DriveThruRPG.com
Close
Close
Browse









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
BattleTech: A Time of War GM Screen
by Ryan N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/10/2015 12:45:32
Works pretty well. Print it off, glue it to some foam board from an office supply store and boom, GM screen

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
BattleTech: A Time of War GM Screen
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

BattleTech: Field Report 2765: Periphery
by NICHOLAS P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/10/2015 11:44:53
- As the Periphery and SLDF are the only factions of this time period who engage in any major conflict, one would think they'd both be detailed. Instead, the information is truncated to save space.
- RWR info is on the Divisional level, not Regimental like every other faction of the period, despite being the primary antagonist of the whole era. O.o (Imagine if the Word of Blake got 4 pages, total, in their own Field Report, while Stone's Coalition received a 280-page book; how and why would you play this?!)
- MAF section has an entire paragraph cut-and-pasted from the DCMS book. No proof-reading.
- ONE paint scheme is given, when most of these regiments have zero published to-date.
- RAT is missing an entire row and is a cut-and-paste hack job.
- Coming up on a year, we've yet to see any errata and none is on the table to be published; the book is just being sold in an incomplete state.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
BattleTech: Field Report 2765: Periphery
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Shadowrun: Data Trails
by Jack T. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/07/2015 22:45:52
TLDR: Don't buy this book unless you specifically want more Matrix fluff or run decker/technomancer-centric campaigns. Go get Run Faster if you haven't already.

I went into Data Trails knowing that others had already said the "good stuff" was missing from it. I kept a detailed report of how I felt about the book. It started off with five stars, and then after the first section of fluff it quickly dropped off. I eventually had to quit reading and come back a long time later to finish up. I am reading it a second time just for the rules, but now I can't even do that.

First and foremost, their talk back in January about fixing up the proofing process back at the end of January (link below) seems to have not gotten anywhere, as there was a parade of errors in the book. It's hard to stay into the reading when I keep coming across them.

Second, I was hoping Data Trails would fill the void of questions left about the Matrix. All it really did was add some things on and provide a *lot* of fluff. Most of the fluff is good fluff, mind you, but still. And then the end is padded with a re-explaination of the rules.

I'm giving this a 3 if only because there are added things in here that are -fun-, and some are -interesting-. But in all honestly, I'm highly disappointed in Catalyst and will be taking back my pledge to buy their books until there's been a good amount of time to see reviews.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Data Trails
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Shadowrun: Data Trails
by William J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/04/2015 02:08:01
I love the Matrix. And I really like SR5. I think they've done a lot to really improve the game from SR4.

The Matrix resolves faster and its rules are more consistent with the rest of the game.

With that said, Data Trails is terrible. Its the lightest core supplement book released so far. Not just on page count, but also on crunch. A lot of this book is fluff, and don't get me wrong, I love the fluff in SR. But the Matrix doesn't need fluff, it needs more options. There are only 2 really new things, Deep Dives, where you go into the Foundation of a Host and can control it but where the rules get weird and dangerous and a lot more abstract, and playable AIs. There is also one new Matrix action and the ability to modify electronics, which are cool but I don't feel drastically add to the rules.

There is some pretty damn good fluff in here too. The short story, Body Hunt, is an amazing read and even brings back the classic character Wolf from Michael A. Stackpole's Wolf and Raven novel. But, while the story was a great read, the rules to do what is done in the story are not explained. Though it is kind of implied how to possibly handle it. And another other short story, Corporate Sponsorship has a decker data spike a camera then mark it with sleaze, which makes no sense by the rules. Anyway, this isn't actually important, because I don't think fluff and crunch need to match, but it sure is nice when it does.

The problem is there isn't enough content in this book. It has a lot of sample hosts and NPCs, which I don't care about, because I'd rather buy an adventure book for that content. For a core supplement I'd rather have more options for deckers and TMs for players, which can also give more ideas and options for NPCs.

The worst part is that there are rules for NPCs but not for PCs. No prices for wireless-negating-paint or faraday cages. No rules for writing software. Nothing for how much it costs to have a host. This means that NPCs can have these things, while PCs can not. One of the things that helps GMs and players is the ability to theorycraft and steal ideas from each other. Anything the PCs can come up with, the GM can use and visa versa. But that is not the case in Data Trails as the GM and PCs are playing with slightly different tools. Its disappointing.

There is also a lot of word count dedicated on clarifying core. Which honestly, is lame. I didn't pay $25 to get the same content in core just explained to me again. I want new stuff. Exciting stuff. Cool stuff. I just want pointless part of the rules that really slow down gameplay, like hacking cameras or opening doors to resolve faster while having epic things like data steals be even more epic and amazing. I want the Matrix to be so insanely invasive to the setting that a hacker isn't there just to loop cameras and open doors, but is there to mess people up with hacking, like a mage can with a fireball or a street sam with a big gun. I just want the Matrix to matter. This book doesn't help with that.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Data Trails
by Marco N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/02/2015 17:25:38
The Table of Contents is a bad joke, important stuff is missing and the organization is horrible.

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Chrome Flesh
by robert l. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/30/2015 15:39:04
where to start..to much fluff, no chapter directory, to much fluff, some use able material SOME not much, to much fluff, its poor handling of mental health issues, to much fluff. All in all this product no ready for prime time and should be avoided like the CDF....writers please emp that idea or do a dream sequence like it never existed..like a bad acid trip and get back the game at hand. Mental health is a real and serious issue..trying to be retards and making light of it in this way is such bad karma. Avoid this product!!!

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Chrome Flesh
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Shadowrun: Data Trails
by Sean H. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/24/2015 16:16:56
Shadowrun: Data Trails provides information, tools and background for the Matrix, the successor of the web in the Shadowrun future. Is it vital to your Shadowrun game? Yes, immediately, if you are a GM running a Matrix focused game, and at some point otherwise as it has enough useful information on the Matrix and deckers to be widely useful for any Shadowrun campaign. The product could have been better organized and the GM’s section deserved to be much larger but still a useful addition to the Shadowrun range.

Shadowrun: Data Trails, is the core matrix handbook for the 5th edition of Shadowrun providing information on the matrix, the global computer network that ties everything together. There should be something for just about everyone (but especially the GM).

The book begins with one of the ubiquitous fiction sections, then an (in game world) discussion on the new Matrix (the global computer network of the Shadowrun universe), how it has changed
and how it works now. It provides a useful overview of the various Matrices, as each major Megacorps has their own overlay as do most governments and then there is the baseline public matrix (the PubGrid) for those who cannot access something better. A brief description of the appearance and feel Megacorp grids and some others are provided to allow for better description of such environments.

The next section deals with the people who use the Matrix, focusing in the hackers, with notes on the hacker underground, slang, and some of the hacker and technomancer groups you can find (or fight or join). Next there is a short section of new positive and negative qualities mostly, but not exclusively, for hackers and technomancers and including such gems as “online fame,” everyone knows the online you, and “data liberator” where you are so convinced that data wants to be free that you give it away every chance you get. The “Born to Hack” section provides life modules to use with the module-based character creation system of Run Faster, but might suggest some builds for characters even if not using that system. Then the work moves into new apps, programs and forms providing new options for hackers and technomancers both. Following new software is new hardware, commlinks, cyberdecks and more for the discerning hacker.

It then veers back to how the new Matrix works with an overview of how the various corporate grids are patrolled and defended including new IC and NPC stats for some of the security personnel one might encounter. Next, hosts are discussed, which is good as they are the major subsystems that hackers are going to be dealing with. Different types of hosts are discussed, government, retail, R&D and so on, with examples for each type presented both in game terms and a full description of how there appear and why they were shaped that way. A brief run on a host is also given as an example of such things which is useful but it could have been a bit more detailed and explicit references to the rules (and rolls) and where to find them would have made it more useful. But the host section is solidly useful and provides good information for GMs, and things to worry about for PCs. Beneath hosts, indeed underlying the entire new matrix, is the Foundation a realm of deep programming that follows its own dreamlike rules. From there you can manipulate the host on a major level, if you can understand the weird dream logic of each realm and, on the bright side, it is a great place to bring your whole team into to solve problems. Two example Foundation realms: Gnome factory, a 1950s-ish cartoon factory run by garden gnomes for a quick adventure, and Jane Austin’s Pride and Prejudice (really) as an exercise in roleplaying and intrigue (though it is only minimally fleshed out).

Next is “The Principles of Insanity” which talks about AI of several different types, including e-ghosts, technomancers that have fallen to the dissonance (the toxic shamans of the technomancer set) and a little bit more on the realm of Matrix and UV hosts. Embedded within this chapter are some new rules, the most major of which is playable AI-types, which I think would have been considerably helped by having a few example characters to better understand how the designers were thinking of the various AI-types and how they could function as characters. Additionally some notes on what sorts of additional abilities dissonance technomancers may manifest and how UV hosts affect those jacked into them. There are lots of good ideas and hooks in this section yet everything feels unfinished with just enough information to get started and then the rest will have to be sorted out on the fly.

Lastly there is a section on Mastering the Matrix, which is advice for the GM on how to use the Matrix in a Shadowrun game. Advice on structuring the use of the Matrix for various scenario types, advice on linking the action between deckers and everyone else, ways to present the Matrix to convey different story metaphors and some basic reminders on how combat in the Matrix works along with an example combat. This should have been the first or second section as it help GMs (and players) frame the information in the other sections and it should have been larger. The Matrix and linking adventure in it to the action of the rest of the characters is by far one of the hardest things a Shadowrun GM has to do in game.

Overall a useful work if oddly organized, I cannot help but think that it would have been better if all of the rules information was gathered in one place rather than being scattered about. Also a chart collecting all of the Matrix actions, old and new, would have been helpful.

Note: Read more reviews and other gaming articles at my journal https://seaofstarsrpg.wordpress.com/

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Data Trails
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

BattleTech: Handbook: House Kurita
by Cungr V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/19/2015 13:05:29
I found this to be a worthy addition and completion of the Handbook series. There are lots of updates to the information found in the original House books and a variety of new vehicles and tech to use in your games at home. As I don't speak Japanese, any problems with the language (See other review) doesn't bother me in the least. I think this book is fairly priced and only wished there were more in the series.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
BattleTech: Handbook: House Kurita
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Shadowrun: Bullets & Bandages
by Roger (. L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/15/2015 02:50:32
http://www.teilzeithelden.de/2015/06/15/rezension-shadowrun--
5-bullets-bandages-es-wird-blutig/

Die kleinen, als eBooks veröffentlichten Werke von CGL zu Shadowrun sollen spielbare Optionen zu den Kernregeln bieten. Und mit Bullets & Bandages geht es um Möglichkeiten, die Charaktere mehr leiden zu lassen, oder sie besser zu heilen. Es stellt sich die Frage, ob das am Ende jeder Spielrunde gefallen wird.

Rezension: Shadowrun 5 - Bullets & Bandages - Es wird blutig

Bereits seit einer ganzen Reihe von Jahren veröffentlicht Catalyst Game Labs für Shadowrun regelmäßig kompakte Publikationen als PDF. So eine ist Bullets & Bandages, das bereits Mitte 2014 erschien und unlängst auch von Pegasus als deutsche Version unter dem Titel Kugeln & Bandagen erhältlich ist – als PDF und auch als Teil des Schattenhandbuch 2. Für diese Rezension liegt mir aktuell nur die englische Version vor.

In den 23 Seiten geht es im weitesten Sinne um Medizin und Mediziner in der Sechsten Welt. Dabei werde eine Reihe von Erklärungen und Ergänzungen zum Grundregelwerk vorgestellt, die es Spieler wie Spielleiter ermöglichen sollen, Charaktere mit einem entsprechenden Schwerpunkt einzubringen. CGL nennt diese Regeln allerdings „nicht offiziell“ und will diese eigenen Angaben nach nicht in zukünftigen Publikationen verwenden.

Alle regelrelevanten Angaben in dem Dokument beziehen sich immer auf die 5. wie auch die 4. (20th Anniversary) Edition von Shadowrun.

Inhalt
Wie gewohnt beginnt das Heft mit einer thematisch passenden Kurzgeschichte. Das anschließende Kapitel über die Grundlagen der Feldmedizin ist Teil der Ansprache eines Offiziers von DocWagon, der damit Neuzugänge zu einem HTR Training begrüßt. HTR steht dabei für High Threat Response, was soviel wie „Einsatz unter hoher Gefahr“. Dementsprechend wird hier die Zusammensetzung eines HTR-Teams behandelt, wie auch die Anforderungen an das medizinische und taktische Können der Mitglieder. Wie bei Shadowrun gewohnt, wird der Text immer mal wieder durch sogenannten Shadowtalk – also Kommentaren von Lesern aus der Schattenszene – aufgelockert und erweitert.

Das nächste Kapitel befasst sich mit den Besonderheiten bei der Erschaffung eines Charakters, der ein Team von Shadowrunnern als Rettungssanitäter oder Notarzt begleiten soll. Dabei werden nicht nur Hinweise zur Nutzung der Regeln aus dem Grundregelwerk gegeben, sondern diese auch mit neuen Vor- und Nachteilen erweitert. Besonders die Nachteile können allerdings jede Kampagne bereichern, findet man dort zum Beispiel „Aged“ (dt. Betagt) oder auch „Pregnant“ (dt. Schwanger).

Anschließend werden im Kapitel „Advanced Biotech Rules“ erweiterte Regeln für die Nutzung der Fertigkeit Biotech vorgestellt, wie auch alternative Schadens- und Heilungsregeln, wie z. B. unbehandelten Schaden wachsen zu lassen. Das ganze macht Kämpfe deutlich tödlicher, ist aber sicherlich eine gern genommene Option für die „RealismusPlausibilitäts-Fraktion“. Interessant sind auch erweiterte Regeln zur Verwundung von intelligenten Heilungssystemen, wie z.B. dem Medkit und technisch noch aufwendigeren Geräten. Diese können optional als Drohnen verwendet werden.

Der letzte Teil erweitert das Repertoire von Drogen (6), Toxinen (4) und Pathogenen (3), sowie Zaubern (2), Adeptenkräften (3) und Ausrüstung (Biotech, Panzerungsoptionen und Drohnen). Tatsächlich sind einige dieser Dinge erst in Kombination mit den optionalen Regeln aus Bullets & Bandages nützlich oder sinnvoll, andere wiederum sind auch völlig unabhängig von den restlichen Regeln eine spannende Erweiterung für Spielrunden.

Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis
Das Dokument ist bei DriveThruRPG für 4,95 USD und damit am untersten Ende des üblichen Preisbereiches für dünne SR5 PDFs. Dazu bekommt man ein wenig Fluff und eine Menge Crunch für seine Runden. Will man sich allerdings nicht auf die optionalen Regeln einlassen, fällt der verwertbare Inhalt allerdings schon etwas dünner aus. Dennoch hat man am Ende ein angemessenes Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis.

Erscheinungsbild
Die Optik ist durchweg hochwertig und im für die 5. Edition üblichen Design gehalten. Das PDF verfügt über eine Kapitelnavigation, allerdings keine Textlinks. Letzteres ist bei dem überschaubaren Umfang nun aber auch nicht zwingend erforderlich. Von dem Titelbild einmal abgesehen gibt es genau drei Zeichnungen in dem Dokument – zwei Szenen und ein Ausrüstungsgegenstand. Alle drei sind solide und anschaulich, mehr aber auch nicht.
Der Text ist in übersichtliche Abschnitte gegliedert und immer mal wieder durch Tabellen oder Infoboxen unterbrochen und lässt sich deshalb leicht lesen. Einzig die Angaben in Querverweisen zu Quellenbüchern stören etwas. Diese sind in der Regel doppelt (für beide Editionen) und manchmal auch nicht, was verwirrend sein kann, wenn man nicht alle Publikationen der beiden Editionen kennt und den Verweis dementsprechend nicht ohne weiteres zuordnen kann.


Bonus/Downloadcontent
Keiner.

Fazit
Bullets & Bandages ist eine ordentliche und saubere Arbeit, die eine Menge Möglichkeiten für eine Spielrunde bietet.

Die gelieferten Zusatzregeln allerdings beschweren ein ohnehin schon schwergewichtiges Rollenspiel und nicht jede Spielrunde wird weitere Proben und Würfe wollen. Auch wenn vieles plausibel erscheint wird eine Rollenspielrunde mit dem Fokus auf das Erzählspiel vermutlich nichts davon verwenden. Damit fallen auch ein paar der davon abhängigen weiteren Neuerungen weg, was den Gesamtwert des Werkes in etwa um 30% reduziert.

Der Hintergrund zu DocWagon oder der Charaktererschaffung sind dagegen auch für Runden hilfreich, die ansonsten bereits mit dem Grundregelwerk glücklich sind. Die Nachteile Aged und Pregnant haben es mir besonders angetan und ich kann es nicht erwarten, gealterte oder schwangere Figuren an meinem Tisch zu haben – aber besser nicht beides in einer Person. Auch die neuen Zauber oder Kräfte – einige kennt man schon aus früheren Editionen – sind unabhängig von dem Schwerpunkt des PDFs bereichernd.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Bullets & Bandages
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

BattleTech: Experimental Technical Readout: Republic Volume II
by Richard R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/12/2015 18:02:16
It was a bit on the thin side but great art work and whar was presented was good.More newr tech would be good

Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
BattleTech: Experimental Technical Readout: Republic Volume II
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Shadowrun: Data Trails
by Rian V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/06/2015 17:04:32
Shadowrun 5 is my first SR edition. I like the fluff in this book - given that it consists of hardly anything else -, but it doesn't answer any questions I ran into while playing as a decker. How do you make your own host? What is patrol IC looking for on a host? How do you make your own programs? Is it possible to create your own deck? Do PANs and WANs maybe offer more functionality than just more security (debatable)? What keeps me from slaving all my devices to the biggest, baddest commlink I can get my hands on and profit from the permanently high firewall rating?

Instead, it adds many questions. I like the idea of the Foundation aka "The plumbing of the Matrix" - a place not unlike UV hosts, as in hyperreal, from which hosts are "grown" from specialized corps. How? Why? No answers. GMing for a decker who really wants to get gritty with the Matrix is probably a nightmare, because it's all very abstract and mysteries are thrown upon the reader which will probably be answered in later books. So either you go along and answer NO questions in your games for the curious players or you make something up and risk going waaaay out of canon with your game.

Anyway, there are a couple entries which I found especially interesting for me personally: How to build a 'deck replacement from scraps (you can turn your toaster into a weapon now), new qualities and the new Matrix action Garbage in/Garbage out, which will open up many posibilities for shenanigans. Also some example runs and the short Matrix overview for GMs are quite informative and I like that AIs are playable characters now.

Other than that, if you want to find an entry for reference, be prepared to stick lots of bookmarks into your PDF. The table of contents is lousy, to say the least.

Overall an okay addition, but severely lacking in crunch.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Data Trails
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

BattleTech: A Time of War Quick-Start Rules
by Tracy H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/05/2015 14:58:33
I have played battletech since the beginning. Was looking at a quick way to get new players in. This looks like it should work well.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
BattleTech: A Time of War Quick-Start Rules
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Shadowrun: Data Trails
by Martin F. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/05/2015 02:30:09
the layout and design of this book is terrible, its almost impossible to find anything you are looking for unless you know exactly what chapter it is in. which is hard when the table of contents does not list what each of the chapters contains nor what they are about. I would not have purchased if i had know this was the case, and I hope they ditch the design very quickly.

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Shadowrun: Data Trails
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Shadowrun: Data Trails
by Stephen D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/04/2015 18:04:54
Not really as bad as some of the reviews make it out to be. This is more a setting book for the matrix than anything else. There are some useful new rules: AIs as characters, upgrading comlinks to gain either a sleaze or attack attributes (pick one), and a new take on matrix architecture. At the same time, the cultural shift to a post-Snowden world is going to set some people off. The Matrix is no longer about freedom. Instead the high lethality of the 5th edition Matrix rules have been packaged as a silent pogrom by the corporations against dissenters. If deckers or technomancers are your favorite character type, then you're probably going to feel put upon by this setting element. If your group tends to run with an NPC decker, then you're going to find much of the fluff useful. Just don't expect 4e levels of crunch.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Valiant Universe: The Roleplaying Game
by keith b. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/01/2015 00:51:07
Unfortunately open ended for Valiant means you only get half a game which justifies the 3 star rating I gave.
The game system is fine, good to even great at times. rolling a d12 game dice along with stat die of 1d4 to 1d12 is a good thing. Using a power to add the power die, replace the stat die or to discard the lower of the power die or stat die is even better. no complaints here about that.

Changing Narrators(GMs) is ok too as most people like playing and narrating, maybe not equally but you know what I mean. It can also take the story in unique and unexpected directions like alien invasions out of no where and all of a sudden your grandmother is standing on the sidewalk where the battle is headed. It can be quite fun and humorous and personal grudges against other group members can be settled using the game system.

my main problem is the effect once you have succeeded in affecting an opponent. some sample characters attacking with the same dice numbers do damage of 2, 3, 4, 1d4, or 1d6 with really no explanation other than if it feels right do whatever damage you want. this applies to fists, guns, swords, fire, or any other form of attack.

As it stands you get a huge amount of armour allowing you to take many hits before having to worry about negative modifiers or lasting effects. Of course some characters possess an Armor power that can reduce damage by 1 but another character has it reducing damage by 3 with no explanation and yet having the same power die.

The samples are great but when creating a custom hero the open endedness falls apart hoping that your game group will keep your powers and the effects to a reasonable level. if your group also wants high damage for their characters they can't stop you from doing the same which means the enemies will have to be even greater in power or you will easily run over most opposition.

Open ended powers are a great thing allowing you to define the power as you play and use it in many different ways however there is nothing stopping a player from loading up on one power and assigning a keep the stat and power dice at the same time. and then using this power over and over for attack and defence. by adding the game die of d12 and a stat die of d12 and a power die of d12 on each roll you can have a max score of 36 to beat out your opponent. as few NPCs come close to this you will be able to hit and avoid the enemy with ease and that is not even using any Event points to modify rolls or scenes.

Tags, Cues, Action Cues, and Disposition descriptors while being optional is way to many. this is a minor issue for me as I would have 3-4 cues whether they be action or otherwise to define my character. A good Narrator(GM) can call in at least 1 of everyone's cues every game session without even trying. As it stands most characters will be cued for anything that happens in the game.

Like I said before half the game is on par with excellent. the amount of sample characters, NPCs, can have a new group running in 2 minutes if the LN(GM) knows the system and doesn't switch roles. Creating characters can be done in less than 5 minutes once you know the system as well. Leaving the cues empty or filling them in as you play(my personal method).

I have mixed feelings about Valiant but if the effects and some power defining was polished up I would not hesitate to raise my rating and purchase a version 2 but as it stands I have quite a few house rules to keep battles fair and NPCs on par with the Players.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Valiant Universe: The Roleplaying Game
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Displaying 16 to 30 (of 790 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates