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Jeremiah Roleplaying Game
by Ben S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/29/2016 17:05:30

I only watched a few episodes of this show, but I can tell this sourcebook seems to capture the feeling of the show well. It is an interesting and well thought out post apocalyptic world. At around $5, the price is great for the pdf.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Jeremiah Roleplaying Game
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Touch of Power: Core Rule Book 1
by Kerry H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/16/2016 20:50:12

Well that was a waste of $5.99, this book has absolutly nothing to do with Traveller (mechanics or settings wise) from what I can tell. It appears to be nothing but a poorly written fantasy heartbreaker, so I find it really odd that it's showing up under Mongoose's Traveller's Aid Society stuff.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Touch of Power: Core Rule Book 1
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Introducing.. Alicia Debeaux
by gundabhai j. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/06/2016 01:38:14

Wow what A Relief To watch this amazing book. Please help the community by making your reviews constructive and informative. Give reasons why you think this product is good or bad. Reviews which lack constructive elements may be deleted since they don't offer the community useful information.

If you feel that this product was poorly scanned, or had some other technical issue, please contact us and let us know about it so that we can resolve the issue.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Introducing.. Alicia Debeaux
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Traveller (French Language Edition)
by Damien T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/03/2016 22:35:23

Traduction de l'anglais vers le français bâclée, paragraphes manquants, et de nombreuses phrases dénuée de sens... un parfait exemple d'incompétence de la traductrice Sandrine THIRACHE à éviter à tout prix ou mieux écrivez à l'éditeur aprés avoir lu un exemplaire du livre et vous aussi râlez pour que ils corrigent ce livre qui mieux traduit serais un super livre à posséder en VF, sinon il vous restera la VO et le dictionnaire anglais/français !



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Traveller (French Language Edition)
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Traveller Core Rulebook
by Bruce O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/17/2016 13:23:32

First i need to establish some bona fides. I have been playing Traveller since 1980. This is a great iteration of the game. It covers basic combat, vehicle combat, and ship combat. All the careers from the original are in there, including most from Citizens of the Imperium. World Building basics are in. The only thing missing from the original Little Black Books is Starship design. Gone are the complexities of some versions. This edition goes back to the original 2d6+skill, and adds a stat bonus. The digital version comes with an easy to read "printable version" which removes the art and saves memory. Overall i am loving it! And nobody dies in character generation.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Traveller Core Rulebook
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Traveller Core Rulebook
by stephanie m. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/09/2016 10:20:02

Really disappointed. I was an early adopter to the beta PDF. We were offered $20 off the final product (essentially pay half up front) and what we got was a poorly printed POD version on poor paper which caused colour fade and leakage. It also had a curved cover with heat/moisture wavy pages.

Turns out there's another version with the amendments at Mongoose. A print run with better paper for the same price. We werent told about this individually, the owner mentioned this on the forums (which i dont frequent) and after he'd taken the money. The first I knew of all this was when my inferior copy turned up in the post.

I feel ripped off and wont be buying mongoose stuff ever again.

If you really want this edition, DON'T buy it here. Go get the proper version for the same money at the publisher's website.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Reach Adventure 1: Marooned on Marduk
by Che W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/28/2016 09:06:53

This is the very definition of an adventure on rails. While there are some interesting characters and a nice one-page map / stats for a shuttle, the adventure is presented like the outline of a novel. The product could be enhanced by having some meaningful choices given to the players. It cries out for a local area map with locations to explore and a range of possible solutions to the situation set up. To run, the Referee will undoubtedly want to use the core ideas but flesh out at least a small part of the described world in more detail.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Reach Adventure 1: Marooned on Marduk
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The Bronze Case
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/12/2016 22:55:39

This is a fun little romp through a backwater planet, where the player characters are caught up in a situation where their good samaritan actions put them smack dab in the middle of a criminal underworld war, and some industrial espionage dirty tricks. The Bronze Case is presented as an "aside": the PC's ship is undergoing maintenance for a bit, and one thing leads to another, and they're helping a beautiful secret agent courier the epynomous bronze case to an undisclosed destination. Gangsters. Spies. Corrupt Cops. Car Chases. Road trip!

The Good: the adventure is very come-as-you-are. There's no major plot rails here. If the PCs mess up, they mess up and they might have some explaining to do to the local constables, but they're Travellers, and they'll leave the port on their starship soon enough. If they are more successful, they'll have made friends with some corporate espionage assets. The NPCs are statted-up using the new Mongoose Traveller 2nd Edition rules, and are given some basic personalities. The GM is given some tips on running car chases using the aforementioned rules. There are some fun little encounters to run, and some low-powered combats to fight, all with some pretty solid worldbuilding context.

The Not So Good: The Bronze Case is very come-as-you-are. If the PCs do not buy in and be good samaritans, rather than amoral murder-hobos, there is no adventure. There are ways to address this problem, but nothing is mentioned in the write-up. There are a couple of places in the adventure where there's a little bit of railroading, but it's all in good fun, and can be avoided, with a bit of GMing. As well, there are plenty of adventure hooks to thread by the end of the adventure, but nothing is brought up: by the adventure's end, there could be a criminal organization with off-world ties that has it in for the PCs. And the industrial espionage angle is not followed up either. Lots of adventures can be spun off of the Bronze Case, but there are no follow up scenarios suggested.

Fixing the buy-in: Instead of having the players choose to be good samaritans in order to run the Bronze Case, the PCs might already have the main NPC friend in the adventure as a contact in their list. This way, they're doing this contact a very big favour, and have motivation to go on the adventure. Most PCs will not have all their contacts named and fleshed out. This is a great opportunity to introduce a new contact for a player whose character hasn't been able to leverage their contacts into an adventure, or an asset yet.

I'd also suggest fleshing out the highly corrupt, yet very in-your-face security forces and criminals on the planet in question. There are plenty of good RP opportunities that are glossed over between the PCs and a variety of shady characters, and possibly including an NPC police detective tasked with handling/containing the PCs and their adventure would make for another interesting layer for this adventure.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Bronze Case
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OGL Steampunk
by Mark L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/09/2016 15:28:34

I took advantage of a price reduction on this title since I'm working on adding some steampunk technology to a game in a fantasy setting.

The information provided is extensive, filling up a 300+ page book with a variety of characters, options, mechs and such to keep any fan of the theme happy while creating and designing various PCs and equipment for a campaign. The contents are well organized and easy to understand.

The only thing that disappointed me was an issue with the geration of the pdf that appears to have prevented many of the graphics from being included on the pages. Large sections of some pages are blank, outlined by text in a way that the reader can tell some type of graphic is intended to be placed there. The missing graphics don't detract from the information provided, but I'd be interested to see the images that are missing, if only to support the descriptions outlining those areas.

The ideas presented in the book will be handy in adding steampunk elements to any existing setting in addition to setting up and running a game solely based on the contents.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
OGL Steampunk
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Legend
by James L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/09/2016 10:28:47

For $1 it's hard to go wrong with this! I also commend Mongoose for publishing this under the OGL, it has allowed for other BRP-based games such as the new Delta Green. While this volume doesn't include any monsters, it could certainly be used for human-centric/exclusive games, and would work well for Game of Thrones. While I'm not the biggest fan of hit locations, it does add some grit to combat, which again could be used very well for low-fantasy and very deadly games.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Legend
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Traveller Core Rulebook
by Fabian S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/20/2016 03:59:41

Traveller is definitely the best game at the things it tries to do. This edition of Mongoose's streamlined and accessible variant is no different. However, leaving out ship construction rules, one the THE most important elements for anyone trying to make the universe their own is an unforgivable mistake. Although I absolutely love the look and feel of this iteration and the rules have received some very welcome improvements, I cannot in good conscience recommend this for players with a similar use case as mine - namely play in a setting that is not the standard Traveller one.

I recommend picking up the first edition, which has fully featured starship construction rules.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Traveller Core Rulebook
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Traveller Core Rulebook
by Brandon O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/01/2016 12:20:35

Bottom Line Up Front: Good game, but only for a certain kind of gamer. Needs an experienced GM. Has some usability issues from a production standpoint, but nothing deal-breaking.

I noticed that most of the reviews here were comparing this book to the previous edition of Traveller, and I wanted to give a review more aimed at gamers who are looking at getting into a new system, and how Traveller stacks up to comparable RPGs by other companies.

1. Characters: First off, the character creation is very complicated, but, since it is very specifically stated that it is meant to be carried out with the group, as part of the game itself, and not as pre-game prep work, I am not docking points for that. It seems like character creation would actually be quite fun to play through, rather than just an excercise in mutual homework. On the flip side, however, the career path system is very dice dependent. Access to professions, injuries, and what skills you learn are all dependant on dice rolls. This is great if you are trying to grow a character organically, but it means that it is very hard to build to a concept, as your aspiring doctor may flunk out of school, get arrested, and end up as a streetwise fence. This can also result in some characters being much more capable than others, with one player ending up as an ex-conscript with the shirt on his back and a bad leg, and the other could be a renaissance woman, with multiple successful careers behind her, a network of contacts accross the sector, and equipped with the finest of gear. Characters also don't advance with experience or levels, learning new skills is purely a function of time (and dice rolls).

2. Game Rules: Gameplay seems smooth, with the primary mechanic being roll 2d6. This is somewhat less random than the d20 system, but more than the White Wolf/Shadowrun roll for success on X many dice. Checks are very skill dependent, with your stats rarely providing more than +/- 1. This means that your character will tend to be good at fairly specific things, rather than having general areas of competence, but it also means you can have left-field skills, as your dumb thug can pick up enough ranks to become quite good at working on his car. On the fly modifiers are handled with a boon/bane system (roll 3d6, pick the best/worst 2), which cuts down on a lot of the mid-conflict math, but loses granularity for saying some circumstance is very/just a little (un)helpful. The skill system also includes some very handy rules, like linked skill checks for non-combat challenges and time bands for rushing/taking your time with a job. On the other hand, the equipment tables have a lot of redundant entries (ie, something with a better version that is just a little more expensive/higher tech). The computer equipment has an interesting rule about buying lower/higher tech versions, and similar rules should be created for other equipment.

3. Gamesmaster: For the GM, Traveller is quite a challenge. No exp or levels means no Challenge or Threat Ratings, meaning you have to eyeball everything you throw at your players without guidelines. For non-combat encounters, the static task difficulties help, but the highly random charecter creation means that what may be easy for one character is very hard for another. The relative lack of charatcer growth does mean, however, that once your have got a sense of what your players can handle it will only change slowly, if at all. Stats for NPCs and Worlds are presented as just strings of characters. If your players ever catch you flatfooted, you will not be able to just give them a monster or world straight out of the book, you will have to sit down and break down the numbers into a useful form. On the upside, Traveller does include a very nice ruleset for creating an entire space sector, complete with trade routes and politics in just a couple of hours (less as you get better with it), and its animal behavior tags are a really nice touch for adding some realism to wildlife encounters. It also includes a very interesting system for modelling supply and demand throughout a sector for (complete with instructions to kick back and let the players drive the pace as they use these rules to scour the sector for profits!) The book is pretty light on setting information, but inference and deduction from comments scattered throughout the book will give you enough to play within their world (if not to be a major part of it). The book also includes a sample sector which, while not ready to play out of the box, does give you a pretty good headstart for building your own adventures.

4. The Product: From a production standpoint, the game has numerous small issues. Typos are scattered throughout the book. Never common enough that it looks amateurish, they are noticeable. There is no index, and the table of contents is very sparse, although the PDF does include a more comprehensive set of bookmarks. On the other hand, there are no links in the document itself, and there are numerous layout choices that only make sense in the physical product (charts being on the opposite page from their rules, larger charts printed sideways). Finally, the order of the the different sections is very poor. Weapon qualities are not near the weapons table, they are buried in the combat section. Rules for space encounters, space missions, and asteroid mining aren't in the encounters or missions section, they are in between the stats for vehicles and the stats for spacecraft. Numerous similar placement choices make this book very hard to use a reference guide (although it does read quite smoothly just going from cover to cover). Reference would be especially difficult in the physcial form due to the aforementioned spartan table of contents/non existent index (The PDF bookmarks and Ctrl-F help a lot). The purchase here (DriveThruRPG.com, Apr 2016) also includes a number of peripherals, including a fillable PDF charcter sheet, but the sheet is buggy, with certain boxes being linked together (ie Filling in Weapon #1's weight will also put that value for Armour #1's weight, and vice versa). A Google search can find you fixed versions, but still it is a little disappointing.

5. Conclusion: In conclusion, Traveller is a system with a very specific appeal. If you are an experienced group of gamers, looking for a hands-off, "let's see where this goes," episodic experience you could do a lot worse than Traveller. You will have a great ride as you watch your character evolve through creation, and then take that character to explore and trade in a space that is filled with colourful, varied worlds, trying to keep up with the mortgage payments on your ship (or stay one hop ahead of the space repo-men!). If, however, you are new to RPGs, like to play specific characters, or looking for a sense of growth from your character, I suggest you look elsewhere. If you are a GM, you might want to pick this up on sale, just to plunder some of the rules/concepts like the sector generation system, and use those in other games. The product here could also use another sweep through Quality Control, just to clear out some of the bugs.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
2300AD: Atlas of the French Arm
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/28/2016 13:28:06

In the French Arm, you'll find the oldest, richest colonies, many of big enough and strong enough to survive as nations in their own right. Here is a mammoth work, atlas and gazetteer and source of many an adventure idea, to fuel your party's explorations and adventures here.

Exploring the French Arm, the first chapter, gives an overview of the history and current state of affairs. It all paints a picture of a living dynamic area, with various tensions and problems arising, being resolved or then fading away again, layering to create the present-day situation. It also shows how the use of languages has followed, with both French and English being useful for the would-be spacefarer.

This follows on naturally into the next section, Conflict on the French Arm. To start with, things were peaceful with exploration rather than conflict occupying people's minds, but of late things have become more contentious. Many conflicts have their origin in squabbles back on Earth that have spilled over to space, with colonies perpetuating the differences begun on Earth and indeed sometimes acting as their proxies. There have also been minor skirmishes as different factions and groups have butted heads. Most recently, however, the source of conflict has come to the Arm with the ever-mounting threat posed by the Kaefers.

Next is a chapter on Organisations, those extra-governmental entities that have a profound effect along the French Arm, influencing policies and decision making across over a dozen systems and countless worlds. Many are commercial in nature, massive corporations that rival governments in scope and influence. Some are 'private security companies' - mercenaries for hire, in other words. There are also those organisations lumped together under the term 'foundations' being any non-governmental, non-commercial group. Several dedicate themselves to 'pure science' or so the PR goes, although they're not backwards in monetising their discoveries. And of course there are terrorists, outlaws and organised crime, pushing their 'cause' or merely lining their own pockets at everyone else's expense. In some way, most of these will impact on anyone visiting the French Arm - suppliers, employers, enemies or allies... or just names in a news bulletin.

Then comes a chapter entitled Libertines. These are the folk who occupy a niche on the spacelanes equivalent to where Romany or Gypsies or Travellers fit in on Earth. It's a fascinating web of relationships and concepts, wrapped up and living in space, roving the French Arm although they are actually more prevalent in the Chinese Arm. Families are at the core of their culture, with ships crewed and run by extended families, some of whom we meet here. In similar vein the next chapter deals with the Belters, those fiercely independent souls who mine asteroid belts for whatever valuable materials they can find.

Next we hear of Mysteries of the French Arm. The tall tales you hear in spacer bars. Strange ruins predating exploration. Unidentified alien objects, some being actual artefacts, others glimpses in the distance... and this leads neatly in to a chapter on Intelligent Life, there being at least three known non-human intelligent races to be found in the French Arm - the Pentapods, the Kaefers and the Arbors.

Scene now set we move on to the Atlas proper. In the fairly large volume of space there are but twelve inhabited colony worlds, with many systems lacking really habitable worlds although many sport outposts. There's a quite lengthy discourse on 'planetology', the science of describing star systems, showing what the various descriptors applied in the Atlas to follow mean. First up, however, are the Outposts - small settlements that are not fully-fledged colonies in their own right but which serve as way-stations on the route to someplace else or which have other purposes.

The listing of outposts is followed by a chapter on Colonies, which introduces the twelve colony worlds. They then get a chapter apiece, with all the information you need to understand what they'd be like to visit in the course of your adventures. For each, there is system data, notes on each planet and the settlements upon them, then the history, native wildlife and more about the mainworld that is the colony itself. Maps, weather charts, a wealth of detail to enable your party to visit or even settle there.

This raises the question: is this a book for all players or the referee alone? The answer is, probably a bit of both. Most of the information here could be researched by an interested character, some at least will be covered in a normal education or is the sort of thing you pick up if you pay attention to documentaries and travel shows. It's possibly best to restrict access a bit, but when direct enquiries are made be open about the information that answers that enquiry... but no more. Make players work for the information, but provide it when they do.

Finally there is a chapter called Exploratory Worlds. This provides details of just a few of the worlds that have charted but barely visited yet - ideal for a game in which exploration of new worlds is to be a feature. There's enough here to get you started and plenty of scope to develop them however you wish.

In short, this is a massive and excellent resource for anyone planning games set in the French Arm. It makes you want to take ship and visit forthwith...



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
2300AD: Atlas of the French Arm
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2300AD: Ships of the French Arm
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/26/2016 10:02:04

The idea of this book is to enable you to populate the spacelanes and starports of the French Arm with an array of different ships which the party might interact with in some way during their adventures. Perhaps it is just a stray blip on a sensor screen or someone parked on a neighbouring pad, or they may get the chance to visit (voluntarily or otherwise) - hence deckplans are included - or maybe even serve aboard for a while. It's all part of the rich diversity of life that this game presents, making it appear 'real' - after all, not every ship you'd be likely to see is going to be the same, no more than every car you see on the road is identical to the rest! It is estimated that there are about 12,000 spacecraft in the French Arm, of which some 2,500 are actual starships capable of travelling between systems. Few, however, are in private hands, most belong to governments, companies or other organisations.

First, though, there is a chapter on Starship Operations. The design system used here is slightly different from that in the 2300AD core rules, in particular reaction drive systems and interface travel have been altered which has brought about changes to the time it takes a given craft to reach orbit from the planetary surfce, so new tables are presented so that you can calculate timings. There are also notes on ortillery fire, fuel costs and the way in which ship data is presented in the rest of the book, with an explanation of terms used.

The following chapters provide a range of example ships in considerable detail that really makes them seem real. First off are Interface Vessels and Small Craft, followed by Drop Pods, Lifeboats and Life Pods, Military Starships, Civilian Starships, Commercial Ships, Liners, Couriet Ships, Mining and Survey Ships, Robots, Missiles and Drones, Surface Probes and finally Unknown Vessels. Each vessel comes with background notes, exterior view sketch, full statistics and deckplans, so whatever your needs, it's likely that you will find something appropriate here.

The 'Unknown Vessels' section is a little different. Here, three distinct yet unidentified vessels are described in terms of sensor readings, observations and the tall tales told in spacer bars. Make of them what you may, or leave them as something mysterious that the party might spot in their travels...

Overall, this is a useful book to have to hand to make the spacelanes of the French Arm come to life in your game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
2300AD: Ships of the French Arm
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2300AD: Libreville - Corruption in the Core Worlds
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/25/2016 13:37:28

Libreville is an Earth city that will be familiar to anyone with thoughts of leaving the planet - it's the base of the Beanstalk and has several spaceports nearby, as well as being a major shipping centre and port for Earth water-based transportation. Just about every corporation and foundation has offices there as well, but whilst this massive city has areas of great wealth there are also some appalling slums. This book is both a sourcebook for Libreville and its surroundings and a full-blown adventure. There are also sample vehicles, spaceships, robots, non-players and random encounters relevant to Libreville which you can use whenever your plot takes the party there.

The first chapter, History, contains just that, the story of how Libreville came to occupy the prominance it has today. Africa survived the wars of the 21st century relatively unscathed, but without the steady stream of aid from the West many nations struggled until South Africa - now under the name Azania - and Mozambique began to flourish and France started taking an interest and brought many former colonies back into its sphere of influence. This included Gabon, in which Libraville is to be found, which is now a full department of Metropolitan France, represented in the French Chamber of Deputies and with all citizens being considered as French.

This is followed by a chapter on Geography, including maps, weather patterns and notes on wildlife (including game stats, should your party wish to mix it with a hippo or an elephant). There are also some details of police equipment and vehicles - now, are the Gendarmes Gabonaise more or less scary than a hippo? Maybe your party will find out!

We then move on to Life in the City. French public relations firms describe Libreville as a Xanadu on the Atlantic, but it's not quite as idyllic as this might suggest. It is a place of extremes, with the abject poverty of the 'Mudville' slums contrasting with enclaves run as gated compounds by corporations for their employees and the central business district where their offices and the residences of the truly wealthy are to be found. There's a map and description, along with some sample spaceplanes and aircraft to be found in the ports outside the city. There's even a sample bus from the city streets, a taxi and a dustcart - familiar sights to any resident or visitor. There's material about surveillance and advertising, common trends and fashions, all manner of little details that will help you bring the place to life. Ideas for encounters and even more detail of what's to be found downtown and in corporate enclaves add to this information, and Mudville life is covered as well.

An added dimension comes from the final two 'sourcebook' chapters: Politics and Power, and Personalities. Here we learn how Libreville is governed, administered and policed, as well as about the major corporate players. There are also foundations and other non-commercial enterprises and of course criminal gangs, organised crime and other less desirable groups. The Personalities chapter presents a host of notable individuals which the party will hear about on the news, even if they never get to meet them... but plenty of ideas are provided to embroil the party in their affairs.

Finally comes the adventure, Mud Sticks. Violence in Mudville is on the rise and the party is hired to investigate. The whole thing hangs together well although it's admittedly rather linear, chasing from clue to clue. You might want to mix things up a bit if you feel it railroads the characters excessively. There's a lot here, loads of people to talk to and the odd opportunity to brawl, although this is the sort of urban adventure where brawling tends to be frowned upon, although infiltration skills will come into play.

Everything is very atmospheric, you can almost feel the African sun and smell the jungle (and urban) smells. Groups which like urban intrigues will find this an interesting place in which to become involved, and anyone leaving (or arriving) on Earth is likely to at least pass through. Make this sprawling city a vivid feature of your game, you now have the tools to make it so.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
2300AD: Libreville - Corruption in the Core Worlds
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