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Fifth Edition Options
by George W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/12/2016 01:44:52

Thoroughly impressed! I wasn't sure what to expect based on the other reviews, but I have to say that this is well worth the $9.99 I paid for it. I would even dare to say that the original $19.99 price is on the mark for the amount optional rules and exemplary details for new and aspiring DM's like myself. First off, there are some great alternate rules for character creation, ability scores, taking a really cool random personality disadvantage to get a bonus feat at level 1, and old school multi-classing rules for double and triple multi-classes, complete with their own XP tables. Reminds me of old school 1st edition D&D Fighter/Mage/Thief and Cleric/Fighter type characters -- simple and a very cool option for creative players!


Then it goes into a massively detailed section of how to best utilize each of the basic game skills in very creative and detailed ways. For example, there are specific rules for using Acrobatics to navigate through a battlefield or for tightrope walking, Athletics to climb walls, grab and save falling characters, or to swim effectively. There's a great section on using deception to seduce NPC's or disguise yourself. The list goes on and on. But my favorite has to be the section on how to use Survival to cover your tracks, move faster, track enemies, and determine direction. I was also very impressed with the rules for using persuasion to haggle, and there's even VERY detailed rules on how to use Animal Handling to train wild animals, dogs, and even magical beasts to perform tasks and fight for you. Oh, and they even explain how to use multiple skill checks to determine degrees of successes or failure for very complex situations. All of it was VERY useful stuff that was previously undefined by the core 5e content and rulebooks.


There are a lot of really cool rules and options for things like deadlier crossbows, simplified ammunition, crafting, double weapons, poisons, rolling for HP, alternate vitality and wounds, confused enemies, blind fighting, alternate initiative rules, variant combat options, rules like dirty fighting and leaping on a larger enemy, additional daily spell slots based on the primary stat, fear checks based on enemy types, better inspiration, and an entire new way of viewing alignment.


Overall, there is ALOT your everyday DM can beneit from here, as well as the everyday player (assuming the DM approves). If you're a new DM, then you absolutely need this document. If you're been DMing for a few years, you probabaly already have a system, so this will be a good suppliment/reference. The bottom line is this. If you already have all the answers, then move on. If you're open to new ideas and change, then definitely download this. If nothing else, it will give you a ton of RPG ideas based on the basic character skills.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fifth Edition Options
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Fifth Edition Options
by Roman B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/04/2016 02:11:41

I purchased this at $10 and wouldn't consider buying it at more. One of the previous reviewers wrote that it would be more appropriately valued at less than $5 and I agree with that. However, there is a lot here to inspire some decent level of play. I'm a relatively new GM and player only having started playing with 5E, and have received a lot of inspiration from the options presented here. While I wouldn't use everything here, I really enjoyed knowing different ways to tweak the options. While not having played Pathfinder or earlier editions of D&D, I understand those are more complicated and rules based, yet my problem with 5E is that there are too few rules, and I find much of 5E to be as nebulous as Fate. I enjoyed these options immensely and look forward to implementing at least a few of these options. Personal favourites were the Wound system, and DR for armour, along with the change to how AC is calculated.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Fifth Edition Options
by Jimmy P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/01/2016 13:37:38

I am fairly underwhelmed by this product.


The product contains rules that are sometimes a direct import from 3rd edition rules. This is the main thing that bugs me about it. If this book was advertised as a way to use 3rd edition rules within 5th edition, that would have been fair advertisement - and I would have probably steered clear from it as I find 3rd edition rules to be cumbersome compared to 5th edition.


The skills section attempts to put an actual difficulty rating on many actions that could be attempted with skills. While this may be useful for a beginning DM, the experienced one would not really use this section - it just slows things down to look at charts during play. It still can provide the DM of any level with interesting new ways to look at what skills can do.


This product introduces character flaws. This is an interesting section, even if only 33 flaws are included here. I would have wanted more, but what we have is decent.


The look is decent if not great. The layout appears a bit amateurish to my taste. The art contained is sometimes good, sometimes bad, but overall is not consistent.


Overall, this product is of inconsistent quality and with a rather high price tag - 9$ for 79 pages - I am not happy with my purchase. In comparison, for 10$ more, I could have gotten a full game of high production value (like Werewolf: Forsaken or Gods of the Fall for Cypher system). This product would be more appropriately priced at 3-4$.


This is my second purchase with this game studio. I believe it will be my last. Unfortunately, it feels like the 3rd edition gold rush cash grab all over again.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Wardens of the Wild (PF/5e)
by Rob K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/26/2016 23:36:13

Wardens of the Wild contains options for both Pathfinder and Dungeons and Dragons 5e focusing on the Elves. It covers 6 elven races with paragon classes for each, 2 modified classes, new or collected class options from different existing supplements, and new spells for both editions. They cover lore for the race types as well as lore for the elves in general. I have not had a chance to test out any of the new options for balance in my own games yet but some of the new rules might have to be modified for my campaigns. It was nice to have the 5e rules in here as well, they don’t have as much material out there yet for player options outside of four books. A few of the options are duplicates from Pathfinder's Advanced Race Guide which has been out for a while. I have the pdf version right now but at some point will want to pick up the hard cover of this as well.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Wardens of the Wild (PF/5e)
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The Reaping Stone Deluxe Adventure
by Keith R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/12/2016 12:15:09

I'm running my group through this adventure.


There are several issues, and we just finished Part One.


1: No city map... at all not even a general layout.
2: Several of the encounts are described as X NPC starts at point A when the PCs enter the room. There is no mark for where that point A is. It isn't in the book or on the battle maps.
3: Partial failing on my part, but NPCs that can't be hurt by non-magical weapons (party is level TWO). What level two party is outfitted with magical weapons to counter that?
4: The sickness, all sense of urgency with the party kinda goes out the window, the ability damage can be restored with a Lesser Restoration. The full page description makes no mention that this can't be done.
5: No real information on the city so far, the name of a few taverns and nothing else. No population information, races, what kind of other information is there.


I'm sure there is more, and we start Part two today.
I'll update this review (if editing is allowed) after they get further through it.


I'm actually disappointed in this one, we are still going to play through it though, and see how part two goes.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
The Reaping Stone Deluxe Adventure
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Fifth Edition Feats (5e)
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/02/2016 08:43:35

I did not play the 3.5 edition of D&D, so I don't know how faithfully this product ports those feats to 5e. I agree with others that the fee (even at $8) is too high for the information provided. The product looks professional and it contains good ideas that can be used to develop 5e feats for use in your campaign, but I would consider perhaps 30% of the feats in the book to be usable as "plug-and-play" 5e feats. Some of the feats are too weak, others are too strong (too weak is more common). Also, some of the feats are variations on the 5e PHB feats that are slightly different, but not significant improvements.


3 stars because the book includes some good ideas and concepts that can be used to develop feats you might not have thought of on your own.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Fifth Edition Feats (5e)
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Publisher Reply:
For those concerned about the price, we generally sell 20 feats for $1.99, 30 feats for $2.99, etc. Consequently, a book with 160 feats is $15.99 in full color print, and only half that in PDF.
Fifth Edition Feats (5e)
by Kenneth D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/01/2016 12:50:41

Positives first. The cover art is truly beautiful and the material is well-presented within.


That aside, however, this is certainly NOT worth the money. There are very few, poorly balanced new feats within this book. Many others are slightly reworded variations of feats from earlier editions of the game. It brings nothing new to the game at all and is certainly not worth even the discounted cost of $8 for these 31 pages. Actually, it's 27 pages in VERY LARGE TYPE. Front and back cover, title page, and leagal document I do not count. The print is huge to disguise the lack of content on these few pages, and what content there is is worthless. You could easily go to a website like Tenkar's Tavern, spend a few minutes talking to folks in their forums, and find FREE resources more in-depth and valuable than this.


Save your money for other, more worthwhile purchases on this site, please.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Publisher Reply:
This review is correct in some respects but doesn\'t address the intent of the book. This title gives players looking for options they had in 3.5 a good way to get them with 5e mechanics. Also, some of the feats that were adapted from the core 5e game were done so they could be of use in other publisher\'s products via the OGL. As with anything, your mileage may vary.
Feats of Legend: 20 Celestial Feats
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/23/2016 05:03:45

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of the Feats of Legend-series clocks in at 9 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let's take a look!


The pdf begins with a handy table that sums prerequisites and feats for your convenience and then goes on to present the individual feats, so let's take a look!


-Angelic Reputation: An achievement feat, needs to have caused fear in evil outsiders; increases DC of fear spells and effect by +2 versus evil outsiders; also nets a massive +5 bonus to intimidate said foes. On the nitpicky side: "In addition, the duration of the shaken condition is increased by 1 round." is slightly less precise than I'd like it to be - it's obvious, this refers to demoralize, but RAW it extends to all shaken condition-causing effects.


-August general of Heaven: This story feat allows you to, as a swift action pronounce a challenge versus an evil outsider, gaining +1 to atk and AC. If the foe or you are attacked during this challenge, you take a -2 penalty to AC and atk for 1 round. This ability can be used at-ill, but only once in 24 hours versus a given foe. As an interesting goal, this feat requires you to defeat good outsiders in nonlethal challenges - which is pretty cool, though an actual number of HD and encounters you need to beat would have been nice. "an appropriate number" does not really help here. Upon making the goal, you get a celestial cohort with leadership score of +2 for determining the cohort's level. Apart from the minor hiccup, an evocative, interesting feat that is a great way to have good guys fight good creatures for once, without jeopardizing alignment.


-Blood of the Fold: +4 to Knowledge-checks to identify good or evil extraplanar creatures and entities; +6 if you have 10+ ranks in the appropriate knowledge skill. You can qualify for this via Eldritch Heritage and the celestial bloodline.


-Celestial Pushback: Evil creatures failing to save versus your channel energy are subject to Bull Rush, with CMB equal to cleric level + Cha-mod. This does sound very powerful, looks broken, but is actually less useful than you'd think: The good alignment means that the creature with this feat will be channeling positive energy, which makes this, via vanilla channeling, only useful versus undead...which seems appropriate. Granted, variant channeling still works, but the okay CMB-scaling still retains this as a feasible feat that's better crafted than you'd expect when first reading it. (Though low-power groups using variant channeling may want to be careful with it.)


-Choir of the Host: Cha-mod allies influenced by Inspire Greatness gain the ability to overcome, interestingly, DR/evil, making them more potent when fighting celestials....which, according to the feat's fluff, was NOT the intent - this should be able to grant the option to bypass DR/good. sigh


-Demon Hunter:1/day, gain +2 to a single attack, saving throw or SR-check versus a demon or known servant of such an entity. AT 10+ HD, this bonus scales up to +4. This is also a story-feat, though it is not properly tagged as such. To make the goal, you have to slay a named demon with HD equal to or greater than your own. The completion benefit is significant: Whenever you deal damage to a demon with a targeted spell or attack, you get a free demoralize attempt that ignores fear immunity. "targeted" should imho be replaces with "single target", since you can otherwise cause free action AoE demoralize attempts...potentially, depending on how you handle free action limitations per round. Other than that, a cool one.


-Dimming the Light: Gain +2 to saves versus Ex and Su abilities of good outsiders in addition to your favored enemy bonuses. Okay.


-Divine Aura: This feat, based on Alignment Channel (evil), adds demoralize to channel vs. evil outsiders; allows you to exchange four rounds of shaken for 1 round of frightened. Solid!


-Fiend Foe: +2 to atk vs. evil outsiders. Boring.


-Find the Conduit: Add +1/2 your level to all healing you dish out. Does not apply to items used/created.


-Fires of Heaven: Spells with the fire descriptor you cast ignore 5 points of fire resistance. Odd: Does not extend to SPs...particularly since the infernal feat applied the bonus to SPs.


-Friends in High Places: 1/day add the celestial template to any neutral or good-aligned creature on the Summon Monster spell list. Works interestingly with skeletons from Skeleton Summoner, if the creature is neutral or good.


-Heaven Sent: Requires having died before. Makes you immune to fear. Basically a reskin of the revenant-feat from the installment of Undead feats. Makes me sad that such a brief book features it.


-Heavenly Weapon: When activating the bane class ability, you receive an archon's aura of menace supernatural ability.


-Holy Warrior: If you wear your patron's symbol on armor or shield, you get +1 sacred bonus to AC (+2 if both armor and shield feature the symbol). Alternatively, you get +1 to atk when featuring the symbol on your weapon, +2 when using 2 such weapons. You either choose offensive or defensive options when taking this feat; you may take it twice to get both bonuses.


-Strengthened Aura: 1/day as an immediate action, make your Aura of Good class feature duplicate circle of protection against evil (Sic! - shouldn't that be Magic Circle against Evil?) for 1 round per level of the class that grants the aura of good.


-Strong-Willed: +4 to saves versus charm- and compulsion-effects.


-Sword of Heaven: +2 to damage versus evil outsiders. Any weapon you wield (including unarmed and natural attacks) is considered to be good aligned for purpose of overcoming DR. This does not overcome weapons with the evil descriptor and they remain evil. Can eb qualified for via Edlritch Heritage and celestial bloodline.


-Voice of Angels: While under the influence of your Inspire Courage, affected allies get +2 to intimidate checks and +2 to Will-saves versus evil outsiders and undead.


-Heavenly Mandate: When using inspire competence, he may force one target to tell the truth, duplicating basically a single-target zone of truth, that requires the target to hear him. Evocative and well-executed!


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting is much more refined than in the last book - while there are some hiccups here, they boil down to minor glitches. Layout adheres to a clean white background with blue headers. The full-color art of the angel on the cover is reproduced inside and is nice. The pdf comes fully bookmarked, which is nice to see.


Neal Litherland, Simon Muñoz and Brian Berg have crafted a collection of feats in this pdf that can definitely be considered high-concept. While, unfortunately, there are some glitches that detract from some of these feats, sometimes even on a rules-level, the matter of fact remains that there are some evocative pieces herein. While this pdf does offer some filler, it's not much. Better than the previous pdf, this is a nice, if not perfect collection. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 for the nice concepts and ideas herein.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Feats of Legend: 20 Celestial Feats
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Feats of Legend: 20 Undead Feats
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/16/2016 04:54:10

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of the Feats of Legend-series clocks in at 7 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 4 pages of content, so let's take a look!


This pdf begins with a handy table that sums up the feats with prereqs etc. and then dives straight into the feats, so what do they do?


-Boneyard Born: +1 DC for necromancy spells, +1 to all saves versus necromancy or death effects, can be qualified for via eldritch heritage and the undead bloodline. Odd, nonstandard formatting: A feat referred is italicized, something the pdf, confusingly continues to do.


-Dark Conduit: Adds your Con-mod to Cha-mod to determine the amount of healing you receive from any negative energy. I think this feat is a bit odd, to say the least - You don't add Cha-mod to healing. UNLESS you're talking about channel energy...but this feat extends to ALL types of negative energy, which includes spells and effects that do NOT add Cha-mod to the healing. Beyond the somewhat wonky 2-attributes-modifier to one effect (somewhat mitigated by the rarity of negative energy healed beings with both Cha and Con-score), the feat is odd and confusing, to say the least. Not gonna come near my table.


-Improved Dark Conduit: Resistance 5 vs. positive energy - quite cool, since we usually don't see the like.


-Greater Dark Conduit: Whenever you kill a creature, you gain fast healing 2 for Charisma modifier rounds. (Charisma is not properly capitalized, as an editing nitpick.) Subsequent killings reset the timer. NOt a fan, since this can be kitten-cheesed for infinite healing, when a generous daily cap, HDx2+Cha-mod, for example, would have prevented basically infinite healing.


-Deathless Determination: You gain Resist Level Drain and auto-remove them after 24 hours. The prereqs of an undead bloodline and Diehard justifies the power of this feat. (And yes, again, you can qualify for this via Eldritch Heritage.)


-False Unlife: +10 to Disguise to seem undead, but you detect as evil undead of your HD when seen via detect evil. Interesting!


-Grave-Touched: +4 to Fort-saves vs. poisons. Can be taken via aforementioned Eldritch Heritage/undead bloodline-combo.


-Improved Grave-Touched: +4 to Fort-saves versus diseases, save versus poisons increases to +6. Can be taken via aforementioned Eldritch Heritage/undead bloodline-combo...which is odd, since the alternate prereqs imply that just having Edlritch Bloodline and an undead bloodline allows for the bypassing of the previous, non-improved iteration of the feat. Here, the special-line actually detracts from the functionality of the feat, since simply basing it on the initial feat would have done the job sans ambiguity.


-Greater Grave-Touched: Save-bonus versus diseases changes to +6, you gain immunity to undead-spread diseases like mummy rot as well as immunity to poisons. Again, this ´can be taken via aforementioned Eldritch Heritage/undead bloodline-combo...which is odd, since the alternate prereqs imply that just having Edlritch Bloodline and an undead bloodline allows for the bypassing of the previous, non-greater iteration of the feat.


-Scholar of Undeath: +5 to all lore-checks to identify undead and their abilities. You also increase the DC of your channel energy, command or Turn Undead by +2...which is pretty brutal, considering how channel already is powerful and has a scaling DC. Still, worthwhile and nice.


-Improved Scholar of Undeath: The base-feat's bonus increases to +10 and the DC-increase to +3.


-Greater Scholar of Undeath: +2 to all saves versus Ex and SU abilities of undead and the DC-increase for channel et al. becomes +4. The whole feat-chain is interesting in concept, though I do consider the DC-increases rather massive. Personally, I consider the bonus extending beyond +2 to be too min-maxy - personally, I will add an Int-prereq to emphasize the scholar-angle the feats imply. (And, via MAD, decrease excess Channel-DC-stacking...)


-Hardened Flesh: Your AC is treated as +2 for the purpose of confirming critical hits and you gain DR 1/-.


-Improved Hardened Flesh: AC-bonus is treated as +4 instead for the critical hit confirmation. DR increases to DR 3/- - like these two feats!


-Necrotic Poisoner: Contact and injury poisons you manufacture can affect undead. NICE!


-Reckless Revenant: You are immune to fear effects...which would be a bit much for one feat...but the prerequisite requires you having risen from the dead...which is rather cool. Sold -even more so, since it takes breath of life into account.


-Redeemed: Gain healing by positive energy, but also be damaged by negative energy as though you were alive. Can't be combined with Dark Conduit. Nice one.


-Scent of the Grave: Favored enemy (undead) characters gain scent to detect undead.


-Tongues of the Dead: Gain Necril as a language as well as +2 to Bluff, Intimidate, Diplomacy and Sense Motive when dealing with intelligent undead. Situational and okay, but not too exciting.


-Touch of the Undead: This feat: "Allows undead you command or control to deliver touch spells for you." That's the whole crunch text of the feat. All right, I'll play: HOW? At what range? Do you have to transfer the touch held to the undead? As what action? Is there a maximum range? Can unintelligent undead hold charges? This feat is well-intentioned and flavorful, but horribly fails at its given task.


-Undead Avoidance: Gain +2 dodge bonus to AC versus undead. Losing Dex-bonus to AC deprives you of the benefits. Okay, I guess.


-Universal Recipient: Okay, we end on a nice one: Reduced DC for attaching necrografts and reduced Con damage for necrografting surgery.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are per se solid, though people that are picky about the fonts used should know that the "o"s are slightly larger than other letters. There are a couple of faulty italicizations here as well. Layout is GORGEOUS - the pdf adheres to a two-column full-color standard with skulls on the borders and a greenish tint - this is a nice-looking pdf. The pdf sports a nice full-color artwork. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.


Neal Litherland, Simon Muñoz and Brian Berg have crafted a book that sports some high-concept, intriguing feats - and indeed, there are some feats herein that are rather neat. You can justifiably call any content herein overpowered and it should make sense in most games, even the dark/low-fantasy-focused games. At the same time, there are a few pieces herein that don't work as intended, which detracts from, unfortunately, some of the most interesting feats herein. In the end, this is a solid book with some rough edges and hence, my final verdict will clock in at 3 stars.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Feats of Legend: 20 Undead Feats
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Fifth Edition Feats (5e)
by Reviewer X. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/09/2016 09:03:33

This was a great buy. The D&D 5e Player's Handbook is somewhat short on feat options and this book goes in depth from past editions to bring more of the mainstay feats to the fore again. I might not take all the feats, but there are enough in here that you are going to find a number of them very useful and worthwhile. Most notably, I like that they addressed some of the class abilities that a lot of 5e players were critical of. The Beastmaster ranger especially felt a little off, and there are feats in here to address some of those class weaknesses.


There's actually over 160 feats, and for sheer content, this is well worth the PDF price. I'll rate this at 5 stars, because it's a nice looking product that delivers on content missing from the new D&D game. Things seeem pretty balanced, as you need to use your bonus actions/reactions to make a lot of the impressive features work optimally.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fifth Edition Feats (5e)
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Feats of Legend: 20 Infernal Feats
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/21/2016 05:18:49

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of the Feats of Legend-series clocks in at 8 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 3/4 of a page blank, leaving us with 4 1/4 pages of content, so let's take a look!


After a handy table that lists the feats along prereqs, we dive right in:


-Blasphemous Tongue:Bonus to intimidate, demoralize demonic/infernal creatures by ignoring their immunity, if any, +1 DC for fear-descriptor-spells, affect potentially demonic/infernal creatures immune to fear- Now this is how you open a feat-book! Neat!


-Call the Damned: Add imp and gaav to summon monster I and III list; 1/day spontaneously add fiendish template to summon. One of the prereqs is italicized that shouldn't be, but that's a cosmetic glitch.


-Chains of Perdition: +2 shield bonus when wielding a spiked chain two-handed. Solid!


-Improved Chains of Perdition: Increase bonus granted to +4.


-Dark Channel: Roll d8s to hurt the living via channel negative energy instead of d6s. Ouch, but mechanically feasible and okay.


-Devil's Advocate: +2 Diplomacy and Bluff, +4 at 10th level; double bonuses versus demons and devils.


-Fiendish Codex: +2 to checks to identify fiends, gain +1 piece of info. Nice.


-Fire and Brimstone (Grit): +1d6 fire damage for 1 grit; solid, though I would have preferred scaling here. Also is erroneously called "deed" once, but oh well - functional.


-Improved Fire and Brimstone (Grit): Your bullets count as evil and magical; spend 1 grit to reroll any attack modified by Fire and Brimstone on a misfire. At +5 BAB-prereq maybe a tad bit soon for alignment-bullets.


-Improved Protection of the Pit: Increase profane armor bonus to +2; gain negative energy resistance 5, +3 and 10 in unhallowed areas.


-Protection of the Pit: Gain profane +1 bonus to AC, +2 in unhallowed areas. Pretty weak...but worth it for the end of the feat-chain.


-Greater Protection of the Pit: Gain DR 5/good, DR 10/good while on an unhallowed site. Solid and the prereqs make sense!


-Hellfire Initiate: Ignore up to 5 point Fire resistance with spells and SPs.


-Hellfire Acolyte: : Ignore up to 10 fire resistance with spells/SPs, also gain fire resistance 5. Prereq possible via Edlritch heritage. Nice.


-Hellfire Master: Ignore ALL fire resistance of a target with spells and SPs; targets usually immune still take 1/2 damage.


-Inured to the Infernal: +4 to saves versus spells and SPs of tieflings, devils, etc.


-Luck of the Devil: +2 luck bonus to one save chosen, may be taken thrice, once per save.


-Pledged to Darkness: You have an evil birthmark that helps intimidate folk...and which acts as an unholy symbol for the devil in question. Kinda cool!


-Speak of the Devil: Increase DC of planar binding-called devil to escape and gain bonus to convince devils to do your bidding, double the bonus in conjunction with Devil's Advocate.


-Tongue of the Pit: Spellcasting in Infernal, which reduces infernal creature's SR by 5 for the purpose of your spell. Has planar binding-synergy.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting aren't perfect, but what glitches are here do not hamper the feats contained herein. Layout adheres to an easy-to-read two-column full-color standard and the pdf has some nice b/w-stock art that fits neatly. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.


Neal Litherland's infernal feats may not all be winners - but they all have their niche, their thematic raison d'être - their justification. This humble book contains some truly cool tools that make sense by virtue of their narrative potential and that's not something I get to see too often. The lack of overpowered or broken feats herein also means that even a really low-fantasy/dark fantasy campaign can easily utilize the content herein, making this an inexpensive, welcome addition and one of the better feat-books I've read in a while. While not perfect in all regards, this still is a good, neat little book, well worth a final verdict of 4.5 stars, rounded down to 4 for the purpose of this platform.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Feats of Legend: 20 Infernal Feats
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The Fen of the Five-Fold Maw
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/07/2015 02:30:44

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This massive mega-adventure clocks in at 100 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 3 pages of advertisement, leaving us with 93 pages of content, so let's take a look!


I was a backer for the KS of this module, but otherwise was in no way affiliated with the creation of this module.


Before we get into the meat of this module, let me briefly point something out - this book does sport 4 nice feats for swamp dwellers that allow for devastating uses of the terrain. The adversaries herein, often with pretty complex builds, sport statblocks more detailed than usual, meaning you won't have to do much book-switching and also sport pretty extensive (lethal!) tactics. Finally, it should be noted that panthagators, stirge swarms and carnivorous giant lily pads are included as new monsters here.


While there is a chase card-deck for use with this module, it does not require the purchase of this deck - the book does provide regular playing card substitutions, though the chase card deck does facilitate using this particular scene. The Pdf's brutal encounters sport scaling advice and the book also sports handy milestones that show a GM when the PCs may be underleveled for a particular challenge. The book also sports Laying Waste-compatible rules for the respective combat encounters - awesome!


All right, so, this being an adventure review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.


...


..


.


Players, seriously, don't spoil this one.


...


..


.


All right, still here? Now that only GMs are around, here's how we begin this module - with hooks. Surprise, right? Kidding aside, the extent of detail these hooks utilize goes beyond what you'd usually expect to see - when e.g. a mad hermit spouts a cryptic prophecy, that prophecy is not only represented as a hand-out, it is delivered in a thick vernacular/sociolect - and there is ANOTEHR hand out that sports the "translated/deciphered" version...and that's not where it ends: The book actually has a clearer, third version the PCs can glean via magic - and that is represented as a hand-out as well. If you're like me, that fact alone (and the wonderful, cryptic threat included) should be enough for you to choose this one, though the others aren't bad either.


So, the PCs are traveling to the town of Wyvernglynn, an isolated outpost of civilization amidst the damp and hostile Sorrowfen swamp - and even of their way to the place, they'll be struggling, for the very first encounter with the lizardfolk that constitute the primary antagonists herein is pretty brutal and should initiate a kind of grudge-reaction...and allow a chance for PCs to turn their tails and run, for it only gets more brutal from here on out.


The town of Wyvernglynn is fully mapped and utilizes a map fans of Raging Swan Press' Village Backdrops-series may know - perched precariously behind balustrades on an island in the midst of a river at the edge of the swamp, this place certainly is not a cozy one - indeed, the Germanic-looking populace is many things...friendly is not one of them. After the local guardsmen are done with their "We're in charge, foreigners!"-routine, the PCs are free to take sidequests and research - and indeed, the settlement has been more isolated than usual, with caravans taken out obviously being the work of the raiders the PCs encountered....which is odd, for usually, the lizardfolk stick to themselves and only partake in internal struggles. The local inn's keeper, one Ostler Giodianus, also seems to be hiding something and asks for a subtle meeting if the PCs do their job well - he confides in them, telling the PCs he's being blackmailed: His daughter is missing....and indeed, the lizardfolk have a spy in town, the lethal assassin Thrazzeem, whose build is BRUTAL. The whole research and potential capture of this potent foe is btw. depicted in lavish detail, including sample read-aloud texts for GMs less comfortable with improvisation.


But sooner or later, whether the PCs defeat, kill or ignore this supreme foe, they'll have to enter the Sorrowfen...and it is here that the module pulls no more punches: The Sorrowfen has entered my conscious as one of the most compelling, unique environments I've seen in my whole gaming carreer: With brutal terrain-based repercussions (Flight = bad idea), predators galore and strange light pointing the way, this is the single best rendition of such a terrain I've seen in a module. While the town already managed to capture the hostility and grime I love in dark fantasy modules, it is with the almost sentient Sorrowfen and its unique ecology that the module truly becomes inspiring: If the mist-choked, lethal swamp and its predators, which the PCs will navigate by moving from giant lily pad to giant lily pad (each of which may be carnivorous...) is not yet enough, if the rules-relevant limitations have not yet blown you away and driven fear into your PCs, then the encounter with the local old woman oracle may just do that.


The "kind" Ol' Mamma Nis, presumably an oracle that guides kids lost out of the swamps does make for a slightly chilling visit: She tells the PCs about a staff, unearthed from dread ruins, sunk in the swamp, which now is wielded by the lizardfolk to dread effect and asks the PCs to bring the staff to her...and yes, this is a bad idea, for in her hut, the missing daughter of Ostler is awaiting the disguised hag's tender claws. This encounter proved to be an exercise in oscillation: The Pcs will arrive with suspicions, then be taken in by her stew (If they eat it...horror later...) and perhaps, realize that something is fundamentally wrong: Oh, and much like Thrazzeem, she is a TPK Games-boss with unique tricks, lethal powers and a build that can send wimpy players crying for their momma. This is a pro-module and Ol' Mamma Nis pulls no punches. She also constitutes the single best classic hag-encounter I've seen so far, with the grisly truth hiding just beneath the surface. Brilliant.


Speaking of which, since I thoroughly have to emphasize that: The Sorrowfen itself will be the enemy for the PCs, the most lethal component: With ruthless random encounters and terrain features, its properties span multiple pages, sparing you the need to swap books, while generating a terrain that most certainly will have PCs reminiscing about that cozy dungeon crawl on the graveyard the other day. It's that good.


But the Sorrowfen is not only about random encounters, the module also sports a significant array of unique, planned encounters - the PCs have, for example, the option to establish an alliance with a tribe of grippli...or destroy this tribe's sacred totem for Ol' Mamma Nis - in either way, the PCs may leave this one with unique totems and/or a stained conscience. Within the swamp, the PCs may also seek out the half-sunken ruins from which this odd staff was taken, potentially allowing the PCs to piece together some clues from the troubled past of this item...and encounter yet more unique foes.


Sooner or later, though, the PCs will have to get to the lizardfolk settlement, where they have multiple approaches - Stealth is problematic; force as well...and if the PCs go in with a truce-flag and want to see the tribe's "god" alongside the shaman, then help them whatever patron deities they may have: For, foolhardy PCs will then stand, surrounded by lizardfolk-onlookers, on a cluster of lily-pads, when the massive, regenerating, serpentine heads with their breath weapons and regeneration break the surface - the eponymous Five-Fold Maw is a brutal, mythic boss that ranks among my favorite boss battles in any module. It's also exceedingly BRUTAL...and it's not the end. You see, violence does not help and even if the PCs manage to win, they still have to escape the lizardfolk's territory with the staff - while a brief insurrection buys them enough time to run, they'll be a long, long way from home...and a long way from either Wyvernglynn or Ol' Mamma Nis' hut.


Which brings me full circle to the beginning of this review: The aforementioned, deck-based chase is different from any you've run: You see, it's a chase than spans multiple hours, one that represents the PCs literally trying to evade capture against overwhelming odds in a terrain that is simply brutal at least 21 challenges...and it is one that can be slightly confusing due to a bit of information being lost in the final version of the module's chase rules. Thankfully, the information's out there, so for your convenience, should you choose to get this, here's what's missing:


" The Lizardfolk Horde (army) marker moves after all PCs have had their chance each turn. It will move onto the first Chase card at the end of the third turn after the PCs begin moving. It will advance one Chase card each turn automatically, unless the Chase card it is on says that it loses a turn. Many individual lizardfolk will be doggedly keeping pace with the PCs and harassing them (as represented by the Encounter cards), but if the Lizardfolk Horde marker catches up to any PC, that PC is considered killed or captured, at the GM’s discretion, and is removed from further participation in the Chase. However, that event holds up the Lizardfolk Horde marker and causes it to lose a turn, so PCs may realize that they have the option of sacrificing themselves to give the PC in possession of the staff a better chance to outrun the horde. Lost turns are cumulative with multiple PCs on the same card and cards that automatically cause the horde to lose a turn.


If at any time the players decide to end the Chase and make a last stand, the GM is free to play that battle out as s/he sees fit.


If any of the PCs successfully advance through 21 Chase cards, they have arrived at the hut of Ol’ Mamma ‘Nis. Go to that section of the adventure for information on how to run that encounter.


If the PCs elect to bypass Ol’ Mamma ‘Nis’ hut and run straight for the walls of Wyverglynn, they must successfully advance past 24 Chase cards. Go to that section of the adventure for information on running that final battle."


---and when the chase ends, the PCs will be fatigued and tired...and depending on their choices, they may have to defeat a hyper-lethal boss and/or a horde battle against the lizardfolk brave enough to hunt them to Wyvernglynn for a thoroughly compelling finale...


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are, for the most part, pretty good, though here are some minor violations of rules-language herein. Layout adheres to a two-column full-color standard in swampy green in the pdf, while the softcover, alas, is only black and white - which is a pity, for, quite frankly, the copious maps and the artworks herein deserve to be in color. Regarding maps: Unfortunately, the pdf does not sport the maps as big versions you can easily print out, nor are there player-friendly versions, which is another strike against the book. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. I actually recommend the pdf version over the print this time around.


Skip Twitchell and Brian Berg have created a module that sports an awesome atmosphere, but one that is also deeply flawed, the missing chase-scene information and the lack of player-friendly maps...


...


I can't do it. F*** my nitpicking routine here, it doesn't do the module justice.


...


Yes, this is a flawed book with some serious rough edges. It's also one of the best modules I've had the pleasure to run in a while. This is a downright brutal module for the pros, for the players who want a challenge; this is a module for all the fans of dark fantasy and unique locales; this is a module for everyone asking for a big, nasty wilderness module; this is a module for those of us that love the grit, the darkness, the brutal challenge that only few modules can provide.


How good is this book's prose, how awesome its atmosphere and terrain implementation, how deadly are the bosses? Well, in a lesser module, the flaws I mentioned would have me smash the book to smithereens and detract at the very least two stars. I can't bring myself to do this to this module. Even in TPK Games' canon of awesome, deadly modules, this one stands out. Much like Frog God Games' Cyclopean Deeps Volume I, this may not be a mechanically perfect module, but it more than makes up for it in its strengths - the bosses rank among the best I've seen in a published module. The Sorrowfen is downright awesome in its visuals and nasty properties. The whole, concise atmosphere generated and the savage, relentless, unforgiving, yet fair difficulty make this a module that, in spite of its glitches, belongs into the library of the discerning GM...or at least into the library of some of you out there.


If you're very picky regarding the aforementioned issues, then give this a pass, but know that you'll be missing out on a very GM-friendly, challenging, awesome module, perhaps even the best swamp module currently available for PFRPG. The fact that even an anal-retentive, nitpicky bastard like me takes a look at the book, scowls, run it, and then says "Screw it, this is awesome!" should tell you something about how good this damn beast is. I've been struggling with myself here - on the one hand, I should rate this down for its short-comings; on the other hand, I want to keep on gushing about it for even more pages than I already have. Ultimately, what made me make up my mind is the fact that the map-issue, while annoying, is not as bad as with some other modules: Being mostly site-driven and happening beyond the confines of a battlemap, their importance is somewhat diminished. Also, this is a module, not a crunch book, so mechanical precision is a bit less important than in a crunch book.


How to rate this, then? You may well call me a hypocrite, seeing how rigorous I usually crack down on the lack of player-friendly maps or issues like chase-info missing mentioned above. I am all too aware that I ought to penalize the module for this. But I am also beholden to my passions and it is this passion (or so I hope!) that I manage to transport in some of my reviews, the passion which I hope, from the bottom of my heart, you, dear readers, share. I am very passionate about this module. I absolutely adore this book. I love it. It's absolutely glorious, evocative, challenging, well-written and unique. It's an accumulation of almost everything I love in a module and a prime example of the level of difficulty and variability I look for in such a beast. In short - I can't bring myself to rate it down. I really, really can't. If you're like me and, at the end of the day, want a book written in great prose, unique environments, deadly foes - the whole deal - then this is 5 stars + seal of approval for you. As a reviewer, I need to scratch that a bit as a concession to the book's objective flaws, no matter how great I think this is - hence, my official final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars + seal of approval...and yes, I'm rounding up here. ;)


One final note: With more editing, player-friendly maps and sans the chase-glitch, this would have made my Top Ten-list of 2015. I wouldn't even have had to think about whether to include it or not. Thank you for bearing with me through this rambling diatribe...now book your trip to the Sorrowfen and watch players gaze in wide-eyed fear at what you throw at them...


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Fen of the Five-Fold Maw
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Feats Reforged: Vol. IV, The Magic Feats
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/24/2015 03:57:01

An Endzeitgeist.com review


The fourth installment of TPK Games' series that redesigns feats to scale with character levels covers the feats from Ultimate Magic and clocks in at 28 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 3/4 of a blank page, leaving us with 24 1/4 pages of content, so let's take a look!


All right, by now you know both the basic principle of the series and how the series works: Basically, you get additional benefits at certain character levels, with common progressions being 7th and 14th level; 9th and 16th level also constitute a common progression ladder and some feats also increase in potency at 18th level or 10th and 17th level - basically, the idea is a rough 7-level progression for most of them.


Now regarding the scaling benefits, much like the third installment of the series, we get effects that go thankfully beyond straight numerical escalation - Extra Ranger Trap, to give you an example, adds +2/day uses of ranger traps at the first scaling threshold and later increases their DC. Action-economy progression for e.g. Fast Empathy also deserves mention. Gliding Step's third progression allows for the expenditure of ki at 18th level to ignore all difficult terrain for 1 round in addition to its straight scaling benefit - which makes sense at such a high level. Remote Bomb's scaling distance (only requiring line of effect), is also nice, and Resilient Eidolon allows you to keep your eidolon around while you sleep at higher levels.


In fact, some of the feat-upgrades herein allow for whole new builds to be efficient - the Shaping Focus' scaling, to name one, allows for up to character level = druid level for the purposes of wild shape - at 18th level more than okay, especially considering the solid scaling step before. So yes, this book does have its moments, where it shines and does so brilliantly. At the same time, this one is less refined in its rules-language than Vol. III: Spell Bluff's scaling options e.g. mention that "you gain no negatives when dueling a caster whose spells are modified by Silent Spell or Still Spell" - the thing is: The vanilla rules for spell duels do never result in "negatives" - did the author mean "penalties"? I don't get how this one is supposed to work and reading up on spell duel rules didn't help. On the plus-side, Starlight Summons getting concealment and later Hide in Plain Sight? That's quite badass. Versatile Channeler getting rid of the -2 penalty for channel purposes at 14th level also is rather interesting.


I also like the decision to make Word of Healing, at 14th level, apply at full potency at a range of 40 ft. Adding two spellblights via Blighted Critical can also be considered a rather nice option in my book and Channeled Shield Wall's scaling bonuses and high-level DRs make sense and implanting bombs is nasty - after 24 hours, long-term implanted bombs no longer count towards your daily limit - evil empires and villains will make ample use of this one...


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no particularly glaring glitches, though there are a couple of italicizations missing. Layout adheres to a printer-friendly two-column full-color standard with solid b/w-artworks thrown in. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.


The Feats Reforged series is hard to review - basically, you have a bunch of feats that you already know and add scaling benefits to them - as a reviewer, what to do? List feat upon feat's scaling options? Boring. Complain about base feats? Unfair. However, if you're a bit familiar with me and my work, you'll probably have guessed correctly that I do loathe quite a few feats out there - and Ultimate Magic is partially banned at my table for a reason, so no, I don't have a high opinion of the source-material this pdf draws on.


At the same time, though, as a reviewer, my task is to determine whether the feats herein do a good job at translating the source-material to a system wherein the feats scale. It is in this context that I'm rating this book. And it is in the context that I can say that Neal Litherland and Brian Berg have done a good job.


While there are some rare and minor hiccups among the formal properties, the vast majority of the scaling feats herein makes sense and even adds dimensions and new build options to the base feats. It is with new effects and intriguing effects beyond the numerical scaling (which is usually implemented in a well-done manner) that this book shines. While I STILL refute, adamantly, I might add, the series' claim that unilaterally adding these to the game does not change balance (this is wrong since some characters frankly get more feats and thus more use out of scaling feats), I gladly acknowledge one fact - even in the cases where I frankly dislike the base feat, the reforged iteration tends to add something new, something more to the table.


A further benefit of this series is that it helps in rare-magic/low-magic games to keep the scales - though wide-scale implementation for the monsters etc. will be a lot of work for the GM, I can see a lot of tables that will welcome this particular aspect over the annoying Christmas Tree syndrome. How to rate this book, then? Well, ultimately, we get a lot of good material here. While personally, I preferred Vol. III and considered its formatting/wording a teeny tiny bit more precise, this still constitutes a worthy addition to the series. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 for the purpose of this platform.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Feats Reforged: Vol. IV, The Magic Feats
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Feats of Legend: 20 Infernal Feats
by Jason L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/19/2015 10:54:01

This book, as the name states, includes twenty new feats for anyone interested in being diabolical (in the truest sense of that word).


Things I liked:
Some new feats for using spiked chains. I wished they did more than grant a shield bonus but you take what you can get to make such a flavorful weapon more appealing.
Two new grit feats for adding hellfire to your shots! Hell to the yes. Pun fully and unabashedly intended.
Hellfire Mastery feats to let you ignore some fire resistance. Fire resistance is so common it seems. These feats are a tax, but worth it to make a dedicated fire specialist.
Feats for social interactions. The game isn't all combat and some feats to intimidate demons that are otherwise immune or to put the fear of the devil(s) into other folk that recognize the monster you've pledged yourself to are great.


For two bucks this is a great buy. This book can be utilized by more than just evil characters; make a character cursed by devilish forces or who made a pact with devils to hunt demons. So many great ideas that can be fleshed out by these feats.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Feats of Legend: 20 Infernal Feats
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Altered Beasts: Gnolls, Vol. I (PF/5e)
by james m. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/17/2015 03:15:03

I honestly found myself more thrilled with this book than I expected. I knew it'd be fun but while reading it I caught myself grinning that evil GM grin.


Done in the similar theme and vain as Pathfinder's Monster Codex, Altered Beasts presents you with many variants of the Gnoll. The biggest advantage of Altered Beasts is it's Pathfinder and D&D 5e compatibility. The layout is easy and user friendly. Moving from PF to D&D 5e is not an issue.


Often times gamers get bored with fighting the same old same old this however gives you new options to spring on your unsuspecting players. As a long time gamer it's exciting to see well thought through monster variants. Some of the Gnoll options are pure GM delights, such as the "Den Mother" & "Plague Bearer" while others like "Demon-Possessed Gnoll" & the "War Chief" are built to put the hurt on your players if they're only expecting run of the mill Gnolls.


All in all this is another great TPK product and I'm looking forward to the following Altered Beasts volumes.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Altered Beasts: Gnolls, Vol. I (PF/5e)
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