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Blade of the Iron Throne Color Edition
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/02/2016 00:59:58

Given the similarity and obscurity of both titles, this review will mostly be a comparison to The Riddle of Steel by Jake Norwood on a few key areas. Overall, it modifies the system of TRoS, which I thought was mechanically excellent but lacking focus, towards low fantasy sword and sorcery (à la Conan the Barbarian). While still mostly realistic, BIT intentionally adopts a more cinematic feel.

CHARACTER SYSTEM TRoS' elaborate stat system (Strength, Agility, Toughness, Endurance, Health; Willpower, Wit, Mental Aptitude, Social, Perception) is reduced to six loosely defined stats: Brawn, Daring, Tenacity, Heart, Sagacity and Cunning. Personally, I was a fan of the way actions often involved multiple stats in TRoS, however I recognise that many people would welcome this simplification. It is worth noting, however, that most physical tasks (including all melee combat) rely on Brawn exclusively, which encompasses ST, TO, EN and HT in the old system (STR & CON for the D&D equivalent). This may lead to homogenisation of combat-orientated characters.

Spiritual Attributes are replaced with four Passions, which act more or less in the same way. Each Passion essentially describes a story arc for the character and, unlike in TRoS, cannot be cashed in for Karma (XP) until "resolved". Overall, I like the way Passions work, although I don't like the way the game leaves players to create Passions completely on their own. This seems like lazy design.

Another addition is the Drama system. Players can spend a Drama point to influence the narrative in one of several favourable ways. I think this is a good inclusion, adding to the whole cinematic, character-driven feel of BIT. In the base rules, Drama points are awarded to players when the GM makes one of these same moves. I don't like this because several of the options make no sense on the GM's end and the rest are significantly less valuable to the GM than to the players. Instead, I think they work better in exchange for GM intrusions (google "Numenera GM intrusion").

COMBAT The overall system and moves are basically the same as TRoS, simplified slightly. As noted above, Brawn now seems to be used for everything. The biggest change, which I consider a big improvement, is the introduction of Limelights. TRoS was notorious for the difficulty of handling large, multi-character fights, with each character making a move one exchange at a time. Instead, BIT grants each player a Limelight, which encompasses their PC and all NPCs affecting them directly in the relevant time frame. The characters within a Limelight fight until a dramatic moment (a foe is defeated, the PC is wounded, etc.) at which point the focus shifts to another PC and their Limelight begins. Presumably multiple PCs fighting a single opponent would have their Limelights combined. Multiple combatants fighting a single opponent can be handled easily enough through the system of Terrain Checks. Overall, Limelights are a simple, effective solution to the groupfighting problem in TRoS, as long as players don't mind the cinematic feel.

MAGIC Magic in BIT moves away from the scientific feel of TRoS towards a dark fantasy feel in line with the sword and sorcery tales it seeks to emulate. Unfortunately, the new system is very poorly fleshed out. Thematically, magic is some nebulous hostile force. The rulebook straight up tells GMs to make it up as suits their campaign. Some people might not mind but once again I find this incredibly lazy. Mechanically, there are 8 Mysteries (schools/disciplines) of magic which each essentially encompass a single spell. Overall, I would stick to combat and keep magic as a background element.

CAMPAIGN-BUILDING/GM TOOLS There's almost nothing. Other than some flavour text and background about the sword and sorcery genre, there's very little to help GMs create the sorts of campaigns and narratives that the game purports to be about. BIT falls very much in the "here're the rules, you're the GM, you figure it out" camp of roleplaying games.

CONCLUSION I'm aware that this review reads rather negatively. I'd like to reiterate that I do like BIT and think it a worthwhile purchase. While I prefer TRoS personally, I recognise that BIT improves on it in several key ways and have brought many of its systems back into TRoS.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Blade of the Iron Throne Color Edition
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Blade of the Iron Throne Color Edition
by Marc S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/16/2015 13:01:05

For the PDF alone I'd give 5 Stars! I haven't played it yet, but the rules seem worth their money.

However, the quality of the soft cover print ist less than bad. For 34 $ I could have printed that myself in a better quality. The pages are unbelievably thin and seem to have not taken the amount of ink well.

I've uploaded a picture where you can see the wet pages: http://oi65.tinypic.com/344w47m.jpg

The whole book just seems very cheap. I will not order a printed copy again.

Buy the PDF though, it's good.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Hi Marc, I am sorry that you received such a poor copy. I myself have ordered a number of copies of this very same book, and on one occasion did receive a copy in the exact same condition as shown in your photo. I reached out to DTRPG customer service and quickly got it replaced. The normal book is better than what you received in all respects. Regard, Phil
Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
by Trystin K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/07/2015 16:25:17

Blade of the Iron Throne is a narrative-focused Sword and Sorcery RPG with a very complex combat system.

It took me awhile to fully understand all the rules, and combat was really tricky to get pinned down just right, but the designers are very active on their forums and were always ready to not only answer my questions, but to explain why. Once we got past the initial hiccups of learning a new system, it opened a new world to us. My group is a long-time D&D group, so there was a lot of adjustment from the old d20 system, but we've since dropped D&D entirely and replaced it with Blade.

What Blade offered us was a complex combat system that was far more exciting and deadly than the old "I attack, rolled an 18, I hit for 6 points" that D&D brings to the table. Instead you've got feints, parries, ripostes, and a dozen or more options for how to handle each round, each of which provides distinct pros and cons for use. It gives dozens of weapons, all with their own stats, benefits and drawbacks. Three different bastard swords, even! Blade gave us a reason to use a halberd, when D&D only punished you for using reach weapons. It provided armor rules that are based on real-world armor, not the D&D mess.

Blade taught us the error of min-maxing. In D&D, your fighter needs to have the highest strength possible, and there is no reason not to do so. Blade forces you to make tough choices, where taking all stats means your character suffers from mental or physical maladies, or begins the game under a curse from a powerful sorcerer, or some other similar fault to overcome. You have to really weigh your options carefully, and your character will have flaws and weaknesses; that's what makes your character interesting.

It's got a really fun magic system that - unlike D&D - isn't just dozens of pages of fireball variations. It's all got this feel of... witchcraft, or voodoo, or some dark art, rather than book knowledge from dusty old libraries. The spells are limited, and very powerful. They carry with them the possibility of taint, and some can fail catastrophically.

It places heavy emphasis on role-playing, with Passion Attributes. These are the things your character is passionate about, what drives him, what keeps him going when the chips are down. These also control how your character advances and grows - not by "killing bad guys", but by chasing his dreams, following his heart, and seeking out what's most important to him.

Are there problems? Of course, nobody is perfect. The book's layout could be better, and the index isn't particularly helpful. The rules can be a little confusing to learn in a vacuum, but the forums are a great resource and the designers are very helpful.

All in all, it's a great game to play, and it really changed our mindset when playing other games as well. It really forces you out of the "min-max" mindset, teaches the value of character flaws, and rewards you for fighting battles with your head, rather than just tossing dice to calculate damage.

Well-worth every penny, and then some.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
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Creator Reply:
Thank you sir, we are grateful for your review and happy your group is having fun!
Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
by Paxton K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/07/2015 12:04:18

I REALLY wanted to love this game. They have an excellent grasp on the genre and they designed it so it could fit into many different S&S worlds. My initial idea was a "Thieves World" campaign.

Then I really dug into the rules. Much can be customized with in its frame work. That framework has problems.

They really tried to break out of the conventional mold, even stating "Don't loot the bodies". Perhaps a gaming first.

It is a VERY detailed man to man combat system. It is actually more detailed than an Avalon Hill board game called "Gladiator". The smallest move counts for something. Instead of normal "rounds", they have two square off and duke it out until something happens. Then its the next players turn. Combat is deadly and something will happen soon enough; but with more than a couple of players, they might want to bring a book.

Character generation is suppose to be dynamic but it really didn't do anything that FATE or similar games did. Yes, the combat options are super intense; but they are geared to man to man, not man to lion, tiger or bear. And it losses a lot if a group off characters are trying bring down a beast.

Perhaps the part that annoyed me most was the "Passions Attributes". You can have a great background and still have no real "Passion" besides "Going to the Big City"; but you are suppose to have 4 and one will add to your dice to and then one from anything related. Big City: 1 die, Survive: 3 die; become best swordsman: 1 die; defend my honor: 1 die. Power gamers just got 6 die in every combat! 4 "Passion Attributes" were just to many.

Another problem is that skills can default to attributes to easily. No point putting just a couple of points here and there, just stack Attributes. The different styles of combat were neat; but way to complicated for anyone but wargamers.

The book looks good but rules are flung all over the book. Out of 370 some pages, 40 are devoted to a recycled campaign world and the rest are pretty much charts. YUP! That's how many charts go into a one on one battle.

I really liked their philosophy. That is why I rate this as a 2 instead of a one. Useful for some ideas and maybe parts of the combat system.

One last interesting note. I read their forums to see if I was missing something. I really wanted this game to work. They provide no equipment list.

They have detailed attack zones and just list things armor is made of. You fill in the blanks. I might have been less bothered by this except THEY ARE WRONG about the types. They spent so much time trying to "break stereo types" and they are just as guilty.

This game is not all bad. A Gladiator campaign could work really well.

They didn't list armor to avoid the Middle Ages trap. Yet they pulled every Middle Ages melee attack straight from fantasy fiction.

They claim a sword is a sword. They all work the same.

Yea, they sure do...



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Hi Paxton, Thanks for taking the time to create your review! I have posted it over at our forums to get some feedback from the Blade community. The new thread is called \"New Review posted on DTRPG\". Regards, Phil
Blade of the Iron Throne Color Edition
by Phillip M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/23/2015 19:10:25

To be fair, it seems to be everything the publisher's blurb says it is - combat heavy (extremely so - and not a bad thing in and of itself).

The only (and main) gripe I have is that there is a lack of Tabular information overall - instead of being easily accessible and at your fingertips, a lot of vital information is buried deep in masses of un-headinged text ... and the majority of the existing tables that are actually quite important are either at the very end of the book or, often, at the end of the entire section they apply to. Not conducive to ease of learning or ease of play ... especially if you are trying to get new players (even experienced ones).

I expect that once you can get past the learning curve it might get somewhat easier.

That said, it does seem to capture the essence of Conan style low magic, brutal combat, Swords and Sorcery ...



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Blade of the Iron Throne Color Edition
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Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
by Thierry L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/24/2014 03:32:49

Excellent re-writing of the Riddle of Steel. The core mechanics of combat are now streamlined and fully playable ! Many issues have been solved or clarified, some examples: Unbalanced TN rating : solved by introducing d12 ! Combat stance, initiative : clarified Combat against multiple opponents : clarified (but still difficult !) Deadly effect of aimed shots : solved Unrealistic effect of high "stamina": solved And so on... That's a very serious job, made by passionnates that have practiced the game again and again, obviously. Several clever innovation with the character creation and attributes too, the Passion Attributes rules have been changed for more realism, a very important point since it is the other innovation of the game that really changes how people play their character.

For those of you who've never played the riddle of steel before, it's really worth trying with that edition of the Blade of the Iron Throne.

Here come the critics now : thinking about players new to the game, it might be difficult to understand the rules, especially those of the passion attributes, sometimes it's as if rules have been written for people who already played the Riddle of Steel. Fortunately help should be available at their forum. And second, it would be great if the annexes could also contain the numerous table needed for combat ! (but I'm sure this point is going to be corrected soon)

CONGRATULATIONS GUYS FOR THIS RELEASE !!!!!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
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Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
by Peter C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/01/2014 17:37:14

Very detailed combat, interesting character creation rules and I think possibly one of the best rules sets for representing the Sword and Sorcery genre. My only regret is, that while it's thematic to the genre - I wishe there weren't naked women on the borders of every page. it makes it much harder to read in public.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
by Pawel K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/21/2014 15:48:19

While Blade refines some of the elements of Riddle of Steel its magic is extremely simplistic (7 spell schools containing a total of one spell each) compared to the epic ( if imbalanced) feel of Riddle of Steel magic, and it does not significantly improve the main shortcomings of Riddle - social interaction is still simplistic at best. Also, the handbook does not contain a Character Sheet.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Hi Pawel! Thank you for taking the time to make a review. Below is a link to an in-depth fan published review of BotIT. I think it provides a fair amount of background concerning our team\'s design choices for this game. http://rpggeek.com/thread/1203290/dethroning-pretenders Thanks for supporting Blade! The Blade Team
Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
by Daniel O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/14/2014 11:43:41

After hearing a lot of good things about "The Riddle of Steel" (but sadly never having a chance to try it out), I was pleasantly surprised when this spiritual successor was announced.

"Blade of the Iron Throne" (no affiliation to "A Song of Ice and Fire", though the system is certainly more fitting to the setting than say D&D) is a low fantasy roleplaying game with a heavy slant towards the Sword & Sorcery tales of the pulp era; a genre in which society is corrupt and/or lawless, nonhuman races have either long gone extinct or become secluded, monsters are rare and never used as cannon fodder, and magic is both powerful and dangerous to its user. Characters will therefore not exactly walk around with a bag full of magical items, and even money is handled quite abstractly (as treasure is just an excuse for S&S heroes to go adventuring; not that they are particularly good at keeping it, anyways...)

Like it's predecessor, BotIT is a success-based dice pool system, with the most obvious change being the switch from d10 to d12. The TN is usually 7 (the typical "You roughly get one success for every two dice" setup for these kinds of systems), but there are other TNs used, especially to simulate the different "handling" of the various weapons and shields. Very servicable and lightweight.

Character creation is done in a similar style to older Shadowrun editions, in that you set priorities for various aspects of your character. Freshly created characters can almost max out certain aspects, but are very flawed in others. An interesting meta-aspect of the rules allows players and the game master to earn "karma", which they can spend to give their next character a head start.

Two very interesting aspects of a character are Assets and Passion Attributes. Assets are like Advantages/Disadvantages seen in other systems, but most Assets can be both good and bad (at the same time, no less!). A big character for example can be very intimidating, but also clumsy. This offers some nice roleplaying fodder, as player characters have to come to terms with their flaws, shaping them into something useful in the process.

Passion Attributes represent the goals and maxims of a character. They give the GM an idea what the player wants to expect to see in the campaign, and they increase and change based on campaign events. Points gained in a Passion Attribute can be spend for character advancement, and they also give the character a helpful dice pool boost should a conflict directly involve one of them. It is therefore wise for the player characters to avoid unnecessary confrontations not related to their goals.

The centerpiece of BotIT is its combat system. It uses a very cinematic "limelight" system: Instead of a rigid initiative system, every fight is instead broken up into scenes focusing on a different important character (even if the scenes take place at the same time). Each scene can take any number of rounds, usually ending when the opponent is slain or something dramatic happens. A rather clever, narrative-based system.

A round is of course more rigidly defined, as this is where the actual combat happens. Every character involved in the round has a pool of dice depending on their weapon proficiency. This pool has to be divided over two "Exchanges" (the actual attack/defense procedure). A plethora of available maneuvers and a nice back and forth between attacker and defender makes this a very tactical system in which knowing how to properly spend your dice is just as important as just having a big dice pool.

A realistic combat system would of course be nothing without hit location tables (fans of the Warhammer roleplaying games would feel right at home here). While ranged combat uses the typical "Roll for a random location, which you can then change slightly depending on taking an optional to hit penalty", melee attacks require you to pick a rough hit area (which makes sense as you don't just swing at the opponent as a whole, but at the approximate location you like to hit). This makes hits to the head more frequent than in other systems, but that's why helmets are important. And rest be assured: heavy wounds in other locations are barely less lethal.

Interestingly, the game doesn't actually use a map for combat. Maneuvering is instead approximated in terrain checks, which you can make to get into a more favorable position, or maneuver around a group of enemies so that only one of them can actually attack you (and trust me, you don't want to fight multiple enemies at the same time).

Overall, the system is quite enjoyable and very recommended for historical / low fantasy settings. It manages to be realistic while not actually being all that complicated. To reduce the grittiness, there are two optional rules: One allows player characters to shrug off wounds with pure willpower, whereas the other one gives bonuses to half-naked barbarians (basically the "chainmail bikin" rule).

A note on the score: I'd rather set it to 4 1/2 as there are some little quirks to the book, which may bring it down to 4 or even 3 1/2 depending on your taste:

  • the character sheet mentioned in the book can only be downloaded from the official site, and only after registering (but why wouldn't you? The creators and other fans give you lightning fast replies to your questions)

  • around a handful of rules are not as clear as I'd hope to, though the RAI is often quite obvious

  • the melee weapon list is not sorted alphabetically, but by general weapon type (blades, axes and blunt weapons, sticks with pointy bits). This can be quite confusing the first time around. Then again, the list covers just about any weapon from any era and continent in just 11 pages that go by quite fast.

(Man, this review got a bit long; to anyone who got this far: thanks :D ! )



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Thank you sir, we are most grateful for the thoughtful review, and are glad you are enjoying the game! - The Blade Team
Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
by Fernando D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/22/2014 01:57:26

As a gamer, I was unaware that S&S had a system such as TRoS (The Riddle of Steel) until a few years ago. While I never got to run that system, I admired its set up, commitment to reality in combat, and a gritty feel to the world. Blade has taken the TRoS system and eliminated the awkward bits and added player driven story elements which make for a far richer gaming experience than that of a Referee driven system.

Character generation is very similar to TRoS making the characters choose their strengths and weaknesses. To be good in one thing, the character will be deficient someplace else. This can be offset with the Karma system (a brilliant idea). The longer a character is played and the more vigorously the player drives the story, the more likely they are to further their Passions, earning more passion points, which can be spent to improve their abilities and skills which builds Karma. The next character will profit from that activity by having fewer weaknesses. This system can also be applied to the Referee so when someone else runs the game for them, they are not left far behind. A brilliant and long deserved system to encourage long suffering GMs to run dynamic games.

The Limelight combat system allows for a fluid, cinematic feel to combat. It focuses upon one character until something significant happens in that combat, someone gets wounded, loses their weapon, dies, runs, etc. It then moves to the next character in the list leaving ambiguity as to what truly happened. Which adds to the excitement of the combat as the player eagerly awaits the next time the camera is on them to finish the fight or find out if they live.

Combat resolution is fast and furious with little ambiguity of how things are done once the players and Referee are used to how things are done. It is akin to the 7th Sea and Legend of the 5 Rings roll and keep system. The manuever based system can truly bring combat alive and it is very difficult to exploit the system as there is always a counter to an attack. No one in invincible, a dagger to the chest will ruin the day of a character just as much as being cloven in two by a great sword.

Sorcery works much like it appears in the S&S novels. It is extra-ordinarily powerful but requires significant dedication to the Art to make it useful in more than a very limited scope. Sorcery can be more dangerous to the sorcerer should they be unprepared or push themselves too far risking tainting themselves with other worldly power turning the mundane world against them and causing themselves all too real harm. Magic always comes with a price.

Overall, I find Blade a welcome relief from the level based d20, overly complex games where characters can dish out and take massive amounts of punishment. Combat is deadly serious and should be very carefully considered before engaged in, as it should be. The price is very low and for the rewarding experience that it provides is cheap at 3 times the price.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Thank you for the wonderful review! We are glad that you enjoy the game! Best Regards, The Blade Team
Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
by Michael H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/09/2013 08:00:20

As a player and GM who remembers the old TROS system I was thrilled to find that someone had revisted the TROS idea and released a updated version. I am gald to say the Blade has all the best bits of TROS without some of the bad parts. The combat system is essenselly the same only the idea of focusing on one characters fight at a time is explained better and runs better using the limelight system in Blade. Sorcery has been altered yet still contains the level of power from TROS, you don't mess with sorcerers in this game. The alterations help make the sorcery system easier to run, and the backlash idea has been made more immediate and effective. Overall this is a fantastic system for the Swords & Sorcery world, and just as good for many other fantasy campaigns.

My only niggle, and the reason why I have not given the product a full 5 stars is that there is no character sheet included in the PDF, or at least my downloaded version does not include one. Which makes it difficult to run the system straight away. If this is fixed then this system is easily a 5 out of 5 and is totally recommended.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Hi Michael! Thank you for the kind review! For the Blade character sheet, please sign up at http://bladeoftheironthrone.com and the download area will become available to you. The character sheet is among the downloads. Best Regards, The Blade Team
Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
by Jorge G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/16/2013 10:21:30

Looks like a great system to play in a S&S wolrd.

The combat looks fully detailed as well as the character creation. The combat maybe too much dangerous for risky PC but that´s also part of this attractive game.

Good game, Good price.... what are you waiting!! ;-)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
by Guy C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/09/2013 18:54:55

I want to express my full support and approval of the development of this project. I admire the 'indie' endeavor; it is a great venue for fresh ideas. As goes my initial reactions to Blade Of The Iron Throne, I have been working with 'advanced combat systems' in RPGs for some time - systems exemplified by Aria, RuneQuest 6E, The Riddle Of Steel; combat systems characterized by Maneuvers, Action-points, small time segments, Effects. Now, Blade Of The Iron Throne has given new life to the TROS 'aesthetic', and has provided a great opportunity for conceptual and technical development of that system. I emphatically approve, and I am very appreciative and grateful for the collective 'forum-oriented' work and enthusiasm that is its foundation. The only major (tentative) criticism I have thus far is the particular emphasis on the Limelight system. Personally, I wish it was officially optional, with a 'round-by-round' method based more on the passage of Simulationist, tactical time being the mainstream method. My impromptu test group demo-ed some scenarios such as this: two characters (staunchly dedicated to each other) were fighting opponents in close-quarters; Player A's Limelight proceeded for 6 routine rounds, when he was suddenly killed; Player B's Limelight went for 1 Round, where he dropped his opponent (an unforeseen occurrence); the question begged was... "What was Player B doing for 5 Rounds while his blood-brother could have used his aid?" We saw too much of a situational liability in trying to "snap-back" time, or to treat time so fluidly non-specific and malleable as to test the bounds of logic and realism. Logic and realism are two prime values in a combat system such as this, and I feel the Limelight system may let an unbalanced 'Gamist-Narrativist' condition creep in for some styles/ideologies of gameplay. In other words, it might unintentionally dummy-down the original intent of tactical integrity in the real-time combat situation. My reading/testing of the system is early, and tentative. Overall, great work on a great idea!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Hi Guy, Thank you for the positive review! I have posted your thoughts for further discussion at our game's website, http://bladeoftheironthrone.com , and invite you to share in the discussion! Best Wishes, The Blade Team
Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
by adam p. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/27/2013 09:34:15

As it stands I can only really comment on the product itself. This is a black and white pdf with no art. That being said, it is somewhat of a mess. The organization of information looks a lot more like the notes of a homemade RPG than a finished product. The bookmarks work well though and after a little familiarization you can easily find what you need. If you plan on playing while using this pdf be prepared to hop from bookmark to bookmark frantically. The price is somewhat high for the manifesto quality of the product. If you are on the fence about this one I would just wait for something more accessible. If you have read up on it and it is something you are truly interested in, proceed.

At first I was not a fan. I read through the 300 some pages in about an hour and had to constantly hop backward to find out what the abbreviation the writers were using meant. Once I got over the general low production quality (taking into account that I was prepared for an artless and text-only file) I began to find quite a few things to enjoy about the system itself. The combat is very cinematic and good ideas are everywhere in the text. I do not personally feel that kind of in-depth approach suits the genre. Conan cleaved,stabbed, and struck but very rarely went into a series of parries or played cat-and-mouse with his opponents. The combat, after a few trial runs, seems a little slow for the genre as well. Keep in mind, none of this means the system is bad. If you are looking for cool-as-hell fight scenes this is definitely a good one for you.

This version offers a lot for people who are willing to dig for it and know what they want to find when they are done digging. If you have any hesitation about purchasing this don't do it. Wait for a more professional version. If you want a very tactical combat system with a lot of good ideas and are willing to sift through 330 pages to get a full understanding, then you should go right ahead.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Hi Adam, and thanks for the thoughtful review! We are glad that you found a good number of points about the game to enjoy! Both our next color and B&W offerings will feature exciting original art, and will hopefully be (organization and polish-wise) a bit more to your liking. I encourage you to join us at http://bladeoftheironthrone.com, as we do check our ego's at the door and take suggestions seriously! Best Regards, The Blade Team
Blade of the Iron Throne B&W Edition
by Ian P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/09/2013 06:10:19

Ever since "The Companion" was released for "The Riddle of Steel" this is what we've been waiting for: a successor to TRoS that places player-driven story ahead of game world exploration, that has a manoeuvre-driven combat system that emphasizes player tactics over character sheet numbers, and has a unified set of mechanics free of the anomalies of the original game. In "Blade of the Iron Throne" we have that game.

Blade has many features that I like as referee and as player. The Limelight concept absolutely rocks, as Blade does away with the wargaming-inspired "I go/You go" approach to combat forever. Loot, wherein coinage is abstracted, frees the player (and referee) from the tyranny of accounting. PAs are clean and clearly linked to the player's immediate (rather than perpetual) goals for their character.

This game is very different to mainstream games. It demands a lot of the player. It demands a lot of the referee. In return it gives a gaming experience mainstream RPG simply cannot match. And it does that session after session, week after week, month after month.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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