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Advanced Races 7: Centaurs (Pathfinder RPG)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/15/2014 10:39:19

Fascinating creatures, centaurs. Half-man, half horse, all wild and strange. Do you want to play one? It's a bit difficult, as the one in the Bestiary is a bit over-powered for a regular character... but unlike most races, or so we are told here, the Bestiary variety are the best of each generation and player-characters are drawn from the common herd, the reverse of most races where those who are player-characters are the cream of the crop. The information necessary to generate a 'normal' centaur are given here, so if you fancy playing one or need some ordinary centaurs to turn up, now you can.


There is a wealth of detail here about centaur life and customs, which will facilitate playing a centaur or bring centaurs to vivid life in your campaign. Being powerful creatures themselves, they view lesser beings as prey, believing that only those strong enough to guard their possessions have the right to keep them and hence accepting banditry as normal behaviour (provided it is not a member of your own clan family that you are stealing from!). Even amonst their own, violent behaviour is acceptable, 'friendly' brawls are commonplace (especially when strong drink is involved) although it rarely goes beyond bruises and broken bones.


To facilitate playing a centaur - with, of course, a radically different anatomy from humanoids - there is a range of traits and other material, both game mechanical and descriptive. Several archetypes are also presented to give an idea of the potentials of this race and to get you going on the creation of your own centaur characters. Feats, spells and uniquely centaur items round out this section. There are also notes on centaur variants - creatures built along similar lines but drawing on different species - how about a half-elf, half-deer alseid, for example?


A fascinating glimpse into a fairly standard fantasy race that is often neglected in fantasy role-playing, at least as a potential character.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Advanced Races 7: Centaurs (Pathfinder RPG)
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Dark Fey (Pathfinder RPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/10/2014 03:58:44

An Endzeitgeist.com review


This mini-bestiary of dark fey is 23 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC,1 page SRD, 4/5 pages of SRD, leaving us with 19 1/5 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?


The first creature herein would be the CR 6 Aridni, essentially tainted pixie hunters that can shoot arrows that can cause hideous laughter, confusion and similar effects, making them well-suited to their task. Beli on the other hand are the ice-arrows firing servants of the arctic god Boreas, whereas Bereginyas at CR 4 are semi-gaseous and, though tiny, they get a racial bonus to CMB and CMD that not only offsets their size penalty and makes them rather adept at their task - these fey actually try to smother you. Ouch. Boloti are frog-headed humanoids clad in jelly-fish like mantles of water that can cause vortexes and even cause water to sprout grappling tentacles. this is the first fey herein I'd consider truly awesome and original - semi-gaseous smothering fey are neat, the Boloti are downright awesome!


Bucca are tiny, poison-using bat-like fey that are vulnerable to sunlight and known for their poison-use. At CR 2 okay, if not particularly awe-inspiring. Chernomoi at CR 1 are essentially the draconic equivalent of brownies. The CR 4 Clurichaun wields antler-glaives that can extend or shrink and disarm or trip adversaries; Combined with their array of SLAs, they make for nice hunter-style adversaries/ hit-and-run foes. Dark Satyrs at CR 6 are...different - with insectile antennae, sleep poison and twisted effects via their piping, these satyr tainted by the Great Old Ones make for one damn cool adversary, both with their signature abilities and SLAs.


Domovoi are fighting fey, house spirits turned enforcers and guards at CR 6, while at CR 6 the Dorreqi, balls of twisted tentacles, are the Walker's tainted version of the Korred. The CR 1 Fey Water Strider are water-walking docile insect-mounts - now this one, I really love! An amalgam of dead fish and amphibians, Mamura at CR 5 are aberrations with the (fey) subtype - which does not exist per se. The description is completely awesome and terrifying, though and their reality-bending and concentration-hampering makes them useful and surely an adversary your PCs will not forget.


The CR 11 Mavka are undead (again, with the non-existent fey-subtype) dryads, tainted into servitude by vampires, bound to cauchemar nightmares and now vulnerable to sunlight: Once again, excellent prose makes one want to sue this creature! The CR 12 Naina are drake fey with various breath attacks, spells and SLAs as well as shape-changing, make for an adversary that may, thanks to the array of abilities, prove to high-level parties as confusing as faerie dragons to lower level PCs.


The CR 11 Nichny resemble humanoid black cats and are actually great soothsayers that may, contrary to appearances, imbue other with luck. This one features a concept with a nice twist and feels rather innovative, so yeah: Neat. Why? Because their xenophobic and gleefully carnivorous... approach at your own peril...


Qwyllions at CR 8 are bloated, hideous mutations of nymphs, again spawned from the corruption of the Walkers - and they actually get an array of fun abilities as well as a weakness and a heritage feat that marks a character as a former thrall to these disgusting parodies of what once was good and pure. Scheznyki, CR 9 fey resembling essentially disheveled dwarven bums, can be rid of some of their abilities by stealing their hats or cut their beards - which is just awesome and cool! This type of information drives home how alien fey truly are and resonate well with me. And yes, we get full item-stats for the hats.


The final fey herein would be the CR 1 Zubnaya, clad in armors of teeth and fighting with tooth-riddled spiked chains, they make for a very disturbing take on the tooth faerie.


The pdf also provides the CR +1 fey animal template as well as a list of known Fey of Midgard by Type and one by CR, all featuring the respective source-books in brackets - handy to have.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are very good, though not perfect - still no true reasons to complain. Layout adheres to Midgard's drop-dead gorgeous full-color 2-column standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience. The artworks used herein are insane - beautiful, of top-notch quality and just beauties to behold, one and all of them - they universally made me want to include their depicted creatures in my game.


Adam Roy provides us with a cool mini-bestiary that admittedly has a hard standing with me - both Legendary Games and Alluria Publishing have upped the ante so high regarding monster books that it's hard to excite me anymore and at first, I confess to not being overwhelmed. But slowly, though distinctly so, Adam Roy seems to have found his stride - the more I read, the more imaginative and unique the creatures got - to the point where there are some serious strokes of genius herein. Now on the downside, aforementioned awesome artworks are not provided for each creature, nor do we get lore-DC-section of fey-like tricks like the ones mentioned before for every adversary herein. What we do get, though, would be very compelling prose that drives home the weirdness of many of the creatures herein. Also, I'm a sucker for fey and mythos combining into something...different and twisted. Oh, and then there's the VERY low price-point - for the artwork, for the quality of the content, the price-point of this mini-bestiary is more than appropriate and indeed a steal. It is also the deciding factor that made me round up from my final verdict of 4.5 stars to 5 - while not all creatures herein are killer, there is some awesomeness to be discovered in this pdf - if you dare to look, that is.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dark Fey (Pathfinder RPG)
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The Iron Secret for 4th Edition D&D
by Timothy B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/05/2014 15:46:23

I just ran this adventure as a one-off during my kids' Christmas break from school. I was surprised by how much they enjoyed investigating the causes of the unrest, rather than simply jumping head-first into combat at every opportunity. The author does a nice job of painting the picture of a city in a state of tension, ready to explode if the right spark sets off the powder keg. My players were immediately interested in keeping the peace, and did a nice job of role-playing encounters that could have easily devolved into combat.


This adventure makes extensive use of the D&D 4th Edition version of the Midgard Bestiary. Fortunately, I already own this, but if I hadn't, I would have needed to substitute every monster in the adventure with something else. That wouldn't have been a terrible thing, but the unusual and downright unique monsters in the adventure are part of its charm, in my opinion. There were several monsters my players had never heard of, or unusual twists on classic monsters, that made them feel fresh again. It would have been nice to have at least had the stat blocks for these monsters included in the adventure. There's plenty of cool content in the Midgard Bestiary that would still make it a valuable supplement, in this case. This is one reason why I didn't rate this adventure as 5/5 stars.


My only other complaint is that the author doesn't suggest some possible motivations for the "shadow forces" at work in this adventure. If my players had approached the adventure as a hack-and-slash (and I'm sure many do, especially as a low-level/introductory adventure), this probably would have never made any difference. However, my players were keen to get to the bottom of the mystery, and that left me to figure it all out. I think my ad lib skills were sufficient in this case, but it's always nice for the author to provide some ideas in situations like these, for DMs who are new or are just having an off night. Plus, that would have been an opportunity to tie this adventure more closely to the Midgard Campaign Setting and its Powers-That-Be, yet give some other options for DMs who placed the adventure in their own setting. For as much intrigue as is going on, I was surprised to get to the last page, and not be given any motivation for the villain.


Besides these fairly small flaws, this was a fun adventure, with a good balance of combat and intrigue. While appropriate for low-level characters, I think it could easily be adopted for higher level play, if players are already involved in the politics of the city. I also want to take a moment to thank Kobold Press for continuing to support the 4E community with fun and innovative adventures such as this one.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Iron Secret for 4th Edition D&D
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Kobold Quarterly Magazine 14
by Brian F. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/04/2014 16:09:35

Yahoo! The Summer 2010 issue of Kobold Quarterly is overflowing with chewy gaming goodness. And if you’re just in the mood for some amazing art, cover to cover is full of spectacular full color and black and white art, starting with “The Paladin’s Treasure” on the front cover. We all knew Paladins were adventuring for something other than the mythical dragon hoard… but don’t tell that to the dragon!


Just in time for Gen Con this summer, the Kobolds were busy bringing theory and practice together to provide inspiration for gamemasters and players alike. But if you’re looking for loot, there’s plenty of that too. As Wolfgang Baur, Kobold-in-Chief, explains in his Editorial – generosity is not an optional quality for good leaders. Viking jarls knew better than to not treat their berserker hordes to good meals, handfuls of gold, and public recognition for great deeds. Wolfgang and his own talented horde do that in each issue of Kobold Quarterly, so I doubt his audience will turn on him any time soon…


I was intrigued in this issue by the wide array of articles – from a detailed description of how to play an Aasimar (angel avatars used to fight evil in mortal realms) from Kolja Raven Liquette to an intriguing ecology article from R. William Thomposon about the Tengu I had no idea were as civilized as they seem to be. The Tengu have intrigued me ever since college when we ran into a few in a session, but now I might have to play one as an NPC!


Also in this issue was the concept of beefing up the ability of “Lay on Hands” for healing. Remember that paladin from the front cover? Laying on hands is one of his abilities that can take a bit of the pressure off the party MASH unit cleric. Though we recently were playing through one of the Pathfinder modules, we were playing in D&D 3.5e and not the Pathfinder revised system, but the more I see of how they’ve tweaked this and that the more I think we should have tried it out. Giving a paladin the ability to remove the effect of a Charm spell, Confusion, Dazzle, or even recent Death would seriously make me look twice at having both a paladin and a cleric in my party.


And one last article I’ll mention here is “Hoard Magic” from Michael Furlanetto. Dragons love their treasure hoards. We all know it. So why shouldn’t they be able to get a bit of power from that wealth? Combat powers based on the size of the dragon’s treasure pile might make a particular critter that much more difficult to kill. If you were defending your pile of gold, wouldn’t you want to have an edge in protecting it? And then, if the PCs are wise enough to take advantage of similar effects, wouldn’t that make a player think twice before leaving his home to go on another adventure?


Issue 14 managed to capture my attention with articles on characters, design, DMing, treasure, and the usual columns (don’t miss the interview with Rob Heinsoo!)… Doesn’t it deserve some of your love as well? Though I (once again) was unable to attend Gen Con this year, Kobold Quarterly gives me a taste of that glory a few times a year, so I think I’ll survive. Just barely though!


If you’re interested in fantasy roleplaying and all the amazing topics that surround it, check out the summer issue of Kobold Quarterly and all the other issues as well. We have to keep those kobolds busy and out of trouble before they come invading our own campaigns… Instead of the “Trouble with Tribbles” it’s the “Kinks with Kobolds”…


(This review first appeared here: http://www.gamekn-
ightreviews.com/2010/09/magazine-review-kobold-quarterly-sum-
mer-2010-issue-14/
)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kobold Quarterly Magazine 14
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Wondrous Items 1: Armor Made from Monster Hides
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/04/2014 12:28:17

Most of us have spent an entire combat wondering if our weapons will ever penetrate a monster's natural armour... but how many of us have thought about using that armour for ourselves after that monster lies dead on the floor?


This product not only poses the suggestion, it also offers practical advice as to how to go about it and a wealth of ready-made samples. To collect the materials, use the Survival skill (which includes useful tricks like how to field dress game - this can be re-purposed to skinning a creature with the care needed to keep the hide intact) and then use the Craft skill to fashion the armour you want. There's even a note on how to work out what it's worth, if you decide to sell. Or want to know the value if you are counting collected hides as part of the party treasure and need to divide it up equally.


The example armours all give the DCs to harvest and make the armour (and you're shown how to work these out for other creatures), as well as any special properties your new armour might have as well as the regular protection element. These are generally based on the natural abilities of the monster that formerly owned the hide, and can be quite inventive.


The adventure potentials are immense. Not only will you eye up every monster in a different light, you may even decide to go hunting for just the right creature based on what you can make from it, or the party may be hired by a less-adventurous craftsmen in need of particular items to fill an order.


Neat idea, and plenty of potential for this to be more than merely 'more loot' for the party!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Wondrous Items 1: Armor Made from Monster Hides
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KOBOLD Guide to Board Game Design
by Jason P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/29/2013 22:21:22

This book lies.


You will note the five star rating for a good reason. The book claims to be about "Board Game Design" when in reallity it is so much more. It's about all games, from board to card to RPG. It discusses the core reasons for design and the main structures behind them. This doesn't focus on individual mechanics, but rather on the more fundamental, structural things.


If you want to design any game, this is a godsend. As a roleplaying game designer, it blew me away. Grab your copy.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
KOBOLD Guide to Board Game Design
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KOBOLD Guide to Game Design, Vol. 1
by Jason P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/29/2013 22:09:07

An oldie but a goodie; this has a a focus on game design within a traditional D&D context, and does it with style. If you are looking for gems like you might have once found in Dragon Magazine, check this out!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
KOBOLD Guide to Game Design, Vol. 1
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Advanced Races 3: Gearforged (Pathfinder RPG)
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/20/2013 03:13:20

An Endzeitgeist.com review


The third installment in the Advanced Races-series is 26 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page SRD and 1 page advertisement, leaving us with 22 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?


Now the story of Gearforged has been told by multiple supplements and could be pieced together from various Midgard-themed sources, but herein we have the story well-compiled and much like the spread content, this pdf offers also fluff-wise the easiest way of getting the whole story of the creation of the Gearforged - from Stross-tyranny to the Free City of Zobeck's revolution to how Rava (a mask of Ariadne) and her church have guided and shaped Gearforged society, while also going into details on Gearforged psychology and iconic concepts like memory gears, soul gems and everwound springs as well as Rava's write-up. Also rather awesome would be the schematic insights into the anatomy of Gearforged, marvelously illustrated in gorgeous full color by Mark Smylie.


Of course, this pdf offers a significant array of traits - a total of 12 different racial traits are provided for your perusal: From a 1/day discharge of 1d4 fire/electricity or sonic damage à la burning hands to confusing foes by linking via touch with their minds, these traits...are actually fun! I mean it! They're not too strong, but confer significant bonuses and make for thematically fitting, intriguing additions to characters that may well make the difference between triumph or doom. Only rarely do I see traits I enjoy as much as these, so kudos! Especially since 5 racial subtypes with assigned traits add also a sense of narrative gravitas to the selection of these traits - I wish more supplements tied story/setting-information that concisely together. And of course, the cool incantation/ritual to turn into a Gearforged is depicted herein as well in all its glory.


But what do Gearforged characters get crunch-wise? Well, they are medium, get +2 to an ability score of their choice, +1 natural armor, suffer no penalty from wearing medium armor, get low-light and darkvision and also the Gearforged traits - these include +4 to saves versus mind-influencing effects, immunity to nonlethal damage, disease, death effects, necromancy effects, poison and sleep as well as exhaustion and fatigue. Furthermore, they automatically stabilize at 0 Hp or less and are not subject to massive damage death. Even upon complete destruction of the base bdy, as long as the memory gears and soul stone are intact, the Gearforged can be recreated. They also don't need to eat, sleep or breathe and may work properly under water for str-score hours - any longer than that immobilizes them unless they have been repaired. Gearforged incur a -2 penalty on swim-checks.


Gearforged cannot heal damage naturally, and even magic only cures the minimum amount of damage. The psionic repair power (nice to see the inclusion!) works normally, though. Gearforged require 4 hours of daily maintenance by themselves - failing to get this period of uninterrupted rest results in cumulative penalties of - 2 to atk, skill-checks, ability-checks and saves and after character level periods sans maintenance, the Gearforged become immobile, requiring outside help to reactivate. They also get +2 to intimidate and Craft (clockworks). All in all, an interesting race - the vast array of immunities is somewhat offset by the impeded healing capabilities of the class - though the question of type remains: While I assume from the fact that they get their own subtype that the Gearforged count as humanoids for the purpose of spells and the like, not as constructs, it would have been nice to have that spelled out properly. Now we also get an array of archetypes, first of which would be the Clockwork Warrior for the Fighter-class: Learning to utilize gears to supplement his/her/its attacks, developing natural claw-attacks and similar tricks in lieu of armor/weapon training. is nice, though we have a formatting glitch here, with one ability's name not properly in bold. The Faithforged are created paladins, who do not get spells, instead focusing on lay on hands (also on gearforged!) and the option to infuse attacks with elemental bonus damage dependant on level instead of mercies and divine grace. As soon as the Faithforged learn to channel they're rather hard to pin down, for their symbol is their own very being. The high-level abilities are also quite unique - kudos for an uncommon, interesting archetype here. The Heavy Gauntlet Witch gets a permanent adamantine gauntlet enhancement to their physical form, enhancing their physical forms with DRs and even fortification. Furthermore, their pain clasp overrides construct immunity and even, in one check, grapple and make paralyzed foes prone and get a reach. An ok archetype, I guess, though it annoys me a bit that it does not specify which abilities the respective powers replace/change - yes, it's a variation of the gauntlet witch archetype from KQ's issue #23, but still - the information should have been in this pdf.


Next up would be the Lawmaster inquisitor - unable to cast [chaotic]-spells, these inquisitors are specialists of intimidation and they make for superb guards, being able to make relatively easy DC 20-perception checks to discern the invisible, ethereal and later even discern the true form of polymorphed creatures and objects. At high level, regeneration and marks of justice as well as a type of imprisonment are added to their arsenal. rather neat! Barbarian gearforged seem like a contradiction in adjecto, but the Quiet Explorer gets a changed rage-quality as well as the ability to retaliate at higher levels, punishing opponents with AoOs. Summoners of the Gearforged race may opt for the path of Salvager - their summoning spells may be restricted, but do add the new scrap beast mini-template to their summons, making them vulnerable to electricity in favor of +2 AC. Also rather interesting, the archetype gets a flying metal sphere weak to electricity (no offsetting the weakness via evolutions!) that can learn to turn into a swarm-form which may later learn to split, throw swarmed foes and as a capstone disarm and destroy items to have the swarm heal itself.


The final new archetype would be the Tinker Alchemist - faster maintenance (only 2 hours, later none at all), exclusive mutagens for Gearforged, bombs automatically enhanced by the breath weapon discovery and may choose energy to be resistant against and even be healed by said energy make up this archetype's arsenal. Among the new items, we get a claw whip, a polish to dazzle foes and a gear buggy vehicle as well as an amulet that may grow spider-like bludgeoning appendages, anti-construct bombs, a kind of battery (to heal and offset maintenance) and finally, bells to interact with destroyed Gearforged.


We also get 16 new feats herein - improved armor, better underwater adaption, counting as both former race and Gearforged, better skill at dismantling constructs, DR/fire, having an integrated masterwork item usable only for you, more beautiful appearance, less penalties for failing to get maintenance, reflexively magnetically disarming foes 3/day, self-repair and even making a limb autonomous 1/day, the feats per se are rather neat - especially the autonomous limb has quite some potential! Speaking of potential, the 5 spells have some cool ideas, but unfortunately, also flaws - take the first spell. It includes this sentence "While encased, use your touch AC for all AC checks." I have no idea what AC-checks are supposed to be. Also: usually, touch AC is worse than regular AC, so why is this an improvement? Per se the spell offers temporary hit points, which is nice, but I still don't get how this one is supposed to work. Dazzling (and int-damaging) foes via bursts at 4th spell level may be nice, but also a bit weak. You can also transform your metal frame into bone, take on inevitable-like aspects or charge your unarmed strikes with electricity damage.


This does include options for non-Gearforged characters as well, though:


Oracles may now opt for the Clockwork and Industry Oracle-mysteries (both of which are AWESOME, the latter allowing you, if you choose to, to wilder in gunslinging!) and the sorceror may now opt for the mechanical sorceror bloodline and we also get information on the Craft (Clockwork)-skill, Disable Device when interacting with clockwork devices and Knowledge (Architecture and Engineering) as well as Use Magic Device. on another note, if you require some inspiration to expand the Craft (Clockwork)-skill, Storm Bunny Studios has a nice supplement out there that could be well used to supplement this pdf. Finally, we get 3 non-Gearforged clockwork-related traits.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are very good, though not perfect - I noticed minor glitches here and there as well as some minor rules ambiguities. Layout adheres to Midgrad's drop-dead gorgeous 2-column full-color standard and the artworks are ridiculously beautiful for this price - James Keegan, Chris McFann and Mark Smylie all did splendid jobs here. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.


The Gearforged have a hard standing with me - I've read MANY construct-races, with varying degrees of being constructy/human-like and just as many solutions for the obvious problems the immunities bring. Now fluff-wise, the Gearforged are my favorite construct-race, but crunch-wise...not so much. I'm not really sold on their balance. Where e.g. Darakhul, who get a similar amount of immunities/benefits have to contend with multiple drawbacks that balance out their powers, Gearforged only get penalties like the maintenance-requirement that can be mitigated and even bought off with significantly less feat-investment than the Darakhul. Furthermore, their immunities are rather significant and the absence of an age, height and WEIGHT-table is unfortunate - I can already see the discussions on whether the gearforged crashes through those ice sheets, branches etc. in my head....


That being said, the options contained herein more often hit the spot than miss it - Designers Wolfgang Baur, Morgan Boehringer, Chris Harris, Adam Roy, Jason Sonia and the mastermind of this pdf Thomas Benton have crafted some rather ingenious pieces of content that should, even for other construct-races, allow for significant amounts of scavenging. Idea-wise, this is definitely a rich, if not perfect offering, a bit on the stronger side balance-wise and with minor glitches here and there, but still a well-worth purchase. Hence, my final verdict will clock in at a solid 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4 for the purpose of this platform.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Advanced Races 3: Gearforged (Pathfinder RPG)
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Midgard Campaign Setting
by Timothy B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 12/14/2013 19:18:39

I'm currently using this setting for my 13th Age campaign, and it's been a great fit for my group. It has a good balance between defining enough, so that I know, in a general way, what each portion of the world is "all about," but doesn't define so much that I can't insert my own details. It has a great take on the pantheon, which is unique to Midgard. Personally, I like some of the more unusual races that play a larger role in Midgard: kobolds, ravenfolk, gearforged, and minotaurs. The world is large enough that it features areas that are influenced by the culture and myths of Scandinavia, Eastern Europe, Arabia, the Italian Renaissance, and even a bit of post-apocalyptic goodness. The world is sufficiently dark, where you know heroes are needed, but not so dark that it's overly Gothic or gritty.


The source books for Midgard are also great additions to my game, and are worth mentioning. There are supplements for several major areas as well as some of the races I mentioned above. And the adventures that I've played through have all been a blast.


I recommend that you check it out!


Originally posted at: http://www.enworld.org/forum/showthread.php?348246-M-
idgard-Campaign-Setting-Impressions&p=6219353&viewfull=1#pos-
t6219353



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Midgard Campaign Setting
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Midgard: Player's Guide to the Rothenian Plains
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/12/2013 04:17:23

An Endzeitgeist.com review


The latest installment of Player's Guides for the Midgard campaign setting is 31 pages long, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial/ToC, 1 page advertisement 2/3 of a page SRD, leaving us with 27 1/3 pages of content, so let's take a look, shall we?


As has become the tradition with the series, we kick off this installment with a short fluffy introduction on the Rothenian Plane and after that, we get the racial qualities of Centaurs - Centaurs get +2 Str, Wis and Con, - 2 Wis, are large, have a movement-rate of 40 ft., darkvision 60 ft., get Run as a bonus feat and are treated as having mounted combat for purposes of feat-prerequisites, get +2 to ride (???) and attacks while charging as well as Heal Heal and Craft (Bows) and as quadrupeds, they get +4 to CMD versus Trip, but also -4 to stealth. Centaurs may also choose from 6 alternate racial traits - from eating anything to faster speed, poison use or increased encumbrance (I assume in addition to the already impressive quadruped encumbrance-bonus), centaurs may also replaced their skilled trait with alternate skill-bonuses while in the Rothenian Plane. If you're going for playing centaurs, I guess they kind of work, though I do consider them rather strong stat-wise - one particular issue centaurs will face would be the climb-issue and similar problems whenever feet would be required and their bulk a hindrance. So honestly...a sample DC-table/advice for this particular race would have been rather justified, especially since per design, they seem to imply that this is a balancing factor.... or the designer just didn't balance them with the core-races: Since they don't use undersized weapons like lamias, the large weaponry alone is quite a bonus...


The second race herein would be the Huginn, the Ravenfolk of Midgard, who get +2 Dex and Wis, - 2 Con, low-light vision, +2 to Stealth and Perception, +4 to linguistics, automatic proficiency with short swords, greatswords and longswords as well as a bite attack at 1d3. They may also choose from a total of 4 alternate racial traits, all of which are nice and balanced, including Wotan-blessed milky-white eyes that impede ranged combat, but mean they are closer to the flow of destiny, allowing them to 1/day add +1 to an attack or check.


The Human ethnicity of the Kariv is also depicted - Kariv replace the default human traits with one or more of 5 different traits, many of which add 1/2 class level to a respective skill: Rather powerful and definitely something, as the header suggests, that should be subject to DM approval. The Khazzaki Nomads may also choose from alternate traits that emphasize their alliance with elves and centaurs or their opposition to dread Baba Yaga or the Lord of Demon Mountain. Finally, Elves may belong to the ethnicity of Windrunenr elves, choosing from a total of 4 racial traits. We also get 26 new traits, all of which are neat, but also nothing too particularly exciting - plus, I noticed a minor glitch, a lack of italicization of a spell herein. Oh yes, all of the races lack age, height & weight-tables, which would have been particularly interesting for Centaurs & Huginn.


Among the 6 new feats, 4 are archery-themed, pinning crited foes or allowing you to incur penalties to add bleed and dex-damage and at level 20, even death (thankfully all with saves) to your shots. The other two feats allow you to unseat multiple foes - all in all, an awesome little feat-section that offers some cool options. Two thumbs up for that category!


Hereafter, we are introduced to Rothenian Archetypes - starting off with the Centaur Cloud-render, who becomes subsequently more immune to detrimental conditions and rather powerful high level abilities in the final spectrum, including increased Str- and Con-bonuses and +2 enhanced threat-ranges and auto-confirms as a capstone. All this mostly in exchange for trap sense, uncanny dodge and indomitable will. Solid if not particularly exciting archetype, though one ability has its name not properly bolded. The Second Centaur-archetype would be the Earth Mother (a druid archetype), who gains detect poison and know direction at will in exchange for woodland stride as well as speak with-spells as abilities etc. - okay druid-archetype, but kind of lacks a true selling point for me. The Holy Spear would then be a centaur paladin - these paladins don't get spells, but instead more lay on hands and mercies and they also get a groom instead of a mount - essentially a human (or elven, or gnomish...though gnomish squires are rather...problematic in Midgard...) squire. At high levels, they may create circles of protection and dimensional lock adversaries. Now this one is rather cool! Speaking of cool - we also get the Sky-Father for the centaurs, an archetype for Marc Radle's much-lauded spontaneous casting shaman-class: This one being particularly resilient and a foe of unnatural supernatural beings (i.e. not necessarily fey). oh yes, and they can MAKE SWORDS OF LIGHTNING. This, ladies and gentlemen, is a worthy archetype!


Khazzaki Husars are a subset of fighters that specialize on fighting while in the saddle and under the stars of the Rothenian plains - utterly bland and boring in contrast to e.g. the Shrive. What's that? The hermaphroditic Shrive oracles of the Kariv may discern lies by partaking in one's blood and they also may discern the hidden or let targets swear blood oaths - mechanically not too intriguing, but the stellar fluff makes this archetype awesome.


Sorcerors of the Huginn may now opt to choose the new Stormraven bloodline, which allows them to store spells in their weapons and sacrifice illusion spells to increase their disguises. We also get 10 new hexes, many of which cripple quite profoundly those coming too near to the rothenian witch - powerful, yes, but also very distinct. 2 major hexes and 6 grand hexes are also included in the pdf - the latter including storms of vengeance and even clone-like doppelgänger.


We also get the new lightning and sky subdomains, 3 divine spells and 5 new arcane spells -one of which calls the legendary Black Gnash, a particularly famous nessian warhound... 8 new magical items, 4 types of magical weapons as well as 5 mundane weapon types and 8 pieces of gear and equipment are ready to be bought via your PC's hard-earned gold. The pdf closes with the stats for 4 different mounts that include fey hounds and spirit horses, but strangely lack the stats to be used as animal companions - particularly weird in a Player's Guide.


Conclusion:


Editing and formatting are good, though not perfect - I noticed no truly outstanding glitches, but there are some minor ones interspersed throughout the pdf. Layout adheres to Kobold Press' glorious 2-column full-color standard and the pdf's artwork ranges from fitting stock to awesome original full-color. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.


Author Adam W. Roy has talent, as he's shown in some installment5s of the series, but this particular one is not his best take - there is nothing particularly broken herein, but there indeed is quite a bunch of filler material that simply could have used a tad more unique options - some archetype are simply not that compelling, the traits don't live up to their name or could (in the Kariv's case) be considered rather strong. The Shrive's exceedingly awesome concept also asks for a better array of exclusive tools. What's imho the worst, though, is that the pdf is extremely focused on centaurs - the other races & ethnicities are more or less glanced at. Which would not be that bad, would not all races herein lack age, height and weight tables AND would the pdf not fail to address the problems adventuring centaurs will inevitably face - whether by ladders or simple tunnel-size. Some magical items or abilities to deal with that or advice for players and DMs would have been very much justified in this particular case.


All in all, the Midgard Player's Guide to the Rothenian Plains left me neither blown away, nor disillusioned - it remains a solid selection of crunch with some neat Midgard fluff strewn in, but also falls short of making for a truly excellent Player's Guide since it fails to modify the formula of the series to the unique challenges the material herein poses - not only via the Centaurs, but also via the human ethnicities: Where are the Status-rating-modifications for example? Crab-Divination? Perhaps exiled Kariv divining via the dread spiders? A tad more balance between the racial material would have gone a long way here. My final verdict, taking these into account as well as e.g. the age, height, weight etc. absence, minor glitches etc. will clock in at 3 stars.


Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Midgard: Player's Guide to the Rothenian Plains
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Advanced Races 6: Kobolds (Pathfinder RPG)
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/06/2013 15:05:41

What do you think when someone says 'Kobold'? Do you reach automatically for your sword? This book may not change your mind, but it will give you greater insight into what those scaly little fellows are all about.


Or even inspire you to play one, if your GM permits...


Or if you ARE a GM, it should help you bring them to life, for at least as long as it takes the party to get their slaying faces on.


Kobolds are portrayed as desperate survivors, ones who cannot even rely on those who hatched out of the same clutch of eggs, never mind the same species. This has bred into them innate cunning and wariness. Here you can read all about the life of a kobold from its hatching to old age (if it lives that long), their religious beliefs, and their place in Midgard (if you use that setting).


There's a section on kobolds as player-characters, which includes a very complex kobold name-generating table (well, roll percentage dice four times). For kobolds not only have given names they also have descriptive nicknames or sobriquets that they acquire based on appearance or behaviour. Interestingly, they do not seem to go in for family names. Perhaps it is just that they do not have much sense of family! In game mechanical terms, the sobriquet can suggest a trait; and there's a list of kobold-specific traits associated with some of the more common sobriquets as well as other more general racial traits that may be used if preferred.


Next comes an extensive list of kobold feats. Some are restricted to kobolds, but others are open to anyone who meets the prerequisites... although actually learning them could prove interesting if you need to find a kobold teacher! Several are based on kobold talents at fighting dirty and apparently the little beasts are good at using their claws to climb. Several kobold archetypes are provided including an archanomechanist and a clockwork alchemist - smart kobolds can come up with some really interesting ideas, it seems. But there are several combat-oriented archetypes as well, possibly fitting the common perception of the small, ferocious, cowardly creature many adventurers hold.


New spells, kobold equipment and a fascinating discourse about the traps that they manufacture follow; and finally there are some magic items.


All in all, a fascinating glimpse at the secret life of the kobold. Your first thought may still be to clobber one as soon as you see it, but you'll know a bit more about them after reading this!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Advanced Races 6: Kobolds (Pathfinder RPG)
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New Paths 7: Expanded White Necromancer (Pathfinder RPG)
by Timothy B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/24/2013 19:35:17

Influenced by the necromancer class in Diablo 2, I've had a player who has longed to play a heroic necromancer for a couple of years, now. The White Necromancer by Kobold Press allows him to do exactly that. He's quite pleased with his huginn necromancer. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in playing a very different twist on necromancers than the typical D&D/Pathfinder villains.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
New Paths 7: Expanded White Necromancer (Pathfinder RPG)
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KOBOLD Guide to Game Design, Vol. 3: Tools & Techniques
by Brian F. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/22/2013 11:40:01

The kobolds are back with another amazing collection of twelve thought-provoking and informative essays from some of the best designers and writers creating roleplaying game material today. The essays cover everything from the simple question of “What is Design?” and work through contentious topics of creativity, craft, and how to recover when things don’t go well. Anyone who’s tried to write professionally understands the power of the blank page, rejection, and the unforgiving and untapped potential of any great idea you can’t quite find the words to express, but it’s a rare treat to get advice from some of the stars of the roleplaying game industry to address those problems. It’s nice to know the kobolds care.


As someone who aspires to be a game designer and writer, I find that rules are hard for me and settings are relatively easy. So as I perused the pages of the guide, I found myself trolling for tips and tricks to simplify my rules process and make finishing projects more of a reality than a wish. With that in mind, I will avoid talking about each essay in depth and instead focus on a couple that I found particularly helpful.


Wolfgang Baur has worked on some of my favorite gaming projects over the years, from the original Planescape line at TSR to adventures for Alternity, Call of Cthulhu, Pathfinder, and a whole lot of D&D. He’s edited the Kobold Quarterly, Dragon, and Dungeon magazines and is the publisher and founder of Open Design – a collaborative game design company. Oh, and in his spare time he publishes the Kobold Guide to Game Design series.


Baur’s essay “What is Design?” tries to define a term that doesn’t lend itself well to a definition unless you have context on your side. In this context, he defines it as “its own discipline, but it always borrows and builds on other modes of creative work.” What does that mean in terms of roleplaying games (RPGs)? It means there has to be a balance between rules and setting. When they are out of balance, you can end up with a less than fun experience for your gamemaster (GM) and his or her players, which may cost you fans or customers. Rules must be focused on the setting and the setting must keep the rules in mind at all times. It’s a balance I know I’ve not yet achieved in my own games.


The other essays build on Baur’s beginning, covering the similarities between designing RPGs for the computer and for the tabletop; the basics of combat systems; the power of a good design, hook and dastardly plot; and the fun and heartbreak inherent in collaboration and any creative enterprise. Each essay is lovingly crafted by a master in RPGs today who knows what they’re talking about.


The other essay that really got my attention was “Basic Combat Systems for Tabletop Games” by Colin McComb. As I said earlier, system design is my Achilles’ heel. McComb manages to explain, in a Q&A-type of format, what you need to know about attack systems, who attacks and when, how things like area of effect attacks affect a group of targets, how to measure the consequences of combat through permanent or temporary damage, and so on. He then lays out a sample system using his own rules (minus stringent playtesting) to show how the questions can help you come up with a working system. The practical aspect of the article provides a ton of hints and help to avoid the common problems that plague beginning system designers (like myself).


Colin McComb was involved in 2nd Edition Dungeons & Dragons, but helped create one of my favorite settings for that edition – Planescape – and even helped with two of my favorite computer games of all time – Planescape: Torment and Fallout 2.


Rob Heinsoo has been involved with the 4th Edition of D&D and seems to have written half the sourcebooks that have been published so far. He’s the force behind the D&D Miniatures game and its first nine expansion sets. And if that’s not enough, he’s worked at Daedalus Entertainment, Chaosium, and A-Sharp in the 1990s.


Ed Greenwood is simply a legend in the gaming industry. Not only is he the author behind the Elminster Series, including Elminster: The Making of a Mage and Elminster’s Daughter, but he’s written hundreds of articles about gaming and continues to GM his own campaign. Where does he find the time when he’s typically writing three novels at a time?


And Monte Cook… What can I say about Monte? When 3rd Edition D&D and the d20 system came out, he was one of the three principle designers behind the efforts. And since then, with his own design studio Malhavoc Press, he’s managed to create several award-winning products such as Monte Cook’s Arcana Evolved, Ptolus, and the Books of Eldrich Might. In my opinion, he has one of the most unique voices among the game designers of today.


If you’re a GM, a game designer, or a RPG player interested in getting into the design side of how to create your own games – you can’t find a better introduction than The Kobold Guide to Game Design – Volume III: Tools & Techniques. These 96 pages will provide infinite food for thought and hopefully save you some pain and suffering along the way. I certainly have a lot to think about now…


As a final note, I think that kobold on the inside cover is up to something… don’t you?


Article first published as here on Blogcritics.org: http://blogcritics.org/rpg-book-review-the-kobold-guide/-



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
KOBOLD Guide to Game Design, Vol. 3: Tools & Techniques
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Sunken Empires
by Brian F. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/22/2013 11:38:22

Ever since college when I actually started having the extra money to do so, I’ve been drawn to game stores and hunting for unique supplements. Adventures, gazettes, simple collections of maps – each has its own attraction for me. As such, I have ended up with a wide variety of books, pamphlets, and PDFs that each holds a particular fascination.


Open Design’s recent release of Sunken Empires: Treasures and Terrors of the Deep encompasses the perfect storm of history, art, and implementation that makes a supplement not only a useful tool for gamemasters to terrorize their players from time to time but a great read as well. From the forward by David “Zeb” Cook to the chapters on dealing with the deep and its denizens held my attention to the very end, which is a rarity in any supplement.


Beginning with Cook’s introduction – “A History of the Aboleth” – I felt I was being let into a tomb of previously unknown horrors. I honestly can’t recall if I’d heard of the Aboleth as a creature prior to reading Sunken Empires, but now I know it has a place in the occasional nightmare realms players may find born of my own freakishly random firing neurons. The story of how the creature came about provided crucial clues to crafting hooks and monsters without filling in absolutely all the details – leaving the rest to the players encountering such vile critters.


And Brandon Hodge takes things from there, weaving a storyteller’s spell upon the reader and introducing them to the aspects of Atlantis, Lemuria, and Mu from tales both ancient (Plato’s tales of at Atlantis) and relatively recent (H.P. Lovecraft adapting Mu into the Cthulhu mythos). Hodge then takes it a step further to create the lost city of Ankeshel and the modern cities of Upper and Lower Cassadega now exploring the submerged ruins and learning a few of Ankeshel’s mysteries.


After that, he provides all an enterprising GM would need to torture entertain his or her players with hints of powerful artifacts and spells from the distant past just waiting to be discovered by an enterprising band of adventurers. We have the half-merfolk Maerean peoples working both above and below the waters as well as new paths for other races and classes… I was particularly fascinated by the description of how Monks are entranced by undersea ruins – “drawn by the promise of lost knowledge and paths of enlightenment cultivated by ancient civilizations.” I’d not considered monks in that light before and yet I may start doing so…


Chapter 3 provides not only equipment for adventures daring to explore the sunken ruins, but by what they may find. The lure of lost technology provides not only interesting magic items, but the almost Steampunk-influenced weapons of a much more advanced race. And the weapons don’t disappoint… rifles that fire magically-created ice slivers, methods of crowd control, and even a magical/mechanical method of duplicating a Dispel Magic spell. Very creative items indeed.


Spellcasters aren’t forgotten either, with new spells provided for Bards, Clerics, Druids, Sorcerers, Wizards, and even Rangers. The Druid spells provide water-related magical effects such as Barnacle Armor, Wall of Water, and Calm the Waves. I was a bit disappointed by the small number of Ranger spells (there are only two) and wondered if as a GM I might consider creating additional powers for those adventurers used to prowling the underwater wilderness. Of course the Sorcerer/Wizard list was the most impressive, including more than 30 new spells for those classes.


The list of new magic items was definitely fun to peruse… Though I felt like I needed a much bigger bankroll to be wandering the aisles for many of the items costing 10,000 gold pieces or more. Even so, as a fighter who wouldn’t want a heavy steel shield shaped as a writhing squid that 3x a day could try to disarm your enemies!


If you plan on running any adventures in the split city of Cassadega, Chapter 5 is a must read. It provides much needed guidance on how to handle different levels of parties adventuring in or near the sunken ruins. Though that discussion is little more than a page, it provides answers to many of the problems parties may encounter if they are outmatched by the environment they find themselves in. Hodge goes so far as to provide random encounter tables for the coast and the underdeep that would scare the heck out of me as a player. Everything from plant life trying to kill you to a shoggoth waiting to devour you and your party as an hors d’oeuvre.


Lastly, Chapter 6 provides a description of the many critters you may encounter above or below the waves in these areas. Everything from a Bone Crab to a Wharfling Swarm (described as a huge number of hairless underwater raccoons with needle-like teeth) and aquatic variants of other creatures such as a Needlefish Swarm (a variant of Bat Swarm), a Slick (a Black Pudding variant), or a Giant Trilobite (variant of a Giant Centipede). And then of course there’s the Aboleth… I certainly wouldn’t want to encounter one in a dark, submerged alley.


Honestly, I was very impressed by Sunken Empires. It provides enough “crunch” for an enterprising GM to take it and merge it into his or her own game world quite easily. And if done right, a GM would have potentially years of gaming to explore all the dark corners of the Ankeshel ruins. I did find a few typos here and there, but nothing earth shattering that prevented my understanding of the content. And the artwork for the book was amazing from Malcolm McClinton (awesome cover art), Thomas Cole, Hodge himself, Pat Loboyko, and Hugo Solis.


If you’re looking for a new supplement and you think you want your players to get wet, scared, or both – I’d encourage you to check out Sunken Empires from Open Design and Brandon Hodge. Look for it at Paizo Publishing, RPGNow, and Kobold Quarterly!


This article first appeared at BlogCritics.org here: http://blogcritics.org/rpg-book-review-sunken-empires-b-
y/



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Sunken Empires
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Kobold Quarterly Magazine 13
by Brian F. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 11/22/2013 11:36:32

The good people at Kobold Quarterly are at it again, producing another fine issue of their roleplaying games (RPG) magazine. However, I have to warn you – perhaps this issue should have come in a paper wrapper because of the cover. The cover art features a scene right out of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, a forest clearing teeming with fae-looking folk, satyrs, unicorns, and other critters all getting ready to party. Now, there are some carefully placed shadows, hair, and arms, but it’s tough to ignore that a good number attending the revelry are stark naked.


Before anyone gets up in arms, I’m not a prude. But my concern would be for those game stores who carry KQ on their shelves and the pre-teen and teenage gamers who shop there. If we want our industry to be taken seriously, it’s tough if one of our best magazines (who have taken over for the once great Dragon and Dungeon publications from TSR/Wizards of the Coast/Paizo Publishing) is presenting Boris Vallejo-style pictures without properly warning folks first.


Yes, this issue does deal with sex and romance in RPGs, but you could warn a fella first. It’s funny, because I don’t typically object to magazine covers. Many of the KQ covers have been suggestive, but not objectionable. I guess it’s the pure… nakedness… that bugged me here.


That said, the articles inside this issue are the typical top-rate variety that you expect from KQ. And alongside the articles about sex and romance, there are articles about gnomish flying machines, magic weapons, and some darker material about creatures like the Shoggoth and using Lovecraftian Gods in 4th Edition Dungeons & Dragons. Again, the mix of content is amazing and thought provoking as always.


Who knew the ecology and psychology of Shoggoths was a topic that needed exploration? These are vile creatures from H.P. Lovecraft‘s Cthulhu Mythos who can now be injected into your own RPG campaigns to add some additional “ick” factor if you need it. “Ecology of the Shoggoth” by Phillip Larwood describes shoggoths as an intelligent ooze that consume living tissue or material and add it to their bulk. But just because they’re intelligent doesn’t mean you can have a conversation with one if you see it sliming down the street. These grotesque creatures embody chaos itself and leave a path of destruction and insanity in their wake. Larwood introduces the concept of cults to these strange creatures who actually feed and worship them… not the kind of folks you want to take home to eat meet your mother.


And if that wasn’t enough to scare your players, Aeryn Rudel describes the properties of some of the Cthulhu elder god and some of the qualities of their worshippers in his article “Lovecraftian Gods”. These gods cover everything from chaos to true evil and I wouldn’t want to run into them in a dark alley. No goody-two-shoes gods here. I do wonder a bit at the game balance qualities of some of the powers the faithful get from these divinities. Things like the Veil of ‘Umr at-Tawil would drive me nuts as a GM or a player for example (a blue silk veil that gives the ability to see all possible actions an enemy may take and then interrupt them), but it’s nice to have additional options.


As a game designer contemplating a Steampunk setting, David Mallon’s article for Pathfinder – “The Arquebusier” – was intriguing. Introducing a class proficient with early firearms such as the Musket and Blunderbuss would certainly add numerous options to a game world. And some of the new feats included, such as Double Tap and Bulletcrafting make this class much more well rounded – giving such a character the ability to not only create such weapons and ammunition, but have proficiency in using them in combat.


By far my favorite article in the issue was Monte Cook‘s “The Thrill of the Unknown” – which cuts to the heart of game setting design, which is one of my favorite things to do. Cook suggests that instead of illuminating all the corners of every dark place in the world, the element of the unknown needs to remain ever present. As he says – “Remember… that the power of the truly unknown is that, because it is entirely undefined, we can never grow accustomed to it.” When you know what’s coming, you can prepare for it. And that’s fine most of the time, but leave a bit of mystery where you and your players can explore it together.


If you’re looking for inspiration as a player or a GM, look no further than an issue of Kobold Quarterly, past or present. Every time I crack open a copy I learn something new or find a new way to look at things… Be sure to pick up your copy of Kobold Quarterly, Spring 2010, Issue 13 at a gaming store near you or online at KoboldQuarterly.com. Even with the questionable cover of this issue, you’re bound to find something fascinating!


This review originally appeared: http://www.gamekn-
ightreviews.com/2010/04/magazine-review-kobold-quarterly-spr-
ing-2010-issue-13/



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Kobold Quarterly Magazine 13
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