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Savage Worlds GM Screen Inserts
by Benjamin S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/22/2017 07:29:17

I expected a variety of tables to chose from. Instead you get three pages of tables which seem to be the same like the free Screen Inserts, downloadable from Pinnacle Entertainment's Website and a collection of artwork for the front. This product is completely useless for me. They should make it clear in the product description that there are only three pages of tables or they should add the tables to the preview, so you can see which table pages are included.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Savage Worlds GM Screen Inserts
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Savage Worlds Pulp Gear Toolkit
by Doug P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/15/2017 13:11:33

We play lots of 1930s era Savage Worlds so this is an invaluable asset. Especially like the relics part.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Savage Worlds Pulp Gear Toolkit
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Rippers Resurrected: Soul Changers - The Budapest Express
by Dorian A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/12/2017 15:21:50

Really good starter, but I'll wait for chapter 2 before I decide my final rating :D



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Rippers Resurrected: Soul Changers - The Budapest Express
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Savage Tales of Horror: Volume 1
by Cedric C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 07/05/2017 06:21:13

Introduction: Savage Tales of Horror is a three-volume set of independent adventures for the Savage Worlds roleplaying game. Even though Savage Worlds has its Savage Worlds Horror Companion, these scenarios can be played with just the core rules. The adventures are based on different Savage World settings, but, again, only the core rules are necessary. This is definitely an unusual approach for adventure collections, which typically center around only one roleplaying game setting. However, given the mortality rates in horror, and gaming groups who can only meet for a one-shot game, these collections are an excellent way for roleplayers to play a variety of horror settings without having to learn another roleplaying game system. They also introduce the gaming group to Savage World's other game systems, which they might not otherwise be exposed to. Many foes have special abilities, so you should be familiar with combat in the Savage World game system. Spoilers ahead, of course. (fwiw, The reviews of the Savage Tales volumes were written in reverse order. Comments common to all three tales are included in all three reviews.)

Face Snatchers: A witch! A witch! Burn her! This generic fantasy adventure finds the players forced by the town to judge a poor elderly woman to be burned at the stake. The mayor says she's a witch, the priest doesn't, and the only witness is a young child. The night turns into chaos as the real witch(es) take vengeance against the town with their minions, former villagers with no faces. Townsfolk are captured, and, as the Mayor proclaims, it's up to the heroes to "track the fiends". While there's plenty of activity before the Final Boss Fight, the gamemaster might wish to add a few encounters in the lair (with root-based monsters) before the final scene. The climax has some creativity, as the witches and their familiars can try to dupe the heroes in various ways.

Cold Storage: Written by Savage Worlds game designer, Shane Lacy Hensley, Cold Storage takes place in 1965, and the players are "all young and beautiful actors and actresses looking for their big break." They'll be attending a party on a great ship to "hobnob with directors, casting agents, movie stars, and other hopefuls." Except they find themselves in the cold freezing water of Alaska, as they see the ship behind them, inverted, and sinking into the water. The survivors enter the only building in the area, whose only activity is a Christmas party held at... 34 degrees Fahrenheit. The party starts off with several eccentric NPCs treating the characters very strangely, ending with a repentant NPC who tells one of the players what's going on and how they can escape. Myself, I would have preferred the players becoming suspicious, but gradually building up the creepiness, and finding out the situation and escape routes on their own. The adventure bills itself as an homage to EC Comics, so I guess that's an explanation for the unsubltety of the adventure.

The Retreat: The Retreat starts off with an homage to The Evil Dead, then turns into monstrous not-exactly zombiefest, including fractious survivor factions that must be dealt with. Rather than ally with any particular faction, event-driven encounters move the party from one faction to another, until they finally find the key to their escape. The adventure is on the linear side and assume the players act as heroes, but, otherwise, quickly executes its novel encounters, and includes some story seeds the gamemaster can further develop. Of the Savage Tales of Horror adventures, I like this one the most, although I still recommend volume three's LARP adventure for beginning gamemasters and players.

Manor of Blood: Set in London, in the early 1900's, the players are members of the Society for Psychic Truth, something of an agency of occult detectives. Sir Findley has inherited his estranged father's house, rumored to be haunted. The members must either prove the house is safe, or put the spirits to rest. The ending could have used a few more hints, but, at least it's a change from the usual ghostly tropes. I think I would have liked more adventures similar to this one.

Moonshine Blues: The suspicious death of bootlegger Whitey leads to more pulp action than pulp horror as the investigators are soon hired by pristine personality, Ruby Ray, to track down the man's killer. Ruby insists his bodyguard, former Boxer "Locomotive" Mike, accompanies them. Assuming the party is heroic (or foolish) enough to accept Ray's temporary employment, they will encounter icthynites, transforming swamp people, a mad scientist, the Black Hand mob, a roomful of undead guests, including one that only speaks Spanish. The adventure is set in Deadlands Noir, with notes on how to convert it to non-Deadlands noir settings.

Conclusion: I would describe these Savage Tales of Horror as adventures, as much as horror. Characters can fight off most of the threats, though the foes are often flexible enough for a game master to adjust ad hoc. Some investigation and stealth is necessary. Some of the adventures are on the linear side and assume heroic action by the characters. And, as said, the adventures are for different Savage Worlds, so they're best played by players who prefer or can only play one-off adventures. The Retreat stands out as, I think, easier to run and action-packed enough for players. The LARP adventure from volume three I would recommend for new gamemasters and players.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Savage Tales of Horror: Volume 1
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The Sixth Gun: Figure Flats
by Cedric C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/30/2017 16:02:19

Introduction: I find it somewhat ironic that Savage Worlds, an RPG game system that supports miniatures, has unique game settings that, if you play several of them, become expensive if you wanted miniatures for each of the settings. That is, while you'd be able to use your generic western miniatures in both Deadlands and Sixth Gun, it's unlikely you could use them for Deadlands: Noir or Last Parsec. So, while Pinnacle Entertainment Group has miniatures for soem of their settings, they also have 3D fold-up "figure flats" so you can have inexpensive paper miniatures for your games -- and you don't have to paint them, either!

The illustrations on the figure flats are typically front-views with a silhoutte for the back of the figure. The figures only have a white background, and the same illustration is used for a non-unique figure (ie. all the cowboys in the Sixth Gun figure flat have the same picture). The artist is Cheyenne Wright, although you should expect a comic book image, rather than the full art of his other Savage Worlds illustrations. The miniature size defaults to about 25mm, but you can change the scale for larger miniatures. The preview pics should give you a good idea of the miniatures.

Of the eight page PDF, one page is a cover illustration, three are of human-sized miniatures, and three are one-page overhead views of gigantic creatures. The PDF comes with singles of the unique characters, and five to twelve copies of non-unique ones.

Unique: Becky Montcrief Drake Sinclair Billjohn O'Henry Brother Roberto Kirby Hale Gord Cantrell General Oliander Hume Missy Hume "Filthy" Ben Kinney Silas "Bitter Ridge" Hedgepeth "Bloodthirsty" Bill Sumter "Old" Will Arcene Asher Cobb Griselda

Non-Unique: Cowboys Pinkertons Husks Indians Griselda Serpent Men

Gigantic creatures: Thunderbird The Winter Wolf Great Wyrm

As a miniature painter, I found these flats to be useful for reference in painting the Savage Worlds Sixth Gun RPG metal Miniatures Set (Becky Montcrief, Drake Sinclair, Gord Cantrell, Brother Roberto, Billjohn O’Henry, Missy Hume, Asher Cobb, and General Oliander Bedford Hume). However, if you don't paint or don't plan to play with these personalities in your Sixth Gun games, you're better off with the figure flats. You can use many of these miniatures in weird west and generic western games, and make multiple copies.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Sixth Gun: Figure Flats
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Solomon Kane
by Chris C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/27/2017 13:22:42

Original review found at: https://rpggeek.com/thread/1802946/savage-world-solomon-kane-review

Having finally gotten around to playing this and seeing that there are no other reviews right now, I thought I would discuss what was in this book and give some of my thoughts. This game runs off of the Savage Worlds rules system. If you don't know how Savage Worlds works, there are a ton of reviews of the system all over the net. Read one of them and then come back.

Also, I am not going to rate the book (within the text of the review, anyway). I will tell you everything about it and you can decide if it's something you would be interested in. If you really care about my personal opinion then yes, I really liked this game.

Next, in case you are coming to this review not knowing what the heck this game is about, it deals with the world of Solomon Kane, a puritan pulp action hero from the 16-17 century who fought demons and monsters, who was created by pulp author Robert E. Howard in the early 20th century. In other words, Kane is like a gun-wielding puritan Conan. In The Savage World of Solomon Kane the players are adventurers who fight and try to survive in a very dark, magic and demon filled early 17th century version of Earth. If you want pulpy action, horror, black powder weapons, and a medium to low magic world, continue on.

A WARNING: Kane is a puritan, and therefore a Christian. His religion(and others) is brought up and discussed in this book. It does not go on and on about it but, if you are to understand Kane and his world, you really need to understand the religions and the religious thought of his day. I feel that the authors handled this very respectfully, tactfully, and carefully, and I don't see how anything in this book would be offensive to anyone. I, myself, am non-religious and am majorly turned off by most games that discuss real-world religion. However, I didn't have a problem with this book or anything I read in it.

Part 1-Fluff

So at the beginning of the book we get almost 20 pages of Solomon Kane fluff. We get an original short story, a short explanation of who Kane is and a short rundown of all of the official Robert E. Howard Kane stories. This section is great for both fans of Solomon Kane (because it is really well done) and for people who have no idea who Kane is (because it lets you know what this whole book--and the adventures you are likely to go on with it--is all about).

Part 2-Characters This next chapter is about making characters. We get some sample archetypes that you can get inspiration from, and then we get into the mechanics of actually making a character.

Making a character in Solomon Kane is almost identical to making a character in the Savage Worlds core book with a few exceptions:

Race: All characters are human. There are no fantasy races (at least not playable ones) in the world of Solomon Kane. This also means that all starting characters get a free edge.

Money: All characters start with 5 British pounds (unless you take an edge that gets you a little more). This will get you some basic starting equipment and clothes and that's about it.

Skills: Although cut from the base Savage Worlds game, Guts is again a skill in Solomon Kane. With the horror theme it really fits. There are no sanity points, though.

Edges and Hindrances: Most of these will be familiar to readers of the Savage Worlds Core book. There is one new edge that lets you activate your righteous fury for free (see righteous fury below). There is also a gunsmith ability that lets you build black powder weapons, bombs, and grenades.

Like other Savage Worlds books, you get summaries at the end of this chapter (and every chapter with a lot of game-mechanics information) of all of the pertinent information (lists of all of the edges and hindrances, ect).

Part 3-Arms and Equipment

At the beginning of this chapter we get information of currency (and later a list of currencies from around the world), as well as how to buy and sell goods within the game. This includes buying and selling bulk goods such as ship cargo.

Next, we are given the game mechanics of making grenades, pistol shot, and powder bombs, as well as a discussion on putting on, taking off, and swimming with armor.

After that we get a short description of the weapons found in the book, special rules for black powder weapons, cannons, and grenades, followed by tables of stats and prices for all of these things.

Part 4-Rules

Again, much of the Savage World rules are the same except for a few notable exceptions:

Righteous rage: When a character spends a benny on a combat action, they have a chance (a roll of 5 or 6 on a d6) to go into a rage, giving you an extra d6 on trait and damage rolls for 3 rounds.

Bennies: In Solomon Kane, if you have unused bennies at the end of the game, you can spend them to roll a d6 for each one. On a 5 or 6 you get an extra experience point.

Mounts: Mounted combat is gone into more detail here than in the Savage Worlds Core book.

Fright: This book has similar fright rules to the Horror Companion but, without sanity points, it works a little differently.

Part 5-Magic and Devilry

In Solomon Kane, there are only two kinds of magic-Shamanism and Sorcery, and the spells are a little more subtle than throwing fireballs at your enemies. In fact, there are few (if any) directly offensive spells.

There are no power points: When you use magic you have a chance to fail and suffer backlash (which includes anything from being shaken to losing permanent levels in your arcane skill).

Spells cannot be maintained: The trade-off is that spell durations are generally longer.

Part 6-GM Section

This section is the standard "how do you GM" part of the book.

Part 7-Creating Adventures

Experienced GMs might rush past this part but I suggest everyone who runs Solomon Kane to give it a look. Not only does it give advice on running adventures in Kane's world, but it has a neat "adventure generator" which is a bunch of charts that help you create an adventure. Using these charts you can make a villain, find out what his goal is, how the characters get embroiled in his schemes, the villains henchmen, and even locations and "twists and turns" that you can incorporate into your adventure.

Part 8-The Savage World of Solomon Kane

Great little chapter about Kane's version of 17th century life. We learn about religion, medicine, science, and even slavery and sexism.

Part 9-The Rest of the Book

The remaining chapters are some of my favorite. In each chapter we are told about a part of Kane's world-Europe, Africa, the Orient, and the Americas. We are told about travel, famous people, religion, dangers, and events for these places. What we are also given is adventure seeds and story hooks galore! We learn about a haunted castle in the Holy Roman Empire's Black Forest, face off against a vampire cult in Africa, explore an ancient native city in the Americas, and fight a mummy in the orient. And that isn't even scratching the surface of all of the information in these chapters.

At the end of all of this we get a bestiary, the game mechanics for hazards such as forest fires and cave-ins, and even the stats for important people including Kane himself. The only negative I would add here is that there are very few pictures for the monsters.

The End: As I said in the beginning, I really liked this game. I am a Robert E. Howard fan so perhaps I am predisposed to liking it. If you are a fan of Howard's work, or Kane in particular, you are probably going to like this game.

Give this game a look if: You are a fan of Robert E. Howard, Kane, or pulp stories/games. You like the Savage World rules system. You are looking for a dark gothic horror game (think Sleepy Hollow or Dracula, only with more pulpy violence).

Maybe give this game a pass if: You hate the Savage Worlds system. You want a magic system where fireballs and lightning bolts are flying everywhere in combat (although, to be fair, you could port those elements in, but then you are missing a major point of playing Solomon Kane).



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Solomon Kane
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Deadlands Reloaded: Player's Guide Explorer's Edition
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/22/2017 04:10:21

http://www.teilzeithelden.de

Klassiker-Rezension: Deadlands Players Guide

Der Weird West ist ein rauer und gefährlicher Ort, voller Schrecken und merkwürdiger Phänomene, aber es gibt trotzdem noch Menschen die sich dort hinauswagen. Manche von ihnen suchen Gold, andere Ruhm und ein paar sind einfach nur verrückt. . Wir haben den Klassiker neu gelesen.

Deadlands spielt im wilden Westen während der amerikanischen Revolution, die bis zu einem bestimmten Punkt exakt so verlaufen ist, wie in unserer Realität.

Dieses Ereignis war ein plötzliches Erdbeben von immensem Ausmaß, das riesige Schluchten in den Kontinent riss, die man fortan als „The Maze“ bezeichnete. Ab diesem Zeitpunkt unterscheidet sich Deadlands stark von unserer Realität.

Man entdeckte den Ghost Rock, ein kohleähnliches Material, das unglaubliche Eigenschaften besaß und die Waffenproduktion und somit auch den Krieg grundlegend veränderte. Ebenso kehrte die Magie in die Welt zurück und verlieh einem geringen Teil der Bevölkerung unglaubliche Kräfte. Doch damit nicht genug, denn es gab immer mehr Gerüchte über Monstern, die aus den besagten Schluchten krochen und sogar Tote, die unter den Lebenden wandeln. Die Spielwelt

Wie ein paar Leuten vielleicht bekannt ist, war Deadlands früher ein reines Tabletop-Spiel (unter dem Namen Great Rail Wars), wurde dann aber von den Savage Worlds-Entwicklern in die Liste der Erweiterungen aufgenommen. Genauer gesagt, war der Beginn von Savage Worlds eben jenes Tabletop.

Der Weird West setzt sich aus einigen faszinierenden Fraktionen zusammen und ist sehr detailreich ausgearbeitet. So besitzt jede von ihnen ihren jeweils eigenen Anführer, Soldaten, Währungen und mache sogar Sondergruppen gegen die Schrecken des Westens.

„The United States“ unter der Führung von Ulysses S. Grant ist die erste der beiden größten Fraktionen, ein gut kontrollierter Staat mit strengen Gesetzen, die von Sheriffs und Agenten des Secret Service durchgesetzt werden.

Ihr großer Gegenspieler sind die „The Confederacy“ die unter Jefferson Davis vereint sind, welcher recht umstritten an seine Position kam, diese aber dennoch mit aller Macht hält. Ihnen unterstehen die Texas Range,r die das Konföderierten-Pendant zum Secret Service bilden.

Eine der Interessantesten Städte war für mich die „City of Fallen Angels“, die sich in der Hand eines Pastors befindet.

Dieser Mann, Ezekiah Grimme genannt, nahm kurz nach dem Auftauchen des „Maze“ eine Bande von Flüchtlingen auf und regiert seitdem die Stadt, indem er die Einfuhr von Lebensmitteln strengstens kontrolliert.

Die Bewohner sind, genauso wie ihr Anführer, größtenteils streng gläubig, was zu einigen ungemütlichen Situationen für Außenseiter führen kann

Die amerikanischen Ureinwohner haben ebenfalls ihre eigene Nation gegründet. Unter dem Namen „The Sioux Nations“ haben sich die Indianer im Dakota-Gebiet unter ihrem Anführer Sitting Bull versammelt und verfolgen den „alten Weg“, wodurch sie sich von Dingen der Fremden wie Feuerwasser und Schusswaffen aufs Stärkste distanzieren und zurück zu ihren Wurzeln kehren.

Es gibt jedoch eine kleine Splittergruppe, die sich den Namen „Order of the Raven“ gab und die Meinung vertritt, dass man den Feind mit seinen eigenen Waffen bekämpfen müsse. Es gelang ihnen, dank des Krieges und der geringen Bewachung, ihre Gebiete zurück zu erobern und sie bislang effizient zu verteidigen.

Aufgrund der großen Ghost Rock-Vorkommen und der dadurch ständigen Überschreitung der Grenzen durch Zivilisten sowie Soldaten, haben die Sioux bestimmte Areale für Außenseiter zugänglich gemacht. Sollte aber jemand außerhalb dieser Zonen erwischt werden, so kommt dieser nur im seltensten Fall mit dem Leben davon.

Im Süden haben sich einige Stämme unter dem mysteriösen Koyoten zur „Coyote Confederation“ zusammengeschlossen, welche außerdem eine stille Vereinbarung mit der „Confederacy“ haben. Diese bezieht sich darauf, dass die Ureinwohner jegliche konföderierten Truppen sowie Städte in Frieden lassen und stattdessen Städte der „United States“ angreifen und zerstören.

Zu guter Letzt gibt es noch „Salt Lake City“ die Stadt im Westen, die berühmt für ihre Experimente und Erfindungen in Verbindung mit dem neu entdeckten Rohstoff, nämlich Ghost Rock, ist.

Ständig in den weißen Dampf gehüllt, der bei der Verbrennung dieser Substanz entsteht, verdiente sie sich den Beinamen „The City of Gloom“.

Doch es gibt hier nicht nur geniale Erfinder und reiche Kaufleute, denn in den dunklen Gassen und auf den Müllhalden herrschen andere Regeln. Brutale Straßengangs sorgen unter den Einwohnern für Chaos und Unruhe und der Anführer von „Salt Lacke City“, Brigham Young, hat alle Hände voll zu tun, diese Unruhestifter einigermaßen unter Kontrolle zu halten.

Die Regeln Deadlands verwendet zum größten Teil dasselbe Würfelsystem, das in Savage Worlds allgemein benutzt wird und ist damit ein schlichtes und schnell zu verstehendes System, das man recht schnell beherrscht.

Wer sich detaillierter mit den Regeln auseinandersetzen möchte, findet dazu in der Besprechung der Savage Worlds-Grundregelwerks die entsprechenden Ausführungen.

Eine Sache, die Deadlands zur Zeitpunkt der damaligen Veröffentlichung einzigartig machte, ist die Verwendung von Spielkarten, nämlich eines ganzen Pokerdecks samt Joker, welche dafür verwendet werden, um für jede Runde die Initiative im Kampf neu zu bestimmen. Jeder Spieler zieht hierbei eine Karte und je höher der gezogene Wert ist, desto schneller ist der Spielcharakter in der Kampfrunde. Hierbei verleiht der Joker dem Charakter jedoch noch einen zusätzlichen Bonus, denn hiermit darf sich der Spieler während des Kampfes frei aussuchen, zu welcher Zeit er an der Reihe sein möchte. Mittlerweile ist dieser Mechanismus in den Standard-Regeln von Savage Worlds verankert.

Außerdem braucht man diese Karten für die Anwendung eine bestimmte Art von Magie, bei der man mit einem bösen Geist, auch Manitou genannt, um dessen Dienste spielt. Dies wird in Form einer Pokerrunde zwischen Spieler und Spielleiter entschieden. Gewinnt der Spieler, so wird der Zauber, je nach Stärke der Hand mit gewissen Boni, gewirkt. Verliert man jedoch, so erhält man einen sogenannten Backlash und bekommt Schaden.

Als letztes kann man die Spielkarten auch für die Fähigkeit „Gambling“ einsetzten, die Regeln dafür sind ebenfalls ausführlich im Buch beschrieben. Charaktererschaffung Die Charaktererschaffung in Deadlands ist einfach und schnell, man kann sich vormittags auf einen Kaffee zusammensetzten und mittags mit der Runde losspielen.

Als erstes suchen sich die Spieler aus, wen sie verkörpern wollen, hier werden vom Regelwerk nicht viele Grenzen gesetzt, sei es die Herkunft des Charakters, dessen Geschlecht oder Beruf, die einzige Einschränkung ist, dass es im Deadlands -Universum ausschließlich Menschen (Anmerkung der Redaktion: später auch Untote) zu spielen gibt.

Nach dem der grobe Entwurf feststeht, werden fünf Punkte auf die Eigenschaften Strength (Stärke), Smarts (Intelligenz), Agility (Geschick), Spirit (Willensstärke) und Vigor (Ausdauer, Durchhaltevermögen) verteilt.

Auch hier gibt es keine Vorschriften wie man die Punkte verteilt, wodurch man als Spielleiter hier und da ein wenig aufpassen sollte, da Spieler, die alle Punkte in ein oder zwei Eigenschaften ihres Charakters stecken, in einigen Situationen hilflos da stehen und so gut wie nichts tun können, was für die Spieler mit der Zeit ein wenig frustrierend werden kann.

Danach werden ein paar Fähigkeiten erworben, hier gibt es in Deadlands noch einmal eine schöne Ergänzung zu der ohnehin schon umfangreichen Auswahl im Savage Worlds Regelbuch.

Nun wählt sich jeder Spieler einen, oder falls gewünscht auch mehrere Nachteile, wobei es von einem blinden Auge über Gierig bis hin zu plagenden Albträumen eine große Bandbreite an Möglichkeiten gibt, aus der die Spieler auswählen können.

Für die Nachteile können den Charakteren anschließend Vorteile gekauft werden oder die Eigenschaften noch ein wenig verbessert werden.

Im Anschluss schreibt jeder Spieler die schlimmste und schrecklichste Angst seines Helden auf ein Blatt Papier und gibt dieses dem Spielleiter, wozu dieser Schritt nötig ist, erfahren die Spieler aber nicht, da dieses Thema ausschließlich im Marshalls Guide für den Spielleiter genauer erläutert wird. Zu guter Letzt wird noch Ausrüstung gekauft und jeder Spieler bekommt einen Punkt in Grit (Abhärtung), anzeigt, wie starke Nerven der Held besitzt und wie gut er mit paranormalen Ereignissen umgehen kann.

Spielbarkeit aus Spielleitersicht Eine Geschichte in Deadlands aufzubauen, ist wirklich nicht schwer, gerade Abenteuer, die nicht mehr als zwei bis drei Spielabende dauern, sind an einem Wochenende fertig.

Ein großer Vorteil von Deadlands bzw. Savage Worlds im Allgemeinen sind die einfach zu verstehenden Regeln und in den meisten Fällen reicht es, das Buch einmal durchgelesen zu haben.

Dieser Umstand ist gerade für Neueinsteiger sehr nützlich, da man so viel mehr Zeit hat, sich auch die Spieler und die Welt zu konzentrieren, anstatt ständig die Nase im Regelbuch vergraben zu müssen.

Natürlich gibt es auch hier Ausnahmen, aber diese beziehen sich meiner Erfahrung nach größtenteils auf das Magiesystem, das trotz der Einfachheit der Regeln ziemlich umfangreich ist.

Über die Jahre hinweg gab es viele Abenteuer und Quellenbände für Deadlands, von denen wir einige besprochen haben. Spielbarkeit aus Spielersicht Als Spieler ist es dank des Settings ziemlich einfach in die Welt von Deadlands einzutauchen. Jeder, der schon einmal Wild West-Streifen gesehen hat, kann sich vorstellen, wie man durch die Wüste reitet, im Saloon mit einem Glas Brandy der Musik lauscht oder eine Prügelei anzettelt, weil der Gegenüber beim Pokern getrickst hat.

Die Regeln sind auch sehr leicht zu verstehen und dadurch, dass man nur zwei Würfel bei den Proben werfen muss und nicht viel zu rechnen hat, ist genug Zeit da, um sich auf das Rollenspiel und die Geschichte zu konzentrieren.

Spielbericht Wir werden euch in Kürze einen Spielbericht zur Verfügung stellen. Erscheinungsbild Der Deadlands Players Guide kommt mit dem erwarteten rauen Wild West-Charme an.

Die Illustrationen sind stimmig und wirklich passend, sodass man schon beim Durchblättern tolle Ideen und Anregungen für einen Charakter bekommt, den man spielen möchte.

Das Buch ist gut zu lesen, schön strukturiert und aufgrund des Inhaltsverzeichnisses beschränkt sich das ohnehin schon sehr wenige nachschlagen auf ein Minimum. Jedoch ist die Schrift am Anfang der Kapitel wegen der etwas unvorteilhaften Schriftart ein wenig unangenehm zu lesen.

Fazit Der Deadlands Players Guide ist für jeden Wild West-Fan auf jeden Fall einen Blick wert, aber auch Leute die dem wilden Westen nicht so zugetan sind, so wie ich, sollten diesem System definitiv eine Chance geben.

Die Welt von Deadlands ist gut ausgearbeitet und interessant, die Regeln einfach und leicht zu verstehen und die Möglichkeiten sind geradezu grenzenlos was man mit diesem Buch machen kann.

Natürlich benötigt man zum Spielen noch zusätzlich das Savage Worlds-Grundregelwerk und am besten den Marshalls Guide gleich dazu, was dennoch zusammen ein leistbares Spielsystem darstellt, welches den Erwerb auf jeden Fall wert ist.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Player's Guide Explorer's Edition
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Savage Tales of Horror: Volume 2
by Cedric C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/14/2017 01:21:41

Introduction: Savage Tales of Horror is a three-volume set of independent adventures for the Savage Worlds roleplaying game. Even though Savage Worlds has its Savage Worlds Horror Companion, these scenarios can be played with just the core rules. The adventures are based on different Savage World settings, but, again, only the core rules are necessary. This is definitely an unusual approach for adventure collections, which typically center around only one roleplaying game setting. However, given the mortality rates in horror, and gaming groups who can only meet for a one-shot game, these collections are an excellent way for roleplayers to play a variety of horror settings without having to learn another roleplaying game system. (LARP of Horror can also be played as an origins chapter of modern-day heroes.) They also introduce the gaming group to Savage World's other game systems, which they might not otherwise be exposed to. Many foes have special abilities, so you should be familiar with combat in the Savage World game system. Spoilers ahead, of course. (fwiw, The reviews of the Savage Tales volumes were written in reverse order. Comments common to all three tales are included in all three reviews.)

Love on the Mountain: Set in the Deadlands, Love on the Mountain has the party on a lovelorn adventure to help out the tenderfoot Merle King find his beloved Jo Ann in the mountains, "captured" by the bearlike Claude Clifton. With this being the Deadlands, a the posse discovers, soon enough, that this is not a mundane adventure. The "hook" of the adventure, I thought, was a little forced, assuming the players would side with the romatic Merle without doing some investigation and fact-checking ahead of time. The NPCs, however, are quite colorful, so, if you or another player enjoy personalities (both major and minor NPCs) in your adventures, you'll find plenty of opportunities. Also, for those gamemasters who enjoy chewing the scenario, the encounters of the mountain path do a good job building up the atmosphere. (Practice a little sleight of hand when you draw cards from the playing deck, or preselect the cards -- BLACK cards -- ahead of time!) For those gamemasters who like to pillage adventures, Love on the Mountain has a gang of disreputable cowboys he can use as enemies for other old west adventures, as well as those spooky mountain encounters I mentioned.

Skitters: A modern-day adventure, Skitters has the players as a cast of researchers in a small town (it's not Mayberry RFD, but it sure comes to mind!), investigating sheep disappearances that have no sign of wolf or other activity. As minor characters, the NPCs have easily run personalities, so you can let players play the town gossip, the excited farmer whose sheep have disappeared, the mayor who doesn't want a town panic, and so on. Inevitably, the local air force is called in, but the adventure has hooks to keep the researchers involved as key support in defeating the menance, as well as following up on its demise. Strange that the bones of the sheep still can't be found. Oh, and did anyone check that the cave network of the spider is attached to the town sewers? You'll have to set up the town vs. spiders miniature battle if you want, but stats are provided. The adventure comes with NPC townsfolk and a research team of pregenerated characters.

Blood on Ice: The adventure opens with the characters as members of Artemis Security and Intelligence, escorting four American university prfessors to a conference on democratic governance. The party is overworked, stressed, and tired, but this is just the opening of the adventure, as militants attack the escort. The co-founder of ASI himself offers the party a rest in Washington, followed by a security investigation job at Jukkasjärvi, Sweden’s famous Frozen Hotel. At the Frozen Hotel, the party is greeted by Sven Helvete, the CEO/Owner, and Axel Nyquist, Chief of Security. Helvete discusses how nine of his security staff members have been murdered over the past two weeks. The killers seem to be using some kind of trained wolf or bear in their attacks. Helvete thanks the team for taking this job, while Nyquist resents the outsiders. Helvete suspects his neglect to maintain the Kyrka, a rarely used local religious building and former tourist location, has something to do with it, since a protest by some locals happened a few months before the strange attacks around the Kyrka grounds. The adventure has some good ideas on how modern-day supernaturals would function in today's world, but I thought the second half of the adventure was too linear, assuming the players would act a certain way, and lacking subtlety, with the supernaturals revealing their hand rather than erring on the side of caution and secrecy. Still, if you want an action movie rather than a guarded secret, then this adventure should work for your group.

LARP of Horror: "To Arms, defend the town!" Or, at least the barn. A LARP ritual goes awry, as a demon is released, subjugating our poor heroes into a series of teenage horror movie and vampire slayer tropes. The scenario is linear, with NPCs often telling the players what to do, but, since the characters are desperate newbies, not experienced adventurers, this shouldn't be a problem. The adventure itself is a good introduction to Savage Worlds, and could be a good origin for a modern day supernatural setting, including Savage World's mystical East Texas University. (Remember to add a curse from the evil bad guy for the party to stumble upon supernatural threats for the rest of their lives!) It presents a variety of encounters not found in most generic fantasy adventures (eg. non-lethal combat, supernatural traps), with simple mechanics resolution. Characters also gain supernatural abilities as they survive, a subtle way to introduce experience to the game. The game comes with pregenerated characters, including why they're playing a LARP.

Rosewood: "Shortly after the 2056 supply run, radio communication with Ares I was lost." Your players are the second emergency team investigating Ares I, a permanent Mars colony. The green material showing on the long range cameras suggest that Ares I was built on an oasis. But certainly that's impossible. What's also odd is that the commander of Ares I has no idea of the first emergency team. Let's hope that the second emergency team is more wary than the first. The adventure has the Ares I crew as additional NPCs which gamemaster assistants could play.

PDF vs. Hardcopy: For adventures, I typically recommend PDFs over hardcopies. With a PDF, you can print out the adventure you're playing for the night, rather than bring the entire book with you. You can print pages on color, then cut them out as visual handouts (some of the Tales of Horror adventures also have handouts). You can cut out and give the players any pregenerated characters (although I would have preferred them to be on half-pages, rather than across a two-column format). You can take notes on the printouts. And, of course, the PDFs are less expensive.

Free Test Drive: I should note that Savage Worlds has a free Test Drive modern-day horror adventure, The Wild Hunt, originally given out on Free RPG Day 2011. The sixteen-page PDF has a short four-page adventure, pregenerated characters, figure flats, and six-page core rules including character generation. A review can be found on RPG.net : https://www.rpg.net/reviews/archive/15/15319.phtml

Conclusion: I would describe these Savage Tales of Horror as adventures, as much as horror. Characters can fight off most of the threats, though the foes are often flexible enough for a game master to adjust ad hoc. Some investigation and stealth is necessary. Some of the adventures are on the linear side. And, as said, the adventures are for different Savage Worlds, so they're best played by players who prefer or can only play one-off adventures.

LARP of Horror stands out as a scenario new gamemasters and players should try for their first games of Savage Worlds. It introduces them to the Savage World game system, without overloading them with the mechanics, yet uses situations that are uncommon in generic fantasy roleplaying. Blood on Ice and Rosewood are better suited for gamemasters who can play various NPC roles, or have assistants to help him. Love on the Mountain would work best with "romantic" players who believe in uniting lost loves. Skitters should be fun for a "giant insect vs. small town" B-movie session, with optional miniature skirmishes for all those plastic spiders from your dungeoncrawl miniatures game or last Halloween party. I've reviewed volumes two and three, and would recommend whichever has settings you and your players would like to play, or volume two for its newbie-friendly LARP of Horror adventure.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Savage Tales of Horror: Volume 2
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Weird War I: War Master's Handbook
by Francesco B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/02/2017 17:57:10

Another quality product from PEG. You can always count on them to make it right, make it look good, and make it work. Fast! Furious! Fun!

This has a plethora of useful facts, stats, and knowledge for you to use for any game set in WW1. It has inspiriations, adventure seeds, and sets the tone beautifully.

Highly recommended if this period is of interest. This is the second WW1 book you should buy, but only because the Player's Guide is the first!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Weird War I: War Master's Handbook
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Weird War I: Player's Guide
by Francesco B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/02/2017 17:54:48

Another quality product from PEG. You can always count on them to make it right, make it look good, and make it work. Fast! Furious! Fun!

This has a plethora of useful facts, stats, and knowledge for you to use for any game set in WW1. It has inspiriations, adventure seeds, and sets the tone beautifully.

Highly recommended if this period is of interest. This is the first WW1 book you should buy!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Weird War I: Player's Guide
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Deadlands Reloaded: Player's Guide
by Brandon W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/27/2017 11:28:04

Deadlands is an iconic license from the RPG frontier days, and it gets the polish it deserves here. The lore is interesting and delivered with gusto. Many designers have forgotten the importance of flavor, and this book serves as a reminder. Its also a reminder of how important it is to know your game's genre niche and play to those strengths. Shadowrun had cyberpunk fantasy, D&D had high fantasy, Mechwarrior had war sci-fi, Cyberpunk 2020 had pure cyber, Star Wars had space opera and Deadlands had the Western. Like a grizzled gunslinger, the Reloaded edition evokes that genre spirit at every turn. The mechanics stay true to their roots, but engrave that six shooter with the best that modern design has to offer. If your going to run a Western game, this is your ride pard.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Player's Guide
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Savage Tales of Horror: Volume 3
by Cedric C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/25/2017 02:45:30

Introduction: Savage Tales of Horror is a three-volume set of independent adventures for the Savage Worlds roleplaying game. Even though Savage Worlds has its Savage Worlds Horror Companion, these scenarios can be played with just the core rules. The adventures are based on different Savage World settings, but, again, only the core rules are necessary. This is definitely an unusual approach for adventure collections, which typically center around only one roleplaying game setting. However, given the mortality rates in horror, and gaming groups who can only meet for a one-shot game, these collections are an excellent way for roleplayers to play a variety of horror settings without having to learn another roleplaying game system. They also introduce the gaming group to Savage World's other game systems, which they might not otherwise be exposed to. Spoilers ahead, of course.

Isle of Death: This adventure takes place within Savage World's Weird War II setting. The players are on a routine mission, which crash lands on a Nazi testing island. Up until the lab, much of the adventure is novel for gamers mostly used to generic fantasy or Cthulhu Mythos roleplaying. Players will involve themselves in a dogfight (read up on the Dogfight Chase rules!), encounter zombie soldiers while in a crashed plane, and skulk around a POW camp to free some prisoners. However, once in the lab, most of the encounters just end with a monster of the week fight. Gamemasters with some experience should be able to change the mood of the adventure and NPCs to focus more on stealth, or interacting with prisoners and staff who'd rather escape. If you like Savage Worlds as a miniatures game, the adventure has plenty of opportunities for miniatures combat. No pregenerated characters are included, but most players should have an idea how to create a World War II allied soldier.

The Final Page: This adventure takes place in Morden Savage Worlds setting. "The world of Morden is part of a setting book for Savage Worlds named Accursed, a place of dark fantasy where the themes and tropes of Hellboy meet those of Solomon Kane. Only those bearing the forms of monsters can stand against the tide of the Witches’ evil. The Accursed are this world’s only hope — they must learn to embrace their curse or fight against it in order to free their world from the grip of darkness." As someone not familiar with The Accursed, it's a little unclear from this sidebar what sort of character should be generated. I think pregenerated characters would have helped. The Accursed roleplaying site, accursedrpg.com, has a wealth of information about this setting, more than enough to run this adventure. You should also be able to run the adventure with generic fantasy heroes, treated as outsiders sent by an unwelcome body. The adventure primarily happens in a mansion, so it's not too difficult to modify it to a Gothic adventure. With some editing and scaling down of encounters, the adventure could be modified into a Call of Cthulhu-style scenario (or even a Tom Baker Dr. Who adventure, "The Witch in the Mirrors", with its science-fiction-y explanation of horror events!).

Hear Your Scream: This adventure takes place in the Last Parsec setting, and optionally uses the the Savage Worlds Science Fiction Companion. Savage World's Last Parsec Primer free download has additional background the gamemaster and players may wish to use. The gamemaster may also wish to play the free non-horror Last Parsec's Unexpected Colony download adventure beforehand. With the characters in space, their communication devices will go dead, and the players will have to communicate non-verbally. The last pages of the adventure have stats for entities encountee during the adventure, a synopsis of the Kobold crew, and pregenerated characters who may be used in other sf games. The adventure starts off with a distress signal, and the players find themselves having to make a decision: who stays on the ship, and who boards the disabled space craft? Tales then divides up its adventure into location-based encounters on the disabled space craft, and event-driven ones on the rescuing ship. The plot is a bit more straightforward than I'd like. Two alien crystaline intelligences have been squabbling about for eons, but, being crystals, couldn't do anything about their philosophical opponents. Milleniea ago, mobile aliens found these alien crystals, which then took over their bodies and resulted in planetary war and doom. Time passed, and the Kobold crew discovered these crystals, which took them over as well, resulting in their demise as the aliens, both as crew members and the mobile aliens, fought each other again. Thankfully, one of the crew, who can be revived in the medical bay, isn't quite telling the truth, and can be played by a wily gamemaster (or co-GM). A creative gamemaster can think of other ways for the different entities in this scenario to have their own interests, with the players caught in-between (or having motives of their own). If players are late to the game, the gamemaster can also try some flashback roleplaying of the crew of the Kobold, so that the players can look at them as more than "extras".

Hotel 96: This adventure takes place in the East Texas University world, or can be placed in any modern horror, mystery, or noir setting. Our heroes find their car (and, mysteriously, cell phones) breaking down in front of the ominous Hotel 96. As they enter the hotel, they find themselves within celebration -- of the last night of Prohibition. Alas, they are soon told, by the charred spirits of the hotel, that they must "end this". The hotel of the adventure reminds me quite a bit of that of The Shining, so you may want to watch that movie (with a bright light) for ideas and encounters with those of the hotel's past. As the characters investigate the rooms, they have various premonitions and encounters with various NPCs. Activities which result in disrupting the environment result in various "haunting" effects that happen to the characters. Myself, I would have liked the adventure to be more subtle, giving clues rather than direct instructions, and the NPC encounters fleshed out more into subplots. Pregenerated characters (Freshmen (Novices) with two advances) are included, and may be used in other East Texas University campaigns.

Dance of the Dead: This adventure "is a Soloman Kane adventure for veteran level characters or higher set in London and the wilds of Scotland." Soloman Kane himself is a pulp-era late 16th to early 17th century Puritan, and creation of Conan the Barbarian writer, Robert E. Howard. N'Longa, one of the characters of Soloman Kane, makes an appearance. The adventure itself can fit any generic fantasy city (with a book seller), and its beginning a particularly good model for designing a town adventure. The adventure also features a variety of ghosts from different eras and you can adjust the difficulty levels of the ghosts pretty easily, from wispy to fully material. The adventure is on the linear side, and assumes the characters will act heroically, rather than ally against the enemy, or even defeat him and take his place. Thematically, characters will need to have weapons that can affect ghosts, although the Friends and Foes section says the ghosts the characters fight are material, and do not have the Ethereal ability (can only be harmed with magic attacks) that Ghosts in the core book have.

PDF vs. Hardcopy: For adventures, I typically recommend PDFs over hardcopies. With a PDF, you can print out the adventure you're playing for the night, rather than bring the entire book with you. You can print pages on color, then cut them out as visual handouts (some of the Tales of Horror adventures also have handouts). You can cut out and give the players any pregenerated characters (although I would have preferred them to be on half-pages, rather than across a two-column format). You can take notes on the printouts. And, of course, the PDFs are less expensive.

Free Test Drive: I should note that Savage Worlds has a free Test Drive modern-day horror adventure, The Wild Hunt, originally given out on Free RPG Day 2011. The sixteen-page PDF has a short four-page adventure, pregenerated characters, figure flats, and six-page core rules including character generation. A review can be found on RPG.net : https://www.rpg.net/reviews/archive/15/15319.phtml

Conclusion: I would describe these Savage Tales of Horror as adventures, as much as horror. Characters can fight off most of the threats, though the foes are often flexible enough for a game master to adjust ad hoc. Some investigation and stealth is necessary. Some of the adventures are on the linear side. And, as said, the adventures are for different Savage Worlds, so they're best played by players who prefer or can only play one-off adventures.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Savage Tales of Horror: Volume 3
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Deadlands Reloaded: Heroes o' Gloom
by Ronald L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/15/2017 13:51:28

An interesting assortment of characters, with a good background for each. However my main requirement as a novice Marshall is a set of decently statted characters for practice one-shots with my gaming group. This product does not deliver in this regard, in that I have 0 certainty that the characters contained within are compatible with the most recent Deadlands Reloaded rule set. Instead, this set of pregens includes a character with Arcane Background(Miracles) along with a listed set of powers, and experience purchased edges in Power Points. This is wholly incompatible with the current Deadlands Reloaded ruleset for AB(Miracles) in which the background grants all available powers and powerpoints are irrelevant.

In short: do not expect this product to be compatible with Deadlands Reloaded.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: Heroes o' Gloom
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Deadlands Reloaded: The Tombstone Seven
by Ronald L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/15/2017 13:48:42

An interesting assortment of characters, with a good background for each. However my main requirement as a novice Marshall is a set of decently statted characters for practice one-shots with my gaming group. This product does not deliver in this regard, in that I have 0 certainty that the characters contained within are compatible with the most recent Deadlands Reloaded rule set. Instead, this set of pregens includes a character with Arcane Background(Hex-slinger), which in the current rules has been rolled into Arcane Background(Magic), aka the Huckster.

In short: do not expect this product to be compatible with Deadlands Reloaded.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Deadlands Reloaded: The Tombstone Seven
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Savage Rifts: Coalition Field Manual
by Gary W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/06/2017 22:23:54

haven't had the opportunity to put this stuff into action, but I love the layout and the art work has me drooling. really excited about playing with all these new toys!!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Savage Rifts: Coalition Field Manual
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