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Gossamer Worlds: The Black (Diceless)
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/08/2016 22:13:58

This is one of my favorite settings presented for Lords of Gossamer and Shadow. This is the answer to the question, "Is there anything in the Gossamer Worlds that can really threaten a potent Gossamer Lord?" This vast, ultra-high tech setting is full of such threats, as well as setting vast and varied enough to peak the interest of any PC intent on seeing new sights.

The setting is so vast, however, that the ten pages of content barely scratch the surface. To use this supplement effectively, a GM will have to rise to the occasion and do a fair amount of prep work. However, there are handfuls of little details scattered throughout the pages you can wrap an entire adventure (or more) around. A nice touch is how the struggle between the Eidolon and Umbra has recently surged in an area, causing ripples through this entire epic setting.

I used this in an adventure and the look on my player's faces once they realized the sheer size of it all was priceless.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Gossamer Worlds: The Black (Diceless)
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Gossamer Worlds: Ring of Fire (Diceless)
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/08/2016 22:03:04

This is an interesting mash-up of a ringworld setting and a wild west frontier. For game masters that have problems getting their jaded players invested in the trials of people in Gossamer worlds, this is your setting. The Ring of Fire introduces a setting so desperate and a people so determined to survive, that anyone who has the slightest sympathy for the underdog would be moved.

There are nice world-building touches that make this different from a stock western setting (aside for it being on a Ringworld, that is). The smattering of different cultures all fleeing eternally westward gives a GM carte blanche to introduce any elements they deem interesting. The author's introduction of the Gunslingers was a very fresh approach that just begs to be used as a plot hook. There is also the potential tie-in to another Gossamer World that could easily lead to other story arcs...

An excellent supplement. Whether you are GM for Lords of Gossamer and Shadow, a player looking for character inspiration, or just someone who likes reading about cool worlds, this is a good buy.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Gossamer Worlds: Ring of Fire (Diceless)
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10 Kingdom Seeds: Hills (PFRPG)
by Björn A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/02/2016 04:05:52

Rite Publishing Presents 10 Kingdom Seeds: Hills by Liz Smith is part of series providing the GM with short town descriptions she can easily plug-in into her game. These settlements are intended to be used as PC bases, as foundation stones to use with Pathfinder's Kingdom Building Rules, but can as easily just be inserted into your setting, to fill empty regions between your big cities. And while they are written with hill terrain in mind, most of them aren't so specific that they couldn't be used with other terrain types as well.

The PDF consists of 9 pages, with 6 pages filled with actual content (plus cover, credits and OGL). Layout and page design is on a professional, high-level standard and I especially dig the artwork which would be worthy of any major publisher. Actual content are around half-page long descriptions of 10 settlements, ranging from Thorps to Villages. Each entry starts with the rule description (as seen first in Paizo's Gamemastering Guide), followed by a short description of the look and the economy of each town. The last one being something I especially like as this is often the main reason why a settlement is founded at all and it immediately creates imaginery. One thing I also like is that those settlements are very varied as far as their main inhabitants' race is concerned. A chaotic good thorp inhabited by half-orcs can excellently serve to play with the player's expectations (and if you'd rather have humans there, just change it, it's no big deal)

Each entry also describes one or two important locations and concludes with some rumors about the settlement or its inhabitants which, while they sometimes feel like created with a random generator (which must not be a bad thing), still immediately add potential plot hooks and ideas to develop own adventures. I mean what could happen if a caravan with a holy sword comes to a village ruled by a CE cleric? (just to give an example). Here you find a village ruled by a bronze dragon, you have ghosts in the streets, cats stealing magic items (for what reason ever) or simply wandering hamlets made out of wheeled huts. So what this products really is successful at is to spark imagination without losing many words. The GM will have to work, if she wants to use these ideas, but she'll have something to start with.

There are some things I have to criticize for honesty's sake. The main criticism is directed at the rules section of each entry. As it seems, the designer forgot to include the modifiers from Table: Settlement Statistics into the settlement modifiers of each entry. There is also one major layout error in the Seahollow entry where the rules section has been divided by the text description. Minor mistakes (at least I think it wasn't done intentionally) can be found in the rules sections for Starrywyn (Danger modifier should be -5 instead of +5) and Redhurst (being a thorp but using the magic item line for villages in the Marketplace section). I'm not the big rules guy, so this is nothing to put much importance in (maybe there are even reasons why there are so many items flowing around in Redhurst and why danger is higher in seemingly peaceful Starrywyn?) but if you're using the settlement modifiers in actual play, you should be aware that you have to recalculate the modifiers according to the rules.

This all said, I can recommend this product. If you are building your own setting or if you're using published settings, there will be empty places to fill and to do so, this product can be immensely helpful. This may not be obvious by the first look, but if you're taking the time to really read the entries, you'll find little, creativity sparking ideas helping you to really bring those settlements to live. So I'll give it 4 out of five stars (a half star removed for the rules inconsistencies, another half star because some of the rumors seem a bit to random for my taste), because while not perfect, I'll probably use all ten settlements in my homebrew (meaning that each if these settlements is worth way more than the 15 cents it costs, and that doesn't even count in the splendid illustrations)



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
10 Kingdom Seeds: Hills (PFRPG)
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Martial Arts Guidebook (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/25/2015 07:45:20

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This massive supplement clocks in at 63 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 59 pages of content, so let's take a look!

Disclaimer: I was an IndieGoGo-backer for this book back in the day, but was in no other way associated with the production of this book.

This was moved up in my review-queue as a prioritized review at the behest of my patreons.

So, what do we get here: Basically, we get 6 schools of martial arts that teach so-called techniques. Techniques can be gained via a plethora of options: Number one would be the Martial training feat, which nets a character permanent access to one technique, which can then be used at-will. Alternatively, there is the Steel Discipline-feat, which nets 3+Int-mod Steel points per day, which can then be used as a resource to activate a martial technique. If the character already has grit, panache or kit or a similar resource, said resource receives an expansion and can then be used to activate a technique. Beyond that, one should realize that access to the school teaching the technique is considered to be a given requirement, putting the reins firmly in the hand of the GM, including a discussion on how to base technique-acquisition on roleplaying. Speaking of which: Technique-acquisition sans expenditure of feats via roleplaying also does sport a concise mechanic for such a means of introducing the material herein.

All of this should already hint at the dual focus of this book: On one side, this book is all about giving martial characters more interesting options, but it is also about providing a social context for martial characters. "But what if a character has no x feats to burn?" Well, you see, that's pretty much one of the truly beautiful components of this book: From antipaladin cruelties to gunslinger deeds, there are plenty of alternate class options to allow such characters to utilize the techniques introduced in this book, a component also supported via the new favored class options that are introduced with the explicit purpose of making techniques more easily accessible. This level of customization options btw. also extends to the techniques prerequisites, which come with 2 different sets: Essentially, just about everything regarding the acquisition of techniques is modular.

Okay, so what exactly do we get in this pdf's respective schools? Well, first of all, this is very much a roleplaying book, as opposed to being simply an enumeration of crunchy bits: Each of the martial schools sports a detailed, well-written introduction, concise pieces of information regarding the respective traditions, information on the respective training grounds, concise adventure hooks (including hazards etc.), boons to be gained from a positive association with the respective school...and new magic items - including nutrition-granting tea, for example. The schools also provide unique feats as well as sample characters - a copious, diverse array of them.

The intriguing thing about the crunchy bits here would be, to me, that they are ultimately perfect examples of Rite Publishing's virtues as a publisher in that they blend high concept fluff with interesting crunch. Want an example? Sure: The Wushin Mountain's diverse schools sport quite a few interesting feats, one of which ought to trigger all my hatred: Stone Swallower allows for the regeneration of ki, a limited resource. Why am I not frothing at the mouth and bashing it? Simple: For one, I love the idea that this feat requires the swallowing of stones for a unique visual. More importantly, though, the strict limitations of the daily uses of the feat render it powerful, yes, but also balanced.

Now as for the techniques - there are a lot of them and a lot of schools to choose from: The dwarven-inspired Badger Style, for example, allows you to break free of grapples and even from being swallowed whole with penalty-less full attacks...and there is "Humble the Mountain" - which is just so awesome: If you hit a foe with it, you reduce the foe to a kneeling position before you, which, while not rendering the target helpless, makes for awesome visuals - and yes, flying et al covered as well. Scaling bonus damage based on BAB versus foes, ignoring DR and hardness may sound brutal, but ultimately, it is the limitations of the technique that render it mathematically feasible in EVERY game. What about a technique that allows you to retaliate against foes that attacked you before with increased efficiency?

The polearm-based Axe Beak style lets you add weapon qualities temporarily to your polearm. What about a mechanically valid way of spearing your foe with a thrown polearm, charging him and retrieving the weapon in one fell swoop? The two-hand-fighting/double weapon-centric trickery of Fox Style allows you to increase your weapon's reach and is surprisingly a style that allows for some unique tricks, while e.g. the Tanuki Style's Shadow Dodge allows you to use smoke pellets for pretty awesome dodge-then-retaliate moves. Otter Style martial artists may kick foes back to strike them with their ranged weapons or execute ranged disarms and perform melee attacks with crossbows and bows and even grapple foes with your bowstring, strangling them!

Now if all of this does sound too WuXia for you in style, you'll be glad to hear that Western martial arts are covered in this book as well: The first of these would be pretty much your swashbuckling/fencing-style school that allows its practitioners to on-the-fly pick up disarmed weapons, ignore difficult terrain, etc. - including using 5-foot-steps to charge or force movement (save negates) with each attack you perform: A simulation of binding weapons with reciprocal movement can also be found among the techniques here. Very interesting from a mechanical point of view: The stances of this school allow for the modification of your initiative score, providing different benefits depending on your position - and if that sounds like too much book-keeping for the GM, just follow the pdf's advice and have the player track initiative. It's definitely worth it!

The Third Suns (get it? "The first son inherits, the second is for the church, the third for the military...") would be pretty much Zweihänder-based martial arts for templar-style knights: Here, we get glory-techniques that can provide the stuff of legends: Brutal offense, at the cost of potential vulnerability, this style is all bout high risk/reward ratios and potentially, means to find a glorious death...or triumph...which would be as good a place as any to also comment on the rather impressive fact that, where a given technique overlaps with a feat, the techniques actually feature proper synergy/additional tactical option, showing a thoroughly impressive level of system-knowledge and mastery. The Halls of Ivy under the Oaks, then, would be an elven tradition that is basically the representation of the concept of bladesinging, blending magic and martial arts: As such, the techniques require the sacrifice of spells...or, via a feat, impose a temporary penalty on your Constitution-score. Now here's the interesting component: The sacrificed spell's descriptors actually change the effects of the respective techniques! Yes, this is as well-crafted as you'd expect it to be. Better yet, the techniques provided herein allow for the expert countering of magic (and crippling of spellcasters further enforced by new weapon properties), making the technique a great alternative to similar tropes. There is also a truly devastating aura at long range that can utterly cripple the whole opposition with unique effects per descriptor- but at a steep cost to yourself that will mean you won't pull it all the time.

The Martyred Arrows school, strongly aligned with a clan of gargoyles, allows for its practitioners to utilize the unique teachings to part winds, make trick shots to cripple the opposition or fire a last-ditch shot at an opponent right next to you sans AoO or penalty...potentially in combination with other school-techniques. And there is Marty's Arrow. Fire at a foe and save. If you make the save, you only are reduced to -1 hp. If you fail, you die. The opponent hit, however, also needs to save or die. If you choose to willingly fail your save, the opponent also takes bonus damage equal to your remaining HP. And yes, this is a death-effect. So, on one hand, I want to complain about this technique...but then again, I'm a sucker for heroic sacrifice last ditch shots and the scaling save means that even characters with a good Fort-save run a very real risk whenever they unleash this one...so yes, not going to complain.

And then, finally, there would be the Ludi of the Waiting Koi - the gladiatorial type school. The techniques here are visceral and intriguing: As an immediate action, you can e.g. lower your AC as a response to an attack, interposing an attack with a net, tanglefoot bag etc. for one of the best counter-strike representations I've seen in quite a while. Better yet, as befitting of the school, we actually get synergy with performance combat and negating immediate and readied actions targeting you via shields allow for unique tactical options...and yes, net/piercing weapon-follow-up combos are part of the deal.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to a printer-friendly 2-column b/w-standard with b/w-bamboo-borders and the pdf sports copious amounts of high-quality b/w-artwork, most of which is new. The pdf comes fully bookmarked.

Timothy Wallace, Matthew Stinson, William Senn, Ben McFarland, Mike Wise and Aaron Phelps took some time to get this book done - sure. But know what: the wait was very damn well worth it! When Path of War hit sites, I expected that one to eliminate the necessity, but then was kind of disappointed by Path of War's explicit focus on high-level gameplay, on fantastic power beyond the means of some tables.

The Martial Arts Guidebook's main difference from this system lies in multiple instances: For one, more than the crunchy bits, this is very much a sourcebook that grounds the disciplines in a concise narrative framework. The balance of the martial arts maneuvers here is impeccable - and it manages something I did not expect.

The Martial Arts Guidebook takes table variation into account in an almost unprecedented manner. The fact that you have not 1, not 2, but, depending on how you count, up to 5 (!!!) ways to introduce this book's content to your game means ultimately that, depending on your campaign, you can limit these or de-limit them. Want full-blown martial arts? No feat-tax, easy access. Want point-based mechanic? Available. Want feat-tax based techniques? You can have those as well. Even the most gritty of 15-pt-buy campaigns can use the content herein - and so can high-fantasy 25-pt-buy rounds: The system works organically and smooth in either and manages to display a thoroughly impressive synergy with feats - it is here the guiding hand of Ben McFarland as a superb developer of exceedingly complex material can be seen at work - even when limited resources can be regained, there is always a fair balance here, no power-creep - this book is NOT about numerical escalation, this book is about broadening the options, about making combat more interesting and diverse - and it excels at its goal.

Let me reiterate this: On one hand, this is a thoroughly inspired book of crunch - but on the other hand, reducing it to this component would be a disgrace to the book; it is so much more. The styles presented here do not exist in a vacuum, though you can sure use them as such. Instead, the detailed information on the schools in this book render the techniques simply intriguing, organic components that can guide full-blown adventures, with sample NPCs and hooks galore. I did not expect to like this book and absolutely feel in love with this book, particularly since the options provide amply unique gambits and tactical options that can be introduced singularly or as complete packages into any given campaign sans unbalancing the material. Let's sum it up: Great fluff, great crunch, potentially perfect synergy with just about any Pathfinder-campaign...what more could I ask for? Well, simple: A sequel. The techniques provided in this book are brilliant and even if you take the crunch away, you'd get a thoroughly inspired book, one that has me wanting more. Whether Conan-esque grit, high fantasy WuXia or a more martially bent Western setting, this book delivers in spades - 5 stars + seal of approval and nomination as a candidate for my Top ten of 2015!

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Martial Arts Guidebook (PFRPG)
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Gossamer Worlds: The Otherlands (Diceless)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/22/2015 03:21:06

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the evocative Gossamer Worlds-series clocks in at 18 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, leaving us with 16 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

So, we begin this installment of the Gossamer Worlds-series with a warning - the theories herein are considered heresy by the established Lords and Ladies. You see, among the vast plethora of worlds and realities accessible, or so goes the hypothesis herein, there are some that may be considered...semi-sentient. Or at least "alive" in the broadest sense that the reality grows...like a plant...or a tumor. From a seed of contact, a chrysalis springs, ultimately leaving only a husk reality behind - or so goes the hypothesis.

You see, the otherlands constitute a kind of template, a kind of change - the reality does not overwrite completely a given world, but changes it into something creepily uncanny. The pdf uses a combination of "fey" and "alien" to describe the phenomenon and I am inclined to concur. Denizen-wise, we receive information on a few of them - the shining ones, which may or may not be the origin of fey myth; the Umbra-touched scattered ones and the hungry ones, which may be the origin of ours fear of giants, man-eating ogres and the like. The most powerful agents of the otherlands, though, remain the emissaries - we receive the full stats of such a being, the disturbing lady featured on the old cover. Finally, following the theme of otherness, doppelgängers are covered - spirits that may assume the guises of others, further cementing the theme of something subtly wrong with reality.

From Tír na nÓg to the underworld, some examples are provided herein as well and, as always, we conclude this brief sojourn into the weird with a list of the world's properties and advice on how to use it.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Rite Publishing’s beautiful 2-column full-color standard for LoGaS and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. Artwork consists of glorious full-color pieces that are absolutely gorgeous to behold.

Matt Banach's Otherlands resonate with me - you see, neither jump-scares (which just startle), nor more traditional horror tends to do it for me. I'm not afraid irl of physical confrontation, nor of accidents, flights, water...you get the idea. The imagery of a raindrop falling in reverse, vanishing in the clouds? That's the stuff my nightmares are made of I still consider Koji Suzuki's Edge to be one of the creepiest books ever - what if Pi stops behaving like it ought to? ...You may now resume laughing at me, but to me, this wrongness is the stuff of my nightmares.

Otherlands taps into this type of uncanny wrongness and does so in a great way...but at the same time, I think it does not follow through with its awesome concept - so, you have this invading reality...where are the modifications on how powers, perhaps even Umbra and Eidolon, work? Dissolutions of a Lords'/Lady's powers? Essentially, this book provides a seed from which one can craft more and it does so admirably. At the same time, it falls short in that it does not provide a concise means to have these effects provide mechanical repercussions beyond the inspired fluff.

My final verdict, hence, will clock in at 4 stars - a conceptually awesome pdf that "only" manages to be good on its own and needs the reader to come fully into its own.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Gossamer Worlds: The Otherlands (Diceless)
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Pathways #54 (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/21/2015 04:18:13

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of Rite Publishing's Pathways clocks in at 41 pages, 1 page front cover, 12 pages advertisement, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 26 pages of content, so let's take a look!

I usually don't do free books anymore, but since a patreon asked me to cover the current Pathways, here we go.

After Dave Paul's well-written editorial, we begin with Rite Publishing's mastermind Steven D. Russell providing a new template, this time around the CR+2 dread phantom armor template, which is, in the tradition of templates with the "dread" prefix, an actually badass, properly deadly version of the concept featured, including a dread curse to negate armor and equipment-based bonuses...OUCH!

One of the most prolific and constantly high-quality-delivering freelancers out there, Mike Welham, has a collection of truly unique items up his sleeve: magical snow-globes. Whether strange snowmen or avalanches, the copious array of unique effects that always transcend being paltry spells in cans render this item category interesting indeed: A well-crafted and truly fun article.

Dave Paul's subterranean spells receive a second showcase in this pdf, but this time around, Creighton Broadhurst's table does warrant special and more in-depth mention: There is a massive potion-generator allowing a GM to create a huge array of different means for GMs to create all kinds of odd and diverse alchemical potions, including mechanically relevant options alongside those that are...cosmetic, but interesting. An inspired collection of tables here and one followed up with 20 things to loot from a wizard's body.

Andrew Marlowe also has some new material for us with Winter's Chosen - an article containing 9 new feats for the chosen of winter - including a cool-down, short-range breath weapon. While the former is a bit OP in some campaigns, this chapter still is inspired...why? Well, there are, for example, feats which utilize a specific weapon enchantment, which allow you to perform additional attacks with unique effects, but at the cost of suspending the item's enchantment for some time - I haven't seen that one before and actually enjoyed it! Oh, and the flavor was great...so yes, I'm using these for my NPCs... Oh, and the chapter also sports new equipment tricks and 3 wondrous item tricks - cool! (...get it?...Sorry, will punch myself later...)

Next up would be none other than Adam Meyers, the man behind Drop Dead Studios, the man who crafted the legendary Spheres of Power-system with a cool interview that you should read...and then, we close the issue, as always, with a best-of of my own reviews and the Path Less Traveled-comic by Jacob Blackmon.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good - while I noticed some minor hiccups, none were too serious. Layout adheres to Rite Publishing's two-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. The pdf's cover art is awesome.

This installment of Pathways, while briefer than its predecessor, does have some truly neat features - whether the template, Creighton's potion-generator, Mike's snowglobes or Andrew's feats - each of the components warrants downloading this one...after all, know what? This one is FREE. It costs zilch, nothing - and it is damn well worth each MB on your HD. Seeing that there's literally nothing to lose in checking this out, my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Pathways #54 (PFRPG)
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Lost in Dream (Fiction)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/18/2015 02:45:03

An Endzeitgeist.com review

I'm going to deviate a bit from my usual standard here, since Lost in Dream is a fiction book - at 273 pages, 1 page front cover, 3 pages of editorial 1 page ToC, 1 page author bio, 1 page back cover, this one leaves 266 pages of content, so what do we get here?

Before I dive in: This review was moved up my review-queue as a prioritized review at the request of my patreons.

This being a fiction review, I am going to deviate in one crucial point from my usual shtick as a reviewer - I will not tell you explicitly what the story is about. Instead, I will try to give you a general idea and analyze the respective characters and plot according to my skills. Lost in Dream, first and foremost, is a novel set in the Dreamlands also shared by the legendary Coliseum Morpheuon; and yes, I purposefully evoked the Dreamlands here, not the Plane of Dreams - this is, very much in its tone and originality, a novel seeking to evoke the sheer wonder and grotesquery of H.P. Lovecraft's legendary story - and it actually succeeds in this endeavor for the most part; unlike it, though, we begin in medias res in the company of a man called Rube (probably not coincidentally named akin to the famous Cartoonist...) and his daughter, as they're standing aboard a vessel of the dread Denizens of Leng, watching a titanic sea monster gobble up telepathic whales...but as so often in dreams, things are not as they seem.

You see, one of the big strengths of this novel lies in the way that the prose, by omission and misdirection, manages to captivate the fleeting, opaque and unstable nature of dream itself - without, surprisingly, becoming annoying. An example: Rube's daughter (and no, that's not a SPOILER - it's the first chapter...), isn't with him, his initial conversation a lull, a phantom conjured forth by reality, more so than perception in general, being fluid.

Which brings me to a second and most important point concerning this novel: Lost in Dream is a gaming novel...and it isn't. You know what they say, the old maxim, that authors should not play RPGs too much to avoid them and their rules creeping into the subject matter, limiting the perspective. (Exceptions to the rule exist - Clinton J. Boomer's novels, for example - though even he deviates in his writing from RPG-y rules and utilize his own setting instead...)

This is and is not true I tend to agree with this notion, mainly due to my intense dislike for most novels, whether they're published for the Forgotten realms, Pathfinder or any other such established setting. Most, not all, mind you. The dislike for this type of novel usually stems from two components: 1) If you're writing for a game system, even implicitly, you're expected to adhere to the system's limitations and as such, e.g. Vancian casting and similar limitations need to be taken into account. 2) While such limitations make for great gaming, in most novels, they fail pretty hard to evoke a sense of tension that drives forth the plot. Similar observations can be made regarding creatures and characters. Ultimately, it is a "damned if you do, damned if you don't"-Catch 22 situation....which brings this rambling excursion full circle.

If you're familiar with the way in which the fluid reality of the realm of dreams is handled in game, you'll also realize several important key factors. For one, the limitations, by virtue of the power of dreams, hopes etc. to shape reality and fuel the narrative, are less pronounced. Secondly, their singular focus and obsessions, in this book, Rube's search for his daughter, becomes less a one-note character motivation and takes on another dimension, one that ultimately shapes the very journey from the shackles of the dread Denizens of Leng to the inevitable conclusion.

Beyond these, one should not be remiss to mention "Jax", the blue-skinned fellow traveler that shakes Rube out of his initial contemplation. Where Rube is the straight man, Jax takes the role of the planes-wise mentor...and it is more often than not that his dialog made me smile: Beyond the scathing sarcasm employed by the good man, his utilization of time-honored insiders like the adored "berk" made me conjure up fond memories of Planescape and all the adventures embarked upon in that context.

The onomatopoeia utilized in the planar slang of Jax does its fair share to entertain the readers, while also cementing the basic feeling of uncanny estrangement (more in an Entfremdung-kind of way, if you're familiar with the literary concept) that is also mirrored by his oscillation between high-brow sentence structures and less refined minor profanities, always creating a picture of someone not 100% used to thinking and speaking as we do...and hitting a stride regarding my own personal predilections.

Which also brings me, personally, to the biggest surprise regarding this novel: You see, gaming novels, particularly those straying deep into the weird and fantastical, tend to lose on one end of the spectrum: Either the threat falls apart and becomes unbelievable, as the heroes nuke the fridge (like Dresden Files' Changes threw the whole premise of any balance or credible threat of...anything to Harry out...) while maintaining the high fantasy aspect. Or, personal, deeply human components take the upper hand and ultimately make you consider them respective protagonists unsympathetic by virtue of them not "getting their act together" when so much's at stake. In a minor way, Rube does fall into the latter category in a minor way...but then again, it is his humanity, the theme of his obsession, his quest, which ultimately fuels the plot of Lost in Dream.

On a character-perspective, the respective protagonists are solid and do their job of serving as a means for identification well; the true value of this book, though, does lie in its absolutely exquisite and inspired world-building, which does render the overall experience of this book rather pleasant. Now, I do know how this sounds, when ultimately, it shouldn't: This is not 2312's plodding and detailed world-building and neither does it feature bland characters that are only tangentially there to justify the world-building: The protagonists very much remain crucial - once again, also thanks to the unique set-up and world provided. If the world is shaped by desires and dreams, one should expect the reality to adhere to them and their fictions - it is thus in a positive way, somewhat akin to Silent Hill 2's narrative, that one can analyze components of the novel as to their respective actions regarding the protagonists...though here, discrepancies are not only existent, they make sense: After all, this is a collective narrative of a reality, not one tailor-made to punish one character.

If all of this sounds too high-brow of an analysis or too plodding, I should not be remiss to mention that this book's overall plot pretty much is a tour-de-force, making this a page-turner, if you will: There is action galore and the pondering I embarked upon above do not represent the focus of the book - they are merely a product of it. It is very much possible to read this as a straight, fun and extremely creative action-laden narrative, should you choose to - though you'd miss out some of the more subtle components of the subtext.

On the formal side, the book comes with a pdf-version, a kindle-version and an epub-version; I used the former to read it and its bookmarks and one-column standard made it easy to read.

Ultimately, this novel is a great read, though one that made me wish it took a bit more time here and there, dived deeper into the psychological ramifications of dreaming and their effect on world, had sported a slight bit more subtle symbolism - but then again, I am a difficult audience to say the least. This book still can be considered an excellent read and a furious debut for author Matt Banach. My final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Lost in Dream (Fiction)
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Pathways #53 (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/18/2015 02:40:37

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The 53rd installment of Pathways, Rite Publishing's free e-zine, clocks in at 53 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of ToC, 12 pages of advertisement, 1 page of SRD, leaving us with 37 pages of content, so let's take a look!

Note: I usually don't review free material any more, but was explicitly asked to take a look at the current Pathways-issues by one of my patreons.

As has become the tradition with Pathways, we begin with Dave Paul's editorial before moving on to the template of this month. This time around, Steven D. Russell Provides basically a creature that is a living execution-machine - including lethal hangman's noose! These constructs are nasty. Nice template!

Creighton Broadhurst, master of Raging Swan Press, does have some material for us as well - two small, yet inspired dressing tables of things you can find in a dusty crypt or a vampire's lair for two damn cool little articles.

Jonathan McAnulty provides something glorious 11 traits particularly suited for dark fantasy/horror gameplay - and all of them transcend the power you'd expect from a trait or feat for that matter...but pays for this power with a well-crafted drawback, marrying mechanical coolness with high-concept ideas: from surviving a massacre to being born into a cursed family, this article made my black heart thump in anticipation.

The next thing you'll see is a thing of beauty: Stat-block wizard Justin Sluder returns with the lavishly-crafted CR 23 divine resilient centaur mageknight Aliltus, who, following the tradition of Faces of the Tarnished Souk, does sport a CR 8 and 16 built as well - and yes, I want to inflict this guy on my players!

We also return to Elton Robb's Leviathan Archipelago to visit to Karnak, Island of the Archosaurus, home to two cultures, that of Sebek-Ka and that of a pharaonic culture...what are Sebek-ka? Humanoid crocodiles that gain +2 Str and Wis, -2 Int, a swim speed, a bite attack for 1d6 (which should specify it's primary, for nitpickers...) and they gain +1 to atk versus tiny or smaller creatures. They also may reroll Will-saves. Over all, a solid race that also comes, fully Cerulean Seas-compatible, with racial buoyancy and depth tolerance-info...neat! It should also be noted that Elton Robb's writing has improved further from the last article in the series...so kudos!

Beyond this cool article, we have a spell showcase drawn from Dave Paul's excellent 101 Subterranean Spells and an informative interview with David Silver, master Ponyfinder himself.

The pdf concludes, as always, with a showcase of reviews by yours truly as well as the Path Less Traveled.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good - while I noticed some minor hiccups, none were too serious. Layout adheres to Rite Publishing's two-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. The pdf's cover art is awesome.

I'm a big fan of Pathways - monthly, FREE - what more can one ask for? Indeed, even one little component of this installment alone can warrant downloading this neat, free magazine, which I suggest you do immediately. My own favorites this time around would be, surprise, Justin's centaur and Jonathan's awesome drawback-laden horror-options. Since this is FREE and has some glorious pieces, I'll rate this 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Pathways #53 (PFRPG)
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Gossamer Options: Characters (Diceless)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/14/2015 04:05:40

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This MASSIVE book for Lords of Gossamer and Shadows clocks in at 73 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page advertisement, leaving us with a colossal 69 pages of content, so let's take a look!

What began as a reverse design based on the art that was available via the deck funded via LoGaS' KS soon became this massive book - and oh boy. But let me begin differently: What's the one thing you need to crunch in LoGaS, the one thing that takes time out of your GM's day that does not pertain weaving the most awesome stories you can conceive? Yes, that would be statblocks for NPCs. While significantly simpler than in PFRPG (or 13th Age if you want to run NPCs with PC-rules against them as opposed to monster statblocks...), LoGaS still requires some work - well, this book takes that work from your shoulders and provided a 100-point, 200-point and 300-point iteration for each and every character featured within - of whom there are, just fyi,30.

Yes, 30. And know what? They deserve being called characters regarding their general concepts. The very first one is a self-aware harvest robot (KKND 2, anyone?) and, from strange nomads of the stairs to characters born to inhuman trysts or characters made into the ultimate weapon of destruction, with an all-consuming rage within. What about nigh perfect hunters, strange dragon riders or strange creatures sprung from worlds of pure magic, where constant forms constantly disintegrate and re-assemble? Perhaps an intelligence agent, fiercely loyal to her world-spanning empire, would be more to your liking?

Perhaps your PCs need help - then introduce them to Seleca Crane, righteous slayer of gods or the mysterious Swan Queen or perhaps a former black ops operative from earth? Or another one, a circus artist stranded on the Grand Stairs? What I'm trying to get at with this enumeration is that the concepts covered are pretty broad. At the same time, though, they do sport imho two relatively unpleasant tendencies: For one, their fluff-angles, usually something I absolutely adore in LoGaS-supplements, are simply not that awesome - the prose is nice, sure, but it falls way flat of e.g. Matt Banach's penmanship. Secondly, the builds themselves feel less imaginative and even a bit restricted - to me, the beauty of LoGaS lies within the fluidity of the concepts, particularly Umbra and Eidolon - there is a lot they can be, not much that they have to be. The characters herein feature, implicitly and explicitly, a more monolithic vision of both concepts, which, while certainly not reduced to a basic good/evil-dichotomy, falls short of the true draw of the very fundamentals existing in LoGaS.

Thirdly, the builds themselves and the way their points are used may be relatively diverse...but more often than not, they boil down to "I have awesome weapons, armor, etc." - which would not be as big an issue, had the Gossamer Worlds series not demonstrated with superb panache what kind of awesome things you can actually do here.

There are a lot of NPCs in here, spanning a wide diversity of occupations and ideologies. Better yet, the pdf provides ample advice on how to make compelling NPCs for LoGaS yourself - step by step, point by point, from concept to execution - which is a section new GMs in particular will certainly appreciate.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good - though I noticed some grammatical/punctuation issues here- more than what I've come to expect from Rite Publishing. Layout adheres to LoGaS two-column full-color standard with one neat full color artwork per character provided. These are awesome, though some of them are slightly pixelated. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Author Mark Knights, with development from Christopher Kindred and Steven D. Russell, provides an interesting collection of NPCs in this massive book, one which, while falling short of LoGaS massive potential, still can be considered to be a worthwhile look. After all, this is "Pay what you want" - you can literally get this, digest it and then pay what you think it's worth.

And personally, the statblocks of the ample characters alone and the time they spare me do warrant downloading this alone, even though I probably won't use them as written - the respective concepts do not resonate with me as strongly as those depicted time and again in e.g. the Gossamer Worlds or Threats-series.

This is still me complaining at a high level, though: The concepts of the respective NPCs herein are imaginative enough to jumpstart the imagination. The very hard to beat price point is what ultimately makes me look past the rough edges and minor flaws this exhibits. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 for the purpose of this platform due to its PWYW-status.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Gossamer Options: Characters (Diceless)
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Gossamer Options: Characters (Diceless)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/14/2015 04:05:03

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This MASSIVE book for Lords of Gossamer and Shadows clocks in at 73 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page advertisement, leaving us with a colossal 69 pages of content, so let's take a look!

What began as a reverse design based on the art that was available via the deck funded via LoGaS' KS soon became this massive book - and oh boy. But let me begin differently: What's the one thing you need to crunch in LoGaS, the one thing that takes time out of your GM's day that does not pertain weaving the most awesome stories you can conceive? Yes, that would be statblocks for NPCs. While significantly simpler than in PFRPG (or 13th Age if you want to run NPCs with PC-rules against them as opposed to monster statblocks...), LoGaS still requires some work - well, this book takes that work from your shoulders and provided a 100-point, 200-point and 300-point iteration for each and every character featured within - of whom there are, just fyi,30.

Yes, 30. And know what? They deserve being called characters regarding their general concepts. The very first one is a self-aware harvest robot (KKND 2, anyone?) and, from strange nomads of the stairs to characters born to inhuman trysts or characters made into the ultimate weapon of destruction, with an all-consuming rage within. What about nigh perfect hunters, strange dragon riders or strange creatures sprung from worlds of pure magic, where constant forms constantly disintegrate and re-assemble? Perhaps an intelligence agent, fiercely loyal to her world-spanning empire, would be more to your liking?

Perhaps your PCs need help - then introduce them to Seleca Crane, righteous slayer of gods or the mysterious Swan Queen or perhaps a former black ops operative from earth? Or another one, a circus artist stranded on the Grand Stairs? What I'm trying to get at with this enumeration is that the concepts covered are pretty broad. At the same time, though, they do sport imho two relatively unpleasant tendencies: For one, their fluff-angles, usually something I absolutely adore in LoGaS-supplements, are simply not that awesome - the prose is nice, sure, but it falls way flat of e.g. Matt Banach's penmanship. Secondly, the builds themselves feel less imaginative and even a bit restricted - to me, the beauty of LoGaS lies within the fluidity of the concepts, particularly Umbra and Eidolon - there is a lot they can be, not much that they have to be. The characters herein feature, implicitly and explicitly, a more monolithic vision of both concepts, which, while certainly not reduced to a basic good/evil-dichotomy, falls short of the true draw of the very fundamentals existing in LoGaS.

Thirdly, the builds themselves and the way their points are used may be relatively diverse...but more often than not, they boil down to "I have awesome weapons, armor, etc." - which would not be as big an issue, had the Gossamer Worlds series not demonstrated with superb panache what kind of awesome things you can actually do here.

There are a lot of NPCs in here, spanning a wide diversity of occupations and ideologies. Better yet, the pdf provides ample advice on how to make compelling NPCs for LoGaS yourself - step by step, point by point, from concept to execution - which is a section new GMs in particular will certainly appreciate.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are good - though I noticed some grammatical/punctuation issues here- more than what I've come to expect from Rite Publishing. Layout adheres to LoGaS two-column full-color standard with one neat full color artwork per character provided. These are awesome, though some of them are slightly pixelated. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Author Mark Knights, with development from Christopher Kindred and Steven D. Russell, provides an interesting collection of NPCs in this massive book, one which, while falling short of LoGaS massive potential, still can be considered to be a worthwhile look. After all, this is "Pay what you want" - you can literally get this, digest it and then pay what you think it's worth.

And personally, the statblocks of the ample characters alone and the time they spare me do warrant downloading this alone, even though I probably won't use them as written - the respective concepts do not resonate with me as strongly as those depicted time and again in e.g. the Gossamer Worlds or Threats-series.

This is still me complaining at a high level, though: The concepts of the respective NPCs herein are imaginative enough to jumpstart the imagination. The very hard to beat price point is what ultimately makes me look past the rough edges and minor flaws this exhibits. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 for the purpose of this platform due to its PWYW-status.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Gossamer Options: Characters (Diceless)
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Martial Arts Guidebook (PFRPG)
by Trev W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/13/2015 19:22:16

There have been many products, both for D&D and Pathfinder, that have attempted to develop more rules, classes and feats for playing martial artists in roleplaying. Often they have been focused on one class, and with martial arts one thinks of the monk, but one could go further beyond options for the monk. With new technique rules fighting options could be given to all melee and warrior classes. Rite Publishing have made the attempt of adding a lot more martial art options to Pathfinder, and I will be discussing how well they did below.

The key option is the technique. These aren’t purely feats, but they can be taken as feats. The designers have been very intelligent, and techniques can be bought and spent a variety of ways. Yes, they can be taken as feats, but you also gain and use them as ki abilities or utilise them through grit. There are many options to use them and this means you don’t have to pay the feat tax, you can get them other ways. This means all these new techniques are open to not only monks and fighters, but paladins, ninjas, gunslingers and even magus as well.

On the techniques they are highly varied but bound around certain themes. Options to regain ki are very useful, as is trip attacks with ANY melee weapon flowing on from normal attacks. The Flying Axe Beak attack, whereupon you charge and throw your weapon and can stagger the opponent has great usability. There are also new debuff options like ‘Humble the Mountain’, allowing you to force a fort save and the potential to weaken your opponent in melee with a whole new type of debuff.

There is a school of Zweihander techniques, giving many new options to the old greatsword fighter. In giving options to cover some of their weaknesses (like being surrounded and their low AC being punctured profusely), the powerful attack technique to allow a free sunder attempt as you make a normal attack upon an opponent with a reach weapon is an exciting change of pace. The book consistently does this, shaking up combat by giving you new combo capabilities.

Nestled in all of these rules and techniques is plenty of context, information on monasteries and fighting associations, and fluff to add these schools and their taught techniques straight into your game. Surprisingly what is also presented are ready-made NPCs that use these techniques and represent their style, along with magic items tailored to groups and information to help these new resources and options to merge into any fantasy setting. There is a lot that is crammed into this product, but it is given space to develop and to make sense.

With so much to offer a DM would need to consider what they will use from this product. You could add a few schools and styles, limit the techniques to just a few suitable to your game, or you could go all out and add everything and all of these new styles and the highly varied new techniques. If you do so combat will never be the same again, it will not be a boring slog as there will be so many new options in combat and different ways a warrior can approach defeating their opponents. It will enrich your game, you simply have to choose how much.

5/5



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Martial Arts Guidebook (PFRPG)
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10 Kingdom Seeds: Hills (PFRPG)
by Trev W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/13/2015 18:08:02

These "seeds" are settlements on the go. Need a name of a settlement, the government info and demographics, along with a few sites within detailed and some rumours and adventure ideas? All of that is provided and they are useful to have as I have seen dms stumped on names & without much time to add character to the hamlets and villages because they are focusing so strongly on the dungeon or plot. This makes it very useful for a DM.

I personally like Borley, the Chaotic Evil little salt-cutter village, but I think it is clear that Eastdeer with its industry of raising familiars and hunting companions has more character.

I give it 4/5 because I really do like it, but I was greedy for more rumours and more information and sites for each settlement. This is easily worth the price.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
10 Kingdom Seeds: Hills (PFRPG)
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10 Kingdom Seeds: Forests (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/11/2015 04:13:20

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This small pdf clocks in at 11 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, leaving us with 7 pages of content, so let's take a look!

So what are these kingdom seeds? Basically, you can consider them to be mini village-backdrops - each of the villages comes with a full village statblock as well as information on unique places associated with the village as well as three rumors that can be considered to be micro adventure seeds. The villages are intended to be inserted into a given kingdom (or any other campaign) - thus the name of the pdf.

What makes the villages unique? Well, they exhibit Rite Publishing's interesting, trademark high-concept ideas: The village of Butteroak, for example, is protected by a double palisade between which assassin vines are planted to keep out the dread predators outside - oh, and if you're caught breaking the law, you get a dagger, are stripped down and have to run around the village...if you're not eaten by the vines, you get to leave...chilling combination of might makes right and pragmatism here.

More common, Calddell is defined by its bowyers, while Eristan is known for their syrupy birch beer and Fayebridge, set in a caldera, utilizes its ample bees to defend the town and keep the massive copses of fruit trees fertilized. Garrant is a nasty place, but one defined by unique copper jewelry made with the help of odd leaves, while Maplelea is defined by the less sinister eponymous maple produce. Mournesse may be snowed in half the year, but is a village of survivors that live via lumber and skins. Nulukkhir, a primarily dwarven and gnomish hamlet, is defined by its half-over-grown houses and pig-farms. Soulmerrow, an elven hamlet defined by the massive cinnamon trees, is similarly an interesting place and finally, Whitespell, is a place where charcoral is made by a kind and welcoming populace.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Rite Publishing's two-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked in spite of its brevity - nice! The pdf also sports nice full-color art.

Liz Smith delivers a per se cool array of brief village-write-ups, with the respective industries and raisons d'être providing enough variation to make this a compelling buy for the low price-point. At the same time, I found myself wishing that there was a little bit more detail and more material that reaches the level of uniqueness of Butteroak's assassin vine palisade - compared to that one, the other hamlets featured fall a bit short. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded down to 4 for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
10 Kingdom Seeds: Forests (PFRPG)
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101 Shadow and Darkness Spells (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/17/2015 04:30:51

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The fourth installment of Dave Paul's thematic spell-collections clocks in at 47 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, 2 pages of advertisement, leaving us with 42 pages of content, so let's take a look!

This pdf was moved forward in my review-queue as a prioritized review at the request of my patreons.

We begin this supplement with a piece of information that makes you appreciate the things to come - namely, a list of diverse lighting conditions - 8, to be precise. Does this terminology seem overly complicated to you? It's actually not - it simply codifies what's already out there in proper terms. The darkness you can only see through with magical aid? Jep, that one has no its own concise terminology. Spells affecting the shadows of targets also offer an issue - where is the shadow? How long is it? An easy default-ruling plus GM-empowerment-statement result in a basic framework that is more solid than what I expected going into this book.

After the massive array of spell-lists (including, obviously, the ACG-classes), we dive into the respective spells - and fret not, there are quite a few spells and effects herein that deal with light as well: E.g. better sight in good light conditions that can be expended for a bonus to saves vs. blindness etc. Taking a cue from the Dark Souls-game-series, Cloud of Fire and Shadow (erroneously called Cloud of Shadow and Flame below the gorgeous artwork depicting it) provides a nasty, powerful terrain control that not only sets up shadowy terrain, it also can deal negative levels and fire damage and even move the cloud around - OUCH. Absolutely awesome - contrast orbs that allow you to modify lightning condition, move it around and utilize the orb to generate contrasts to the lightning conditions caused. It also provides a significant array of catch-terminology for all kind of movement and cases that would have generated gaping rules-holes in the hands of a less capable designer.

It should be noted that this attention to detail, which ultimately renders the spells very precise and versatile, also extends to the spells utilized to creating light and shadows. Want your own shadow plane pocket dimension? The spell is in this book. Want to go nova and blast foes with dazzling rays emitting from your body? There's a spell for that - one that may be chosen as a sun domain spell. Want to condemn a target to emit supernatural darkness, which not even darkvision can penetrate? Yes, the spell is in this pdf. Speaking of curses: Cursed to Walk in Shadow is narrative platinum, nay, mithril. You curse a target- whenever the creature walks in bright light for too long, there is a chance the creature slips into an eerie duplicate of the surroundings, shifting to the shadow plane. If you need any guidance why that's creepy, may I point towards the Silent Hill games...only the duration is shorter for each trip. Still, this spell is incredibly awesome and could carry a whole campaign. Absolutely glorious and perhaps one of the most intriguing spells from a narrative point of view.

Of course, more combat-relevant spells for quicker movement in shadows (can I get a "Nice!" from the Dishonored-fans out there?) to magic-impeding darkness, these spells offer a vast array of tactical and narrative options.

What about the long overdue darkness-based mirror of daylight powerlessness? Indeed, the spell is in this book and the quality it bestows should be scavenged for monster-creation rules...and it should have been part of the base rules from the get-go. Granted, though - not all spells reach this abject level of awesomeness - there are some variants like shadow-centric dispels I consider to be slightly less compelling and more like variants. Immediate action steps into the shadow plane for 1 round can also be considered rather intriguing, opening a new array of tactical options for the characters employing these spells. Want to glamer your shadow or assume the form of a darkmantle? There are spells for this around here...

Among the most powerful spells herein - what about making a target carry, literally a piece of the night sky with him alongside the darkness - which makes this both a curse and a blessing, the latter primarily for the undead... Supernaturally clear sight is powerful - but at higher level, it gets awesome: What about a spell that conceivably allows you to grant such a power to vast amounts of allies, allowing e.g. armies to combat invisible foes? Communal spells and a shadow-based blinking effects (with unique rules), shadow or light-based force-explosions or stripping a target of its shadow provide unique benefits that resonate well with the tropes we all know and love. What about gazing to the stars to detect creatures, as the lines between stars, silvery and shining, guide your intuition? Fantastic visuals.

Speaking of which: If your shadow touches a creature, you can switch places with it via shadow transposition...and if you can't see the vast tactical potential here, I can't help you. Speaking of which - there is a high-level spell to pit a vast area into perpetual darkness...which is an apt and awesome final spell for this book.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no glitches of significance. Layout adheres to Rite Publishing's classic full-color 2-column standard with a purple-ish tint and the book comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. the book sports numerous gorgeous full-color artworks.

This book is more than a return to form for author Dave Paul...though that may be the wrong way to put it. Basically, the first two books are pretty much my reference-level of what an awesome spell-book should be. The third fell slightly short of this echelon-level of awesomeness. This one, quite frankly, surpasses them. Yes, there are some minor hiccups here. Yes, some of the variants are not that awesome.

But I am not engaging in hyperbole when I'm saying that no other spell-book has inspired me to the extent this pdf managed. There are spells herein that not only will be a vast boon to each light/darkness-themed character, the book also sports concise terminology and several spells that conspire to allow you to create effects for campaigns: Whether you want a vampiric domain of eternal dark, a narrative of Silent hill-style cursed characters, Plane of Shadows-related awesomeness - this pdf delivers.

To an extent, where I actually think it transcends the limitations of its own focus, of its genre. This book can conceivably be read not only as a cool expansion to e.g. the arsenal of Ascension Games' "Path of Shadows" or as a mechanical scavenging ground to get inspiration for more material for Interjection Games' Antipodism-designs; this book actually could conceivably be considered a selection of spells that allow you to depict creatures of shadow, whether they be shadow fey, dark creepers or shadar-kain, as thoroughly unique. Beyond even that, I maintain that the spells herein can carry whole modules, perhaps even whole campaigns. This is one of the few spell-books out there that can be considered to be so inspired it may be worth the effort to change modules and perhaps even plotlines to utilize it - it's that good. This is the most inspiring spell-book I've laid my eyes on in quite a while - and well worth a final verdict of 5 stars + seal of approval. It is also a candidate for my Top Ten of 2015. If you like the theme in any shape, way or form, then this is a must-have, inspired book.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
101 Shadow and Darkness Spells (PFRPG)
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Pathways #52 (PFRPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/16/2015 02:51:16

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The 52nd installment of Rite Publishing's free monthly e-zine Pathways clocks in at 50 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page ToC, 12 pages of advertisement, 1 page of SRD, leaving us with 35 pages of content, so let's take a look!

As per the tradition of Pathways, we begin with David Paul's editorial and then, a new template crafted by Steven D. Russell and an accompanying sample creature. This time around, we get the walking wasteland CR+2 template, which renders creatures truly toxic/putrid - healing-impediment and spoiled foods and drinks, courtesy of these beast's auras, accompany them like the noxious, poisonous clouds that never stray far from them - oh, and the very attacks of these beings corrode magical items and their mere presence also shatters objects. Yes...these guys are AWESOME! A sample creature is provided with a CR 4 blink dog (featured on the cover) - which is more deadly thanks to its auras and blinking than you'd expect from the CR. Devilish and nasty! Two thumbs up!

Mike Welham also has an article for us - one that depicts a multitude of alchemical cures - both for poisons and other ailments. These items, while all solid and awesome, can be quite a godsend. On the one hand, they deemphasize the requirement for divine magic defeat particular ailments. At the same time, this does take a bit away from e.g. the threat of some sicknesses/poisons. Still, particularly for a low (or high!) magic game, this chapter is more than welcome. The alchemical item that allows low level characters to participate in under-water exploration also is quite frankly amazing. Why am I not complaining about the potions having these low prices? Well, the miracle cures can have a plenitude of nasty side-effects - which are represented by 2 neat and awesome tables - ignore for high fantasy, capitalize on them for low fantasy. Great way to take table variation into account!

Ceighton Broadhurst, mastermind of Raging Swan Press, is next up with dressing - 20 chests and 20 things you'll find in vermin-infested dungeons can be used to supplement perhaps the most useful book in my library (GM's Miscellany: Dungeon Dressing, my Number 1 Top Ten product of last year!). So yes, these dressings are neat indeed!

Since poisons are something of a theme here, Jonathan McAnulty presents us with several quirks that allow you to be poisonous and touched by the darkness...or perhaps, you have a developed immunity? Anyways, I thoroughly enjoy these quirky traits and the penalty associated with each maintains balance versus the more significant benefits they provide. Like it! This section saw me wanting more!

This is also the time, when we return to the Leviathan Archipelago (in the Questhaven setting), courtesy of the penmanship of Elton Robb, covering the island of Saanata (And pointing you towards some neat game-books to further flesh out the culture...) No, before you ask, this is not explicitly required, since the idea here is intriguing: Polynesian culture is reappropriated to fit with the gillmen in an interesting kind of ecology/cultural overview, while showing awareness of e.g. the excellent Cerulean Seas-supplements by Alluria Publishing, including providing racial buoyancy and depth tolerance rules for the race - awesome! It should also be noted, that Elton's writing shows significant improvement here - while the sentence structure still is a bit on the short side here and there, the well-researched text proved to be more captivating than anything I had read from him prior to this - so be sure to give this a look - content-wise, it is an inspiring glimpse at a unique setting!

The interview this time around is with none other than the man behind the monthly comic and a lot of the artwork you're looking at - Jacob Blackmon! I encourage you to read it - it's inspiring and also a great way to see how my friend Joshua's influence is felt to this day.

We close this issue, as always, with reviews by yours truly.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no glaring glitches. Layout adheres to a 2-colum full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked with nested bookmarks for your convenience. The cover-art is neat.

The patreon-model that now supports this monthly e-zine has been good for Pathways - this installment sports not only more content, what#s here also ranks among the finer installments in the magazine's long and colorful run. More importantly, it's FREE. As in, it costs NOTHING. Go ahead and download it - even if you dislike the quirks or the alchemical items, the template alone is worth the time to download this...and hey, you never know when you'll need some Polynesian flavor and ideas, right? All in all, this is one of the best Pathways and, being FREE to boot, well worth 5 stars + seal of approval.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Pathways #52 (PFRPG)
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