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Traveller Core Rulebook Beta Playtest
by paul h. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/15/2015 17:14:44

The Beta-rules are in too much flux at the moment to really review the product. The new core rule book isn't going to follow the same path as the previous one, and this may be good, or not so much. The tag line says it's everything you need, but that's not entirely true as you'll still need to purchase the additional core rule books to round out the initial set of information. That is unless you happen to enjoy playing Traveller where pretty much everyone has the same ships, the same weapons the same everything.


There's a lot of small changes to the rules that add up to a big change in the overall game. It's not just one thing here or one thing there, it's lots of things here and there. But somewhere buried in all there is sill the intent for it to BE Traveller. Or at least a sci-fi game that has the inherent feeling of Traveller.


If you are on the fence about this I don't have any good advice for you on which way you should proceed with the game. It's not ready to be played right now and you'll be waiting for quite some time before it is. And when it does come out, you may not feel it's enough to justify replacing your 1.0 sets of books for the 2.0. I highly suggest to anyone who is trying to figure out which way to jump that you point your browser over to the Mongoose forum and catch up on the discussions. That's probably the best way for you to determine if this new version is right for you.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Traveller Core Rulebook Beta Playtest
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Traveller Core Rulebook Beta Playtest
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/09/2015 13:41:44

OK, so why do we need a new set of rules? Let's see what is here and how it improves on what has gone before. It is supposed to be broadly backwards-compatible with Mongoose Traveller materials, but will of course have resources - sourcebooks and adventures - crafted specifically for it in due course.


The Introduction begins by explaining what Traveller is: a science-fiction role-playing game of the far future that can be used to play out whatever you fancy - and adds that if you have a favourite SF film or TV series (or presumably book!), Traveller ought to be able to replicate it on your tabletop. It touches on the Third Imperium (the Official Traveller Universe as it's known) and gets a little muddled in the distinction between the players of the game (that's you and me) and the characters that they play. I am not (alas) a Traveller, my character is, the lucky tode! It talks about the sort of adventures and campaigns you can enjoy and runs through some game conventions (standard terminology) before explaining the concept of Tech Levels and, in brief sentences, showing what each one means from TL0 to TL15.


Next, Chapter 1: Character Creation introduces the unique Traveller 'life path' character generation process. It is recommended that a group of players generate their characters together, primarily so as to establish connections between them - it's also to be noted that lots of players enjoy creating characters as a game in its own right even when they don't need one! (However there is a new connections bonus that can lead to an additional skill level for both characters involved.) The process is well explained with plenty of detail (and suggestions, even here, for adventures) and there is a large flowchart that makes the process clear. As a double-spread page that would be fine, it's worth printing out at least those two pages from the PDF to get the full benefit. Each career - and the pre-career options of university or military academy - provides the character with not just skills but life-events that have in-game consequences as well as game-mechanical ones. Overall, the actual process has not changed much, but it is laid out and explained well. Character generation is primarily human-centric, with a brief mention of aliens and scant details of Aslan and Vargr - the intention is that they will be covered in separate sourcebooks. Tucked at the end is a new career, that of the Prisoner. It's not one that you choose for your character, but assorted events that may arise during character generation will land him there without the option!


This is followed by Chapter 2: Skills and Tasks, which gets down to the business of explaining how to use the skills that your character has and the task resolution system. Although still based on the classic 'roll 2 dice against a Referee-set difficulty' the use of modifiers other than those based on the character's own capabilities has been replaced by the use of extra 'boon' or 'bane' dice. These come into play when conditions are beneficial or adverse to the attempt being made. A third die is rolled. If conditions are favourable, the player discards the lowest roll and uses the other two dice to resolve the task as normal. If things are against him, he discards the highest die roll before resolving the task. Neat, and a lot easier than having to determine just how beneficial or otherwise the circumstances might be! The idea is that task difficulties and applicable modifiers ought to be fairly standard for any given task, all you need to decide is if the circumstances under which you are trying to accomplish it warrant a boon or a bane die to be added to your roll.


Chapter 3: Combat then takes a long, hard look at how fighting is run within the game. Combat is still deadly, and relatively speedy. Characters use their skill in the weapon they are using, and wield them in initiative-order sequence in combat rounds. The system has been streamlined and integrated with personal combat, vehicle combat and starship combat all working the same way.


Naturally, getting caught up in a brawl is not the only danger to be faced in the far future, so Chapter 4: Encounters and Dangers provides loads of hazards and the game mechanics necessary to deal with them. Environmental dangers abound... but fortunately there is also a section on healing. Animals (which may or may not be hostile) are also covered here with a broad outline of a system to create animals and encounters with them. Several examples are given - and it can be great fun thinking up exotic critters for the worlds the party visits in its travels. Animals, of course, are not the only beings they will encounter, so there is also a section about NPCs which includes quick generation of them and the sort of encounters that may be had... there's even a rudimentary patron encounter system here for generating really fast adventure seeds on the fly.


Next comes Chapter 5: Equipment. Starting off with notes on money and standards of living it soon launches into The Core Collection, a catalogue of much of what the well-equipped traveller might need - which is presented like a real-world catalogue complete with illustrations (well, some of them, and plenty space earmarked for more) and sales-speak as well as the necessary game mechanics to use them. As well as the weapons, armour and gear you'd expect, the Core Collection also includes augmentations - cybernetic or biological modifications to improve on or even add things to the standard human.


Chapter 6: Vehicles follows; but here the emphasis is on what vehicles can do and how they are operated. It also includes vehicle combat. Quite a few examples are provided for those who want to get going quickly. This is followed by Chapter 7: Starship Operations which looks at the bread and butter of running a starship and starship encounters, including things like running costs and starship security. There's a separate chapter for starship combat, which allows characters to play a part in different roles - and makes starship captains worry about how much power they are using! Both ship-to-ship combat and boarding actions are covered here.


Next, Chapter 9: Common Spacecraft looks at ships which are familiar to the experienced Traveller player, but presents them in a new and visual manner. Statistics appear in a neat panel that gives you all you need to know, whilst deckplans have gone isometric. This gives a nice impression of what it would actually be like to wander around the ship in question and matches up well with the external views. They won't work so well as old-style deckplans for people who like to run combat aboard like a miniatures skirmish though. There's a good range of standard craft here from traders and scouts to liners and yachts.


Separated out - not everyone likes to use them - is Chapter 10: Psionics. (They are, however, mentioned within the lifepath parts of character generation: with several opportunities to be contacted and tested. If you don't want to use them, you'll have to roll again if you get one of those results.) The default model is that psionics are rare and viewed with offical caution if not outright hostility - in the Third Imperium, for example, they are banned. If you do choose to use them, psionic strength and skills are covered here as well as the psion career path.


Next comes Chapter 11: Trade. This provides a system for conducting interstellar trade that manages to be quite detailed and yet abstracts the process to a few die rolls, a neat method that allows a party to focus as much or as little attention on it as they please whilst still providing the possibility of a rationale for their travels and an income to fund it.


Finally, where are you going to travel to? This is covered by Chapter 12: World and Universe Creation which lays out the way in which worlds, systems and sectors are described and how to design them, and Chapter 13 which details the Sindal Sub-Sector in the Trojan Reaches - the new setting which is to be developed for this latest iteration of the Traveller game.


Overall, this book presents something that is still recognisably Traveller but with the benefit of 30-odd years of game design building on the original concepts. It shows great promise particularly in terms of integration and streamlining of game mechanics, and presentation values look as if they will be good too - although of course in this playtest version quite a lot of the art is missing. There are also a few typos which will hopefully be caught before the final version... but it promises well for the future of the game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Traveller Core Rulebook Beta Playtest
by A. P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/05/2015 03:03:19

Second edition represents a marked departure away from the traditional, rules-heavy, refereed, simulationist approach to Sci-Fi gaming toward a mass-market, rules-light, game-mastered Sci-Fi in the Far Future(TM).


Boon and Bane dice work similarly to advantage/disadvantage dice in D&D 5E. What works well in a light setting like 5E is the harbinger of doom in Traveller. Billed as a system to simplify the referee's job, Bane and Boon dice actually limit player options without being much better than the traditional DM based system. For example, where before you could take multiple negative DMs to cut the time required for a task by several steps, you are now limited by the B&B system to one step only, since a player can only be affected by one bane dice at a time. I used that particular system just last week in my own game. Had I been playing this edition, I would've been incinerated by a jumpcusser's laser beam. The life of a famous drive engineer and his crew ended because he was magically prevented from speeding up his rolls by more than one step. Wait, though-- would I have been killed? Let's take a look at space combat!


Space combat is totally, 100% wrecked. Structure has been removed as a stat. As an example of the changes, the normal Free Trader now has a hull rating of 40. Weapon damage is, on the whole, the same as 1E. System hits are now restricted to critical hits exclusively. Where in 1E, you'd get through the hull and the armor, then start hitting systems and structure before actually destroying the ship, when you remove the hull in 2E, the ship is destroyed and beyond, and I quote, "any repair". That's right-- hull points are now health points. 1E's harrowing, highly-lethal, and most of all satisfying damage model has given way to what is essentially ground combat in space with more hit-points. Not only that, but good luck taking it as a prize. At least after a combat in 1E, you could take hull-less ships as heavily-damaged rewards, or for salvage, or something. Now you're just... out of luck? The fact that system hits are now essentially random means that power is more of an annoyance than anything in the combats I've run. While it could have been a welcome addition to the simulation of 1E, it seems like a pointless extra stat in a system that wants to be this light. Several ships cannot actually run their maneuver drives, jump drives, and basic ship systems in combat at the same time, as well. This is before weapons, you understand. I'd fix this, if there were any actually any ship construction mechanics in the core rulebook. Those are stripped out in favor of a multi-book "core collection" philosophy. The ghost of D&D whispers at our airlock again, friends.


Those are the two big complaints I have right now. Not the only ones. The skill mechanics aren't that good. A couple of skills were combined that made sense, but the progression is a little fast, and there's a hard limit on how far you can progress. EDU is now the most important stat bar none if you're playing a freeform game. Armor values on people have gone way up, without a corresponding increase in damage output. Combat in general is far less lethal. I mean really! This is a game where you can die during chargen. Why nerf the lethality? My friends and I have run a couple of sim combats and we're all kind of universally disappointed.


Now, it's not a total loss. I'll pick and choose some mechanics that I like as they are to use in my 1E games, particularly a certain clarification about the amount of mail available at a port, but I'm not going to be transitioning over to 2E as it stands now. 2E is tantalizingly close to being okay, but it's marred by some weird mechanics that can be fixed, and some big flaws that are working as designed and intended, according to the forums. I haven't posted there yet, but I plan to. I feel like a segment of the Traveller playerbase was left out of previous playtests by accident, and the exclusion of the serious side of the community let the book get to this current state. Like I said at the start, this book represents a design philosophy shift, not poor design. These would be good rules for a different game. They're bad rules for Traveller. If you're not on board with the present direction of the game, or willing to really push to try to change it, I wouldn't drop the cash on this.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Book 4: Psion
by Dale W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/29/2015 10:43:53

An interesting look at the psionic gifts which provide many versions of them that, until this book, were only available to and the definition of the Zhodani. Well worth the purchase if psionics are something you intend to add to your Traveller Universe.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Book 4: Psion
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Supplement 7: 1,001 Characters
by David B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/15/2015 20:36:31

Well presented book with all sorts of good ideas for NPC's. This one, as a supplement, is not "required" but I believe is a must have for any GM's collection. Even IF you do not use the NPC's as described you can use it for a spring board of ideas.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Supplement 7: 1,001 Characters
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Special Supplement 3: Vehicle Upgrade Manual
by David B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/15/2015 20:34:12

Good addition to the vehicle rules. To me it was somewhat useful others may find it invaluable depending on your campaign style. On the whole i do recommend it to all GM's.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Special Supplement 3: Vehicle Upgrade Manual
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Special Supplement 4: Rescue Ops
by David B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/15/2015 20:31:27

This was an excellent source book for rescue ops. If your characters like to play fire fighters or medics or just gem themselves into that sort of situations this book is for them. I recommend it to GM's for the technical data and equipment listings with in.



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[5 of 5 Stars!]
Special Supplement 4: Rescue Ops
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Referee's Aid 4: A Guide to Star Systems
by David B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/15/2015 20:29:02

Awful. Has nothing of interest to the gamer it is just one long document about how stars are. This is not a better or improved system generation setup. Do NOT waste your money on it.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Referee's Aid 4: A Guide to Star Systems
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Supplement 10: Merchants and Cruisers
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/10/2015 10:30:20

In the far future, it's reasonable to expect a vast array of ships to be plying the space lanes - just stand beside a busy road and see just how many different vehicles go by! - so this book provides a collection of different ships and ideas for variants to ensure that it's never boring out in the black or at a space port in your Traveller universe.


The Introduction explains how the ships have all been designed using the rules in the core rulebook and in Book 2: High Guard - so they'll be systemically compatible with anything you design or have taken from other books. The rest of the book is divided up into logical groups to make it easier to find what you want just when you need it.


The first section is Small Craft, being anything from fighters and shuttles to specialised ships for boarding actions or even planetary assault. These are followed by sections on Military Craft, Scout Vessels, and Civilian Ships; then more exotic vessels in sections devoted to Aslan, Darrian and Vargr ships. The military craft presented here are the smaller ones like patrol cruisers and support vessels, whilst the scout ones include those used on covert activities as well as more regular Scout missions. Civilian ships in clude not just merchants but passenger liners and even an interstellar casino!


For each ship, you get a short description of its appearance and uses, a full stat-block and a deck plan. These are nice, neat, clear plans - with the added bonus of each one has the legend explaining the symbols beside it. This coupled with most ships covering either one or two pages means that PDF users can print out the relevant pages for ships they want to use without having to refer to the rest of the book. There are occasional sketches of external appearance as well, nice for people who want to know what they can see when they look out of a porthole/use a view screen!


The 'alien' vessels do have a slightly different feel to them: Darrians like personal space, Aslan ships generally have a shrine and so on. The odd typo and some of the deck plans (especially for some reason in the Civilian Ships section) being less than clear about what's where notwithstanding, this is a very useful work for anyone who delights in the variety of ships to be encountered out in the black.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Supplement 10: Merchants and Cruisers
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Book 0: Introduction to Traveller
by Michael J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/09/2015 15:30:06

A surprisingly complete set of the Traveler character rules. Unlike the original edition, where 3 out of five characters died during set up, everybody survives basic training and learning their careers. Except for space ship design and planet building, you have all you need to play the game.



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[5 of 5 Stars!]
Book 0: Introduction to Traveller
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SITREP 2: Aster
by David T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/07/2015 16:10:20

Having purchased Sitrep 1, I bought this for the weapon and equipment 'review' section at the back and am well pleased.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
SITREP 2: Aster
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SITREP 1: Callia
by David T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/07/2015 16:08:36

Whilst I do not consider it expensive it does lack detail of the world. However I did like the bonus detail on
sundry weapons and equipment.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
SITREP 1: Callia
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Special Supplement 3: Vehicle Upgrade Manual
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/04/2015 07:42:53

What with Supplement 5-6: The Vehicle Design Handbook and Special Supplement 1: Biotech Vehicles you might have thought that vehicle design was a done deal... but no, here's some more! This book presents three new types of chassis (the ekranoplan, the rocket plane and the ornithopter) and a wealth of new rules for things like vehicle maintenance and design flaws, not to mention lots of other stuff.


We start off with a section of New Chassis Types. There's a brief description of what an ekranoplan actually is - something like an aircraft but relying on ground effect (I think I need to do more research before I understand this!) - and then a whole bunch of variations and features on the theme for you to choose from. Rocket planes (which are capable of lifting off from a standing start rather than belting down a runway) and ornithopters (which flap like birds) are given similar treatment.


Next is a section on Universal Modifications. These may be applied to any vehicle type when you want that feature or effect, and there's quite a lot of them. Perhaps you want to instal a complete command centre in your vehicle (the sort of facilities you need to coordinate rescues or police/military activity), maybe you want a winch or drone racks... or perhaps you want the entire vehicle to be capable of being air-dropped from something even larger. Just reading through the options gives plenty of ideas. Maybe you need to sweep mines or withstand pressure... or just want a touch of luxury.


Not everything works perfectly, of course, so the next section is Quirks and Flaws. Quirks are flavour - like a nasty smell you cannot trace - while flaws can have an in-game effect resulting from poor design or manufacture of the vehicle. If you forsee a lot of hanger time for your creation (or want to avoid it!) head on over to the next section, Maintenance. This provides rules for keeping vehicles in tip-top condition... and what might happen if you don't!


If you want it big, then the section on Designing Ultra-Heavy Vehicles is for you. The Vehicle Handbook was aimed at smaller vehicles, ones on a more personal scale, rather than really enormous ones... yet sometimes that may be what you need. The suggestion here is to build in sections, using the appropriate rules for making heavy vehicles of the appropriate type, and stick them together. This is followed by a section on Weapons, providing even more options for offenseive armament.


The next section covers Vehicles as Robots and Drones. As I write, driverless cars are just about a technical possibility (they're still working on ethical and legal aspects), so in the far future it is likely that virtually any vehicle can be fitted with a robot brain and made autonomous, or operated by a remote controller as a drone. There's even a possibility of a cyborg vehicle, using a sentient brain as controller - something like Anne McCaffrey's brainships - or an artificial intelligence like Keith Laumer's bolos.


Finally, there's a selection of ready-designed vehicles which demonstrate these rules in action, or which can be used in your game straight off. These just scratch at the surface of course, but they give an indication of what is possible. If you enjoy designing vehicles, you'll want to add this book to your resources... and even if you are not a serious gearhead, it provides lots of ideas about vehicle types and capabilities even if you don't want to go through the complete design process.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Special Supplement 3: Vehicle Upgrade Manual
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Special Supplement 1: Biotech Vehicles
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/03/2015 07:28:14

This short PDF supplement packs a lot in, providing the wherewithall to create 'biotech' vehicles using the standard vehicle design system presented in earlier supplements (originally Supplement 5: Civilian Vehicles and Supplement 6: Military Vehicles, later revised and published as Supplement 5-6: The Vehicle Handbook). As this system concentrated on the end result of your design, rather than the means of accomplishing it, creating compatible living vehicles is not too difficult.


Science-fiction is full of biotech constructs, living creatures which fulfil roles normally occupied by inanimate objects. If you play the 2300AD setting, the Pentapod race uses living starships and vehicles already, or you may want to recreate something you have read about or seen on screen. Used in conjunction with The Vehicle Handbook, you can now do so.


As the vehicle design system is effects-based, most of the work is done using it, and this book highlights the differences due to your design being a biotech one rather than a standard 'rustbucket'. To start with, they are pricey - double the cost of conventional vehicles. You can make most every type of vehicle but its to be noted that they need a 'structure type' as well as the chassis type in the standard design system. Here, you need to decide if the creature is a vertebrate or an invertebrate (i.e. does it have an internal skeleton?). Invertebrate-based vehicles are a little cheaper but they are a bit more vulnerable to damage - a bit odd, ask a cockroach, one of the most durable creatures around and an invertebrate!


Other differences include metabolic type (endothermic or exothermic) and environmental limitations, as well as range and fuel... your biotech vehicle needs to be fed whether or not it's going anywhere! Depending on what they eat, their performance varies - and if your vehicle is a carnivore you will probably have to hunt for it, whilst a photosynthetic vehicle has unlimited range in daylight although it is comparatively slow-moving and may grind to a halt if driven too far at night!


Most biotech vehicles are fairly stupid but some have limited, animal intelligence and can follow simple directions rather than be guided by someone. The supplement also covers defensive capabilities, sensors and even the ability to self-repair when damaged. As for weapons, you can mount normal ones whilst some biotech vehicles have quite novel ones of their own.


Finally, there's a sample biotech vehicle, an airship, to play with. If the idea appeals, however, you'll soon be rooting through novels and films for inspiration - I'm thinking of John Varley's Titan right now, which presented one of Saturn's moons as a construct filled with strange creatures, often filling the roles we'd use machines to fill... It is an interesting concept, and one which will allow you to create some truly alien vehicles, the sort of thing that reminds players that their characters are in an alternate reality.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Special Supplement 1: Biotech Vehicles
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Supplement 14: Space Stations
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/31/2015 08:09:42

As soon as a civilisation ventures forth from its original planet, it's going to start building space stations - even we here on Earth have, despite not having developed interplanetary travel yet! In the starfaring community of the far future envisioned by Traveller, it's likely that most inhabited systems will have space stations as well as settlements planetside. Indeed, they may be the main habitations in some systems, for example when the main world is resource-rich but not suitable for major long-term colonisation. They are also good places on which to have adventures!


The first chapter, Space Station Design, dives straight in to present a system for creating space stations with the customary wealth of tables and options to enable you to custom-design the space station that you want. Most are built in the orbit that they will occupy once completed, with components being delivered and bolted together in space. There's a checklist to work through, beginning with the essential decision of whether you wish to have artificial gravity or to spin your station to generate gravity within it. Then you need to decide on a configuration and size, and it goes on from there. An important consideration is the orbit in which it will be situated, which will depend on the use to which it will be put - and also determine what facilities need to be provided. It may also be necessary (or at least prudent) to arm the station.


Once these basics have been determined the next chapter, Station Equipment, comes into play. This looks at the various uses to which the station may be put and the equipment that will have to be installed. Perhaps mining operations are conducted from the station, or - especially if the station is located in an asteroid belt - ore is brought there to be refined. There are likely to be facilities such as shops and entertainment for visitors and residents, docking facilities for visiting ships and maybe even a dockyard for ship repair or construction. Communications and sensor gear will be required and so on.


Now that the station has been constructed and equipped, turn to the Combat and Operations chapter to find out how to run (and defend) your brand-new station. This provides the details you need if there's a combat involving the station itself - generally defensive actions as they are fairly easy to hit but unlikely to mount attacks. In terms of more peaceful operations, space stations work pretty much like starports and you may wish to refer to Supplement 13: Starport Encounters as well as the material here. Due to size limitations, ships wishing to dock may be limited as to how long they can stay or may even have to hang around waiting for a berth to become available.


The next chapter, Space Station Generation, provides tables to aid in determining what stations are present in a given system and what they are doing there. Amred with that information you can then loop back to the first chapter and design those for which you need that level of detail - after all, if your party is not interested in asteroid mining, just knowing that there is a refinery station in the asteroid belt is sufficient, but if their business (or your plot) takes them there, you will need a lot more information about it. This chapter also provides plenty of inspiration about what sort of space stations there may be in a system - from naval bases to commercial operations, Imperial consultates, scout bases, pirate havens and much, much more. I once played in a campaign where an entire sub-sector was embroiled in a war and the party - rather than working for one side or the other as the Referee had intended - set up a 'neutral zone' entertainment facility space station where members of either faction were welcome as long as they left their dispute outside!


Next up, for the budding traders, there's a chapter Maintaining Trade, which actually goes well beyond actual trading to look at the economics of running a space station. It's quite fascinating, and easy to imagine a campaign based around keeping a station operational - cutting deals, dealing with problems and so on. This is followed by a chapter called Docks and Yards which goes into detail about the operation and economics of docking and shipyard facilities. If you run a construction yard, there are two options: build ships to contract or build speculatively and hope someone will purchase them. There's plenty of detail here to facilitate either kind of shipbuilding.


This is followed by Agave, a chapter detailing a complete system in which planets are at best harsh and mostly incapable of supporting life, so most inhabitants live on space stations instead. There's a history and description of the system, notes on military and other significant groups, places of interest to visit - and several Patron Encounters that could lead to a series of adventures here. This chapter ends with notes on several other possibilities if you want a station-rich system... these are just ideas and you'll have to flesh them out for yourself.


Finally, Space Stations is a chapter of ready-made stations that you can drop into your game wherever the need arises. There are descriptions, plans, illustrations and full statistics for an antique station, a research station, a manufacturing station, a trading station, a mining station, a construction station, a fleet station, a defence station, an interdiction station, and an X-boat hub station. The plans are somewhat uninformative and sketchy and the illustrations also leave something to be desired - with each station getting two or three virtually identical ones supposedly showing it from different angles.


The usefulness of this will depend on what's important in your game. In many games, even if you visit a space station there is no need for this level of detail, the Referee can just describe the areas as needed. If you want to base your game on a station though, this material will come in very handy! And, like every system in Traveller, there's the potential for using the design system on its own as a form of 'gearheading'.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Supplement 14: Space Stations
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