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2300AD: Black as Pitch
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/23/2016 09:53:20

This adventure is the third and final part of the Grendelssaga, which began with Rescue Run and continued with Salvage Rights. It really only works if you have run the preceding two adventures in the trilogy, as too much of the plot relies on the party having been involved in earlier events. Against a background of renewed exploration on Grendel which the party are not invited to participate in, they instead are invited to RebCo to dicuss a job offer... a rather interesting one which will land them back on Grendel anyway!


As one might expect, their path will not be a smooth one - and plenty detail is supplied to enable the Referee to manage events. Once they get there, the excitement is not over and there are considerable opportunities for interaction with both humans and Pentapods as well as some major exploration... and plenty of action and combat too, so this should prove entertaining for virtually all groups. For those interested in alien races, this adventure provides a prime opportunity to learn hitherto unguessed-at things about Pentapods.


As ever, there is masses of additional material - equipment, weapons, vehicles, locations, alien species and more - which is not just useful here but may play a role in your own adventures. There is also an appendix giving more information about Pentapods as well as others covering various factions (human and Pentapod) which again provide fertile ground for further adventure.


Taken as a whole, the Grendelsaga makes for an excellent adventure, and it is far better to run all three components together. Again, better proofreading would have improved this book, but the sheer wealth of information rounding out this particular corner of known space makes this book and the whole series fascinating and invaluable.



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[5 of 5 Stars!]
2300AD: Black as Pitch
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2300AD: Rescue Run
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/22/2016 07:54:08

In the Queen Alice star system, most people live on Beowulf... but this adventure, the first in a series of three, takes the party to the next planet out, Grendel. This is a largely unexplored planet, regarded as uninhabitable, but it is home to a university research station studying the violent weather and emergent life forms on Grendel. As well as the adventure, this work serves as a sourcebook for Grendel and the research station itself.


The adventure itself concerns the evacuation of the research station - normally scheduled for the cold season only the contractors who normally ship the staff home have gone out of business, and the local authorities are more concerned with an alert concering potential Kaefer raiders than in picking up a handful of academics. If the party has a suitable vessel, they are hired to do the job in that, if they do not they will get given a court order to take a ship belonging to the former contractor (whose employees are still waiting on back pay and are likely to object).


There are background notes on the staff at the research station and on the trip to get them... including some potential problems that might arise on the way. Once there, the party are welcomed - the station has already suffered storm damage and the staff are eager to leave... although there is another storm coming and they will have to stay overnight and leave in the morning.


The descriptions are highly-detailed and there's a wealth of information here (although at least one 'see page XX' that hasn't been picked up in proofreading!) on the station and on the planet Grendel, as well as an assortment of survival gear that may be of use.


It's a taut little adventure with plenty of opportunity for interaction, but short on opportunities for combat. In some ways, it is a scene-setter for things to come, and possibly should have been included with the next adventure (Salvage Rights) rather than as a stand-alone, but it could make an interesting side-adventure if you are using it on its own. There are some suggestions for follow-up adventures as well, and if you do intend to run Salvage Rights this is a well-nigh essential percursor.



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[4 of 5 Stars!]
2300AD: Rescue Run
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2300AD: French Arm Adventures
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/21/2016 10:04:36

This book contains three adventures and ancillary material about the worlds on which they are set. The adventures are based on ones originally released by Game Designer's Workshop for their 2300AD game - Beanstalk, Kafer Dawn and Energy Curve - which have been retooled for the Mongoose Traveller ruleset. It is recommended that the introductory adventure Tricolore's Shadow be played first, but as I don't have a copy I cannot comment on that.


There's a nice map of the French Arm, then it's on to the first adventure, Beanstalk. There is a lot of supporting material explaining the nature of the Beanstalk itself and the planet of Beta Canum where it is to be found - plenty of history and background that makes the place come to life and suggests further ideas for adventure even after this one is done. Beta Canum has four continents - the French Continent, the British Continent, the German Continent, and the Southern Continent, and there is also an alien embassy, the Pentapod Enclave. All of these are described in considerable detail.


Scene set, we move on to sections entitled The Actors and The Drama. The Actors provides details of leading NPCs and The Drama consists of three separate but linked scenarios concerning the Beanstalk. These are followed by further materials: suggestions for follow-up adventures, technical data about beanstalk operation and other matters.


The adventures themselves involve the party working as troubleshooters for Rebco sampling air around the Beanstalk, getting involved in a dispute over foodstuffs produced by British and French companies and trying to survive when the Beanstalk gets sabotaged... Each can be run as a standalone adventure or they can be run in sequence.


Next comes Kafer Dawn (which for some reason suddenly becomes Kaefer Dawn...). In this, the party are mercenaries on the planet Aurore and get embroiled in the growing war with the Kafer (or Kaefer), an alien race that is not inclined to share space with any other colonists. There is background on Aurore, its capital Tanstaafl and the Kafer themselves, ideas for adventuring on Aurore and three scenarios to get you going. There's a lot to keep characters who enjoy the mercenary life busy.


The third adventure is Energy Curve. This is not as well introduced as the others, everything's a bit muddled and a thorough read-through is recommended to understand precisely what is going on as - unlike the others in this book - you cannot get an overview at a glance. It involves a downed exploration vessel and the fight for survival on an unknown planet that ensues. There is masses of opportunity for exploration and interaction in this one, a fascinating and challenging adventure that lasts the better part of a year (game time).


Finally, there are a couple of appendices, one on the Pentapods and one about technology. Overall, there is a wealth of resources here over and above the adventures themselves, although there is a rather jumbled air to the whole thing with disparate adventures suited to at least three different parties (if not groups of players - people who like exploring may find less fun exploring new worlds or troubleshooting in a fairly civilised environment where gunplay is frowned upon, and vice versa). But there's plenty of material here and well worth reading as you build your knowledge of the French Arm and mine it for opportunities to adventure.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
2300AD: French Arm Adventures
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2300AD: Tools for Frontier Living
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/19/2016 14:14:15

Much of Traveller 2300AD is about life on the frontier, and this book begins by attempting to bring some of that flavour across, with a piece of fiction about farm life and some explanations. For example, frontier living is a mix of primitive and advanced technology, and knowledge across the entirety of known space is fairly consistant. Hence the Technology Level of a frontier world is more a reflection of what they can make there, the manufacturing capabilities, than what they actually understand there. They can usually get hold of higher-tech items, provided they are willing to pay for them. Attitudes are different, too, the sort of people who make good colonists have a somewhat different approach to life that those who remain on core worlds. Sketches of sample colonial settlements illustrate this discussion on what the colonies are actually like, and it all makes fascinating reading.


Next comes a chapter on Colonies and Colony Design. The colonisation process is described in detail. Once a potential colony world is discovered, first in are survey teams, who begin with orbital surveys and then land, staying for five to ten years looking round a new planet then once it is deemed suitable the pathfinders arrive and spend another five years setting up basic infrastructure before the actual colonists turn up. There's masses of detail here, enough to inform the development of a campaign about establishing a colony, if that takes your fancy, and this includes apposite rules information.


This is followed by Outposts and Outpost Design, where 'outposts' are defined as small-scale facilities established in deep space, on asteroids, or inhospitable worlds. These are not intended to be self-sufficient of themselves, although they may be components of a large whole. The same concepts can be used in creating colony precursors, a nucleus about which a colony can develop and eventually become self-sufficient. Deep space or asteroid based outposts are often zero or low gravity, those on planets have gravity of course but may be on airless worlds (or those with an inhospitable atmosphere). Again there's plenty of detail - and illustrations of sample outposts - to enable you to incorporate them into your game.


Next comes a chapter on Frontier Agriculture. Virtually every colony tries to farm for at least their own use if not for export. Most of the time, crops of Earth origin need genetic modification to be able to thrive on other worlds. Animals may or may not need this, depending on whether you can grow crops that they can eat... but they likely will have to be protected from local wildlife. Sometimes, said wildlife can be tamed and farmed itself, should they be edible or otherwise useful. Greenhouses, hydroponics and aquaculture (fish farming) are also discussed.


Everyone needs somewhere to live, so the next chapter discusses Structures. This primarily covers imported structures, rather than those built using local materials, although these are covered as well, with the rules and costings you'll need. Many are modular in form, and often come pre-fitted according to their intended purpose. This is followed by a chapter on Power Systems.


Then a chapter on Animals opens with some fiction from an exo-veterinary surgeon, describing her life as a colonial veterinarian. Much of the material here covers exported Earth animals and their adaptations to colonial living, but we also hear about creatures native to the colony worlds. There's also costings and rules for animals here.


Next we take a look at Clothing and Protective Gear. Now we get to the sort of 'shopping list' I'd been expecting when I opened this book - in fact the discussions talked about above were a delightful surprise! Of course, listings of stuff your characters can purchase are always useful. In many groups, shopping ranks highly amongst preferred activities - generally only combat and carousing get more interest from them. There's everything from smart and budget street clothes to armour and specialised outfits in this chapter.


The chapter on Medical Technology opens with quite an impassioned tirade from a medical doctor who resents those who think the technology is taking over and doing most of the work. The trained medical mind still has its place. However there's plenty of equipment listed here to supplement such trained minds. There is also a list of drugs, not all of them medical... some are 'recreational' or have other uses besides healing.


The gear theme continues with a chapter of Exploratory Equipment, everything from backpacks and tents to mapping equipment and even snowshoes. This is followed by Tools and Industrial Equipment - everything from the multitool in your pocket to fabricators and explosives. Then on to Computers, Communicators and Personal Electronics. This in particular shows the difference between 2300AD colonies and their earlier counterparts. Even the most primitive appearing colony has access to cutting edge computing power. Similar in nature are the Sensors and Scopes which follow. This group of chapters rounds off with Miscellaneous Equipment and Consumer Goods - autokitchens, makeup kits and even a composting toilet.


Next, out into space beginning with Space Equipment. This is the stuff you really don't want to fail! It includes rescue equipment, beacons and satellites here, before moving on to Spacesuit Design. If you have a mind to, you can get down and dirty with custom designing every detail of the suit on which your life will depend. In similar vein, the following chapter deals with Aquatic Equipment, with dive gear, boats and other items useful if you intend taking to the water.


There's a chapter on Police and Security Equipment, plenty of useful stuff here whichever side of the law you may happen to be on. Then comes the Weapons chapter, unsurprisingly one of the longer chapters in the whole book. There's plenty here to keep your gun-bunnies happy.


The final section of the book is mostly transportation, although the chapter on Robots and Drones provides robots (and drones, of course) for many purposes. Following this fascinating read, there are chapters on Walkers, Vehicles and Starships and Spacecraft.


With the material herein, your Travellers should not want for anything that they might need as they roam the worlds or settle down to build a colony.



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[5 of 5 Stars!]
2300AD: Tools for Frontier Living
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2300AD Core Rulebook Revised
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/16/2016 11:34:42

The original Traveller 2300 (from Game Designer's Workshop) had little to do with Traveller proper, being set far earlier and having a different ruleset. In this revisualisation by Mongoose Publishing, the ruleset is brought in line with the rest of their Traveller product, but the original setting and flavour is kept intact... and some cunning additional rules are added to enable it all to work well.


The Introduction explains the setting clearly. The date is 2300AD, as in but 300 years into the future, human beings have left Earth and colonised some 20-odd habitable plants in other solar systems... and the single SF element is the faster-than-light 'Stutterwarp' drive that got them there. Earth nation-states still exist, so colonies regard themselves as being French or Australian or... rather than 'of Earth', although some large corporations and other groups wield as much clout as nation-states. Five alien races have been encountered, with varying levels of hostility. Although now core Traveller rules are being used, this is NOT Traveller per se, it is more realistic, probably a bit more gritty - and yet it's still a game of adventure and exploration.


The first chapter, Background, covers the history that got us to 2300AD. It's not quite the same as the original 2300AD game, but it is pretty close. Starting at the year 2000, it appears things went from bad to worse, with 2000-2089 being regarded as Twilight, a time little understood, not least because of widescale destruction of records during (perhaps because of) a nuclear war the origins of which have been lost. This caused considerable damage to much of Europe, Russia, North America, China and India, though France somehow managed to remain relatively unscathed. The war was followed by further devastation from several pandemics, possibly caused by bio-weapons. Eventually France started taking an interest in space travel and slowly some semblance of civilisation returned... leading to renewed scientific endeavour and a new age of exploration. Of course this wasn't completely peaceful and reading about the various squabbles shows how the current state of affairs developed.


Next, Core Worlds introduces the sort of life to be lived on the core worlds of Earth and Tirane (in the Alpha Centuri system), but which can also be found the more advanced urban areas of long-settled colony worlds. Life can be luxurious, at least if you're a knowledge worker, but far too many are unemployed and scrabbling for anything that they can get. There's a surveillance culture that many from outside find oppressive and restrictive, the payback being security and convenience. There's a lot of cultural homogeneity - one of the reasons many people decide they want to move on out to the stars. This overview leads into a more detailed look at Earth, the rest of this solar system, and Tirane.


Then comes a chapter Frontier Worlds, which provides similar information on what life is like out in the colonies, and details what they are like. One interesting feature is Planetary Adaptation Syndrome: human beings are designed for Earth and even the most Earth-like world just isn't the same. You have to adapt to live there and it may not be easy, even with DNA theraphy and drugs to assist. This is a good place for a discussion of disease, as people do not have natural defences against the bugs on a new planet either. There's a good overview of all the current colonies, so read through and decide where you want to visit first... or maybe even settle. Plaetary Adaptation Syndrome means that most people do not flit from world to world all the time, a key difference from mainstream Traveller.


The final part of the setting information is a chapter on Foundations, Corporations and Terrorists. Not everything revolves around nation-states, so here we meet some of the other major players, with plenty of detail and examples. Characters might end up working for one such entity, or opposed to it... they are certainly likely to interact in some way if only by purchasing a corporation's products or hearing about the latest terrorist outrage on the news.


Then we get into rules territory, with a chapter detailing Character Generation. It is similar to the system presented in the core Traveller rulebook (which you need to possess to play this particular game line) but with differences based on this setting, so read through carefully as you decide on what your character will be. Again, wonderfully-detailed characters result, complete with the outline of a backstory to explain how they reached their current state as you start play - it's quite a distraction, you want to sit creating characters instead of getting on with reading the rest of the book!


This is followed by Alien Races. Most of this is quite general and could be regarded as what a well-educated human being might know about them. The implication is, however, that aliens will be NPCs, so the Referee may choose to restrict access to this material. No rules for creating alien characters are provided.


Next comes Cybernetics and DNA Modifications. Herein you will find all the rules you need to allow characters to take advantage of these augmentations. Beware, most places in the Core Worlds don't like people who have had their DNA changed! Material here provides for a fairly 'low-cyber' style of game. If you want more, try Mongoose Traveller Supplement 8: Cybernetics - the advantage of sharing a common ruleset! The really interesting bit is the discussion of DNA modification, a new introduction to the ruleset.


Then we move on to the Science and Technology chapter, which covers the current state of play in the biological sciences, computers and information security, mechanical telepathy (this sounds... interesting) and transportation. Robots and drones and materials science are alos mentioned. Then we get a bit more practical with chapters of Equipment, Weapons and Armour, Robots and Drones, a spot of Cortex Hacking, and Vehicles.


Next we move on to Starship Design - the concepts and rules - followed by Starships, Spacecraft and Space Stations (loads of examples), Space Travel and Space Combat and finally Starship Encounters. Loads of information, all honed to this setting yet fitting in to the underlying ruleset. We then turn to NPCs and Animals, with plenty of samples of both.


Finally, there's the 2300AD Referee's Guide. This provides additional guidelines and a wealth of ideas about the sort of campaigns that you can run - exploration, trade, combat (ground or space), or maybe you fancy a party of troubleshooters or an anti-terrorist spin on things. There's also an extensive list of sources you might use for inspiration: fiction, films, TV shows and more. There's a calendar for the year 2300AD, and the Near Star List used to set up space for this game. Interestingly, it's the original 1988 one used in Traveller 2300 - it maintains the flavour of the setting better than contemporary knowledge of what's out there!


Overall this is a masterful blending of a very original setting with an established ruleset and - with the good range of supplements available - makes for some interesting gaming.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
2300AD Core Rulebook Revised
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Traveller Core Rulebook
by Shane M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/13/2016 15:11:48

An improvement on the 1st edition book, a lot of stuff that used to slow the game down or make it feel it bit odd has been removed or streamlined, making for a faster simpler game, yet with just as much depth as the old Traveller.


Skills have some minor tweaks with major relevance to game play (e.g. Athletics).
Skill checking using Target Numbers rather than 8 all the time, and Boons and Banes bring this edition right up to date with some of the other games I currently play, but these changes feel natural to the system, and great to see a more integrated system across personal, vehicle and space combat.


Things I used to have culled from various supplements and published adventrures to help me run a campaign has been brought in, and cleared up, such as medkits, healing, kit, and computers, although there are no living traveller rules, which I use in our campaign.


The PDf works well across platforms including iPad (tried and tested in a gaming session).


Already got the print version on order. Highly recommended.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Traveller Core Rulebook
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Traveller Core Rulebook
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/04/2016 12:22:15

I'm still going through the rules, but I am excited to play the new version. Everything that needed to be simplified is done so in a way that keeps to a common, understandable methodology. This makes it easier to run and for new players to pick-up.


One gripe. No ship construction rules at all, which I believe will be part of the High Guard supplement. I think this is a significant failing for a core rulebook. To me, it's like removing the magic section from the D&D Core Rulebook. Not everything needs to be in there, but there should have been at least basic guidelines to tweaking the ships provided in the book. It's really not worth transitioning or starting a new campaign until that supplement is released. Because of that, I can't recomend picking up this version to someone who only wants (or can afford) to purchase the main rulebook.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Marches Adventure 1: High and Dry
by Marius F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/28/2016 07:57:14

Nice starting adventure to give the players access to a ship with some quirks and history. I like that the advanture does not require any combat. I like that the book has a few neat maps of the locations in question to make it easier for the GM to explain the various situations. It is also a bonus that the adventure does not require any combat to complete. The main drawback is that much of the adventures events is based on the playing character always beeing out of luck or receiving the short end.



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[4 of 5 Stars!]
Marches Adventure 1: High and Dry
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Reach Adventure 1: Marooned on Marduk
by Marius F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/28/2016 07:54:56

Short adventure that can be included into any campaign and any remote location. I would like to have seen at least a few ready do use maps of the environment and the combat sceenes. Also would have been nice with a bit more information about the planet to make aftermat and follow up adventure easier.



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[4 of 5 Stars!]
Reach Adventure 1: Marooned on Marduk
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Traveller Core Rulebook
by Marius F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/28/2016 07:39:54

Nice book with very clear explanations of the system.


Drawbacks:



  • No setting information

  • No infromation about configuring a ship, feels like must have information to play the gam.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Traveller Core Rulebook
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Traveller Referee's Screen
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/28/2016 06:50:29

Overpriced and underwhelming!


This new edition of Traveller from Mongoose is great, gut thier referee screen disappoints. Too little substance for too much money. The product description says the document is 13 pages.


Here's a breakdown of the 13 pages:


Page 1: The cover - It has a table of contents (yes for 13 pages)
Pagse 2-5 Reference sheets from the new core rules
Pages 6-9: B/W art of the 4-panels
Pages 10-13 Color art of the 4-panels


I guess I misunderstood that 13 pages would be in addition to the screen art. I also wasnt expecting to get the screen art twice. The art is cool I'll give them that. But I was hoping for AT LEAST 13 pages of charts and tables from the core rules! Not 8-pages of the screen art.


I can't imagine paying $20 for the printed version anf the "discounted" pdf for $11.99 is not worth it either. Maybe $3.99.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Traveller Referee's Screen
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Deneb Sector
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/20/2016 23:24:53

Fantastic! Just like the paper copy I own! It is clear and clean and even looks good printed. Well worth the money spent.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Deneb Sector
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The Book of Encounters & Lairs
by Bruce L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/11/2016 16:46:15

Wow!!! This book lists 46 separate encounters, two of each monster type, one, "On the road," so to speak, and the other of the monster type in their lair. Note that the two encounters may feature a different type of the same creature from the, "On the road, encounter." The monsters featured are varied: Aboleth, Behir, Bugbear, Derro, Black, and White Dragons, to name just a few!


The encounters are labelled for "Encounter Level" (EL) which helps the DM make a decision, at a glance, whether a selected encounter is of the correct level. There are also guidelines for scaling the encounters to a different EL. The encounters offer tactics, maps for each encounter area, with descriptions on how the monsters will approach the PC's. Each encounter consists of two, or more, pages of description. The second, Lair encounter, features the same family of monster, though not always the same monster in particular. For example the wilderness encounter, for the two Dragon entries, concerns a (named) Black Dragon, while the Dragon Lair encounter, concerns a mated pair of White Dragons. The lair encounters are given the same level of details regading the monsters habits, how they will react, etc. The White Dragons' lair, for example, features a frozen larder, complete with subtle clues as to what the PC's will encounter when they penetrate deeper into the Pair's lair!


At the end of the book, there are Encounter Charts: "These charts will provide a Games Master with all the information needed to determine just exactly what it is the party encounter, how many of them there are and scale it all according to the level of experience the group represents." Now this, is fantastically useful to the DM!


The final chapter, "Help for the Games Masters," is quite useful, It offers direct instructions for the DM. Here is a line which captures the sense of this final chapter, "The gaming gloves are off here; this is just you and me, talking about encounters and gaming from the perspective of how to run a better, more believable game." It consists of seven tips, with lengthy discussions, on how to improve your game -- both for you, and your players. Overall, this book is quite well done, in all aspects. I look forward to using it in my own games! Cheers!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Book of Encounters & Lairs
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Traveller Core Rulebook
by sam w. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/04/2016 09:15:20

An improvement in evert way from MGT1. Mechanics are completely cleaned up, the book layout and art brings in into the 21st century, and previously the "boring & long" space combat has been updated significantly.


I'd like to point out the sole item that people seem concerned about, starship construction rules being moved to the upcoming High Guard book (within a month or two), makes perfect sense and I view it as a positive change. I had never previously created a ship with just the core 1st edition traveller, due to ammendments and changes published in High Guard. In 2nd edition, they avoid this mistake by ensuring a full set of complete and verified construction rules in the book dedicated to such, rather than splitting them over two books.


For a more complete review, please see:
htt-
p://www.rpg.net/reviews/archive/16/16668.phtml


This product is absolutely worth your time and money.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Traveller Core Rulebook
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Traveller Core Rulebook
by Edwin A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/01/2016 14:54:16

OK I read pretty much all of this, and it hasn't changed that much from 1.0. It's a cleanup, and there are some good rules added, but it's not fundamentally very different. I think pretty much everything (Mongoose) will be compatible with it.


In short, if you don't own Traveller, this is the book to buy. If you do own Mongoose 1.0 you probably don't need this unless you're running a campaign, and if you are, you probably will be enticed by something below. I'm looking forward to the other books and will definitely buy them.


caveat: I could be wrong about any of this, it's from memory.


New rules:
damage from Falling/gravity heat/cold poisons, vacuum, radiation, etc. (LOTS on radiation)
power requirements for ship systems
ship critical hits, which may impact power requirements
different repair rules (better engineer rolls use less spare parts, which are expensive)
specific grapple rules
Trade table is flattened. easier to make some money, but harder to score huge
Passenger revenue is more varied and more profitable and therefore more attractive.
Modernization overall (computers don't take huge amounts of space. cooler tech)
Sensor rules are better defined and more interesting
There's an included subsector (setting) which may be interesting, I didn't read it in detail
More interesting non-weapon things to do in ship combat (engineer actions/maneuvering/sensor jamming/etc.)
some of the skills have been rearranged and make more sense. (computers is now under electronics, for example.)
Pre-career education (university or military academy) is available.
Task chains are less swingy -> (can't give huge +/- to someone else by helping)
I think the man combat stuff added some options: parry/dive for cover/dodge, but don't quote me on it
ship maintenance costs now scale, can double-bunk.
Ship construction (see below) is more granular, and has more options.


Cons:
Ship construction is NOT included in this book, I had to extrapolate from some of the beta stuff and the ship examples, but the examples are playable. There are some neat ideas coming in future books based on the beta material (more updated computer and ship parts)
Added boon/bane (roll 3d6 and take highest/lowest two) which was unnecessary I think. I just adjust DM as needed.


things I have not read:
psionics (much)
character generation tables (looks pretty similar though)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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