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Village Backdrop: Byrnfort
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/30/2018 05:58:11

An Endzeitgeist.com review

Huh. When I posted the latest Village Backdrop-review in my attempt to catch up with the series, I noticed that, while I had access to this village’s files, I never actually downloaded them or wrote a review. Weird. Anyways, since I am a completionist and pretty OCD regarding the like, here we go!

Byrnfort’s pdf clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Byrnfort is situated in the ancient Barainwood, and its frontier-status in a hostile wilderness becomes immediately apparent to anyone who sees it: With thick walls of timber and sharp stakes encircling the village (lavishly mapped by Maciej Zagorski), it is obvious that this place, hunched and somewhat claustrophobic, is a refuge from the horrors out there – but not necessarily one that can withstand all that is out there. More a fortification that a village in the traditional sense, the local dressing habits and “industry” mirror this reality, and so do the community leaders, who hearken to the nature-themed side of things.

We get a sample marketplace section here, and, as always, village lore for smart PCs to unearth as well as 6 sample whispers and rumors. The local inn, the Stout Draught gets its own little notes on the price of food and accommodation. Cool: There is a charhouse, which fabricates specialized alchemical coals, three of which are provided. These include one that potentially helps with poison at the cost of being sickened. I really like how flavor and mechanics are married here. The events do hint at something more going on here, and indeed, there is a secret society of sorts, the Green men – who have a pact with a rather deadly fey ghost. As such, they are obligated to conduct strange rites, of which 6 are provided, adding further flavor.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ elegant 2-column b/w-standard and the cartography, as always, is excellent. The pdf comes in two versions, one optimized for screen use and one for the printer. They are both fully bookmarked for your convenience.

My apologies to author Amber Underwood for missing this nice village previously; Byrnfort has a cool, almost Twin Peaks-y vibe going on, and the emphasis on coal and the like is a seldom seen or developed aspect in villages, which adds a sense of authenticity to the village. The rites are really cool and further add local color to the place. So yeah, all in all, I found myself really loving this one! My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars +seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Village Backdrop: Byrnfort
Click to show product description

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Creator Reply:
Epic! I'm delighted you enjoyed this village so much. Thank you for the review!
Village Backdrop: Byrnfort (SNE)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/30/2018 05:56:53

An Endzeitgeist.com review

Huh. When I posted the latest Village Backdrop-review in my attempt to catch up with the series, I noticed that, while I had access to this village’s files, I never actually downloaded them or wrote a review. Weird. Anyways, since I am a completionist and pretty OCD regarding the like, here we go!

Byrnfort’s pdf clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Byrnfort is situated in the ancient Barainwood, and its frontier-status in a hostile wilderness becomes immediately apparent to anyone who sees it: With thick walls of timber and sharp stakes encircling the village (lavishly mapped by Maciej Zagorski), it is obvious that this place, hunched and somewhat claustrophobic, is a refuge from the horrors out there – but not necessarily one that can withstand all that is out there. More a fortification that a village in the traditional sense, the local dressing habits and “industry” mirror this reality, and so do the community leaders, who hearken to the nature-themed side of things. Important for purists – the classes referenced by the NPCs include thief and wizard, so if you’re one of the folks firmly in the magic-user section, this may be a very minor aesthetic gripe.

The system neutral version, alas, does not gain a marketplace section, which is a minor bummer. and, As always, village lore for smart PCs to unearth as well as 6 sample whispers and rumors can be found. The local inn, the Stout Draught gets its own little notes on the price of food and accommodation. Cool: There is a charhouse, which fabricates specialized alchemical coals, three of which are provided. These include one that potentially helps with poison at the cost of being sickened, which can mean different things, depending on your system – just stating “can’t act” or “halves movement” or something like that would have been more elegant here.

Still, I really like how flavor and mechanics are married here. The events do hint at something more going on here, and indeed, there is a secret society of sorts, the Green men – who have a pact with a rather deadly fey ghost. As such, they are obligated to conduct strange rites, of which 6 are provided, adding further flavor.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no serious glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ elegant 2-column b/w-standard and the cartography, as always, is excellent. The pdf comes in two versions, one optimized for screen use and one for the printer. They are both fully bookmarked for your convenience.

My apologies to author Amber Underwood for missing this nice village previously; Byrnfort has a cool, almost Twin Peaks-y vibe going on, and the emphasis on coal and the like is a seldom seen or developed aspect in villages, which adds a sense of authenticity to the village. The rites are really cool and further add local color to the place. The absence of the marketplace section and not 100% perfect conversion of the alchemical coal represent very minor detriments for this version of the pdf, but not enough to cost it the well-deserved 5 stars for a rather cool little settlement.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Village Backdrop: Byrnfort (SNE)
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Creator Reply:
Epic! I'm delighted you enjoyed this village so much. Thank you for the review!
Village Backdrop: Byrnfort (5e)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/30/2018 05:54:55

An Endzeitgeist.com review

Huh. When I posted the latest Village Backdrop-review in my attempt to catch up with the series, I noticed that, while I had access to this village’s files, I never actually downloaded them or wrote a review. Weird. Anyways, since I am a completionist and pretty OCD regarding the like, here we go!

Byrnfort’s pdf clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 6 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Byrnfort is situated in the ancient Barainwood, and its frontier-status in a hostile wilderness becomes immediately apparent to anyone who sees it: With thick walls of timber and sharp stakes encircling the village (lavishly mapped by Maciej Zagorski), it is obvious that this place, hunched and somewhat claustrophobic, is a refuge from the horrors out there – but not necessarily one that can withstand all that is out there. More a fortification that a village in the traditional sense, the local dressing habits and “industry” mirror this reality, and so do the community leaders, who hearken to the nature-themed side of things. The 5e-version refers the default NPC-stats where appropriate.

There is no marketplace section in the 5e-version, which is a bit of a bummer. As always, village lore for smart PCs to unearth as well as 6 sample whispers and rumors can be found. The local inn, the Stout Draught gets its own little notes on the price of food and accommodation. Cool: There is a charhouse, which fabricates specialized alchemical coals, three of which are provided. These include one that potentially helps with poison at the cost of a temporary exhaustion level. I really like how flavor and mechanics are married here, and while there is a typo here (one instance where “poison” should read “poisoned”), I applaud that the items have been converted to 5e. The events do hint at something more going on here, and indeed, there is a secret society of sorts, the Green men – who have a pact with a rather deadly fey ghost. As such, they are obligated to conduct strange rites, of which 6 are provided, adding further flavor.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ elegant 2-column b/w-standard and the cartography, as always, is excellent. The pdf comes in two versions, one optimized for screen use and one for the printer. They are both fully bookmarked for your convenience.

My apologies to author Amber Underwood for missing this nice village previously; Byrnfort has a cool, almost Twin Peaks-y vibe going on, and the emphasis on coal and the like is a seldom seen or developed aspect in villages, which adds a sense of authenticity to the village. The 5e-conversion is nice, though the absence of the marketplace was a bit of a bummer. The rites are really cool and further add local color to the place. So yeah, all in all, I found myself really loving this one! My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars for this version.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Village Backdrop: Byrnfort (5e)
Click to show product description

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Creator Reply:
Epic! I'm delighted you enjoyed this village so much. Thank you for the review!
Village Backdrop: Masquerade
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/29/2018 05:04:28

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Village Backdrop-series clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Okay, so first things first: This is NOT your everyday village. Much like in every village backdrop, we do get notes on local nomenclature and dressing habits, as well as village lore and 3 rumors (instead of the standard 6)…but that is pretty much where the similarities with the regular installments of the series end.

Masquerade is not a fixed locale. Instead, it is a rickety conglomerate of three barges forming a floating village-theatre of sorts, with the performers masked and in costume at most times, at least while outsiders can witness them. This is Richard Pett, though, and as such, there is a theme of the grotesque, of underlying decay and grime suffusing the village – this case, represented by the bane of the village, the unifying factor that ties together this community: Masquerade is a colony of lepers, masking their affliction behind the gaiety they bring.

Tragedy and comedy entwine with one another in an intricate manner, for Masquerade’s founder, the enigmatic Silent Queen and absentee captain Absinthe Morell (take a look at that name and the connotations it automatically causes!) created this place as an exile and trap of sorts…but in a twist on trope, the place has become something more for her, a family of outcasts of sorts…and thus, she has taken on an oath that requires nigh-unparalleled willpower to maintain…but whether she can maintain it and for how long…only the GM decides.

Indeed, while Richard Pett has a knack for writing great locales, the extended cadre of characters herein deserves special mention – no less than 9 sample NPCs with potentially complex motivations can act as a foil or allies for the PCs and include some intriguing angles, with the theme of the masquerade itself obviously acting as a good reason to not provide read-aloud texts for their looks.

We do get such texts for the respective locations on the ships, though, and, as in all the new village backdrops, the respective points of interest come with services that can be purchased. Now, as you can glean from the set-up here, masquerade is very much depending on retaining its secrecy, which is upheld by the magical talents of the crew…but PCs may well pierce the veil, which can provide truly intriguing moral conundrums. Should they out the leper-troupe and their dangerous mistress?

An alternate angle for adventuring would be the fact that the troupe does regularly try to cure its members via magic when funds allow for it, but this also, to a degree, represents a parting of sorts, adding a bittersweet flair to the whole proceedings, something that ultimately suffuses the whole cast of characters – this place’s inhabitants are as multi-faceted as the masks and gowns they wear are outlandish and colorful. Indeed, none of the characters on the ship are evil, and while they may come into conflict with the PCs, this is ultimately not a location intended to be solely murderhobo’d through. I can easily picture compassionate PCs becoming very attached to the troupe, perhaps using it to cross borders or infiltrate enemy lands…but that may be me.

Indeed, one can obviously use this village just as well as a take on the trope of normals vs. “freaks”; one could run it in a vast plethora of ways, and indeed, we do get some suggestions on how to adventure in masquerade. Oh lord, I just made a formatting-based joke. Sorry, that’s a new low for me. Anyways, it should also be noted that, yes, we do get a list of 20 entries of village dressing and events, and the PFRPG-version comes with the usual settlement statblock as well as, rather cool, a nice little global effect pertaining magic in Masquerade.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ elegant, printer-friendly b/w-two-column standard and the pdf sports some nice b/w artworks, though I have seen one of them used before. The b/w-cartography by Maciej Zagorski is really nice, though it is GM-only, noting secret doors and the like. High-res versions player-friendly were made available, at least to my knowledge, to Raging Swan Press’ patreons. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience and comes in two versions, one optimized for screen-use and one optimized for the printer.

Richard Pett is perhaps the undisputed master of the tragically or comically horrific, or the grotesquely touching. His adventures and supplements (and his novel Crooked) show not only a capacity for great world-and location-building; there is always something deep and resonant in his prose. He can evoke the visceral and dark, and yet it never truly devolves into grimdark bleakness, instead settling in a more oscillating and thus, efficient manner. His spooky supplements work because they are relatable and this is no different. Masquerade will surely be considered dark by some, but ultimately, it represents a tale of hope and will overcoming the odds, depicts a company of uncommon outcasts that have been forced into the roles they now play. The duality of themes, of the eponymous masquerade, is mirrored in every little component of the pdf, bespeaking a careful and precise use of the evocative prose featured herein.

This book is very much an act of deliberate craftsmanship and wordsmithing, and thus manages to stand apart from favorites of mine and benchmarks, be that Ravenloft’s Carnival, the phenomenal Blood Bayou, or Nick Logue’s grisly fey carnival. Masquerade, in spite of having chosen perhaps one area in RPGs where absolutely superb supplements abound, manages to carve out its niche as a truly remarkable place; indeed, it almost feels like a village that could carry a whole series of novels…or, well. Adventures. The characters and general location are immensely captivating, rendering this a masterpiece, even within the context of the extremely high level of the Village Backdrop-series, rivaled only by some of John Bennett's and Mike Welham’s legendary contributions. Even in master Pett’s impressive catalogue, this stands out in its achievement of this level of depth so in so few pages.

This humble supplement set my mind ablaze with ideas and managed to really touch my heart…and considering that it’s only 7 pages long, that means something. This pdf thus gets 5 stars + seal of approval and actually qualifies as a candidate for my Top Ten of 2018.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Village Backdrop: Masquerade
Click to show product description

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Creator Reply:
Thank you for this review! You'll not be surprise to learn I'm delighted you liked Masquerade so much!
Village Backdrop: Masquerade (SNE)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/29/2018 05:00:11

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Village Backdrop-series clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Okay, so first things first: This is NOT your everyday village. Much like in every village backdrop, we do get notes on local nomenclature and dressing habits, as well as village lore and 3 rumors (instead of the standard 6)…but that is pretty much where the similarities with the regular installments of the series end.

Masquerade is not a fixed locale. Instead, it is a rickety conglomerate of three barges forming a floating village-theatre of sorts, with the performers masked and in costume at most times, at least while outsiders can witness them. This is Richard Pett, though, and as such, there is a theme of the grotesque, of underlying decay and grime suffusing the village – this case, represented by the bane of the village, the unifying factor that ties together this community: Masquerade is a colony of lepers, masking their affliction behind the gaiety they bring.

Tragedy and comedy entwine with one another in an intricate manner, for Masquerade’s founder, the enigmatic Silent Queen and absentee captain Absinthe Morell (take a look at that name and the connotations it automatically causes!) created this place as an exile and trap of sorts…but in a twist on trope, the place has become something more for her, a family of outcasts of sorts…and thus, she has taken on an oath that requires nigh-unparalleled willpower to maintain…but whether she can maintain it and for how long…only the referee decides.

Indeed, while Richard Pett has a knack for writing great locales, the extended cadre of characters herein deserves special mention – no less than 9 sample NPCs with potentially complex motivations can act as a foil or allies for the PCs and include some intriguing angles, with the theme of the masquerade itself obviously acting as a good reason to not provide read-aloud texts for their looks. In system neutral version, their references obviously have been changed appropriately to the respective old-school monikers and classes.

We do get such texts for the respective locations on the ships, though, and, as in all the new village backdrops, the respective points of interest come with services that can be purchased. Now, as you can glean from the set-up here, masquerade is very much depending on retaining its secrecy, which is upheld by the magical talents of the crew…but PCs may well pierce the veil, which can provide truly intriguing moral conundrums. Should they out the leper-troupe and their dangerous mistress?

An alternate angle for adventuring would be the fact that the troupe does regularly try to cure its members via magic when funds allow for it, but this also, to a degree, represents a parting of sorts, adding a bittersweet flair to the whole proceedings, something that ultimately suffuses the whole cast of characters – this place’s inhabitants are as multi-faceted as the masks and gowns they wear are outlandish and colorful. Big kudos: The magical healing of the afflicted has been converted to refer to the proper old-school spell.

Indeed, none of the characters on the ship are evil, and while they may come into conflict with the PCs, this is ultimately not a location intended to be solely murderhobo’d through. I can easily picture compassionate PCs becoming very attached to the troupe, perhaps using it to cross borders or infiltrate enemy lands…but that may be me.

Indeed, one can obviously use this village just as well as a take on the trope of normals vs. “freaks”; one could run it in a vast plethora of ways, and indeed, we do get some suggestions on how to adventure in masquerade. Oh lord, I just made a formatting-based joke. Sorry, that’s a new low for me. Anyways, it should also be noted that, yes, we do get a list of 20 entries of village dressing and events, and the system neutral version has been modified regarding prices of goods etc. to reflect the different realities of the system; however, there is one minor complaint here: The settlement has a global effect regarding its effects on magic, which is pretty minor in PFRPG; in the old-school system neutral version, I personally would have gone a step beyond. It’s a matter of aesthetics in this version, though, and not a complaint versus the integrity of the effect.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ elegant, printer-friendly b/w-two-column standard and the pdf sports some nice b/w artworks, though I have seen one of them used before. The b/w-cartography by Maciej Zagorski is really nice, though it is GM-only, noting secret doors and the like. High-res versions player-friendly were made available, at least to my knowledge, to Raging Swan Press’ patreons. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience and comes in two versions, one optimized for screen-use and one optimized for the printer.

Richard Pett is perhaps the undisputed master of the tragically or comically horrific, or the grotesquely touching. His adventures and supplements (and his novel Crooked) show not only a capacity for great world-and location-building; there is always something deep and resonant in his prose. He can evoke the visceral and dark, and yet it never truly devolves into grimdark bleakness, instead settling in a more oscillating and thus, efficient manner. His spooky supplements work because they are relatable and this is no different. Masquerade will surely be considered dark by some, but ultimately, it represents a tale of hope and will overcoming the odds, depicts a company of uncommon outcasts that have been forced into the roles they now play. The duality of themes, of the eponymous masquerade, is mirrored in every little component of the pdf, bespeaking a careful and precise use of the evocative prose featured herein.

This book is very much an act of deliberate craftsmanship and wordsmithing, and thus manages to stand apart from favorites of mine and benchmarks, be that Ravenloft’s Carnival, the phenomenal Blood Bayou, or Nick Logue’s grisly fey carnival. Masquerade, in spite of having chosen perhaps one area in RPGs where absolutely superb supplements abound, manages to carve out its niche as a truly remarkable place; indeed, it almost feels like a village that could carry a whole series of novels…or, well. Adventures. The characters and general location are immensely captivating, rendering this a masterpiece, even within the context of the extremely high level of the Village Backdrop-series, rivaled only by some of John Bennett and Mike Welham’s legendary contributions. Even in master Pett’s impressive catalogue, this stands out in its achievement of this level of depth so in so few pages.

This humble supplement set my mind ablaze with ideas and managed to really touch my heart…and considering that it’s only 7 pages long, that means something. This pdf thus gets 5 stars + seal of approval. The system neutral version is just as strong as the PFRPG-version in its overall themes and execution, and thus shares its nomination for my Top Ten of 2018.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Village Backdrop: Masquerade (SNE)
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Creator Reply:
Thank you for this review! You'll not be surprise to learn I'm delighted you liked Masquerade so much!
Village Backdrop: Masquerade (5e)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/29/2018 04:58:15

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Village Backdrop-series clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Okay, so first things first: This is NOT your everyday village. Much like in every village backdrop, we do get notes on local nomenclature and dressing habits, as well as village lore and 3 rumors (instead of the standard 6)…but that is pretty much where the similarities with the regular installments of the series end.

Masquerade is not a fixed locale. Instead, it is a rickety conglomerate of three barges forming a floating village-theatre of sorts, with the performers masked and in costume at most times, at least while outsiders can witness them. This is Richard Pett, though, and as such, there is a theme of the grotesque, of underlying decay and grime suffusing the village – this case, represented by the bane of the village, the unifying factor that ties together this community: Masquerade is a colony of lepers, masking their affliction behind the gaiety they bring.

Tragedy and comedy entwine with one another in an intricate manner, for Masquerade’s founder, the enigmatic Silent Queen and absentee captain Absinthe Morell (take a look at that name and the connotations it automatically causes!) created this place as an exile and trap of sorts…but in a twist on trope, the place has become something more for her, a family of outcasts of sorts…and thus, she has taken on an oath that requires nigh-unparalleled willpower to maintain…but whether she can maintain it and for how long…only the GM decides.

Indeed, while Richard Pett has a knack for writing great locales, the extended cadre of characters herein deserves special mention – no less than 9 sample NPCs with potentially complex motivations can act as a foil or allies for the PCs and include some intriguing angles, with the theme of the masquerade itself obviously acting as a good reason to not provide read-aloud texts for their looks. In 5e, their references obviously have been changed appropriately

We do get such texts for the respective locations on the ships, though, and, as in all the new village backdrops, the respective points of interest come with services that can be purchased. Now, as you can glean from the set-up here, masquerade is very much depending on retaining its secrecy, which is upheld by the magical talents of the crew…but PCs may well pierce the veil, which can provide truly intriguing moral conundrums. Should they out the leper-troupe and their dangerous mistress?

An alternate angle for adventuring would be the fact that the troupe does regularly try to cure its members via magic when funds allow for it, but this also, to a degree, represents a parting of sorts, adding a bittersweet flair to the whole proceedings, something that ultimately suffuses the whole cast of characters – this place’s inhabitants are as multi-faceted as the masks and gowns they wear are outlandish and colorful. Big kudos: The magical healing of the afflicted has been converted to refer to the proper spell in 5e.

Indeed, none of the characters on the ship are evil, and while they may come into conflict with the PCs, this is ultimately not a location intended to be solely murderhobo’d through. I can easily picture compassionate PCs becoming very attached to the troupe, perhaps using it to cross borders or infiltrate enemy lands…but that may be me.

Indeed, one can obviously use this village just as well as a take on the trope of normals vs. “freaks”; one could run it in a vast plethora of ways, and indeed, we do get some suggestions on how to adventure in masquerade. Oh lord, I just made a formatting-based joke. Sorry, that’s a new low for me. Anyways, it should also be noted that, yes, we do get a list of 20 entries of village dressing and events, and the 5e version has been modified regarding prices of goods etc. to reflect the different realities of the system; however, there is one minor complaint here: The settlement has a global effect regarding its effects on magic, which has not been properly translated into 5e, as it assumes the existence of a caster level; this should instead employ the “At Higher Levels”-mechanics imho. Similarly, a -1 penalty to saves versus some effects is not very 5e-y; I’d actually escalate that to disadvantage.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ elegant, printer-friendly b/w-two-column standard and the pdf sports some nice b/w artworks, though I have seen one of them used before. The b/w-cartography by Maciej Zagorski is really nice, though it is GM-only, noting secret doors and the like. High-res versions player-friendly were made available, at least to my knowledge, to Raging Swan Press’ patreons. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience and comes in two versions, one optimized for screen-use and one optimized for the printer.

Richard Pett is perhaps the undisputed master of the tragically or comically horrific, or the grotesquely touching. His adventures and supplements (and his novel Crooked) show not only a capacity for great world-and location-building; there is always something deep and resonant in his prose. He can evoke the visceral and dark, and yet it never truly devolves into grimdark bleakness, instead settling in a more oscillating and thus, efficient manner. His spooky supplements work because they are relatable and this is no different. Masquerade will surely be considered dark by some, but ultimately, it represents a tale of hope and will overcoming the odds, depicts a company of uncommon outcasts that have been forced into the roles they now play. The duality of themes, of the eponymous masquerade, is mirrored in every little component of the pdf, bespeaking a careful and precise use of the evocative prose featured herein.

This book is very much an act of deliberate craftsmanship and wordsmithing, and thus manages to stand apart from favorites of mine and benchmarks, be that Ravenloft’s Carnival, the phenomenal Blood Bayou, or Nick Logue’s grisly fey carnival. Masquerade, in spite of having chosen perhaps one area in RPGs where absolutely superb supplements abound, manages to carve out its niche as a truly remarkable place; indeed, it almost feels like a village that could carry a whole series of novels…or, well. Adventures. The characters and general location are immensely captivating, rendering this a masterpiece, even within the context of the extremely high level of the Village Backdrop-series, rivaled only by some of John Bennett's and Mike Welham’s legendary contributions. Even in master Pett’s impressive catalogue, this stands out in its achievement of this level of depth so in so few pages.

This humble supplement set my mind ablaze with ideas and managed to really touch my heart…and considering that it’s only 7 pages long, that means something. This pdf thus gets 5 stars + seal of approval. However, when contrasted with the PFRPG-version, I was a bit disappointed to see the global effects on Masquerade not adequately translated to 5e, which is why this version loses the nomination for my Top Ten of 2018. That should not deter you from checking this out, though – the prose remains phenomenal and a capable GM can easily fix the global effect snafu!

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Village Backdrop: Masquerade (5e)
Click to show product description

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Creator Reply:
Thank you for this review! You'll not be surprise to learn I'm delighted you liked Masquerade so much!
Cool Words for Gamers
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/26/2018 04:31:57

An Endzeitgeist.com review

And now for something completely different!

This book clocks in at 72 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page dedication, 1 page introductory quote, 7 pages blank, 2 pages advertisement, 1 page author bio, 1 page acknowledgements, leaving us with 57 pages of content, laid out for a 6’’ by 9’’ standard, meaning you can fit up to 4 pages on a given sheet of paper when printing this one. It should be noted that the book comes with jpgs for the cover and an .epub and .mobi version as well, making it easy to use in the context of e-readers.

After a brief preface, we begin with exactly what this says on the tin – rarely used words that can enrich your vocabulary. Why should you bother? Simple: Our language obviously does not only influence our own social interactions. Within the context of roleplaying games, it illustrates very much how linguistic conventions and the use of words shape our perceptions of reality.

You see, as human beings, we all have certain associations with certain words and the words we use, while conventionalized by social standards and languages we speak, ultimately, our languages differ in crucial ways from person to person – even within the context of the same language. A rather famous example for this would be the linguistic concept of degrees of category membership – is an ostrich a bird? If so (yes, it is), is it a better bird in its “birdiness” than e.g. a nightingale or a sparrow? Our concept of “bird” is arbitrary and yet we use it every day – because that is how language works. It categorizes infinite, disparate phenomena in information-clusters whose meaning we can convey with at least moderate accuracy. It is a necessary tool for any kind of society to work.

Many of our disputes in daily life, both domestic and in a professional context, can be traced back to misunderstandings, to people not being sufficiently precise with the language they employ and the associations they may elicit. In roleplaying games, this issue is exacerbated and may be most famously illustrated by the old tale of the gazebo, misunderstood by an increasingly desperate player as a monster. This by now famous and classic meme/anecdote obviously puts its fingers on a crucial part of roleplaying – it is almost entirely contingent on the mastery of language. In more rules-heavy systems, we need to know syntax and semantics of the system; in any system, regardless how rules-lite it may be, we require language and an understanding of language in order to create the shared imaginary worlds in which our games take place.

It is evident, then, that each individual will have a different idea of what exactly is happening, how everything looks like, etc. – and yet, there is a consensus regarding some aspects of what is happening. The task of the author and GM/Judge/referee/etc., then, would be to create vivid descriptions and prose that manage to set the neurons of the players ablaze with excitement, each in their own way.

Nothing is as frustrating as reading a per se interesting adventure that sports horrid prose; similarly, there is nothing as frustrating as not getting the elaborate, flowery prose that the GM employs – as such, this book can be considered to be a true help for PCs and GMs alike – GMs learn about strange and archaic words, while players can read the book to lower the chances of suffering from a gazebo-moment.

Chances are, for example, that many a roleplayer may know what an “adyton” is, but even with my extensive reading and expertise under my belt, I was not aware of the meaning of “agruw.” I knew what a “chamfrain” was, and “chthonic” is a word we read rather often, but I had never even seen the word “dandiprat” before. Why should you care about such words? Well, for one, immersion; secondly, to improve your writing. Thirdly, perhaps because you want to expand your active vocabulary. There is power in words, and if you’re like me and enjoy reading e.g. the old Icelandic Sögur in the original, or if you e.g. enjoy Catherynne M. Valente’s flowery prose, Voltaire’s or Wilde’s wit, you’ll know that there is beauty in the written word, in the properly phrased happenstance.

Now, if you believe that I’m just pulling the importance of language out of my academic behind, rest assured that I am not: Gary Gygax himself was known to use language to convey hidden characteristics in names – if you knew where to look. Hence, the final chapter of the book is devoted to “Gary’s Clever Names.” We take a look at pregen names and what they actually mean, which makes this book a rather interesting piece of linguistic gaming archaeology: Take, for example “Cloyer Bulse the Magsman.” As most gamers versed in old-school games will know, magsman is an 8th-level title for the thief. Here’s the thing: Did you know that “Cloyer” denotes either a pickpocket’s accomplice or the guy who blunders into a bunch of thieves and demands a share? Did you know that a “bulse” is a package of diamonds or gold dust? Or take the grey elf fighter/magic-user Ycore Rixie: This fellow may well be suffering from delusions of grandeur – “Ycore” means chosen/elect, while “Rixle” means “to rule” or “to have dominion.”

The book comes with a suggested further reading list, which is nice to see.

A drawback of the pdf-version here is that the book has no bookmarks, which represents a comfort-detriment. I’d suggest getting the PoD-version, particularly since it makes for nice reading when you put in on the table and a player has to wait its turn or has already finished the obligatory pizza during the lunch-break. For the pdf-version, you should probably detract a star from my final verdict.

Now, unlike pretty much every other book I’ve reviewed, this handy little booklet by Creighton Broadhurst is highly contingent in its appeal on whether you value cool words/language etc. If the idea sounds boring to you (which it frankly shouldn’t, but I’m not one to judge), I can understand that. If, however, the idea sounds exciting or interesting to you, then this is very much worth getting! Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Cool Words for Gamers
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Creator Reply:
Hooray! Glad you liked this, End. I loved putting this book together--I'm a bit of a word nerd!
Treasures & Trinkets: Gemstones & Art Objects (5e)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/24/2018 09:06:56

This resource provides the busy DM with loads of loot to tempt their party... or, for that matter, to stock residences for the discerning, provide items for an auction house or whatever use you might find for a selection of 'art objects' or gems.

It's divided into two sections. First up are the art objects - these can be any decorative item from paintings to statues, vases, trinkets, tapestries. Most are not so easy to transport due to size or fragility or just plain awkwardness, so if you do use them as loot the party needs to decide what is actually worth the effort of pilfering! They are presented in a series of lists of twenty items at a time (handy if you want to roll at random), with each list containing items of similar value ranging from 25 gp to a massive 7,500 gp apiece. They all sound beautiful - maybe one of the party fancies a pair of purple samite curtains woven with flowers in golden thread for his home, or maybe a painting in a gilded frame depicting a giant's castle in the clouds under attack from a flight of dragons is going to look nice on the wall. Or maybe he'll be hawking a soapstone bust of the dwarven king, Odvin Hammerschlag around a nearby town to raise cash for supplies for the next adventure (or a rowdy night in the best tavern in town!).

Then attention turns to gemstones. Again they are grouped by value starting with 'ornamental' stones at 10 gp a throw and ramping up to 'jewels' worth 5,000 gp apiece. Naturally cut and condition can affect the price. Each is both named and described, so you can give the description and let them wonder just what it is (an Intelligence check DC is recommended if you want them to figure out what they have found and what it's worth).

Finally, there's mention of the reputed magical properties of gemstones - which might inform, for example, which ones you use when crafting magic items - and on special appearances (fancy cuts and the like) or even complications that might affect whoever possesses the stone. For remember, all this stuff may not be mere loot, it may also be part of the plot!

A useful collection of items to scatter throughout your campaign world. Loot, plot items or just make the dungeon look prettier!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Treasures & Trinkets: Gemstones & Art Objects (5e)
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Fantastic! Thank you for the review, Megan! I'm glad you enjoyed the book!
Monstrous Lair #3: Ogre Cave
by Joseph B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/23/2018 12:48:58

Big fan of the Monsterous Lair line! More great stuff from Raging Swan!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Monstrous Lair #3: Ogre Cave
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Creator Reply:
Our first Monstrous Lairs review! Thank you so much for posting it Joseph--I much appreciate it!
Village Backdrop: Laewas (5e)
by Joseph B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/23/2018 12:45:58

Another great Village Backdrop from Raging Swan! Keep 'em comming -I use them all!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Village Backdrop: Laewas (5e)
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Thank you for the review and kind words, Joseph. Glad you enjoyed Laewas!
Treasures & Trinkets: Treasure Hoards #4 (5e)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/22/2018 09:58:08

In this fourth installment of the Treasure Hoards line, an array of twenty-five substantial hoards belonging to the wealthy (well, they ARE challenge level 17-20 after all!) are presented ready for you to locate for the party to pilfer. The format is as before, with a list of hoards which you can roll upon if you are happy with a random one, or you can read through each one if you'd prefer to select. This time, none of them is devoid of magic, unsurprising at this high level.

Within each hoard, first you hear about the cash - just gold and platinum pieces at this level and even so the quantities are such as to require some heavy lifting. Next comes a selection of items: gemstones, clothing, jewellry and miscellaneous items. Each has a note concerning value, generally with an Intelligence DC check to work out what they are worth and sometimes to figure out what the item is if it's not readily apparent by just looking at it. (Although I don't think it really takes a DC 20 Intelligence check to know that a promissory note to the value of 10,000 gp is worth... 10,000 gp!) Finally, magic items are listed with a brief description, but no indication of value, or for that matter details of what it does... you'll have to look those up elsewhere.

There's some nice stuff here, and several items could lead to adventures of their own. Why are they here? How did whoever you've given them to get hold of them? What will be the effect of the party hawking around that particular and distinctive item that they've just looted?

One hoard contains five fully-caparisoned heavy war horses! Make sure you use that one somewhere that there's accommodation for the horses. Another includes a complete sailing ship... Moving on to the magic, most is in the shape of potions, scrolls and wands with a few magical weapons and pieces of armour thrown in for good measure.

When you need some loot in a hurry, or some inspiration when stocking the next dungeon, this is a handy resource. The only thing I'd add is a total value for each hoard - there's always a party member who wants to know that!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Treasures & Trinkets: Treasure Hoards #4 (5e)
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Creator Reply:
Thank you for the review, Megan. I'm glad you found this instalment useful!
Village Backdrop: Lady Cross
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/21/2018 07:36:22

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of Raging Swan Press‘ cult-series clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page of SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Lady Cross is a village that falls squarely into the terrain of “basically an adventure” – just throw PCs into the mix, watch them interact with the locale, and slowly unearth the metaplot, for a classic, Shakespearian tragedy has marked the locale, providing a very easy metaplot for the GM to develop as a downtime adventuring site.

Situated in rough moorlands, with harsh northern winds, the village has a distinct Islay/Highlands-theme, which is generally something I enjoy and, as a fan of a good whiskey, can appreciate; indeed, with the soil is poor, Lady Cross sports no less than 6 different wells, which help emphasize the distilling and brewing as the primary resource of the settlement. It should be noted that, courtesy of the soil, the brew of choice here would be gins, not whiskey, though. Tea shops and fortified walls, visible in Tommi Salama’s excellent map, make the village seem rather safe, idyllic even.

Indeed, in the PFRPG version’s settlement statblock, the village has a danger value of +0, making it a per se relatively safe place…most of the time. At the same time, the shadow of the tragedy looms and represents a ticking timebomb of sorts.

Now, as always for the series, we do get notes for the marketplace section as well as 6 rumours. The pdf contains notes on the villager appearance and dressing habits as well as nomenclature, and PCs that do their legwork can unearth some lore. The pdf also provides information on the booming gin production and local law enforcement and the local customs, which sport a somewhat pagan tint, centering on the “Sorrow Tree” and the equinoxes.

Now, this supplement, structurally, follows the evolved form of Village Backdrops, providing a massive 20-entry table of local color events and dressing to make the village come to life. This also is mirrored in the fluff-only write-ups of the 2 NPCs, who come with a brief read-aloud description and mannerisms and personality. The read-aloud sections also extend to the write-ups for the nine notable locations. The village has an expanded sidebar, courtesy of its focus on beverages, which was something I enjoyed. Objects available for purchase are noted in their respective locations and the village has some additional adventuring potential:

The wells bespeak a system of tunnels, now mainly boarded up hastily and left forgotten, and a killer is stalking the village. Combined with the strong “main plot” of the village, this allows the village to act as a pretty efficient set-up for adventuring.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting re very good. I noticed no serious glitches on a formal or rules-relevant level. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes with really nice, original b/w-artworks and the cartography by maestro Salama is amazing, as always. The pdf comes fully bookmarked and in two versions – one optimized for screen use and one optimized for the printer.

This is the first file by Robert Manson I’ve read and I confess to being positively surprised. The village has a strong identity and angle that I enjoy; the fact that it basically is an adventure waiting to happen, that it can be run as a backdrop, has a dungeon-angle and one for investigation, as well as a nice complicating factor, makes this structurally well-executed. That being said, this time around, the nature of the main antagonist and focus of the storyline inherent in the setting, feels like it falls short of what it could do, courtesy of its relatively rules-lite nature. This settlement practically screams for haunts, hazards and a more fitting representation for the main antagonist herein – the creature chosen is as vanilla as can be and thus presents a detriment for the PFRPG-version, considering the alternatives the system offers. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Village Backdrop: Lady Cross
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Creator Reply:
Thanks very much for the review, Thilo! I'm glad you liked Lady Cross!
Village Backdrop: Lady Cross (5e)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/21/2018 07:34:29

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of Raging Swan Press‘ cult-series clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page of SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Lady Cross is a village that falls squarely into the terrain of “basically an adventure” – just throw PCs into the mix, watch them interact with the locale, and slowly unearth the metaplot, for a classic, Shakespearian tragedy has marked the locale, providing a very easy metaplot for the GM to develop as a downtime adventuring site.

Situated in rough moorlands, with harsh northern winds, the village has a distinct Islay/Highlands-theme, which is generally something I enjoy and, as a fan of a good whiskey, can appreciate; indeed, with the soil is poor, Lady Cross sports no less than 6 different wells, which help emphasize the distilling and brewing as the primary resource of the settlement. It should be noted that, courtesy of the soil, the brew of choice here would be gins, not whiskey, though. Tea shops and fortified walls, visible in Tommi Salama’s excellent map, make the village seem rather safe, idyllic even.

Indeed, the village turns out to be a rather safe place…most of the time. At the same time, the shadow of the tragedy hinted at looms prominently over the village and represents a ticking timebomb of sorts.

Now, as always for the series, we do get notes for the marketplace section as well as 6 rumours. The pdf contains notes on the villager appearance and dressing habits as well as nomenclature, and PCs that do their legwork can unearth some lore. The pdf also provides information on the booming gin production and local law enforcement and the local customs, which sport a somewhat pagan tint, centering on the “Sorrow Tree” and the equinoxes.

Now, this supplement, structurally, follows the evolved form of Village Backdrops, providing a massive 20-entry table of local color events and dressing to make the village come to life. This also is mirrored in the fluff-only write-ups of the 2 NPCs, who come with a brief read-aloud description and mannerisms and personality. They have btw. been assigned proper 5e default statblocks. The read-aloud sections also extend to the write-ups for the nine notable locations. The village has an expanded sidebar, courtesy of its focus on beverages, which was something I enjoyed. Objects available for purchase are noted in their respective locations and the village has some additional adventuring potential:

The wells bespeak a system of tunnels, now mainly boarded up hastily and left forgotten, and a killer is stalking the village. Combined with the strong “main plot” of the village, this allows the village to act as a pretty efficient set-up for adventuring.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting re very good. I noticed no serious glitches on a formal or rules-relevant level. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes with really nice, original b/w-artworks and the cartography by maestro Salama is amazing, as always. The pdf comes fully bookmarked and in two versions – one optimized for screen use and one optimized for the printer.

This is the first file by Robert Manson I’ve read and I confess to being positively surprised. The village has a strong identity and angle that I enjoy; the fact that it basically is an adventure waiting to happen, that it can be run as a backdrop, has a dungeon-angle and one for investigation, as well as a nice complicating factor, makes this structurally well-executed. That being said, this time around, the nature of the main antagonist and focus of the storyline inherent in the setting, feels like it falls short of what it could do, courtesy of its relatively rules-lite nature. This settlement practically screams for legendary or lair actions associated with the respective locales - the creature chosen is pretty vanilla and while 5e does not have the same amount of creatures (yet) as PFRPG, I still feel like the tragedy would have made for a great way to customize the challenge here. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4 stars for the 5e version as well.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Village Backdrop: Lady Cross (5e)
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Creator Reply:
Thanks very much for the review, Thilo! I'm glad you liked Lady Cross!
Village Backdrop: Lady Cross (SNE)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/21/2018 07:31:14

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of Raging Swan Press‘ cult-series clocks in at 13 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page of SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Lady Cross is a village that falls squarely into the terrain of “basically an adventure” – just throw PCs into the mix, watch them interact with the locale, and slowly unearth the metaplot, for a classic, Shakespearian tragedy has marked the locale, providing a very easy metaplot for the GM to develop as a downtime adventuring site.

Situated in rough moorlands, with harsh northern winds, the village has a distinct Islay/Highlands-theme, which is generally something I enjoy and, as a fan of a good whiskey, can appreciate; indeed, with the soil is poor, Lady Cross sports no less than 6 different wells, which help emphasize the distilling and brewing as the primary resource of the settlement. It should be noted that, courtesy of the soil, the brew of choice here would be gins, not whiskey, though. Tea shops and fortified walls, visible in Tommi Salama’s excellent map, make the village seem rather safe, idyllic even.

Indeed, the village turns out to be a rather safe place…most of the time. At the same time, the shadow of the tragedy hinted at looms prominently over the village and represents a ticking timebomb of sorts.

Now, as always for the series, we do get notes for the marketplace section as well as 6 rumours. The pdf contains notes on the villager appearance and dressing habits as well as nomenclature, and PCs that do their legwork can unearth some lore. The pdf also provides information on the booming gin production and local law enforcement and the local customs, which sport a somewhat pagan tint, centering on the “Sorrow Tree” and the equinoxes.

Now, this supplement, structurally, follows the evolved form of Village Backdrops, providing a massive 20-entry table of local color events and dressing to make the village come to life. This also is mirrored in the fluff-only write-ups of the 2 NPCs, who come with a brief read-aloud description and mannerisms and personality. They have btw. been assigned proper old-school class designations. The read-aloud sections also extend to the write-ups for the nine notable locations. The village has an expanded sidebar, courtesy of its focus on beverages, which was something I enjoyed. Objects available for purchase are noted in their respective locations and the village has some additional adventuring potential:

The wells bespeak a system of tunnels, now mainly boarded up hastily and left forgotten, and a killer is stalking the village. Combined with the strong “main plot” of the village, this allows the village to act as a pretty efficient set-up for adventuring.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting re very good. I noticed no serious glitches on a formal or rules-relevant level. Layout adheres to Raging Swan Press’ two-column b/w-standard and the pdf comes with really nice, original b/w-artworks and the cartography by maestro Salama is amazing, as always. The pdf comes fully bookmarked and in two versions – one optimized for screen use and one optimized for the printer.

This is the first file by Robert Manson I’ve read and I confess to being positively surprised. The village has a strong identity and angle that I enjoy; the fact that it basically is an adventure waiting to happen, that it can be run as a backdrop, has a dungeon-angle and one for investigation, as well as a nice complicating factor, makes this structurally well-executed. Now, while I did complain about the rather vanilla nature of the adversaries in the PFRPG and 5e version, I could field, in theory, the same complaint against the system neutral version – the OSR-games out there sport a ton of more interesting creatures. However, this is designated as the system neutral version and as such, complaining about wanting a deeper or more interesting rules-component would not be fair in the least. As such, the pdf works imho best in its system neutral version, as there is no system-immanent shortcoming in representation to complain about. Hence, my final verdict for this version will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Village Backdrop: Lady Cross (SNE)
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Creator Reply:
Thanks very much for the review, Thilo! I'm glad you liked Lady Cross!
Treasures & Trinkets: Treasure Hoards #3 (5e)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/21/2018 06:50:24

This is the third in a series of 'ready-made' treasure hoards that you can use when planning adventures or even right in the middle of a game if your party decides to go on a looting spree and want to know what they've found. There are twenty-five hoards, designed to suit challenge levels 11-16. Four have no magic items, so you can pick them if for some reason the presence of magical things is not appropriate.

Each hoard is presented in a standard format. First up, the coinage, at this level it's all gold and platinum pieces - even in one hoard that consists of a collection of well-stuffed piggy banks. Next are the ordinary items which include gemstones, books, clothing and other items of note. For each, there's an Intelligence DC check to figure out the value (and sometimes to reveal a bit more about what it is, if that's not clear just by looking at it). Finally, magical items are listed. Scrolls and potions predominate, but weapons, armour and a few other items are included.

The one flaw is that you don't get a total value for each hoard. You'd have to add up the cash and the values given for the mundane items... and then go look up the magical ones in the core rulebooks to get their worth! Still, you are going to have to look them up for the precise properties anyway, and at least each one gets a bit of atmospheric description, like the colour of each potion or notes on the condition or appearance of the item.

A neat resource to help you come up with interesting collections of loot rather than merely handing out coins when the party goes robbing their foes.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Treasures & Trinkets: Treasure Hoards #3 (5e)
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Creator Reply:
Thanks very much for the review, Megan. Glad you liked this book!
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