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Legendary Beginnings: Into the Feyweald
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/23/2016 10:30:11

An Endzeitgeist.com review


The first of Legendary Games' modules to support the simplified Beginner's Box-rules clocks in at 38 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page ToC, 2 pages of introduction, 1 page advertisement, 1 page inside of back cover, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 28 pages of content, so let's take a look!


Before we do, I should not be remiss to mention that this module features a handy "slightly advanced" spellcasting array of options used by some of the creatures herein - they can be cast as a standard action and are collected one a handy GM cheat sheet. It should also be noted that this module is intended to be kid-friendly; as such, it features relatively straightforward themes of fighting bad guys and doing good; if political intrigue or shades of grey morality are what you're looking for, this may not be the place. I firmly believe in teaching via roleplaying games and kids should not just slog through combat upon combat - and the author seems to concur here, stating the directive that social and thinking skills should be challenged by modules as well.


As for the age-range, well, unless the kids in question are particularly sensitive, this module should be appropriate for kids ages 4 up; in case of very sensitive kids, 6+ would be a pretty safe bet. This does not mean that this module is "kid's stuff", mind you - it very much works for adults, but I'll get back to that in the conclusion. As a quick summary: All but those that want something really dark and gritty should find some fun within these pages.


Setting-wise, this module assumes the kingdom of Threll in the author's Terrallien world, which is a pretty "normal" fantasy world; as such, it is very easy to plug into other campaign settings - in this kingdom, the feyweald is basically a protected area, where the spirits of nature may roam free, unimpeded by Threllish civilization....and this is as far as I can go without going into SPOILER-territory. Potential players should jump to the conclusion.


...


..


.


All right still here? A strange sickness has been plaguing the Feyweald and the nymph queen Pryhoza has asked for assistance from Threll's king Ambrose I, offering an alliance in return for assistance in this matter, which would in turn render diplomatic relations with reclusive druids a distinct possibility. The problem seems to be gift horse...and hence, enter the PCs, which are assumed to be members or associates of the Zekerian order, as denoted by magical amulets - these amulets also provide a safety net 1/day to prevent death and allow for some healing to further decrease the potential of player frustration. The group arrives at Northrunner Sound, scheduled to meet with the queen and her two advisors ( a leprechaun and a brownie), but an audience with the queen obviously requires the proper gifts - while the king has sent a whole chest, the hustle and bustle of sprites means that the PCs will have to rely on their wits and people skills to present the correct gift to the correct fey. This first social stumbling block out of the way, the feast begins, but as soon as the arboreal banquet is in full swing (and PCs get bored with the interactions), the party is, alas, crashed: Mites riding giant jumping spiders assault the party and it will be up to the PCs to defeat the threat.


After the threat is eliminated, queen Pryozha confides in the PCs: An evil force has taken root in the feyweald, changing it, turning it and its creatures slowly evil, turning it Unseelie. (And yes, if you're using Green Ronin's Advanced Bestiary and full PFRPG-rules, you'll have the template used here!) She asks them to seek out the threat and take care of it, but not before granting them a specific oil that is supposed to help them bypass the resistances of some fey - a valuable resource that the PCs hopefully use cleverly.


On their way through the forests, the PCs will have a chance to help awakened badgers from a trap laid by unseelie brownies and fauns navigate where traps and mites await and encounter an aggressive bird that can be calmed down by smart players...and finally defeat a nasty unseelie giant toad...and finally, possibly the first underground complex ever awaits the players: The lost grove, where a sinkhole guarded by mites now speaks of the influence of a nasty, trapped being called Bayaga. In the pit of the grove where the PCs will have to defeat more mites, an unseelie sprite and faun and yaldira, a multiclass forlarren and champion of the evil, imprisoned bayaga. The villains boast in good ole' traditional villain monologue and indeed, during the combat, bayaga creates a crystalline earth elemental as a form to fight the PCs - destroying it takes the unseelie curse from the afflicted fey.


Having defeated this threat, the PCs are hailed as heroes, are granted a blessing from the beautiful fey queen as well as masterwork items as a thank you - not bad for novice adventurers, and yes, PC death can be reversed...and Ambrose's favor/reward is nothing to scoff at either!


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no grievous glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' neat two-column full-color standard for the series, though in an odd peculiarity, my readers depict some passages of text in slightly bolder letters than other paragraphs. This is purely aesthetic nitpickery, though. The original full-color artwork by Paul Pederson and Beatrice Pelagatti employed in the book is absolutely gorgeous and makes for cool handouts. Michael Tumey's cartography is similarly nice.


Paris Crenshaw's first kid-friendly module is fun, evocative and has a structure and feeling like a classic fairy tale, which it ultimately is. This renders it not only palpable for kids, it also can be fun for adults and with some rewrites, you can make it as dark as you want to. Structure and diversity-wise, this is pretty cool. That being said, at the same time, the traveling section through the forest and the final dungeon note paths the PCs travel, with letters and numbers pointing...nowhere. You see, the cartography is player-friendly, which is awesome - no distracting keys and hotspots can be found on them...well, all of them but one, which is weirdly inconsistent. But the structure of the module seems to employ a bit of wilderness hexcrawling, some sort of choice regarding the path taken...and the maps provided do not help in that regard at all, which is weird to me; my theory is that the module was supposed to have player-friendly and GM-maps and they have been either mixed up or somewhat confused. Anyways, this is still a minor hiccup that does not detract much from the quality of the module.


One note, though: It depends on the players you have....but kids can minmax and make brutal builds pretty well once they set their minds to it. If your group consists of adults or kids with experience...they'll curbstomp all but the final encounter. So yes, the focus of this module rests on new players and those that have less experience in using the game. Admittedly, this is the very intent of the product line and not every group is as hardcore as my kiddie-group, but it is something other target demographics may want to be aware of.


There would be one more slight complaint of mine, resulting probably from being somewhat spoiled by Playground Adventures: I am a firm believer in teaching children, at least to a certain extent, about morality in games, since it is an easy and unobtrusive manner to do so. Reinforcing good behavior and morals can be easily achieved in games. Personally, I would have loved to see the module actually feature the choice of how the PCs handle defeated unseelie entities more - a bit of interrogation and foreshadowing from prisoners, for example. The module does offer a means of reverting the unseelie transformation, which is a good thing in a kid-related context. This may be controversial, but I do believe that there is a didactic opportunity lost here - if the choice to keep the defeated unseelie alive or kill them was emphasized more, that well could upset some kids, true; at the same time, rewarding players for "doing the right thing" and only knocking the fey unconscious in the aftermath could have been a very educational experience for the players. I once did this in my games and as soon as the kids realized that good deeds would be rewarded, the motivation to be good increased significantly. Your mileage may vary, of course, but it is something to consider when running this module, particularly for the younger ones.


Now one final note: This was originally written as part of a girl scout experience and honestly, running this module, with its sequence of civilization, banquet, hike, etc. in the downtime of a family trip to a national park or nature itself can be exceedingly rewarding: Take a break, play for half an hour, eat when the PCs are eating, get to the teensiest bit creepy final when it turns dark - the module very much features a structure not unlike a trip into the wild...and honestly, that's how I'd run it in a perfect world where I had the means.


Ah, right, the final verdict. All in all, Into the Feyweald is an evocative fairy tale to participate in; difficulty-curve wise, it is VERY easy, until the final encounter, where things get tougher. The module assumes a moderately competent GM and features a LOT of read aloud text, so no excessive experience is required on the GM's side - only enough to handle the key/map hiccup sans stumbling and the final encounter; if you can run that one, you're good...and it's not hard to run. The module is beautiful and fun, though it does not reach the absolute apex; its atmosphere is great and playful, but a couple of the finer aspects could have used a bit more guidance or specific rewards for actions. In the end, I consider this a good module for kids with some slight room for improvement. My final verdict will hence clock in at 4 stars.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Beginnings: Into the Feyweald
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Occult Character Codex: Kineticists
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/19/2016 08:41:38

An Endzeitgeist.com review


The (for now) final installment of the Occult Character Codex-series clocks in at 32 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of how-to-use/introduction, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page blank, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 24 pages of content, so let's take a look!


The general introduction of how the series works kicks this off - the characters featured herein utilize the NPC automatic progression championed by Pathfinder Unchained, which makes the NPCs used herein more suitable challenges for the PCs - a decision I wholeheartedly applaud. As always, we do receive a blending of common and less common races in the array of creatures featured in the book, with e.g. merfolk being featured among the less common races and there even is a stone giant, a leprechaun and a fearsome hobgoblin featured.


Somewhat odd - the explanation on how to use does mention regular spellcasting in a book on kineticists...a glitch that is even more jarring when one looks at the tactics-section, where hints for the medium are provided. That being said, the section is still pretty useful, with a helpful table of optimum burn helping in running kineticists - kudos for providing such guidelines for the GM. The respective statblocks, just fyi, do feature an "If at optimal burn"-section in the tactics, which is pretty neat to see.


The kineticist, as a class, prior to 3pp-additions, has been pretty challenged pertaining evocative archetypes, so it should come as no surprise that, in this discipline, there isn't that much variety in this book. A few characters sport a fighter level; there are the uncommon races, but base-class wise, this book is pretty much straight kineticists. The pdf covers the CRs from 1/2 to 19, as always. On a feat-perspective, the book does offer a surprising diversity regarding the feats chosen, considering how few of them make sense for the kineticist, so yeah, kudos there.


Regarding utility wild talent selection and infusion selection, the builds also utilize a sufficient breadth of options. That being said, I did notice a couple of minor glitches in the builds herein - I noticed e.g. minor hiccups regarding the internal rules-language of the kineticist employed in the tactics section - it's "accepting burn", not "gaining burn." Generally, when I could reverse-engineer hiccups, they did tend to be not crucial.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are good, though e.g. the cut copy paste hiccups regarding the medium are unnecessary. Similarly, the minor wording hiccups and glitches may not be bad per se, but they do show up. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' two-column full-color standard for the series, with a nice array of original full color pieces. The pdf comes fully bookmarked, though oddly the bookmarks are double - there are WIP-bookmarks and the finished ones. Both are functional, though.


Julian Neale's kineticists are an interesting bunch - while their builds provide a relatively broad scope regarding the feats and race-combos employed, the pdf ultimately did feel a bit less refined than the best in the series do. At the same time, the support provided by the book makes running the characters themselves somewhat easier than one would assume, which is a plus in my book. All in all, this is a nice, solid collection of NPCs, though one that is less refined than usual for the series. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up by a margin and in dubio pro reo.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Occult Character Codex: Kineticists
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Beneath the Festered Sun
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 08/16/2016 08:10:06

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This plug-in for the Mummy's Mask adventure path clocks in at 42 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page introduction, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 35 pages of content, so let's take a look!


The module is a sandbox investigation that can be inserted before the final act of the first installment of the Mummy's Mask AP, which is a sound decision - one of the criticism voiced against said module is its unbroken sequence of dungeon crawls. But can this module really bring the desired change o pace?


This being an adventure review, the following text contains SPOILERS. Potential players will want to skip to the conclusion.


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..


.


All right, still here? Great! Groomed from an early childhood to serve as priestess of the goddess of death, the individual called Kapanek developed her own profound beliefs, a variation, a heresy of the doctrine followed by the majority of people in ancient times - unfortunately for her, her own talent would prove to be her undoing, as a being that looked somewhat akin to a skeletal herald of Anubis manifested - her eidolon, mistaken for a divine herald. Her heresy continued, she gained influence via a prestigious marriage...but then, a dread plague struck and was all her foes required to take her down and slaughter her family. Her death curse unfulfilled, the world has turned...but her eidolon has schemed for a long time to fulfill the vengeance of its mistress.


As the PCs return to delve once again into the dungeons, they are notified of the ruins being closed since civil unrest and the rare astrological event "Festered Sun" is happening. From the get-go, the module offers a significant assortment of options to gather information, with higher checks providing more knowledge. The PCs (and other parties) have a vested interest in resolving the unrest, since a local inquisitor is quick to point his finger at the tomb-raiding groups as a possible source for the issues. In order to find the truth behind the strangely powerful curse - Ruja, the man in charge, offers 3 venues to start the investigation. For one, the Anubian sects that follows lost and forgotten Kapanek's doctrines needs to be inspected; secondly, the astronomer Gyep tried to warn the city, but was laughed at - so checking him out may help. Finally, the is an odd mirage surrounding Mafiris Estate that should most definitely be investigated. Choosing their entry vector, the PCs receive a court order exempting them from the curfew.


Stepping outside and looking up at the festered sun can cause blindness, as a strangely compelling curse seems to affect the very city and exposure to daylight may similarly cause burns via another curse (yep, that is a preview of the curses that will feature in Mummy's Mask #3) - in a rarely seen level of detail, the precise wording of the curses uttered has been reproduced, which is pretty awesome, at least in my book. In the camp of the Anubians spawned from Kapanek's teachings and the PCs are generally welcomed to the camp of the heresy, though in the shadow pavilion, the metal globe with the silhouetted shapes of ancient gods (see cover) is interesting...and the leader of the sects, one brother Thute, seems to be less than pleased with the meddling PCs. As the investigation winds down here, a shadow will assault the PCs - which is taken by the locals to be an unfettered aspect of the soul (the 5 aspects of the soul as defined by Kapanek's teachings are explained in detail) -it is also said belief that may put an end to the dread curses...but so far, the PCs don't yet know that.


The PCs may actually witness an abandoned cistern defended by rather aggressive crowds of people that guard a woman of blood: Partaking from her blood seems to eliminate the curses...but drinking human blood from the strange apparition does have its own risks - the PCs will have to take a close look at the abandoned cistern's insides and deal with whatever lurks in its tainted depths.


The temple of Pharasma, which hands out alms and bread, may well be a source of the issues - and indeed, stealthy gremlins have been switching breads, spreading dread contamination among the inhabitants of the city.


The astronomer Gyep in the astronomer's lodge is in dire circumstances, as a deadly mummy is guarding the gnome and represents a powerful, lethal adversary the PCs will need to dispatch to rescue the gnomish Cassandra. Gyep can answer a lot of questions the PCs may have and less improvisation-skilled GMs will enjoy the significant array of read-aloud text for questions, providing guidance and exposition. Gyep actually confirms that the festered sun actually is just the trigger for a curse...but not the source. Said mummy and blood golems may point the PCs towards the house of one Yaro-comatose and basically unresponsive, his abode has been rigged...and he was the man to create the mummy and blood golem.


Slowly, the pieces start falling in place and the mirage-covered Mafiris estate may be the most lethal of the respective areas -inside this planar bubble, the PCs can actually meet Kapanek's tainted, reincarnated form...and whether they can get some information out of her or not, in order to save an old woman who does know more, the PCs will probably have to deal with the lethal creature that once was Kapanek.


At this point, the pieces will probably have fallen into place and the PCs will have dealt with the fragments of Kapanek's soul...all but one. In the end, the powerful unfettered eidolon Kerux, which also doubles as the unique and challenging boss of this module - with its fall, the legacy of death and dread curse will end.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant issues pertaining rules-language or formal criteria. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' two-column full-color standard and the pdf comes with copious pieces of artwork, all in full color. Legendary Games fans may know some of them from other books, but not all.


Pedro Coelho's "Beneath the Festered Sun" is a fantastic addition to Mummy's Mask. This module represents a great change of pace from the constant dungeon delving, adds social interaction and some non-linear sleuthing to the AP and, beyond that, sports a truly evocative array of visuals: From the curses to the places visited, this very much breathes this ephemeral spirit of Swords and Sorcery; this module would work well in the Hyborian Age, Gygax's Khemit or similar environments - the overall aesthetics and themes utilized are captivating, unique and fun. The mythology evoked resonates well with concepts of our very own ancient cultures...and I should not fail to mention that the author also seems to be a truly superb cartographer: Absolutely gorgeous full-color pieces, both with keys and key-less versions, are provided for GM and players. The quality of the cartography is glorious and fits, theme-wise, perfectly into the context of Mummy's Mask.


So, to recap: This should be considered to be a must own addition to Mummy's Mask, as it provides a great change of pace; the production values are glorious, the writing is precise, the supplemental information copious. I read this but once and ran it without any hassle and the guidance for GMs less accustomed to prolonged social interactions between PCs and NPCs further helps in establishing this as a great, evocative module. In the end, the AP is significantly better with this module included; this ranks as one of the finest plug-in modules LG has put out so far. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Beneath the Festered Sun
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Mythic Minis 89: Clever Combat Feats
by Steve D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/13/2016 22:20:07

Mythic Minis 089: Clever Combat Feats is a 2016 release from Legendary Games. It is a supplement for Pathfinder Roleplaying Game. It was written by Jason Nelson and Alex Riggs. The cover is by Lance Red. It is part of the Mythic Minis series.


Presentation
This product is a 3 page pdf. It has a color cover. The additional pages feature the cover image ghosted. The content is in sepia tones and the print is on the small side. The layout is comparable to similar products from Paizo Publishing.


Content
This entry in the series covers feats suitable for swashbucklers and similar characters who rely on speed and grace rather than brute force. it provides 9 new mythic feats on a single page. The feats are all mythic extensions of feats originally found in Ultimate Intrigue.


The 9 mythic feats presented here are But a Scratch which allows the character to use the feat on ranged attacks as well as melee and has the chance to leave the shooter shaken; Cat and Mouse doubles the character's bonuses when attempting a riposte; Circuitous Shot allows the character to bounce a shot off one object per mythic tier; Clambering Escape allows the character to impose penalties on those they reposition using this ability; Cunning Intuition allows the character to ready a full round action; Fencing Grace allows the character to use the ability with any one-handed weapon and they gain the advantages of this ability even when using two weapons; Martial Dominance allows the character dominate multiple creatures based on his attack bonus; Ranged Feint allows the character to use a ranged feint to deny him his Dexterity Bonus to any attacks, not just his; Ready for Anything allows the character to take a full-round action during a surprise round or to use a mythic point to grant a surprise round when there wouldn't have been one.


Evaluation
These are the feats of the swashbucklers! There are feats here to avoid damage, to make yoru foes look silly in a fight and to flat out embarrass people with how slow they are by comparison. If you've always wanted to play Zorro, the Grey Mouser or Cyrrano, these are some of the feats you need.


I recommend this for anyone who is interested in swashbuckling play. The price is right and so are the feats.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Minis 89: Clever Combat Feats
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Occult Character Codex: Spiritualists
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/27/2016 09:33:07

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of Legendary Games' collection of Occult Adventures pre-built NPCs clocks in at 36 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of how to use/introduction to the subject matter, 1 page ToC, 1/2 a page blank, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 27 1/2 pages of content, so let's take a look!


Okay, it has been a while since I covered one of these, so let's recapitualte: The Occult Character Codex-series basically provides NPC-codex style entries for the respective class, utilizing automatic bonus progression as introduced in Pathfinder Unchained as well as buffing featured in the respective statblocks. The statblocks themselves feature a pre-buffing section where applicable and, for ease of reference, save DCs come with F, R, and W as shorthand for the saves in the respective spell etc. entries, allowing for an easy reference.


CR-wise, the NPCs herein range from CR 1/2 to CR 19, covering the whole breadth. The respective spiritualist builds, obviously, feature their respective phantom pet, rendering the overall statblock density of the book relatively high. The builds in the series do try to depict organically grown characters, i.e. the NPCs herein, while being efficient, also feature capabilities that ground them in the respective world, a decision I generally applaud.


As has become the tradition with the series, the NPCs featured herein diverge in their respective focus - while we do have some classic, CORE-races using spiritualists in the book, there also are samsarans and even grippli to be found among the builds. The onmyoji archetype is used in a few of the builds as well - so racial diversity's here; archetype-wise, the book could sport a bit more diversity.


Regarding the emotional focus of the respective phantoms, the pdf does provide a sufficient array of diverse options, with the foci generally fitting well the theme of the respective phantoms. The same can't be said about all of the spell-selections certain themes in spells can be readily identified - granted, there is diversity here, but it could have been a tad bit more pronounced. On the plus-side, while a similar observation can be made pertaining some feats, the overall breadth of strategies via builds is significantly broader. Kudos!


That being said, unlike the other OCC's I've covered, there is something I need to mention - the phantoms have some glitches in central abilities; unfortunately, these glitches tend to be rather crucial ones - slam damage is incorrect in some cases, correct in some and does not progress properly, extending the issue to the respective damage caused; similarly, DR-scaling of the phantoms is not accurate. The frustrating component here is that there are quite a few of the entries that work out well, but still, those are pretty central components in the respective build.


Does this make the book unusable? No. But it does limit its appeal.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting, on a formal level, are very good, though this time around, the uncharacteristic glitches in he builds do somewhat limit the book's appeal. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' two-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. Artwork-wise, we get some classic LG-artworks as well as the cool cover artwork.


Julian Neale's spiritualists are the weakest entry in the series and were a rather odd experience for me, reviewing-wise. Why? Because I happen to have the build-notes for them and while these also have hiccups here and there, they are other hiccups - while e.g. the DR in the build-notes for the level 20 NPC isn't correct, the slam attack base damage actually is. My theory is that: Something went wrong in layout/dev. Some of the glitches obviously are cut-copy-paste hiccups. EDIT: The author has contacted me and taken full responsibility - that takes guts and backbone, so kudos!!


That being said, there is still value to be drawn from this pdf - the builds themselves are pretty complex and even with their glitches, the pdf still represents some seriously spared time. The glitches mentioned can be relatively easily purged and while the pdf thus can't be considered to be the high-point of the series, neither does it deserve being dismissed. What's here, generally, is cool and GMs willing to invest a bit of work to fix the glitches get some complex builds out of this one. Still, the pdf could also have employed more in the archetype discipline.


In the end, I will settle on a final verdict of 2.5 stars; if you're in it for flawless statblocks, round down; if you want the majority of grunt work done for you, you'll still find use for this. My official final verdict will round up due to in dubio pro reo.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Occult Character Codex: Spiritualists
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Legendary Planet Player's Guide (Pathfinder)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/20/2016 11:00:51

An Endzeitgeist.com review


The Player's Guide for the Legendary Planet AP clocks in at 19 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page inside of back cover, leaving us with 14 pages of content, so let's take a look!


Okay, after the usual introduction to the matter at hand, we have to discuss one thing: The AP is set to officially begin at 2nd level, with the optional "The Assimilation Strain" prequel basically blindsiding the more mundane PCs. Hence, campaign trait selection is held off to the begin of the first "proper" adventure. Beyond that, there is a bit of a potential disjoint here: Namely, that this Player's Guide provides an array of new alien races, which make perfect sense in the context of the AP, yes, but also contradict the optional Assimilation Strain lead-in. Basically, if you elect to employ the "fish out of water"-approach and run the prequel with terrestrial PCs, you'll lock yourself out of basically all options in this book...until a PC dies/retires, that is. Which is a bit of a pity, since I prefer the approach via regular PCs stumbling, wide-eyed and bumbling, into the possibilities of Legendary Planet...but your mileage will obviously vary.


Anyhow, the first of the new races introduced herein would be the Auttaine, half-constructs that gain +2 to an ability score of their own choice, normal speed...and they have build points - 3 + initial Constitution modifier, to be precise. They can use these points to customize their own bodies - from internalized weapons to component pouches, the customized options are pretty cool.


Chlorvians are basically the half-plants here and gain +2 Con and Cha, -2 Str, low-light vision, +4 to Stealth in wooded environments, +1 natural armor, retries of Diplomacy-attempts only botched by 5 or less and treat Charisma for the purpose of the verdant bloodline as two higher, +1 level for purposes of the Plant domain. Characterized by the symbiotic bond with a seed, they also get +2 to saves versus mind-affecting effects, paralysis, sleep, poison, but thankfully not the huge array of plant immunities.


The Tretharri are 4-armed philosophers that gain +2 Str and Wis, -2 Cha, +2 to Swim and Climb checks and 4 arms - one is primary, all others are secondary. Still, this makes them brutal shredders.


The Zvarr, winged saurian humanoids, would be the final new race. Zvarr get +2 Dex and Int, -2 Wis, gain a climb speed of 30 ft, darkvision, +1 to Acrobatics and natural AC, a 1d3 primary bite attack that can be used as secondary in conjunction with weapons, +2 to Appraise as well as vestigial wings they can use via Fly to glide and prevents deadly falls. The races come with age, height and weight tables.


I was btw. positively surprised by the following section - from languages to focuses and skills, the pdf does offer some general, but very welcome guidelines to make the characters work well within the context of the Legendary Planet AP, discussing skills and the like - but the book actually goes one step beyond that, also featuring information on various intriguing classes from the 3pp-circuit - from godlings to luckbringers and machinesmiths, to, obviously, psionics, the Player's Guide provides quite a few nice shootouts pertaining how the classes work within the context of the saga.


The pdf also offers 12 unique campaign traits that count as their own category. Unlike traditional traits, these do come with extensive and evocative background flavor - whether you are a surviving experiment of the dread Jagladine, an interplanar gladiator or a xenobiologist, the traits generally are intriguing and mechanically relevant - bursts of movement, for example, are intriguing and powerful. I found myself pretty excited about them and hope the saga will actually reference them in the plot to come. Cool and well-crafted section!


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games' beautiful 2-column full-color standard for the series and the pdf offers several beautiful full-color artworks for the new races, etc. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience, though they are a bit glitchy - they point towards e.g. sections of the intro and quite a few are called "_goback" instead of being properly named.


Will McCardell, Alexander Augunas and Neil Spicer have crafted a per se great player's guide. The races occupy the upper echelons of power and feel sufficiently brutal for the purposes of this AP. Power-wise, these aliens basically are in the upper echelon beyond the capability of e.g. the aasimar. For the high-powered gameplay we can expect from this AP, that works, though, and generally, the races seem to be pretty much on par. That being said, there are no favored class options for the races, in case you expected those.


This Player's Guide, as a whole, makes for a great offering for the demographic that wants to start Legendary Planet at 2nd level. Those of us, however, who wished to begin with the "fish out of water"-scenario via "The Assimilation Strain" are basically left hanging in the air. The enhanced power and campaign traits associated with the setting are useful and cool...but they ultimately don't help bridging the power gap between the races and terrestrial standard races. Whether it's "a simulation", a time-lapse or the like, the pdf doesn't really offer help reconciling the assumptions of this PG with the alternate, optional prequel. I expected to see some notes on upgrading regular characters to those herein or an alternate "unlocking"-system for the content herein...or something like that. As a whole, those of us who opted for this entry vector will get no help from this pdf, which is the one massive gripe I have against it. This does not make the Player's Guide bad, mind you - but it does limit its appeal and immediate usefulness for those of us who elected to run with the prequel.


This may not wreck the otherwise concise and well-written player's guide, but it does render the book less universally appealing than it otherwise would be. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4 stars.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Planet Player's Guide (Pathfinder)
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Legendary Villains: Evil Clerics
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/14/2016 09:19:10

An Endzeitgeist.com review


The third installment of Legendary Games' supplements containing powerful options for GMs crafting dastardly villains clocks in at 40 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page introduction, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 33 pages of content, so let's take a look!


From Randall Flagg to Thulsa Doom, once you start thinking about it, popular fiction is rife with great cleric-y villain antagonists and the introduction of this book does quote several of these beloved antagonists as inspirations to draw upon before moving towards a rather crucial aspect of evil clerics: As servants of the divine, they INSPIRE. No matter whether they are fanatics, the traumatized or simply bigots, the term of demagogue often conjures up the clergy, spittle-faced, whipping their believers into a frenzy...just as much as thinking of evil clerics immediately conjures up scenes of black-robed cultists of the demonic or the elder gods congregating in abandoned places, with pure, evil power and a divine plan most maleficent at their finger tips. Much to my positive surprise, we thus begin this supplement with disruptive actions evil clerics can engage in - from notes on evil cleric buildings utilizing the kingdom-building mechanics to special, evil cleric related downtime events, the pdf is off to a great start: Subverting recruits or greasing the rumor mill - the power and insidious strategies employed are well-crafted and add a so far neglected componnet of the threat that evil clerics represent.


Now we begin with a 10-level Prestige Class, the Sinweaver, who gets 2+Int skills, d8 HD, full channel energy progression, 9/10th spellcasting progression, 3/4 BAB-progression and 1/2 Will-save progression. As the name implies, these clerics are themed around sin - as such, they can, as a SP, detect sin - as a nitpick, though, this one does not specify how often it can be used - I assume at-will, but clarification would have helped here anyways. t 1st level, the PrC gets a sin pool that can hold up to 3 + class level points and it refreshes to 3+1/2 class level upon resting. These points power the sin powers of the class and can also be expended as a free action when casting a spell to increase CL or DC by 1. Also at first level, the PrC gains the ability to "eat" confessions - basically, after interacting with a creature verbally for 10 minutes, the sineater may use a standard action, adding sin points to her pool depending on the sin consumed, though this can be resisted with a Will-save. Sin points gained can range from 1 - 5 and the pdf provides guidance regarding on what constitutes sinful thoughts etc. Also at 1st level and every 2 levels thereafter, the PrC gains access to one of the aforementioned sin powers. These provide a pretty extensive array of options - from supernatural disguise self to a melee touch that deals damage and grants said damage as temporary hit points, temporary switching of energy type channeled or enhanced senses that scale with PrC-level attained, the selection of powers is interesting.


As a nitpick, sineaters could kitten the whole system - since sentient creatures have sinful surface thoughts, eating the sins of animals via speak with animals is possible - a minimum Int/type-caveat could have helped here. Similarly, the temporary hit points granted by aforementioned touch could easily be drawn from slaying kittens, since the hit points gained are dependent on the damage caused, not the actual hit points lost by the target. While this is obviously no problem for GM NPCs and similarly should not be an issue in most games, it does provide an imho unnecessary loophole. Weapon enhancement can also be found, though, oddly, the weapon properties available have not been italicized here. At 3rd level, the PrC gains an aura that can be maintained for 1 round per sinweaver level, granting the sinweaver a +4 bonus to Charisma while in effect and forces those nearby to save or "become distracted by sinful thoughts." Okay, two things: One, what is the action to activate the aura? Swift? Immediate, free? No idea. Secondly: What does that "distracted" mean? It's not a default condition in PFRPG. Does it work akin to the distracting weapon quality? Does it render flat-footed as per Distracted Shot? No idea. At 10th level, the PrC allows for the class to "force a final confession from a dying creature" and raise it as a variant shade made of sin, beholden to the sinweaver...which is okay...but once again, kittenable, lacks the information for the action required to use the ability...and feels disjointed. Pet as a capstone? Okay, I guess...but...why? Overall, I wanted to like this PrC, but it feels disjointed to me, with the actual sins not really featuring prominently. Similarly, the issues with ability activation and abuse potential disqualify this one at my table, even though I really wanted to like it and do like the idea behind it.


The pdf goes on to provide archetypes for evil clerics, with the first being the Deceiver, who loses medium armor and shield proficiency and gets a modified skill-list. They may choose one domain available to another god - at 4th level, the archetype can expend uses of channel energy to change the energy of the channel, domain powers or even prepare spells with the [good]-descriptor. Cool! The archetype can also conceal the nature of the unholy symbol, masking it as the holy symbol of another deity and may add class dependant bonuses to social skills made to deceive believers. They can also imitate auras. At 8th level, the archetype can shift the blame to others and spontaneous casting is modified in a unique manner, gaining spontaneous conversion into trickery-related spells. Cool archetype!


The second archetype herein is basically the Calistria warrior-cleric you may wanted in theme- the Sacred Stinger gets a modified proficiency and skill-list (exchanging shields with several martial weapons). The archetype receives diminished spellcasting, but also bonus feats at 1st level, 5th level and every 5 levels thereafter...or rogue talents; and yep, 10th and 20th level expand the available list. 8th level nets poison use. All in all, a balanced, neat archetype somewhat lacking in the fact that it could have used some unique tricks.


After these archetypes, we are introduced to a new domain, the disease domain, which lets you burst pustules and fire bolts of viscera at nearby foes (30 ft.), nauseating and sickening foes, usable 3 + Wis-mod times per day. Clerics with this domain can't ever drop to below 1 in ability scores via diseases, with 4th level eliminating detrimental effects and 8th allowing you to contagion via a touch 1/2 cleric level times per day. Solid, if not a domain that blew me away.


The pdf also features 4 regular feats: One lets you Craft Cursed Items (or add curses to existing ones), while the other 3 feature modifications of channel energy, allowing for the addition of the sickening condition, contagion or darkness, with the latter scaling at +4d6 to instead use deeper darkness. These would be basically the "normal" feats herein; feats I'd generally consider feasible for evil PCs. But, at least for me, the series has excelled in the super-powerful story-driven feats as pioneered by Clinton J. Boomer. This book similarly has an array of very complex feats, that nevertheless are a tad bit less extreme than in previous books - here, they're called "Avatar of Evil"-feats. This time around, they are based on the Unholy Scar feat, which means the symbol of your deity is etched into your skin as a birthmark, scarification of the like, acting as an unholy symbol. When using this to channel negative energy to damage the living, its DC is increased by 2 and also acts as a phylactery of faithfulness. Any action versus your deity, though, strikes you progressively more crippling afflictions: Bestow Curse, blindness and then, all loss of power.


Now, in all but name (since those are closed IP), the feats themselves align with the core Pathfinder deities, with e.g. Bestial Avatar, obviously, being the feat for followers of Rovagug. As a swift action, such clerics can enter a barbarian rage for rounds equal to 1/2 cleric levels, but sans rage powers. Multiclass cleric/barbarians instead count as 2 levels higher for rage power granted ability purposes. The respective feats also add an array of spells to the spell-list known of the respective cleric - one at 3rd level and one for each subsequent spell level. However, beyond the restrictions of the Unholy Scar feat, each feat does come with a drawback and a specific obedience to follow: The aforementioned feat penalizes all Int-based checks by -2 and requires that you 1/week destroy an object of significant importance to another person, with your end-goal being the unleashing of the dread god from its confinement. Those that follow Norgorber can memory lapse via a touch Cha-mod times per day, but also become susceptible to influence, as dread secrets corrode their resolve and may afflict them with amnesia if their mental attributes ever fall to 0. Servants of the Old Ones are afflicted by madness and must conjure forth beings from beyond, while diabolical avatars must broker lopsided contracts. The Lamashtan avatar feat has a couple of formatting relic (strike-through boxes) instead of hyphens in its formatting, but otherwise is disturbing enough, with divinely-prescribed pregnancy every 3 years. All in all, these feats are rather well-balanced, considering their serious powers and story-implications and I can generally see them work for player characters.


The pdf also provides new cleric spells - 8 to be precise. They allow the target to conjure forth uncontrolled cockroach swarms from the fallen, assume three variants of diabolical aspect, induce amnesia and a spell-version of the good ole' infernal contract trope. A sound-based, somewhat blasphemy-ish unearthly chorus, dependent in efficiency on HD of the affected, makes for a solid 4th-lvel spell-option, while the award for the most disturbing evil spell, perhaps ever, goes to monstrous birth, creating a horrific duplicate in the target, an abomination that proceeds to hamper the target and then burst forth to slay its parent. Shudder-worthy indeed, even as a male.


The pdf also sports an assortment of magic items, half of which, though, are cursed! Cloaks of weakness, phylacteries of heresy...the ideas here are cool. There also would be an unholy symbol that allows the target to replace a domain power with another domain power that's part of the patron deity's portfolio, an altar that facilitates the binding of planar allies, a Cha-enhancing perfume (and one that attracts the undead!), a cannibalistic hunger inducing blade (lacking "blade" once in a cosmetic glitch), enchanted funeral shrouds...pretty cool. A glove containing deadly syringes would be among the more unique items here.


However, it is here that the pdf once again amps up the awesome factor: I've you've followed my reviews for a while, you may noticed that I am a ridiculous fan of the grimoire concept Legendary Games used in the plug-ins for both Carrion Crown and Jade Regent - you know, legendary tomes containing forbidden knowledge and unique benefits. This book does feature two new grimoires, with the first being the Book of Assignations, which contains the scriptures of an evil cult of the Lady of Wasps herself, potentially providing access to a Wasp faux familiar. The book also teaches to channel Con-damaging poison with your channel and contains a variant of faithful hound, a wasp that can deliver wicked stings. Oh, and have I mentioned the spell that generates a whip of wasps, which can transform into a swarm? Yeah, pretty cool!


The second grimoire in this book would be Nythria's Memory Shards, penned by an erstwhile faithful devotee of Norgorber, ultimately as an act of defiance in the face of her betrayal by the deity. The feats contained in this book allows for the addition of bleed to channel and a very powerful option for 10th level characters to stagger those hit by Weapon Specialization weapons. The grimoire also contains 4 new spells, one of which is a memory flooding based slightly superior confusion. At 7th level, save-or-die-touch is not really a favorite, but stealing faces of living or deceased foes and obscure identity both will find their fans - as the pdf notes, Nythria's main achievement was the theft of hundreds of faces - basically, this grimoire is just what fans of A Song of Ice and Fire's faceless men wanted.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are good, though not as precise as usual for Legendary Games - I noticed a couple of minor hiccups here and there. Layout adheres to the two-column full-color standard usually employed in the Wrath of the Righteous plug-ins. The pdf sports a blending of new and old artwork - while all is high-quality, I still wished the grimoires had their own unique pieces instead of reused ones from previous grimoire-installments. With art being expensive, though, I understand this decision. The pdf comes with basic bookmarks that aren't in sequence and provide no nested bookmarks.


Jenny Jarzabski's evil clerics took me on a roller-coaster ride. I like the Ultimate Campaign-support and I cherished the grimoires. I was similarly positively surprised by the deceiver archetype and the fact that the complex avatar-feats actually work well with PCs as well. At the same time, the pdf, as a whole, felt somewhat less creative than the previous installments - I found myself a tad bit less enthused in the concepts evoked. And then there would be the PrC, which should be a great take on the Thassilonian cleric...but falls pretty short in multiple ways of what it sets out to do. As a totality, this pdf has some gems and some less refined pieces, with the gems elevating it above the fray. Hence, the book can be considered to be a solid, if not perfect purchase, with a rating of 3.5 stars, rounded up 4 for the purpose of this platform.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Villains: Evil Clerics
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Legendary Hybrids: Kinetic Shinobi
by Jesse S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/09/2016 11:57:22

I checked this out since I liked N. Jolly's other stuff, and found a very nicely put together hybrid class here. The mechanics work together well, including features from both parent classes while having enough separation to make the hybrid unique, allowing it to work with mechanics from both of its parent classes. The real shocking thing here was the massive amount of archetypes, filling a variety of niches that I wasn't expecting.


Artwise, it has the same level of polish that I've seen from other Legendary Games products along with the solid mechanics and writing that I would hope for here. If you like either the kineticist or the ninja, you're going to really enjoy this hybrid of the two!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Hybrids: Kinetic Shinobi
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Legendary Hybrids: Kinetic Shinobi
by Samantha H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/06/2016 21:08:02

If you've read Jolly's other works, this review is more or less uneccesary - $7 for a book of this quality is an absolute steal. Do yourself a favour; you won't regret it.


If you haven't read Jolly's other books, read the above paragraph anyway and see what you've been missing out on. I'm particularly attached to the Arsenal Sniper archetype, although I'm actually tempted to play the sample Shinobi provided!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Hybrids: Kinetic Shinobi
by Trent H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/06/2016 12:08:19

The flavor of the class is really cool, as is the mixing of ninjas and kinetic blast. theres also way more options than I was expecting for something like this, and the archetypes do a lot to completely change the class. Overall, there's just a lot of different ways to build this class, making it a sweet hybrid class. and the art is super nice too!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Monsters #36: Mesoamerica
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/24/2016 11:39:35

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This installment of the Mythic Monsters-series clocks in at 34 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page ToC, 2 pages of introduction, 3 pages of advertisement, 1 page inside of back cover, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 22 pages of content, so let's take a look!


We begin this installment of the Mythic Monsters-series with an unconventional offering - while the couatl has already been covered in Guardians of Good, this installment features the 10-level Plumed Servant-PrC that gets 1/2 BAB-progression and Will-save progression, 2+Int skills per level, 6/10 levels arcane spellcasting progression. Requiring 5 ranks in various skills and 2nd level arcane spells as well as a roleplaying prereq and 2 languages, these casters get an aura of good and a domain at 1st level and every 3 levels thereafter, though these only grant the domain powers. The spells associated with the domains can be learned as arcane spells when leveling up - and yes, this takes level-discrepancies between spell-lists into account. They gain a feather focus as an arcane bonded item in lieu of a divine focus and may use fly for class level minutes as an extraordinary ability. The higher levels provide detect alignment, stern gaze, scaling bonuses versus grapples and poison, elemental speech and may use plumes instead of potions for several items and they may make celestial armors from couatl feathers and skin instead of from gold. The fly-duration of the wings can btw. also be used as a resource to add metamagic to an array of spells. Detect thoughts, ethereal jaunt, timeless body and unlimited flight (coupled with freedom of movement) complement the PrC. Of course, this is MYTHIC monsters, so it should come as no surprise that full-blown mythic variants of the PrC's tricks have been included...which is nice - overall an okay option with cool flavor, but not a PrC that blew me away.


We are here for something different, right? Yep, the creatures! We begin with a classic: The CR 7/MR 3 Ahuizotl, whose voice mimicry is now supplemented by a fascination-causing illusion that drowns those unhappy enough to subject to it - and also extend its tail to a whopping 30 ft. A solid upgrade. The Cherufe,a t CR 16/MR 6 gets a retributive detonate, may generate ash storms, can throw exploding rocks, cause lava to burst forth by stomping and gets both fiery blood and aura - a great upgrade from the rather uninspired iteration in Bestiary 5 that makes the creature really come into its own!


At low levels, the CR 4/MR 1 chupacabra causes bleed damage and is a superb master of camouflage - and its chupar now causes mythic haste. Nice! The CR 10/MR 4 Guecubu can drag foes hit with it under the earth, burying them - awesome! Oh, and charges from burrowing and an aura of unluck complement another creature that now is a much better representation of the myths associated with it.


CR 21/ MR 8 and thus utterly deadly - the Lusca.Drawing power (and regeneration) from the carnage they inflict, decapitating bites, a mastery of sharks and a mythic-power-upgradeable bleed complement a lethal build. Peuchen get CR 12/MR 5 and may possess animals...and staggers foes that are constricted. With surprising coils, swift action vampiric touch and hypnotic scales, these can be considered, once again, a great upgrade for the base creature. At CR 6/MR 2, the saguaroi can grow additional limbs via mythic power for more slams or find even hidden sources of water - interesting potential ally....but not as cool as the mythic iteration of one of the coolest animals EVER: MYTHIC GIANT MANTIS-SHRIMP. Superb sight, great carapace, iterative pincer attacks (with the option to use mythic power to remove the penalties...) and sonic bursts that accompany their superbly fast strikes (including staggering foes) make this creature...GLORIOUS. And yes, their sight is incredible. Oh, and they get a superb full-color artwork and 3 variants.


The mythic tunche, at CR 21/MR 8 can absorb animals, plants and vermin, instantly killing them and incorporating them into their dread gestalt entity...which also allows them to split into multiple creatures. Oh, and they have a concentration-crippling aura and may use Rise of teh Jungle more than once...OUCH! The option to decrease their required actions for teleports also make them far more deadly than their already cool non-mythic brethren. Even more powerful, the mythic Tzitzimitl clocks in at CR 23/MR 9 and gets a lavish full-page artwork. Great: Eyebeams that combine dispelling, energy drain and damage...brutal. Their deeper darkness causes brutal cold damage, they can convert positive to negative energy and have an ability called apocalyptic harbinger that grants them some serious immunities. I really want to use this beast right now! (And yes, these guys have Sun Eater and Nailed to the Sky...'nuff said.


At the other end of the spectrum, namely at CR 1/MR 1, the xtabay is one of the most disturbing plot creatures I know - and that's all I'm going to say about them. The base creature is great; the mythic upgrade is also great, also thanks to one of several feats provided in this book to supplement the builds, here Mythic Feel Footfall. The CR 5/MR 2 Zuvembie can force the living to heed their call and can use nature's exile and power the undead they can animate as with mythic animate dead. Solid, if comparably less remarkable.


We end this pdf with a true legend - Xipe Totec, golden-skinned and clad in flayed skins. In case you didn't know - this is actually a deity in Aztec mythology, more popularly known as Tezcatlipoca and was the deity of life, death and rebirth. Either a former deity or on the verge of deific ascendancy, this CR 30/MR 10 killer with his flaying criticals, heart eating and the option to infuse creatures with spellcasting capacity, he ranks among the coolest builds in the series AND makes for a superb boss/plot-device...oh, and he's basically impossible to destroy. His artwork, btw., is absolutely awesome.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no grievous glitches. Layout adheres to Legendary Games two-column full color standard. The original pieces of full color art provided are high-quality and awesome. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.


Mike Welham and Jason Nelson have crafted a great array of monsters here - while personally, I'm not too blown away by the PrC in the beginning and while a precious few creatures could have used a bit more, as a whole, this is a truly evocative, unique array of adversaries. More important, at least to me as a professed aficionado of Aztec mythology and Mesoamerican folklore, the creatures herein just are infinitely closer to what they ought to be doing. Increasingly, I can observe this series spoiling me horribly regarding monsters - I expect by now that a creature has a couple of unique, flavorful tricks up its sleeve - so much so that the last two bestiaries, from a mechanic point of view, often disappointed me. This pdf's achievement, then, would lie in actually making these evocative, classic and oh so awesome beings finally live up to their myths. Mythic indeed. 5 stars + seal of approval.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Monsters #36: Mesoamerica
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Legendary Kineticists
by Jesse S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/12/2016 15:27:28

I received a review copy of this book, but no other compensation.


This book comes with a lot of content, and new archetypes for non kineticist, but the really cool part was the new mind element. It's more than twice the size of any first party elements and has a huge amount of customization. The wild talents alone left me with a ton of character ideas to play around with, and it has a way more occult feel than the base class, which is nice. Overall, I'd say the Mind element was the really big draw here even if everything else was great, just for the variety of abilities it opened up.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Kineticists
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Legendary Kineticists
by Andras Z. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/11/2016 22:45:26

I received a free copy of this product, but it certainly hasn't affected my view of it. N. Jolly, lead author of this product, brings us yet another stunning addition to the Kineticist base class introduced in Occult Adventures, this time published by Legendary Games, who, in my opinion, make excellent quality products with formatting, art, and editing on par with first party publishers.


The seven archetypes are each great in their own way. Two of them, the Awakened Bloodrager and Surge Fist Monk, are pretty run of the mill "base class but altered to have mechanics from another class" archetypes. Which is by no means a bad thing. Kineticist mechanics fit very well into the kits of Bloodragers and Monks, crunch-wise and fluff-wise, creating an interesting new take on ways to play them. The remaining archetypes include the True Psychic, a Kineticist archetype based on using the character's mind to control the world around them AND the minds of others, two bardic archetypes, one for the bard and one for the kineticist, the War Kineticist, and lastly, the Artistic Summoner.


I want to comment on Artistic Summoner in particular, because while at its core it is a "Kineticist with Summoner mechanics" archetype, it makes itself stand out with the path it takes. At its core, it uses CON instead of CHA (somewhat out of necessity), and the summoned creatures are treated as constructs, and doesn't change too much else. However, the direction its flavor took gave birth to the Sculpture Blast, which I think is great and practically iconic of the archetype. Basically, this composite blast creates a temporary lesser simulacrum of the target hit, loyal only to you and with special properties based on your choice of form. Certain talents provide additional options for this blast, and I'm surprised it's optional!


But the juiciest section of this book is the new element, Mind. Don't confuse it for the telekinetic powers of Aether, either. Aether interacts with the environment, while Mind takes the fight straight to your enemy's brain. In a way, it's kind of like certain psionic mechanics.


The book features a hefty selection of new talents and infusions for elements both new and old. While Mind is the clear focus of the product, new Void and Wood content really shines as well. The excellent diversity of options really makes you wish you could take more infusions and talents on kineticists so that you can go full aboleth on the world around you.


Lastly, Legendary Kineticists also features new kineticist-related feats, a few items, and a sample 12th level Neurokineticist character build complete with character background and ways to incorporate it into your game.


All-in-all, an excellent product that I think is well worth adding to your collection. The content provided in this book will open up quite a wealth of options for using kineticists in your games.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Kineticists
by Trent H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/11/2016 17:56:38

The amount of new talents here was really awesome, and the mind element has a TON of new talents to help it be bigger than other elements from the start. Loved the archetypes here, war kineticist is gona be something I use a lot. The other archetypes were pretty cool too, surge monk seems really fun, and I actually kind of want to play a gravity based void character with all hte cool stuff for them here. It's definitely a big step up from the wild talents in occult adventures and stuff, and i really hope we see another one of these. aslo the art was just great, loved the samel character too!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Starfall
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/10/2016 11:08:12

An Endzeitgeist.com review


Okay, this plug-in for Iron Gods...wait. Scratch that. This is basically no plug-in, it's a damn huge expansion. Starfall clocks in at 76 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of introduction, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 69 pages of content, so let's take a look!


This module is intended for 13th level characters, who should, in the process of this module, gain about 1.5 levels worth of XP. The pdf provides two technological items, the photon pistol (with stun and kill-settings) and the radiation suit and sports, creature-wise, the toadhemoth, which would be a CR 14 variant of the froghemoth. A mythic creature, the Qomok, first featured in Mythic Monsters: Aliens is also featured in this module with its full and deadly stats. The numerous maps in full color are also featured in player-friendly versions that lack tell-tale keys and legends, which is great indeed to so.


So, that's basically the gist of the basics - in order to go into more detail, I will have to, obviously, go into SPOILER-territory. Potential players should jump to the conclusion to avoid having their experience soured.


...


..


.


All right, only GMs still around? Excellent! The adventure begins inconspicuous enough when the PCs happen upon Kreth, who hails them in order to ask for their assistance: His tribe, the Shadow Crow nomads, have fallen victim to raiding giants that came upon them with a strange, crab-like entity. The expedition to reclaim the kidnapped individuals has, alas, been a total failure and resulted in the deaths of many capable members of the tribe - and this is where the PCs come in, as they track the brutes, deal with a behir in the wings and stumble upon a lethal ambush-site, where the crab-thing has prepared an ambush most lethal, for it is no mind-less brute, but actually one of the dreaded neh-thalggu. The fight is on...and then, something unprecedented happens - a strange silvery egg appears...and the brain collector seems to actually be terrified of it!


The weird apparatus emits a massive blast that paralyzes those hit and then proceeds to accelerate the PCs and the neh-thalggu into orbit, protecting them from the deadly journey...and then the fight ostensibly resumes encased by strange glass walls, as the residents of Ardent Hope observe the strange savages (the PCs) fighting. The Dzjaeri, pale, live-skinned humanoids observe this curious result of the malfunctioning AI within the strange silvery egg. After hostilities are resolved, the strange observes open communications, informing the PCs of the need to sterilize them before flooding the chamber with a strange, sickening hazard before opening the secured arrival rooms...and beginning negotiations. One of the Dzjaeri apologies for the inconvenience imposed upon the PCs (though they are held at gun-point for now) and explains their situation: It seems like the probe that brought the PCs to the Ardent Hope has been destroyed...which sees them stranded in orbit. Yay.


Things are even better - you see, the Ardent Hope is basically toast at this point: The Dzjaeri can't colonize and move down to Golarion since a bacterium that exists there triggers lethal brain aneurysms in their kind - and the neh-thalggu's collected brains seem to offer a means or at least a lead on how to fix this issue...for it's only a matter of time before the ship ceases to function. A previous malfunction has already compromised the Terrestial Enclosure and tainted it with the bacterium and, what's worse, neh-thalggus have actually escaped. 8 of them. The reactor has went offline as well and the air and nutrient processors went offline with it. Thousands of their people, still in cryogenic sleep, await a grim end indeed.


The deal offered by the Dzjaeri Jathis is simple: Eliminate the escaped neh-thalggus, secure the brains and reactivate the failed systems and he'll awaken an engineer and have him prepare an escape pod for the PCs. Sounds like a cake-walk, right? Well...no. The Ardent Hope, depicted in lavish detail, has visited quite a few worlds before it started to fall apart to this extent and thus, the terrestal enclave now houses some rather interesting creatures, like aforementioned toadhemoth, lethal flora or plant-elk herds. Aurumvoraxes and lukwatas complement the trip through jungles most alien and the hidden control room now sports an assortment of the dreaded brain-collectors.


Interesting, btw. - repairing the service lift etc. - all of that is not the finale. Not even close to it. A) The PCs won't find the neh-thalggu...at least not all of them. B) the qomok I mentioned before? Well. Now awake. And suddenly the timer starts ticking, mercilessly towards extinction, as the stardrive's self-destruct sequence has been initiated. You know, the drive that keep the huge asteroid-space-station afloat in orbit? Yes, this is a problem - a huge one. Worse yet, the countdown means that the PCs, from now on, must hurry - and the cat-and-mouse game has now been extended to also including a transdimensonal entity that basically is a take on Carpenter's "Thing" or dead Space's dread Necromorphs - the entity tries to assimilate basically anything it can get in its dread clutches. It is powerful (mythic even). It's smart and deadly - but for now, the PCs will have to brave hull breaches and tackle varied technologies in order to prevent the Ardent Hope from plunging drive-less into Golarion.


Whether you integrate the qomok hunt (and their gambit to make landfall and spread on Golarion...) into this frantic series of events or restructure it to do the action first and then the bug hunt, the module does accommodate for that. Speaking of which: Realize how my own review so far assumes, at least to some extent, cooperation with the Dzjaeri? Well, while this may be the default assumption of the module, it is by far not the only playstyle covered. My own players are far too mistrusting (and have, imho correctly, deduced that the Dzjaeri may well pose a threat to Golarion in the long run...brains and stuff...) and promptly turned upon them. The interesting component here may well be that a couple of unique robots and stats for the NPCs, security nodes etc. can also make this module work as a free for all, though this playstyle requires a slightly more experienced GM. Why does this work? Well, because the Ardent Hope actually sports A LOT of material regarding its environments, unique challenges and hazards and entities . you are not reduced to following the proposed script here, though this still feels very much like a story-driven module.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no grating accumulations of glitches. Layout adheres to legendary Games' beautiful two-column full-color standard and the pdf sports numerous artworks in full color, all of which are excellent, though fans of LG may know some of them from previous publications. The cartography is extensive and neat in its attention to detail, though not as impressive as the artwork. Still - the player-friendly maps are a huge boon and make for neat handouts!


What happens when Tom Philips and Mike Welham join forces? Awesome, that's what. Starfall is a massive module with potentially apocalyptic consequences, should the PCs fail. While the beginning is a classic, lackluster-looking bait-and-switch, that is by design and interesting. The new race/culture depicted herein is equal parts interesting and disturbing and would make for a great cast of allies...or villains. The use of the powerful entities, the switching of tempos from exploration to frantic hustling for one's life and the different themes evoked throughout the module nonetheless coalesce into a concise whole that makes for a long, fun module that not only works within Iron Gods, but makes for a pretty seamless insertion into most campaigns - though, obviously, characters even halfway capable regarding technology should be assumed. Then again, PCs that do not try to eradicate the Dzjaeri always have these guys to fall back on, which means that not even this is a requirement.


All in all, this module is fun, diverse, has some unique challenges and plenty of potential to be customized for various vastly diverging playstyles. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Starfall
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