DriveThruRPG.com
Recherche









Retour
Autres commentaires laissés par cet éditeur:
Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG
par Kevin K. [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 05/03/2017 19:24:21

"GLORY & GOLD WON BY SORCERY & SWORD"

Dungeon Crawl Classics Role Playing Game (DCC) by Goodman Games is a truly remarkable RPG. If you see it on the shelf your first thought may be, "holy crap, that book is huge, that game has got to be bloated (or insert other term for a "big" game)". If you get past that initial shock though, DCC RPG will surprise you. It's actually quite rules-light. DCC favors an old-school feel of rulings rather than rules. What makes the book huge is how the spell system works.

See, casting spells in DCC is a big deal. The second paragraph in the magic chapter sums up the feel perfectly. "Summoning magical energies is arduous, expensive, and dangerous. No wizard does it lightly. As a result, there are no mundane magics, no spells used simply to light a corridor, for example. Use a torch, fool; it is much safer!" Each spell has an expansive table because you make a spell check and the result determines that instance's effects. Basically, while you know magic missile produces missiles of....magic, whether you get one mote of arcane energy or turn into a machine gun of magical onslaught depends on your casting check (roll) on that turn. Now, this is quite an oversimplification of the casting system but what I am trying to stress is the book totals more than 476 pages. 174 pages of that are spells!

Okay, so the book is big. Well, if you want to learn the general mechanics, character options, equipment, and combat rules then those are all contained within 91 pages. Imagine that, less than 100 pages and you have more than a general understanding of the game. Cool? Cool!

Enough about the "size" of the book. Let's get into some of the other awesome bits about DCC RPG.

Wanna play a completely gonzo game starting out as peasants who tromp into a dungeon and are destroyed by droves? Awesome, that's just what the DCC 0-Level funnel was designed for. Basically you roll up a (nearly) randomly Player Character and head into the dungeon. Actually you roll up a bunch of 0-levels (probably between 3-4 depending on the number of players and the needs of the adventure) and descend into the abyss.

What do these PCs look like? Well, they have some ability scores (including a Luck stat, isn't that awesome? Basically how Lucky you are and you can "burn" luck to help you when you are in need of some extra awesomeness!), some hit points, a measly amount of coin (they are peasants usually), a randomly determined piece of equipment, an occupation (and hey, the occupation may choose your race like Elf, Halfling, or Dwarf. More on this later). Your occupation also gives you one weapon and training in that weapon plus some trade goods!

Classes in DCC RPG are a little different than modern D&D like games. Humans get a choice of Cleric ("the militant servant of a god"), Thief, Warrior, or Wizard. Each of these classes has their own flavor and way of interacting in the adventuring world. Demi-Human, Dwarf, Elf, and Halfling immediately enter into their own racial class. The Dwarf is very similar to the Warrior but with its own flair. The Halfling is kinda like a combination of Thief and a little Warrior with some Halfling specific abilities as well. The Elf is a magic user that can also be pretty decent with a weapon as well. Sorta like a combo of Warrior and Wizard but...only in certain ways.

Changing gears now, Goodman Games set out with the goal of producing a one-book RPG so everything you need as a Judge (the DCC RPG term for Game Master) is including in this single volume as well. Things like Quests, Judges Rules, Magic Items, and Monsters are all inside the book. Also, as a Judge Goodman Games through in a couple of adventures to help you get the feel of the game. The 4th printing of DCC includes a 0-Level funnel and an adventure for characters of levels 1-3.

I could go on and on about the DCC RPG book but really, you should pick it up and give it a read!

How about in play? What's it like?

I've ran two 0-Level funnels. One in which the characters stayed 0-Level and another where the characters leveled up part way through and became 1st level characters because I wanted to get a taste for what 1st level characters are like. Both times I ran DCC I used the Sailors on the Starless Sea adventure by Harley Stroh (buy here or here). I'll review this adventure sometime in the future but it's awesome!

The game is wacky and zany! DCC RPG uses a dice chain rather than a large amount of modifiers. On the dice chain are dice that folks may not be used to (Zocchi dice like d14, d16, d24, etc.) but DCC RPG includes conversions for people who don't want to buy more dice (who doesn't want that) or you can use the awesomely available Crawler's Companion App (available in tons of places by Purple Sorcerer). Anyway, between the randomness of dice, the off-the-wall mentality of DCC RPG and Goodman Games' reliance and stressing of Appendix N, DCC RPG is a fantastic experience that is sure to rock your game table.

I'm trying to not gush on and on about DCC RPG but seriously, it's a good time. You should check it out!

Okay, I can't stop myself. Wanna know more about DCC RPG? You should join up with the DCC Community on Google Plus (G+) or the Goodman Games Forum.



Classement:
[5 sur 5 étoiles!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

Fifth Edition Fantasy #1: Glitterdoom
par Michael W. [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 02/26/2017 21:02:06

I have all of the 5e fantasy modules and this is the third I've run. Like the others it takes just a bit longer than one session (if you're playing only three or four hours). I fit this story into Faerun (put it in the Giant's Run mountains, changed the evil dwarf god to Abatthor) as a way to start a Faerun campaign. I nerfed the hit points a bit for some of the villains to make this useable with first level characters.

I like the idea of exhaustian levels in addition to normal damage.

All around good adventure.



Classement:
[5 sur 5 étoiles!]
Fifth Edition Fantasy #1: Glitterdoom
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG
par Doug B. [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 02/18/2017 12:50:08

A beautiful RPG that schluffs off the excess baggage that weighs down some other fantasy RPG's. It presents a fun, dynamic system that makes play exciting with wonderful results designed to inject that feel you had when you first dove into RPG's. Very simple to use, yet complex enough to spark the imagination. The system is free of the things that bog down an overly crunchy system and boils it down, leaving the joy of role-playing.



Classement:
[5 sur 5 étoiles!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

Xcrawl: Louisiana Crawl (DCC RPG Edition)
par Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Ajoutée: 01/13/2017 04:36:48

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This Xcrawl-module clocks in at 20 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 16 pages of content. It should be noted that both editorial and SRD are actually not the respective penultimate pages - relevant if you're like me and tend to print out modules.

All right, before we dive into the nit and grit of this module for 3rd level characters, it should be noted that 100% of the sales go towards helping the flooded areas of Louisiana. While the shocking images of Katrina still are vivid in our memory, you may not necessarily know that the nameless, less catchy and media-marketable storms dropped thrice this amount...so yeah, it's a module for a good cause.

One more thing, since I wager not all of my readers will be familiar with Xcrawl. First of all, you may know that I like playing DCC; while I don't receive a lot of copies for review purposes for the system, I enjoy it immensely. Xcrawl would be a radically different type of setting/premise published by Goodman Games in cooperation with Pandahead Productions...and is one I really like - basically, the PCs are thrillseekers and super-athletes that participate in a Running man-style, hyper-lethal live-on-pay-per-view game show. The GM (here called DJ - dungeon judge) may actually use the moderator and the unique set-up for hilarious effect. The delightfully different set-up of dungeon-crawling as a very lethal competitive sport lets you generate a completely different atmosphere. That being said, you do not need the Xcrawl rule-book to play this module; DCC rules suffice.

There are some peculiarities the module explains, the first of which would be Mojo Pool. Mojo represents the unconscious power of teamwork and may never sink below 0 or rise (usually) above 12. These points are added on a 1: 1-basis to action dice for combat or spellcasting, skill checks or ability score checks. They usually cannot be added to saves, critical or fumble checks or corruption/deity disapproval checks and a PC needs to be at least 1st level; 0-level noobs don't get mojo. Sounds common, right? Well, here's the catch - you can't spend them for yourself. You can only give mojo points to allied creatures or fellow PCs...and you may NOT ask for them - if you do, you are blocked from receiving mojo for the remainder of the scenario. This, as a whole, enhances teamwork and makes the group come together better in the long run, as fellow players learn to trust one another and the capabilities of the PCs.

Mojo is rolled at the beginning of an Xcrawl event by rolling 1d12; each player makes a luck roll as well - on a success, you add +1 mojo, on a failure, you deduce 1 mojo. Halflings double the bonus on successful checks. 12 is still the cap for the pool. If a mojo point is added to a roll and the roll's a crit, the mojo points are added, but not actually expended from the pool - this is referred to as Destiny. Conversely, on a mojo-enhanced roll that results in a fumble, the group loses one additional mojo point - this is known as Choke, analogue to the disaster every Battle Rapper dreads.

Xcrawl, as an entertaining sport, also has rules for grandstanding - working the crowd, if you will. A grandstanding check is 1d20 + Cha bonus + character level, with crowds determining the DC and a default being DC 21. A character may grandstand up to twice per combat encounter as a move action; on a success, the character can gain 1 fame. Additionally, in the round immediately after a combat, the character may similarly grandstand, for the same benefit. That being said, feel free to insert my old and tired "per encounter is no reliable time-frame"-rant - not the biggest fan there.

But what does the fame-score denote? It is, basically, the percentile chance the character has to be recognized in a crowd. The higher the fame score, the more the character can ask for standard appearance fees in media, events, etc. - this money is out of crawl money and can thus not be used to cheese the artificially-created monetary balance of Xcrawls. A table of standard appearance fees and fame buy table is included...and if you don't want to, you can pretty much ignore the whole section. Ahem, so that would be the rule-peculiarities!

Flavor-wise, it should be noted that several items are banned in Xcrawls; Safe rooms are called break rooms. Charmed adversaries are treated as defeated and yes, you may be disqualified if you, for example go through a NoGo door or attack a being with a NonCom (non-combatant) badge.

Anyways, ladies and gentlemen, please strap yourselves in and get ready! These basics out of the way, you want to know about the show, right? You want to see the struggle the athletes are about to face! Well, as always, from here on out reign the SPOILERS. Potential players should jump to the conclusion or risk a fate worse than that featured in our show!

...

..

.

All right, still here? Sure you're the properly authorized DJ? Great!

The crowd DC for this module is a cuddly DC 13 and unless otherwise noted, hallways are 12', doors requiring a DC 16 Strength check to break. It should also be noted that the PCs, if they mirror the out-game charity with in-game charity, will be rewarded. During the module, the PCs will have the chance to take charity shots of chartreuse - after the first drink, Fortitude saves are in order and a total of 4 stages of drunkenness, including rules-relevant effects. If you and your buddies are responsible adults, the module can double as a neat drinking game...ahem. Not that I'd endorse that or anything. insert usual rapid-fire speech disclaimer about responsibility etc. But I digress.

We begin with an extensive array of read-aloud text that sets the unique stage perfectly, even for groups unfamiliar with Xcrawl, including an introduction of the DJ - indeed, DJs usually not comfortable with improvising a lot of text will enjoy the well-written, extensive flavor text. The first room already establishes well the extreme game-show nature of the set-up: You have a winding corridor...of the bayou! Everything wants to eat the PCs and they only have 24 rounds to navigate air boats through its winding stretch; if they're too slow, they'll forfeit the treasure of the room! Oh, and beyond the buzzing swarms of mosquitoes, dire gars, animated Spanish Moss (that stringy, cool ropy moss you know from pretty much all the pictures), the PCs will also have a chance to down charity shots poured from a lizardman bartender and have I mentioned the water moccasin swarm? Yeah, a pretty furious beginning!

After that, we're participating in a battle of the bands - the PC's band (featuring Lizardman Henry, Johnny Sketch, et al.) jams it out against undead musicians rising from the bayou - and the competing bands actually influence the proceedings: The loser reduces the die on the dice chain. The opposition to the PCs would be a cadre of deadly were-nutria - the goal: Take out the enemy band, for each musician gone represents a decreased bonus for the checks to see who prevails. In the aftermath of this room, the DJ will open a water-chute the PCs have to take...and end 15-ft deep in gumbo; the lid of the titanic pot they ended up in is 15 ft. above them, as gigantic giant chefs loom (though tehse are illusions) - the PCs will have to balance on gigantic vegetables and fight the giant crawfish to the death...falling into the rapidly heating gumbo is detrimental to one's health, just fyi.

After a brief hallway and break-room interlude (again, featuring chances to take shots - there are a ton of these!), the PCs will be introduced to a hilariously lethal piece of satire - the red tape golem, that can generate explosions of red tape to keep characters stuck, has an obscene reach and yep, trying to attack it may get your weapon stuck. A formidable foe indeed! After that, it's not over - it's NEVER over with bureaucracy - so the exit door here's trapped: Razor sharp paper. One more form...argh....

After this, the PCs get to meet a celebrity: Pierre, the awakened turtle: Ancient and the only awakened animal to be accepted into university. He'll pose riddles to the players - solve three and you're good to go. Problem: he only speaks French. Okay, that would be no problem whatsoever at my table. However, if it is a problem at yours, be happy, for perceptive PCs can find a shroom to help them overcome the language barrier....but beware what you eat...Anyways, the PCs can attempt one answer per combat round, for they're beset by variant Louisiana troglodytes while being quizzed by Pierre. As a minor nitpick - the sample riddles are in English. While I didn't have an issue getting French riddles, having those as well would be nice for groups that want to flex their language-skill-muscles.

And after this one...it's time to face the very incarnation of destruction Louisiana constantly faces - the big boss battle pits the PCs against nothing short of the storm - there is a reason a benign genius loci is here for them - they will need all the help they can get, for the fury elemental is not only unique and lethal - it can actually generate so-called storm assassins, made from rain, wind and lightning for a furious (Get it, fury elemental? Sorry, will punch myself for that later...) finale!

The module ends with the aftermath and a list of reliable charities that devote themselves to helping the affected areas and people.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no glitches. Layout adheres to a printer-friendly two-column b/w-standard and the module sports several neat original b/w-pieces of art - kudos!! The cartography is nice as well, though no player-friendly, key-less map was included. Considering the nature of the scenario, such a map would have made no sense anyways and is not required, though. The pdf-version comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Written by Brendan LaSalle and George "Loki" Williams, this charity module was a blast to run. Beyond the cool idea of a charity product that you purchase depicting a charity Xcrawl, it is a fast-paced, versatile scenario: There is not a single boring or even just "good" encounter herein - each and every room, each challenge has something unique going for it, making great use of the special tricks the DCC-rule-set supports. Beyond that, it is a module that oozes charm and heart's blood - from the novel and far-out encounters to the well-written prose, this module is an amazing experience.

Even beyond the confines of DCC and Xcrawl, this can make for an amazing scavenging ground if you need encounter ideas for planar material, a weird wizard's past-time or similar gauntlets; pretty much each encounter could be scavenged as a form of highlight, capstone or unique set-piece. And it's a charity product as well - one of the best I have seen, mind you, and one that would receive the self-same verdict if it was a regular offering - namely 5 stars + seal of approval. If you're looking for something out of the ordinary and want to do a good deed in the process, then this is absolutely perfect. Get it!

Endzeitgeist out.



Classement:
[5 sur 5 étoiles!]
Xcrawl: Louisiana Crawl (DCC RPG Edition)
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

The Dungeon Alphabet
par Christopher H. [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 12/29/2016 09:56:17

Easily one of the best books I've ever read for:

  • putting a dungeon together
  • getting creative flames lit
  • entertaining
  • roll tables for things you'll actually use

It is an easy read, and can get you to snap out of your normal creations and into something new. Your players will thank you for it!

Great value and worth every penny! This is an essential part of your DM toolkit; get it.

Bring your dungeons to life with all these awesome options.

Oh, and the artwork is incredibly good.



Classement:
[5 sur 5 étoiles!]
The Dungeon Alphabet
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

Dungeon Crawl Classics 2016 Holiday Module: Twilight of the Solstice
par Jonathan A. [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 12/23/2016 16:28:27

Much love for this module. Like especially that they have the opt-out text directions for pre-existing groups. I aint't run it yet but I may be looking to tweak a few of the dangling threads since I game with pretty crafty cusses. I may even take a chance to run this at my workplace with some noobs who will fall for evry pitfall. My intuition is that the novelty of breaking up gametime as real time for the 1 hour lunches strikes me as a good reward system for thinking or acting quick and paying off the reveals to entertain me.

The setting without spoilers seems right in line with the season. There are clever nods to holiday traditions and treats peppered in the text. The scenarios lend themselves to Robert Beevan style misadventure.

Just barely got into DCC. Been gaming since my grade school days. I tend to keep a loose grip on adventure details and re-purpose the encounters and features I like for use elsewhere and discard what I don't like in a canned adventure. Looking forward to running this with a laid-back or new group mostly. But I think this is a good fit for me and others who have very little interest sizing up encumberance tables and tracking our blood-sugar levels.

Destined to be a classic; I suspect regularly it'll be reprinted regularly until they top the the scratch off character sheet novelty with some new implementation of the mosaic strip-tease charcter sheets sold seperately.



Classement:
[5 sur 5 étoiles!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics 2016 Holiday Module: Twilight of the Solstice
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG
par Benjamin K. [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 12/09/2016 13:27:22

My favorite system. Easy to teach and has alot of fun random charts. Also community support is great



Classement:
[5 sur 5 étoiles!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics RPG
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

Age of Cthulhu 3: Shadows of Leningrad
par Joshua O. [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 10/08/2016 18:36:47

The production values are good, but theres no room in my vision of Call of Cthulhu for silly monsters like yetis. really obvious, talking yetis played for laughs. i might check out more of these series, but if its all cartoonish and pulpy it doesnt match the feel im going for. for PULP Cthulhu this obviously fits right in but for my game, the science and plausibility is where the horror comes in, as it does in Lovecraft, incidentally. i was looking for a tense, historically accurate and serious toned adventire in the young Soviet Union. this is Cthulhu Crawl Classics.



Classement:
[3 sur 5 étoiles!]
Age of Cthulhu 3: Shadows of Leningrad
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

Dungeon Crawl Classics #81: The One Who Watches From Below
par Dan C. [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 09/28/2016 18:30:17

If you like 'Phantasm' you'll love this adventure. Yeah there are killer dwarves (not the bearded kind), but the general vibe of the fantasy elements really nailed the atmosphere of 'Phantasm'. The horror isn't entirely magical; it isn't entirely technological--it falls squarely into an ambiguous, hideously suggestive middle ground. The curse gimmick is the best example (see preview). It added a fun dimension to roleplaying that my new as well as experienced players really enjoyed.



Classement:
[5 sur 5 étoiles!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #81: The One Who Watches From Below
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

Dungeon Crawl Classics #66.5: Doom of the Savage King
par Customer Name Withheld [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 09/10/2016 10:38:45

This is a great beginner adventure to give new players a well-rounded experience of RPGs. There is a village to experience, NPCs to meet, a dungeon to explore, treasure to find, wilderness to wander, and a Big Bad Boss to defeat. I converted this for use with D&D 5E. I also ran it as a one-shot for a group of 11 PCs. Things only really got crowded in the dungeon and I just raised the HP of the monsters to last a little longer.



Classement:
[5 sur 5 étoiles!]
Dungeon Crawl Classics #66.5: Doom of the Savage King
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

Age of Cthulhu 1: Death in Luxor
par Customer Name Withheld [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 09/07/2016 05:35:45

The opening adventure from Goodman Games in their Age of Cthulhu line. A very solid release. I like the artwork, there are decent maps. Player Handouts are provided at the back of the book along with pre-gen characters. The adventure is good without blowing me away.

I have several of the adventures in the Age of Cthulhu line, I haven't been disappointed yet



Classement:
[4 sur 5 étoiles!]
Age of Cthulhu 1: Death in Luxor
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

GM Gems
par T. B. [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 08/07/2016 23:32:31

Recommended by several Twitch/Youtube DMs this guide is list of ideas for making your game a richer and more meaningful place.



Classement:
[4 sur 5 étoiles!]
GM Gems
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

How to Write Adventure Modules That Don't Suck
par Ben S. [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 08/06/2016 05:11:42

I've recently been working on writing adventures for publication. This book is a good value price-wise and the sections are written by people who publish games regularly. It has some good advice and there were some module writing suggestions that someone like myself who has never written modules for a mass audience hadn't considered before. Even if you're just getting it for use in writing modules for your own gaming group, you still might find some kernels of knowledge, especially if you're new to GMing.



Classement:
[5 sur 5 étoiles!]
How to Write Adventure Modules That Don't Suck
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

Xcrawl: Dungeonbattle Brooklyn (DCC RPG Edition)
par Jeffrey W. [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 07/01/2016 14:45:35

I am fairly new to DCC, but I've been a fan of XCrawl for a decade. I was a big fan of the Dream Park novels by Larry Niven and Steven Barnes, the idea of LARP on camera wasn't new to me, but the surprising history of the North American Empire put a great twist on the idea. The "games" for for keeps - full-on lethal with live steel and live goblins. Oh, and I think I am contractually obligated to say if you die, YOU DIE. So XCrawl is televised dungeon crawling by competitive teams through wholly manufactured dungeon environments. A person known as a Dungeon Judge, or DJ, creates the dungeon layout, recruits, enslaves or purchases monsters, stocks with treasure... And then the crawlers run through the course. Teams are isolated from one another, and they're scored on various criteria, like party members surviving, treasure secured, total time elapsed, etc. Vegas-style statisticians even keep track of the action for wagering purposes.
So, televised X-Crawling meets Dungeon Crawl Classics. DCC is a rules set designed to "feel" like the 1970s are said to have felt. Now, here's my take on this. I've read things various old timers have said about gaming in the early days. I've sat down with a lot of the first generation authors, and rolled dice with Frank Mentzer and Zeb Cook, and eagerly questioned Ernie Gygax. I believe the truth lies in the following analogy: Dungeon Crawl Classics is to gaming in the 70s as John Boorman's Excalubur is to the actual Arthurian period. That is, it's an idealized, distilled, and purified concentration of all the awesome that is then turned up to eleven and served up on a Molly Hatchet album cover. DCC is made to feel like the side of a van decorated with Vallejo artwork, and that makes it a thing of beauty. The way in which arcane magic works, the ability of Clerics to anger their deity, the crit and fumble tables... All of it. It makes for a great gaming experience that is just like all those stories of 70s gaming. So, put DCC and XCrawl together and what do you get? A Reese's Cup of awesome. You get the experience of a potentially super-lethal televised dungoeon run with all the bells and whistles that makes DCC unique from bog-standard D20 3.x mechanics. Things that set DCC apart are a perfect natural fit for XCrawl, such as the Deed Die, which allowes Warrior and Dwarf characters to declare special moves and attacks that are generally the stuff of Feats in 3.x. With the Deed Die, these characters can declare all sorts of showoff mayhem for the cameras. The variable nature of spellcasting means chances for high drama with the crowds. It's a natural fit.

OK, so the module itself. Bear in mind this is for 1st-level DCC characters and represents the finals of a non-lethal XCrawl division. In the case of Dungeonbattle Brooklyn, the finals have been made full-lethal to increase ratings. So this is the first foray into real steel and full-power magic for your PC team. The first part of the adventure is some pretty mundane obstacles, but it picks up a bit from there. There's a great homage to American Gladiators and then some interestingly designed rooms and traps. The one star I'm dropping from the rating of 4/5 is due to the repetitive nature of checking all doors for traps, removing traps... lather, rinse, repeat and for the swingy implementation of the mud room. Now, there may be nothing for the first issue- old school dungeons tended to have TONS of traps, and I do recall my early experiences in the 80s being meticulously checking every single door. This may be a necessary evil of the genre. The second issue I will caution DMs (DJs?) to use discretion on. The text says 0-3 enemies rise from the mud each round with a total of 14 baddies possible. Due to the die rolls, the players were able to get in, grab the treasure, and get out with little fuss because no more than 2 creatures were actively threatening them at any given time. The Cleric's "Holy Hadouken" of turning ability handled some, and the rest of the party handled others. I would highly recommend adjusting the appearance of the creatures to front-load the encounter beginning with the PCs reaching the middle of the room. The room is a GREAT addition to the dungeon, but using the random distribution with the possibility of zero new monsters in a turn (which happened three times due to a d4 that just didn't feel like killing PCs) meant my PCs never really had a sense of threat about this room, and given that there is only one way in and out, it's got the potential for some serious brown trousers time if played right. Anyway, as an introduction to both XCrawl and DCC, this module was an insane amount of fun for a group just dipping their toes in both. The use of mundane challenges at the beginning can give the players a bit of eyerolling and thinking this whole televised dungeon crawling thing is just silly... then the REAL fun begins. Four out of five d14s from me. Would definitely run this again for another set of players. Looking VERY forward to the DCC version of the XCrawl corebook.

Classement:
[4 sur 5 étoiles!]
Xcrawl: Dungeonbattle Brooklyn (DCC RPG Edition)
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

Age of Cthulhu: Transatlantic Terror
par Eric B. [Acheteur vérifié] Date Ajoutée: 06/05/2016 10:50:06

At 12 pages, including pre-generated characters and a map of the HMS Adriatic, this little gem makes a good investigative one-shot, suitable for convention play. I will try not to revieal spoilers other than to say that it really reminds me of the older Call of Cthulhu scenarios from the 80s and early 90s - a lot of investigation must be by character choice (very little railroading the players to following up on clues) with, if successful, a VERY deadly group of mythos creatures at the end. I have run this in a convention to completion in 3 1/2 hours. I did handicap the mythos creatures (no spells) and even then it was a close run thing.

Great for a single night of entertainment, either using the pregens for a one shot or for a transit of existing characters across the Atlantic.

Groups recommeneded/not recommended for:

I would recommend this without reservation to a group that enjoys the roleplaying, exploring of the luxury cruise liner, is interested in a investigation, and not put off at having to fight the super-bad mythos.

I would be concerned with a more action-oriented group or ones that need to be put on the trail, such as a group that enjoys Delta Green type scenarios.

Other notes from play:

  • One group was convinced that I had placed the characters on the Titanic and was going for a total party kill - gaurenteed.
  • Expanding the scenario into a campaign could be done. One player was convinced that the myhtos creatures encountered were now present everywhere; it would be simple to make this paranoia part of the game world for future investigations into the "hidden menace".


Classement:
[4 sur 5 étoiles!]
Age of Cthulhu: Transatlantic Terror
Cliquer ici pour afficher la description du produit

Ajouter à la Commande

Affichage 1 de 15 (sur 466 critiques) Pages de Résultats:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Prochain >>] 
0 article
 Derniers Produits
 Gift Certificates