich diese eher positiv oder negativ auswirken, bei manchen Runen gibt es sowieso nur einen der beiden Aspekte. Die Runen schränken auch die Klassenwahl ein – nur mit Odins Segen kann man Berserker oder Zauberwirker werden. Die Wahl einer Klasse, hier Archetyp genannt, ist übrigens optional. Sie beeinflusst vor allem die verbilligten Skills.


Yggdrasill kennt 9 Attribute, auf die man 19 Punkte verteilen darf. Ein Wert von 2 ist Durchschnitt, 4 ist das Maximum für neu erschaffene Charaktere, und 5 der Höchstwert. Diese entsprechen auch den geworfenen Würfeln. Man sieht schnell, dass wenn man in einem Attribut nicht unterdurchschnittlich sein will, nur einen Extrapunkt verteilen kann. Kauft man sich höhere Werte durch Senken einiger Attribute auf 1 hat man in allen zugehörigen Skill-Kategorien nur 1 Würfel im Ergebnis. Umgekehrt sind hohe Attributwerte ein starker Vorteil in der gewählten Kategorie. Als Trost verbleibt, dass man ein niedriges Attribut schneller ausgleichen kann als ein hohes erhöhen.


Dump Stats versucht das System durch die vielen sekundären Attribute zu vermeiden, die aus den primären errechnet werden. In irgendeinem der zahlreichen Spielwerte oder Skills wird sich eine Schwachstelle ganz sicher rächen. Hierbei fallen die vielen Formeln auf:


Body = STR(ength) + AGI(lity) + VIG(our)
Mind = INT(ellect) + PER(ception) + TEN(acity)
Soul = CHA(risma) + COM(munication) + INS(tinct)
Hit Points (HP) = 3 x Body + 2 x Mind + 1 x Soul, Wounded = HP / 2, Severely Wounded = HP / 4, Dead = - HP / 4
REA(ction) = INT + PER + INS
Physical Defence (PD) = AGI + VIG + INS
Mental Defence (MD) = TEN + INT + INS
MOVE(ment) = AGI+VIG
ENC(umbrance) = STR x 2 + VIG
Furor Pool = (VIG + INS + TEN) / 2 oder VIG + INS + TEN oder VIG + INS + INT (je nach Klasse)


Die gleichen Formeln kommen zum Einsatz, sollte man ein Attribut steigern.


Man wählt eine Gabe (gift), oder zwei Gaben und eine Schwachstelle (Weakness). Man verteilt 35 Punkte auf Skills, wobei es je nach Archetyp verbilligte Skills gibt. Kein Skill darf höher als 7 sein. Zu guter Letzt kann man sich noch Kampfspezialfertigkeiten (combat feat) und Zaubersprüche kaufen.


Die Tüftelei, welche Attribute wichtig sind, ein kurzes Stöbern in der Liste der Gaben und Schwachstellen, und dann noch das Herumgeschiebe bei den Skills – Yggdrasill gehört bestimmt weder zu den schnellen noch den besonders langsamen Systemen beim Erstellen eines SC.


Spielbarkeit aus Spielleitersicht


Wenn man jeweils die Liste der Kampfmodifikatoren und der Probenschwierigkeiten am Tisch bereithält, sollte sich Yggdrasill gut leiten lassen. Schwierig wird es werden, über all die Schicksalsrunen aller Spieler am Tisch, immerhin drei pro SC, den Überblick zu behalten, und sich diese dann noch in ihrer Bedeutung zu merken und das ins Spiel (und die jeweiligen Proben) einzuflechten.


Das Verwalten kleiner, umständlicher Sonderregeln wie Kampf mit zwei Waffen und den ganzen Manövern ist eher umständlich, und hier sind eindeutig auch die Spieler gefordert. Monster sind eher simpel gestrickt, erfordern aber manchmal etwas Nachschlagen und lassen sich dann nicht direkt aus der Beschreibung spielen.


Hinweise an den SL gibt es kaum, ein eigenes Kapitel über das Leiten des Spiels fehlt, aber dafür gibt es ein umfangreiches Abenteuer als ersten Teil einer Kampagne, die sich über alle Bände erstreckt.


Spielbarkeit aus Spielersicht


Das System lässt den Spieler vieles entscheiden, aber wer Berserker oder Zauberwirker werden will, braucht Würfelglück – nur das Erwürfeln der Ansuz-Rune erlaubt es Spielern, diese Pfade mit seinem Charakter zu beschreiten. Die Chance hierfür ist 1 aus 8. Nachdem man alles andere außer den Runen selbst bestimmen darf, beißt sich das deutlich mit dem Rest der Charaktererschaffung.


Genauso frustrierend dürften einige Macken des Systems sein, wie z.B. das Verwerfen guter, eventuell sogar explodierter Würfe beim Wirken einer negativen Rune. Die Regeln sind auch nicht einheitlich und symmetrisch: Eine Gabe erlaubt einen Würfel mehr zu werfen, eine Schwäche erzwingt es, den schlechtesten Wurf ins Ergebnis zu rechnen. Die Erfolgsschwellen sind zwar eine mathematische Reihe, aber zusammen mit den Modifikatoren sind die Zielzahlen krumm und unintuitiv. Solche Dinge erschweren das Einprägen und flüssige Spielen.


Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis


Cubicle 7 hat auch bei The One Ring eher hohe Preise, aber das Verhältnis zwischen Preis und Leistung fällt bei Yggdrasill schlechter aus. Für den PDF-Preis, den ich als eher hoch empfinde, will ich mehr Illustrationen, da muss alles noch mal eine ganze Ecke besser sein.


Spielbericht
Es fand kein Testspiel statt.


Erscheinungsbild


Das Produkt hat ein sehr schönes Layout, der Text ist gut lesbar und selbst auf reinen Textseiten fühlt man sich nicht erschlagen. Das Produkt ist in Sepiatönen gehalten und gefällt. Die vorhandenen Illustrationen sind richtig gut und stimmungsvoll. Schade, dass die meisten Buchseiten ohne sie auskommen müssen.


Bonus/Downloadcontent


Ein Charakterbogen, eine Landkarte und einen Auszug aus The Nine Worlds gibt es auf der Cubicle-7-Homepage. Das neueste Produkt der Reihe, Uppsala, fehlt hier, ist aber auch erhältlich. Wer sich für andere Produkte des französischen Verlags 7éme Cercle interessiert, der sollte auch bei Qin – The Warring States oder Keltia (gleiche Regeln wie Yggdrasill) reinschauen.
Fazit


Nur mit gutem Willen mag ich Yggdrasill mit einer Drei bewerten.


Ein kluges, gut formuliertes und recherchiertes Setting trifft hier auf ein Regelsystem, das unnötig komplex ist, ohne dabei dem Spieler einen Mehrwert zu bieten. Durch die Formeln und Zahlenwerte wird das Spiel weder besonders realistisch noch besonders variantenreich. Starke Kämpfer verlassen sich auf ihre Stärke, agile Kämpfer auf ihre Gelenkigkeit. Über die Multi-Aktionen pro Kampfrunde müssen die Spieler auch buchführen. Die ganze Komplexität wirkt krampfhaft und beinahe wie „l'art pour l'art“, als würde sie um ihrer selbst willen betrieben. Die zahlreichen Schwellen und Modifikatoren im Spiel wirken willkürlich und sind nicht gut zu merken, und die überreiche Vielfalt an Attributen, Sekundärattributen, Fertigkeiten, Manövern, usw. wirkt einfach nur unübersichtlich.


Dem eher zweifelhaften Regeldesign (eine klare Zwei) steht die Spielwelt gegenüber, in die man sich gut einfühlen kann. Der Fluff-Anteil ist eindeutig gut geschrieben und würde sich meinem Geschmack nach gut mit einer Savage-Worlds-Konversion spielen lassen. Quasi-Historisches und Mythen, diese Mischung gefällt und sollte durchaus Freunde finden können. Ich habe diesen Teil mit Genuss gelesen, und denke mal, dass sich The Nine Worlds dementsprechend auch als Anschaffung lohnen könnte. So ein Setting mit Bezug auf eine existierende Sagenwelt aufzubereiten ist ja nicht trivial, und das wurde hier durchaus gut geleistet.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Yggdrasill Core Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Cthulhu Britannica: Avalon - The County of Somerset
by Ken T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/10/2015 14:28:04

This is a very Folklorish title, with a great overview of the setting historically with details on Geography, Locales and a great section on Legends and Customs. If you got the Cthulhu Britannica: Folklore, and enjoyed it you'll want to get this. With 3 quality investigations plus scenario suggestions you cant go wrong.
Think: the mystery of Holy Grail, Wicker Man, King Arthur, witches, Hammer Horror rural setting & deep ones and you're on the right trail. Both this and the Folklore supplement allow you to do something a little different with CoC. Worth the read alone. 5 stars



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Cthulhu Britannica: Avalon - The County of Somerset
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Lone Wolf Adventure Game
by Matthew B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/31/2015 15:15:34

As a lifelong fan of the original Lone Wolf gamebooks, it was unthinkable that I didn't get this. All the same, I was a little wary. The two previous attempts to make LW into an RPG had been something of a curate's egg, good in parts...


I needn't have worried. Cubicle 7 have turned in an excellent piece of work. Rules are simple, very simple. The basic Initiate level is essentially the same as the gamebook rules, with a few alterations to suit a multi-player, GM (or 'Narrator) lead game. This simplicity is presented as a strength, allowing beginners to RPGs to pick up the system quickly and easily. For those more familiar with the concepts, the more advanced Master level rules add skills, traits, weapon qualities and other factors to increase the game's complexity (a caveat: even at Master level this is still a simple system. It's conceivable that some might find it a bit too simple for their tastes).


Some players may rankle at the fact that they're limited to only one class, the Kai Lord. This isn't such a bad thing. The Kai, with their wide range of special powers, or Disciplines, can be quite a varied bunch, especially with good role-playing. Other character classes will be available in a future supplement.


Visually this is a very attractive product. The illustrations are of a uniformly high quality and the layout is appealing. Rules are presented clearly, with the differences between Initiate and Master levels highlighted. There are several player handouts including pre-gen characters, tokens, and a beautiful map. Enough background detail is presented to give even a complete newcomer a basic grounding in the world of Magnamund, and the bestiary contains a wide selection of possible enemies.


Finally we get a two part adventure, cleverly written so the first part is simpler than the second. It would be possible to start with Initiate level rules then adopt the more complex Master level rules between parts if the players so wish.


Overall: An excellent gateway to the world of Magnamund. Pretty much essential for Lone Wolf fans, but also an ideal starter RPG for those new to them. Experienced players may find it a bit basic.


DISCLAIMER: I'm trying not to be biased here, but I should state that I have been credited as a proofreader for this product. That was not for pay and I'm not benefiting financially from that.
I AM involved in a future supplement, for which I will (hopefully) be paid. To prevent a conflict of interest, I'll not review that one!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Lone Wolf Adventure Game
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Victoriana 3rd Edition
by Aaron H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/30/2015 16:21:16

The following review was originally posted on Roleplayers Chronicle and can be read in its entirety at http://rolep-
layerschronicle.com/?p=46093
.


Victoriana is a fantasy steampunk game set in the Victorian era, primarily centered on England. It is very much a historical fantasy setting as time has proceeded much as expected, but events during that time are slightly altered to coincide with Victoriana’s basic canon. The first major change is that all religions within Victoriana have unique names, but draw on equivalent historical religions. The second major change is that humans aren’t the only sapient inhabitants of Earth; there are also Eldren (which are essentially elves), dwarves, gnomes, huldufolk (which are essentially halflings), ogres, orc, and beastfolk (which are essentially anthropomorphic humanoids of various animal design).


I’ve always been curious about Victoriana and how the Heresy Engine is designed for it. When it came up on the Bundle of Holding, I jumped at the opportunity to get the whole set. What came in that set was the 3rd edition of the Victoriana core rulebook. Having never seen the 1st or 2nd editions, this review looks at only the 3rd edition and not how it compares to previous core rulebooks.


For starters, Victoriana is truly a unique setting experience. Not only is it a fantasy steampunk setting, with more leanings toward technology than magic in the Victorian era, it draws upon its own historical fantasy tropes instead of completely rehashing existing ones. While some are the same or at least similar, these tropes are more tied to the implied history of the setting prior to the Victorian era than they are to any implied “typical” use in a fantasy setting. This experience is only made the more interesting with Victoriana’s class-breeding-function system. However, class doesn’t mean character class, it means social class – Upper, Middle, and Lower. These interrelated functions of the setting help drive character creation along with defining the type of experiences the character has had before choosing the path of adventuring (or whatever it is they decide to do). Overall this is done in an interesting backward method whereas Vocation is defined first, then Social Class, then Breeding (i.e. homosapien subspecies), and finally Attributes and Skills. Granted, the first three provide some definition for the latter two, but there are still additional creation points to provide the freedom of assigning final stats to the character.


Thanks to Airship Pirates, I was already familiar with the Heresy Engine before purchasing Victoriana. Needless to say, I like the Heresy Engine dice pool mechanics. Not only for their simplicity, but also because the dice pool has a clean difficulty mechanic. Successes are counted on one colored dice, difficulty is counted on another colored dice. Each success on the difficulty dice negates a success on the regular dice. Simple enough! The one thing I don’t particularly care about the Heresy Engine is the high quantity of skills it employs, but this is more of a personal preference than a fault of the mechanics. I prefer skills that can be easily grouped, but sometimes for setting flavor, it’s preferable to go the other route and break those skills out into their individual uses. Being that skills are grouped into a basic, advanced, and magic category, managing them on a character sheet is not that difficult.


Victoriana also employs a very interesting game mechanic that balances chaos and order. There is apparently this eternal power struggle going on whereas chaos and order are being continuously shifted throughout the world to see who can win. However, the true winner is when the world is properly balanced between chaos and order as too much of either one is a bad thing. This is represented on a cog, which really plays to the steampunk aesthetic. I really like this mechanic in terms of balancing magic and technology (on different ends of the power struggle) and ultimately is incorporated into the base mechanics through various bonuses and penalties. I won’t get into those, but you’ll have to take my word that they integrate nicely and make for an interesting mechanical representation of the fantasy steampunk theme.


Going into Victoriana, I already knew the setting was historical fantasy based in the Victorian era. Combined with this was steampunk technology that previously wasn’t as prominent as it has now become. Thus I classify the setting as historical fantasy steampunk. During one of my trips to Gen Con, right before 3rd edition came out, I spoke to the crew at Cubicle 7 to find out what was different with the upcoming new edition. One of the comments was that people were confused on whether or not the setting was historical fantasy, steampunk, fantasy steampunk, or gothic horror, which is often common to the Victorian era. The answer I got was that it’s all of them and whichever one you want at the same time. The result is that all of those elements have been incorporated into the setting, but not always in a particularly smooth fashion. In fact, the supposed gothic horror aspects of the setting do not come out clearly at all until they’re smacked into your face in a section that claims “Victoriana is a horrific setting”, or something like that. It didn’t seem horrific at all to me until that statement was made, but that ultimately doesn’t matter to me as they do provide text and bestiary that supports that, albeit not as much as it supports the other elements of the setting. A better way of describing the setting is that you have elements of history, fantasy, steampunk, action and adventure, and gothic horror all rolled into one package. GMs can then pick and choose which elements they want to incorporate without breaking the setting.


Overall, I really like Victoriana and I think it’s a well-built system with an interesting setting. The horror aspects don’t seem as ingrained in the setting as the historical fantasy and steampunk aspects do, but it’s easy enough to add those in. You’re not really going to get that gothic horror experience like you might think; the setting may be ominous, but fear isn’t an integral part of it. It’s more like necromantic or occult fantasy than gothic horror; the aesthetics of such are much more present than actual gothic horror ones. However, if you’re looking for that Victorian fantasy steampunk style, there’s really no need to look any further!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Victoriana 3rd Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Keltia Map of Ynys Prydein
by Ben S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/21/2015 07:40:04

Nice detailed map that can be used for other games as well.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Keltia Map of Ynys Prydein
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Displaying 16 to 30 (of 284 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates