DriveThruRPG.com
Close
Close
Browse









Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
Psychedemia • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Winston C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/18/2015 14:14:43

Psychedemia is a marvelous gem of a setting with just a few flaws in the stone that need to be cut away. I really liked running this game, but I had to rewrite the storyline, fix inconsistency within the book, and beef up the psychic powers before anything worked right. Character creation is fine, walking you through the ordinary Phase Trio, but with a twist appropriate to the setting. Instead of being the cream of the crop, the party is set up as the rejects. These are the candidates that everyone else expects to wash out. Everything in the setting is stacked against them, from the faculty to the other students, to the mechanics of the game itself. There is potential here to engage your players in an uphill climb to victory instead of just slugging their way through the campaign. That part of the game really appeals to me.


Mechanics. The psychic powers in the game are really underpowered, especially compared to other games based around psychics. There are only three abilities: ESP, Psychokinesis, and Telepathy. You are given automatic rankings in the three psychic powers, but there are few reasons to invest in ESP and virtually no reason to invest in Telepathy. The problem is that these powers are essentially passive, serving as perception checks and defensive rolls; players don't get to actually use them for much of anything at all. It frustrated my players and really stripped the feeling of "being psychic" out of the game when they realized that their "psychic powers" were actually weaker and less useful than their regular skills.


Story and Setting. I really wanted a military academy war story. Instead, I got a peacenik view of war and the military in general. The setup and situation is really incredible. I love the potential of using the astral realm as a means of conflict and see many stories rising from the problems generated by battlefield that is inaccessible to adults. Unfortunately, the story carries a heavy bias against adults in general and the military in specific, to the point where the adult military are portrayed as bloodthirsty warmongers. It's very limiting, requiring you to tell the specific story in the book the way they have it written. The alien "threat" turns out to be a case of misunderstanding, a "spoiler" that's revealed in the first paragraph of the introduction. Conflict arises because the evil humans want to war against the peaceful aliens and must use their innocent children to do it. Maybe I'm old and know too much about politics, but I don't buy it.


A more serious flaw involves the way the astral realm is treated. The author can't seem to decide if it's a physical realm where you can actually go or the mental construct of a shared consciousness. It's written both ways inconsistently. Ultimately I just picked one paradigm and ran with it.


The author's single-minded focus on presenting an evil military results in one-dimensional and uninteresting characters on both sides of the story. There is great potential here for complex stories involving the kinds of real problems of self-identity and responsibility that teens face. They could be writ large against a backdrop where rampant hormones blow everything out of proportion and every decision can have catastrophically fatal consequences. The book missed the mark in presentation, but I give it full credit for inspiration. I thought many things about the premise were intriguing, but the book presented no interesting mechanical toys and insisted on developing the setting in a way into which I could not buy.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Psychedemia • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

The Three Rocketeers • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Bruce B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/17/2015 09:04:20

This is pretty glorious. Basically, everywhere Alexander Dumas might have mentioned counties, strike those and put in star systems instead. It's got lines like "The Vatican system was first explored by Star Pope Andromeda II when a catastrophic engine failure stranded her ship in the system." If this kind of thing works for you, then you'll be delighted to know that this book does it really well, really consistently. (If it doesn't, well, there'll be another book along in due season.) For some of us, this as very much as wanted and lovable as very different works like Mindjammer (which I just got done praising again earlier this morning).


There's also some neat game mechanics in here. This Fate riff uses six aspects, stunts, and nothing else. If you've seen the stuff Rob Donoghue's been doing with TinyFate and the like...yup, same kind of thing. I won't go on at length - you can check it out yourself. I will note that I love every permutation on the idea behind this example stunt:


Master of Disguise: Because I am a master of disguise with a knack for being in the right place at the right time, once per session I can join a scene already in progress, having posed as a minor character.


...because it so perfectly adapts a whole bunch of great dramatic/comedic moments to game play, and the game really supports it rather than making you struggle to get through unwarranted barriers.


As you'd expect, swordplay gets extra attention. Swordplay stunts combine four elements - appearance, edge (special tricks), main hand, and off-hand - into a single package. All Rocketeers have a swordplay stunt that models how they fight. For instance:


Subtle: Invoking your fencing aspect to create an advantage based on misdirection grants +3 instead of +2.
Perfect Footwork: When you succeed with style on defense, you may create a situation aspect with a free invocation instead of gaining a boost.
Small Sword: Gain +1 to attack an enemy who has already acted in the round.
Cloak: Gain +1 to create an advantage when you obfuscate your weapon.


(That's from the Rocketeer-version writeup of Aramis.)


Since there aren't skills to spend milestone advances on, you use milestones to add an additional entry to an element of your character's swordplay stunt.


As is of course necessary for Dumas-type action, there's fun handling of conspiracies:


In Three Rocketeers, conspiracies are modeled with aspects—alliance, goal, and weakness—and approaches—Influence, Might, Power, Reach, Resources, and Secrecy.


And there's a great adventure, and just loads for fun. I've said "fun" quite a few times in this post. Well, what can I say? This is a really fun book.


(Reposted from my Google+ stream, at https://plus.google.com/u/0/10712240343180692-
6287/posts/bHTpiNEhSCr
)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Three Rocketeers • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Eagle Eyes • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Bob H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 11/13/2015 16:39:43

The artwork is evocative of the setting ( a noirish , crime story ancient Rome ) and reinforces the setting also , lots of sahdow and darkness .
The writing all serves and informs the theme and feeds back into the setting .



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Eagle Eyes • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Monster of the Week
by Christopher V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/30/2015 15:28:17

This game turned out to be more fun that I initially thought it would be. I was attracted to it because I enjoy the Apocalypse World system, and have had some success running Dungeon World with mixed groups of experienced players and totally new players. None of us are that into the monster shows this game is trying to emulate, and it seemed that the setup was more on rails than our DW adventures. Well, we played this originally as a Halloween special, but everyone had so much fun we will definitely be bringing those characters back.


The book guides you nicely through mystery preparation, and provides a simple sheet to keep it organized. Armed with that and a few location ideas, you are good to go. Let the players off the leash and play to find out what happens. The playbooks are great. There are a ton of choices and the players can really flesh them out with their cool ideas.


As usual with these games, if you have strong player buy-in everyone is going to have a great time.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Monster of the Week
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Aether Sea • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Thomas P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/23/2015 19:13:10

Great setting, reminds me of Star Wars meets Treasure Planet or something. My kids & I liked the (free) PDF so much that I actually went & purchased the physical book. I love the art & the concepts introduced here. My only criticism (hence not 5 stars) is a lack of detail. It would be great to have more example Aspects or Stunts for players to use, or more detail on the common technology available to characters or information on the various other cultures (like the Necrocracy mentioned in the adventure, sounds so cool!).


This is a common criticism from me towards most Fate supplements, so it is not unique to the Aether Sea. It's like saying, if you're familiar with the setting, you're fine & can come up with relevant Aspects & Stunts, otherwise, you need to make something up. Which is fine for some people, but for others, it means they're not going to be playing.


Still, a fine supplement!



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Aether Sea • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Eagle Eyes • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Michael J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/22/2015 20:20:29

As a fan of most of the mystery writers mentioned, I loved it. Thought it fit better in Fate Accelerated than Core. Glad it didn't include yet another version of the Cataline Conspiracy which has had at least six novels by six authors. Don't know why game authors are so fond of Noir, though, as I am not. But fortunately not too noir of a game, and easily ignores the noir.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Eagle Eyes • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Aether Sea • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Alexander K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/16/2015 14:57:48

This was the first pre-constructed Fate adventure I ran for my group.


Aether Sea honestly runs more like "out of the book" Fate Accelerated than "out of the book" Fate Core. It uses aspects rather than skills, but this was actually a plus for the group I ran it for. Character Creation (even with the addition of Fantasy Races) was a simple 20 minute process as we started playing.


The built in setting is an interesting Spelljammer-esque D&D takes to the stars concept. The included adventure can be short enough for a single night or stretch on for a couple days depending on your group. Creative GMs will also find enough suggested behind the scenes to stretch the adventure into an ongoing campaign.


This product is definitely worth putting a few dollars toward.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Aether Sea • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Fate Accelerated Edition
by Rix W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 10/02/2015 13:49:42

I'm a huge fan of Fate Core, and I wanted to give this slimmed down version a try. While some things you might be used to in an RPG like "rolling for Lore" don't quite fit this model and have to be reworked (which can be a good thing,) pretty much everything else you want a player to do (as an active action) is simplified greatly in Fate Accelerated. I ran this with a group of people who had never played a tabletop game before, and in 5 minutes, I had them invested in the story and making choices for their characters while accepting what the dice revealed as the story progressed. I don't think FAE replaces Fate Core for every story possibility, but there are some circumstances where it just can't be beat for it's elegance and simplicity.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fate Accelerated Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

SLIP • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Jacob P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/26/2015 13:58:55

Basically it is...well, its not all that basic, really. The earth is being invaded by horrors from beyond the universe(or something), and you characters play the folks who try and stop that. You can have special powers related to moving between realities and otherworldly knowledge, though you don't need to take them. It reminds me a great deal of Nightbane(or Nightspawn to you Palladium purists out there), only without the Nightbane. I think it would be fun to add in some conspiracy stuff from eagle eyes and maybe add in some powers or abilities from a few other Fate add-ons and make a really bizarre game of weirdness and horror. As it stands this is a really solid game and I recommend it.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
SLIP • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Psychedemia • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Jacob P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/26/2015 13:46:02

A little bit Harry Potter, a little bit Ender's Game, and a whole lot of Bad News Bears. I really dig the set up and the rules. You play a bunch of psychics in the future where mankind has contacted alien life that exists in, or interacts with, more than the understood four dimensions of the universe. Your characters are not the best and the brightest, they are not the chosen of prophesy, they aren't even the most driven to succeed. No your characters are the psychics they would have never brought on board if they had enough psychics to be picky. They don't and you are the last worst choice for peace. Their are other student groups who are far better than you, and they know it. Mechanics-wise the skill number has been reduced to nine skills plus three psychic skills. I really like this setup and as I read it I got to thinking that I would probably use nine skills for a hack at sometime in the future. The psychic skills are interesting and fun, and the alien races and The Realm(weird multidimensional psychic space) are spiffy. Check the game out, I don't think you will be disappointed.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Psychedemia • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Masters of Umdaar • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Peter D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/25/2015 10:59:03

Loving this fun evocation of adventure story tropes, from Edgar Rice Burroughs through Thundercats & Avatar to Dark Crystal resonances in the setting. The character creation pushes towards the nicely odd, looking forward to hitting up my players with some cliffhangers from the new system. Thoroughly recommended.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Masters of Umdaar • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

The Secrets of Cats • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
by Russell G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 09/20/2015 14:42:47

Didn't think much of this setting at first glance. Picked it up because it was cheap. Then I read it and absolutely loved it. Went back and pitched in more money which, hopefully, will go toward more add-ons and supplements for it. Even bought a physical copy.


The setting is brilliant and original and is brimming with ideas and plot seeds that are fertile ground for GMs to make this setting their own.


The mechanics are lightweight enough to not get bogged down in rules interpretations but have enough "crunch" to allow each character to shine with their own unique skill sets and strengths.


Pound for pound, one of the best game settings I've seen in recent memory.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Secrets of Cats • A World of Adventure for Fate Core
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Designers & Dragons: The 00s
by Roger (. L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/19/2015 02:56:03

Vor über vierzig Jahren erfand TSR mit Dungeons and Dragons das Rollenspiel. Seitdem haben zahlreiche Verlage, Autoren und Produktlinien dieses Hobby bereichert, ebenso viele sind wieder von der Bildfläche verschwunden. Die Reihe Designers and Dragons strebt an, die bewegte Historie dieser Branche so ausführlich aufzuzeichnen wie nie zuvor.


Rezension: Designers and Dragons – Die Geschichte des Rollenspiels


Im Herbst 2006 begann Autor Shannon Appelcline eine neue Kolumne auf rpg.net mit dem Titel „A brief history of the game“, in der er die Geschichte diverser namhafter Rollenspielverlage detailliert aufzeichnete. Diese Serie wurde schließlich 2011 in einem üppigen Hardcover von Mongoose Publishing unter dem Titel Designers and Dragons auch in Buchform veröffentlicht. Im Herbst 2014 wurde das Projekt dann von Evil Hat Productions nach einem sehr erfolgreichen Kickstarter in einer zweiten, überarbeiteten und großzügig ergänzten Auflage herausgegeben.


Inhalte
Die gesamte Reihe Designers and Dragons besteht aus vier dicken Softcover-Bänden, von denen jeder ein Jahrzehnt umfasst. Ausschlaggebend ist dabei das Gründungsjahr der beschriebenen Verlage, egal wie lange sie sich halten konnten: So findet sich die Firmengeschichte von TSR (1973-1997) im Band der 70er, während die von Wizards of the Coast (1990 – heute) – die ja erst mit der Veröffentlichung von Dungeons and Dragons 3e im Jahr 2000 zu einem der wichtigsten Häuser im Hobby aufstiegen – im Band der 90er auftaucht.


Die Serie nimmt sich aber nicht nur der großen Namen an: In dieser überarbeiteten Fassung kommen auch zahlreiche kleine Verlage zur Geltung, die nachhaltigen Einfluss auf das Rollenspiel hatten: So lassen sich beispielsweise die ersten Ideen, die schließlich in TSRs Dragonlance münden sollten, in der Geschichte von Tracy Hickmans erster Firma Day Star West Media nachlesen. Ein anderes Beispiel ist der kurzlebige Verlag SkyRealms Publishing, der durch sein originelles und durchdachtes Setting von Skyrealms of Jorune spätere Systeme wie Ars Magica oder Vampire: The Masquerade beeinflusste.


Der Schwerpunkt von Designers and Dragons liegt dabei aber klar auf dem englischsprachigen Markt. Der Großteil der Serie ist natürlich den us-amerikanischen Verlagen gewidmet, aber auch wichtige englische Häuser wie Games Workshop, Mongoose Publishing oder Cubicle 7 werden beleuchtet.
Nur selten werden auch Verlage aus anderen Ländern erwähnt, weil ein von dort stammendes System über eine englischsprachige Firma seinen Weg in die Staaten gefunden hat. Selbst dann bleiben sie oft nur Randnotizen, wie etwa die in den 90ern erschienenen Systeme französischen Ursprungs: Nephilim bei Chaosium, Metabarons bei der zweiten Inkarnation von West End Games und In Nomine mit einem eigenen System bei Steve Jackson Games. Der Verlag Metropolis erhält dank der Übersetzung des schwedischen Horrorrollenspiels Kult ein eigenes Kapitel, ebenso FanPro LLC, dank der Übernahme von FASAs Rollenspiellizenz für Shadowrun.


Als roter Faden ziehen sich durch alle vier Bände auch die weitreichenden Trends und Ereignisse, denen sich kein Verlag entziehen konnte, und vermitteln so einen sehr guten Überblick für die gesamte Situation des Hobbies in den jeweiligen Jahrzehnten.
So bekommt man etwa ein Gefühl dafür, wie unbedarft die 70er noch waren, was das Potential dieses neuen Spielgenres anging, und so die Entstehung von Drittpublikationen durch Verlage wie Judges Guild ermöglichten. In den 80ern sieht man, wie der Markt aufblühte und diverse Genres für sich entdeckte, auch hatte die Kundschaft kein Problem mit komplexen Systemen wie GURPS, Champions oder Rolemaster. In den 90er Jahren ging der Erfolg der Sammelkartenspiele an keinem Verlag vorbei, für viele altehrwürdige Namen wie GDW, West End Games oder ICE bedeutete er sogar das Ende. In den 2000ern schließlich erhält man einen umfassenden Blick auf die Auswirkungen der großen Publikationsblase, die die offene d20-Lizenz von Dungeons and Dragons mit sich brachte; aber auch das Aufkommen der kleinen Indie-Publikationen erhält gebührende Beachtung.


Neben diesen großen Strömungen und Phänomenen vergisst Autor Appelcline aber nie den Blick für Details. Wichtige personelle Veränderungen, Verhandlungen zu Übernahmen und Lizenzen oder der Beginn von Entwicklungsphasen lange vor der eigentlichen Veröffentlichung werden ausführlich dargestellt. Bei wichtigen Produkten werden zumindest die wichtigsten Neuerungen und Innovationen erläutert, die nachhaltigen Einfluss auf das Hobby haben sollten. Auch Erweiterungen der Produktpalette um Brett- oder Kartenspiele fehlen nicht. So entsteht für jeden beschriebenen Verlag ein eindrucksvolles Gesamtbild über dessen Entwicklung, inklusive sich anbahnender Erfolge oder Fehlentscheidungen.


Auch wenn das Sujet der Firmenhistorien zunächst als trockene Materie anmutet, so gelingt es Shannon Appelcline durch seinen sehr präzisen Schreibstil und hervorragenden Aufbau stets, einen spannenden roten Faden zu erschaffen, der den Leser Seite für Seite fesselt. Dabei verliert man auch nie den Überblick der manchmal unübersichtlichen Verknüpfungen zwischen Verlagen, Autoren und Lizenzen: Sorgfältig verweisen kurze Nebensätze darauf, wo deren Geschichte den aktuell beschriebenen Verlag verlässt und in einem anderen Kapitel wieder auftauchen wird. Ein kurzer Kasten am Kapitelende beinhaltet zudem alle Verweise, an welcher Stelle man die Lektüre fortsetzen kann, um einem erwähnten Designer oder der Geschichte einer Lizenz zu folgen, sei es im gleichen oder einem anderen Band.


Allerdings merkt man nebenbei auch, dass unser kleines Nischenhobby doch erstaunlich schnelllebig ist: Designers and Dragons betrachtet die Branche nur bis zu seinem Veröffentlichungsjahr 2014, so dass das im Folgejahr erschienene Dungeons and Dragons 5e nur in seiner Entwicklungsphase als DnD Next Erwähnung findet, oder das unlängst durch sein Auftauchen in Wil Wheatons Tabletop bekannt gewordene Fantasy Age gänzlich fehlt.


Die Beschreibungen der einzelnen Verlage sind je Band nicht einfach nur chronologisch nach Gründungsjahr sortiert, stattdessen fasst Shannon Appelcline sie immer nach übergeordneten Gemeinsamkeiten und Phasen in der Entwicklung des Hobbies zusammen. Nehmen wir als Beispiel Band 1 über die 70er: Dieser ist in vier Teile gegliedert und behandelt zuerst Gründervater TSR, darauf folgt die erste Welle von Verlagen, die auf das neue Genre des Rollenspiels aufsprangen, wie etwa Flying Buffalo oder Judges Guild. Teil 3 erzählt von Verlagen wie Metagaming Concepts oder Chaosium, die ihren Ursprung im Wargaming haben, um schließlich in Teil 4 von universellen Verlagen wie Grimoire Games oder Midkemia Press zu berichten.


Eingeleitet wird jeder Band durch ein Vorwort, das stets von einem Designer verfasst wurde, der das jeweilige Jahrzehnt maßgeblich geprägt hat; so etwa Glorantha-Erfinder Greg Stafford für die 70er oder der Gründer von Wizards of the Coast Peter Adkinson für die 90er. Zwei Anhänge vervollständigen jedes Buch: Der eine bietet 10 kurze Besonderheiten über den Stand des Hobbies und der Industrie im jeweiligen Jahrzehnt, im anderen werden die zahlreichen Quellen aufgelistet. Darauf folgt noch ein umfangreicher Index, der penibel die Namen jedes in einem Band erwähnten Verlags, Autors, Systems und sogar Produkttitels nachschlagen lässt.


Nutzen
Designers and Dragons ist nicht einfach nur die Sammlung von isolierten Firmenhistorien, stattdessen vermittelt die Serie einen hervorragenden Überblick über das gesamte Hobby. Verknüpfungen der Verlage untereinander werden gut deutlich, trotz des Umfangs von vier Bänden erhält man dank der vielen Querverweise und Detailbeschreibungen zum Wechsel von Designern, Lizenzen und Produktlinien ein umfassendes Gesamtbild.


Auch viele Publikationsentscheidungen, die bei ihrer Veröffentlichung für Überraschung, Verwirrung oder Kritik gesorgt haben, werden durch die Darstellung der Details im Hintergrund nachvollziehbar. So war für mich persönlich beispielsweise die ausführliche Erläuterung des Einflusses von Konzernriese Hasbro auf Wizards of the Coast eine sehr erhellende Lektüre.


Zuletzt zieht sich unterschwellig noch eine weitere Erkenntnis durch die vier Bände von Designers and Dragons: Auch wenn es immer wieder Verlage gibt, die durch kluge Geschäftsentscheidungen oder hochwertige Qualität sehr erfolgreich sind, so bleibt diese Branche doch letztlich vor allem eines: das Werk leidenschaftlicher Rollenspieler, die voller Enthusiasmus den Sprung vom heimischen Spieltisch in die Geschäftswelt gewagt haben.


Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis
Jeder einzelne Band von Designers and Dragons besticht durch einen enormen Umfang, der den Leser für geraume Zeit beschäftigen wird. Sowohl zum Preis für die physische (rund 20 EUR) als auch für die günstigere digitale Fassung (10 USD) erwirbt man außerordentlich viel Inhalt für sein Geld, zumal diverse andere Rollenspielprodukte oder Taschenbücher zu vergleichbaren Preisen mit dünner ausfallen.


Erscheinungsbild
Jedes der vier Softcover-Bücher misst 6 mal 9 Zoll und ist damit etwas größer als DIN A5. Der Einband ist vierfarbig mit einer sehr stimmungsvollen Illustration von Andrew Bosley. Das Motiv gibt zudem auch die großen Trends des beschriebenen Jahrzehnts wieder: So sieht man auf dem Titel des ersten Bands zu den 70ern, in denen Dungeons & Dragons alles dominierte, fantastische Recken im Kampf gegen einen Drachen, während der dritten Band über die 90er, geprägt von White Wolfs World of Darkness, übernatürliche Kreaturen im Wettstreit abbildet. Zudem verwendet jeder Einband eine andere Primärfarbe, was für eine noch prägnantere Unterscheidung sorgt.


Das Innenleben von Designers and Dragons ist vollständig in schwarz-weiß gehalten. Der Text ist der Buchgröße angemessen einspaltig gesetzt und wird immer wieder von den Titelbildern der Produkte, die gerade thematisiert werden, aufgelockert. Die regelmäßige Unterteilung der jeweiligen Verlagskapitel in mit eigenen Überschriften versehene Abschnitte lockert den Lesefluss zusätzlich auf, ebenso die in kursiv abgesetzten Zitate, die in den Text eingestreut sind.
Diese sachliche Schlichtheit ist dem Thema der vier Bände durchaus angemessen – die Serie brilliert durch Recherche und Schreibstil, nicht durch ihre Optik.


Die jeweiligen PDF-Fassungen präsentieren sich ähnlich einfach: Ebenen sind nicht vorhanden, auch nutzen die Dateien nicht die Möglichkeit von Verknüpfungen innerhalb des Dokuments. Gerade der sehr umfangreiche Index sowie die Empfehlungskästen an jedem Kapitelende, wo man nach gewünschtem Stichwort weiterlesen kann, hätten sich hierfür angeboten. Dafür sind die Lesezeichen vorbildlich gesetzt und ermöglichen über drei Stufen die Kapitel, Verlage und Abschnitte direkt aufzurufen.


Fazit
Designers and Dragons wirbt damit, dem Leser alles über die Entstehung des Rollenspielhobbies zu vermitteln, was man je wissen möchte, und schafft dies auf ganzer Linie. Die vier Bände spannen einen fesselnden Bogen über vier Jahrzehnte und vermitteln sowohl einen detaillierten Blick in die Geschichte der jeweiligen Verlage als auch ein Gesamtbild über die Entwicklungen der ganzen Branche. Der präzise, nie unnötig trockene Schreibstil trägt dazu bei, dass die Lektüre stets ein wahres Vergnügen ist.


Der Fokus liegt dabei deutlich bei den Machern aus dem englischsprachigen Raum, wichtige Systeme anderer Länder werden nur am Rande erwähnt, so sie ihren Weg in die USA gefunden haben. Bedenkt man aber die überwältigende Bedeutung, die der US-Markt stets in diesem Hobby hatte, und dass auch kleinere einflussreiche Verlage in diesen Bänden beleuchtet werden, so mag man diesen Makel gern verzeihen.


Auch wenn sich Designers and Dragons optisch eher zweckmäßig schlicht gibt, so ist sein Innenleben tatsächlich die umfassendste Beschreibung über die Entstehung unseres Hobbies, die ich jedem nur ans Herz legen kann.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Designers & Dragons: The 00s
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Designers & Dragons: The 90s
by Roger (. L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/19/2015 02:55:43

Vor über vierzig Jahren erfand TSR mit Dungeons and Dragons das Rollenspiel. Seitdem haben zahlreiche Verlage, Autoren und Produktlinien dieses Hobby bereichert, ebenso viele sind wieder von der Bildfläche verschwunden. Die Reihe Designers and Dragons strebt an, die bewegte Historie dieser Branche so ausführlich aufzuzeichnen wie nie zuvor.


Rezension: Designers and Dragons – Die Geschichte des Rollenspiels


Im Herbst 2006 begann Autor Shannon Appelcline eine neue Kolumne auf rpg.net mit dem Titel „A brief history of the game“, in der er die Geschichte diverser namhafter Rollenspielverlage detailliert aufzeichnete. Diese Serie wurde schließlich 2011 in einem üppigen Hardcover von Mongoose Publishing unter dem Titel Designers and Dragons auch in Buchform veröffentlicht. Im Herbst 2014 wurde das Projekt dann von Evil Hat Productions nach einem sehr erfolgreichen Kickstarter in einer zweiten, überarbeiteten und großzügig ergänzten Auflage herausgegeben.


Inhalte
Die gesamte Reihe Designers and Dragons besteht aus vier dicken Softcover-Bänden, von denen jeder ein Jahrzehnt umfasst. Ausschlaggebend ist dabei das Gründungsjahr der beschriebenen Verlage, egal wie lange sie sich halten konnten: So findet sich die Firmengeschichte von TSR (1973-1997) im Band der 70er, während die von Wizards of the Coast (1990 – heute) – die ja erst mit der Veröffentlichung von Dungeons and Dragons 3e im Jahr 2000 zu einem der wichtigsten Häuser im Hobby aufstiegen – im Band der 90er auftaucht.


Die Serie nimmt sich aber nicht nur der großen Namen an: In dieser überarbeiteten Fassung kommen auch zahlreiche kleine Verlage zur Geltung, die nachhaltigen Einfluss auf das Rollenspiel hatten: So lassen sich beispielsweise die ersten Ideen, die schließlich in TSRs Dragonlance münden sollten, in der Geschichte von Tracy Hickmans erster Firma Day Star West Media nachlesen. Ein anderes Beispiel ist der kurzlebige Verlag SkyRealms Publishing, der durch sein originelles und durchdachtes Setting von Skyrealms of Jorune spätere Systeme wie Ars Magica oder Vampire: The Masquerade beeinflusste.


Der Schwerpunkt von Designers and Dragons liegt dabei aber klar auf dem englischsprachigen Markt. Der Großteil der Serie ist natürlich den us-amerikanischen Verlagen gewidmet, aber auch wichtige englische Häuser wie Games Workshop, Mongoose Publishing oder Cubicle 7 werden beleuchtet.
Nur selten werden auch Verlage aus anderen Ländern erwähnt, weil ein von dort stammendes System über eine englischsprachige Firma seinen Weg in die Staaten gefunden hat. Selbst dann bleiben sie oft nur Randnotizen, wie etwa die in den 90ern erschienenen Systeme französischen Ursprungs: Nephilim bei Chaosium, Metabarons bei der zweiten Inkarnation von West End Games und In Nomine mit einem eigenen System bei Steve Jackson Games. Der Verlag Metropolis erhält dank der Übersetzung des schwedischen Horrorrollenspiels Kult ein eigenes Kapitel, ebenso FanPro LLC, dank der Übernahme von FASAs Rollenspiellizenz für Shadowrun.


Als roter Faden ziehen sich durch alle vier Bände auch die weitreichenden Trends und Ereignisse, denen sich kein Verlag entziehen konnte, und vermitteln so einen sehr guten Überblick für die gesamte Situation des Hobbies in den jeweiligen Jahrzehnten.
So bekommt man etwa ein Gefühl dafür, wie unbedarft die 70er noch waren, was das Potential dieses neuen Spielgenres anging, und so die Entstehung von Drittpublikationen durch Verlage wie Judges Guild ermöglichten. In den 80ern sieht man, wie der Markt aufblühte und diverse Genres für sich entdeckte, auch hatte die Kundschaft kein Problem mit komplexen Systemen wie GURPS, Champions oder Rolemaster. In den 90er Jahren ging der Erfolg der Sammelkartenspiele an keinem Verlag vorbei, für viele altehrwürdige Namen wie GDW, West End Games oder ICE bedeutete er sogar das Ende. In den 2000ern schließlich erhält man einen umfassenden Blick auf die Auswirkungen der großen Publikationsblase, die die offene d20-Lizenz von Dungeons and Dragons mit sich brachte; aber auch das Aufkommen der kleinen Indie-Publikationen erhält gebührende Beachtung.


Neben diesen großen Strömungen und Phänomenen vergisst Autor Appelcline aber nie den Blick für Details. Wichtige personelle Veränderungen, Verhandlungen zu Übernahmen und Lizenzen oder der Beginn von Entwicklungsphasen lange vor der eigentlichen Veröffentlichung werden ausführlich dargestellt. Bei wichtigen Produkten werden zumindest die wichtigsten Neuerungen und Innovationen erläutert, die nachhaltigen Einfluss auf das Hobby haben sollten. Auch Erweiterungen der Produktpalette um Brett- oder Kartenspiele fehlen nicht. So entsteht für jeden beschriebenen Verlag ein eindrucksvolles Gesamtbild über dessen Entwicklung, inklusive sich anbahnender Erfolge oder Fehlentscheidungen.


Auch wenn das Sujet der Firmenhistorien zunächst als trockene Materie anmutet, so gelingt es Shannon Appelcline durch seinen sehr präzisen Schreibstil und hervorragenden Aufbau stets, einen spannenden roten Faden zu erschaffen, der den Leser Seite für Seite fesselt. Dabei verliert man auch nie den Überblick der manchmal unübersichtlichen Verknüpfungen zwischen Verlagen, Autoren und Lizenzen: Sorgfältig verweisen kurze Nebensätze darauf, wo deren Geschichte den aktuell beschriebenen Verlag verlässt und in einem anderen Kapitel wieder auftauchen wird. Ein kurzer Kasten am Kapitelende beinhaltet zudem alle Verweise, an welcher Stelle man die Lektüre fortsetzen kann, um einem erwähnten Designer oder der Geschichte einer Lizenz zu folgen, sei es im gleichen oder einem anderen Band.


Allerdings merkt man nebenbei auch, dass unser kleines Nischenhobby doch erstaunlich schnelllebig ist: Designers and Dragons betrachtet die Branche nur bis zu seinem Veröffentlichungsjahr 2014, so dass das im Folgejahr erschienene Dungeons and Dragons 5e nur in seiner Entwicklungsphase als DnD Next Erwähnung findet, oder das unlängst durch sein Auftauchen in Wil Wheatons Tabletop bekannt gewordene Fantasy Age gänzlich fehlt.


Die Beschreibungen der einzelnen Verlage sind je Band nicht einfach nur chronologisch nach Gründungsjahr sortiert, stattdessen fasst Shannon Appelcline sie immer nach übergeordneten Gemeinsamkeiten und Phasen in der Entwicklung des Hobbies zusammen. Nehmen wir als Beispiel Band 1 über die 70er: Dieser ist in vier Teile gegliedert und behandelt zuerst Gründervater TSR, darauf folgt die erste Welle von Verlagen, die auf das neue Genre des Rollenspiels aufsprangen, wie etwa Flying Buffalo oder Judges Guild. Teil 3 erzählt von Verlagen wie Metagaming Concepts oder Chaosium, die ihren Ursprung im Wargaming haben, um schließlich in Teil 4 von universellen Verlagen wie Grimoire Games oder Midkemia Press zu berichten.


Eingeleitet wird jeder Band durch ein Vorwort, das stets von einem Designer verfasst wurde, der das jeweilige Jahrzehnt maßgeblich geprägt hat; so etwa Glorantha-Erfinder Greg Stafford für die 70er oder der Gründer von Wizards of the Coast Peter Adkinson für die 90er. Zwei Anhänge vervollständigen jedes Buch: Der eine bietet 10 kurze Besonderheiten über den Stand des Hobbies und der Industrie im jeweiligen Jahrzehnt, im anderen werden die zahlreichen Quellen aufgelistet. Darauf folgt noch ein umfangreicher Index, der penibel die Namen jedes in einem Band erwähnten Verlags, Autors, Systems und sogar Produkttitels nachschlagen lässt.


Nutzen
Designers and Dragons ist nicht einfach nur die Sammlung von isolierten Firmenhistorien, stattdessen vermittelt die Serie einen hervorragenden Überblick über das gesamte Hobby. Verknüpfungen der Verlage untereinander werden gut deutlich, trotz des Umfangs von vier Bänden erhält man dank der vielen Querverweise und Detailbeschreibungen zum Wechsel von Designern, Lizenzen und Produktlinien ein umfassendes Gesamtbild.


Auch viele Publikationsentscheidungen, die bei ihrer Veröffentlichung für Überraschung, Verwirrung oder Kritik gesorgt haben, werden durch die Darstellung der Details im Hintergrund nachvollziehbar. So war für mich persönlich beispielsweise die ausführliche Erläuterung des Einflusses von Konzernriese Hasbro auf Wizards of the Coast eine sehr erhellende Lektüre.


Zuletzt zieht sich unterschwellig noch eine weitere Erkenntnis durch die vier Bände von Designers and Dragons: Auch wenn es immer wieder Verlage gibt, die durch kluge Geschäftsentscheidungen oder hochwertige Qualität sehr erfolgreich sind, so bleibt diese Branche doch letztlich vor allem eines: das Werk leidenschaftlicher Rollenspieler, die voller Enthusiasmus den Sprung vom heimischen Spieltisch in die Geschäftswelt gewagt haben.


Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis
Jeder einzelne Band von Designers and Dragons besticht durch einen enormen Umfang, der den Leser für geraume Zeit beschäftigen wird. Sowohl zum Preis für die physische (rund 20 EUR) als auch für die günstigere digitale Fassung (10 USD) erwirbt man außerordentlich viel Inhalt für sein Geld, zumal diverse andere Rollenspielprodukte oder Taschenbücher zu vergleichbaren Preisen mit dünner ausfallen.


Erscheinungsbild
Jedes der vier Softcover-Bücher misst 6 mal 9 Zoll und ist damit etwas größer als DIN A5. Der Einband ist vierfarbig mit einer sehr stimmungsvollen Illustration von Andrew Bosley. Das Motiv gibt zudem auch die großen Trends des beschriebenen Jahrzehnts wieder: So sieht man auf dem Titel des ersten Bands zu den 70ern, in denen Dungeons & Dragons alles dominierte, fantastische Recken im Kampf gegen einen Drachen, während der dritten Band über die 90er, geprägt von White Wolfs World of Darkness, übernatürliche Kreaturen im Wettstreit abbildet. Zudem verwendet jeder Einband eine andere Primärfarbe, was für eine noch prägnantere Unterscheidung sorgt.


Das Innenleben von Designers and Dragons ist vollständig in schwarz-weiß gehalten. Der Text ist der Buchgröße angemessen einspaltig gesetzt und wird immer wieder von den Titelbildern der Produkte, die gerade thematisiert werden, aufgelockert. Die regelmäßige Unterteilung der jeweiligen Verlagskapitel in mit eigenen Überschriften versehene Abschnitte lockert den Lesefluss zusätzlich auf, ebenso die in kursiv abgesetzten Zitate, die in den Text eingestreut sind.
Diese sachliche Schlichtheit ist dem Thema der vier Bände durchaus angemessen – die Serie brilliert durch Recherche und Schreibstil, nicht durch ihre Optik.


Die jeweiligen PDF-Fassungen präsentieren sich ähnlich einfach: Ebenen sind nicht vorhanden, auch nutzen die Dateien nicht die Möglichkeit von Verknüpfungen innerhalb des Dokuments. Gerade der sehr umfangreiche Index sowie die Empfehlungskästen an jedem Kapitelende, wo man nach gewünschtem Stichwort weiterlesen kann, hätten sich hierfür angeboten. Dafür sind die Lesezeichen vorbildlich gesetzt und ermöglichen über drei Stufen die Kapitel, Verlage und Abschnitte direkt aufzurufen.


Fazit
Designers and Dragons wirbt damit, dem Leser alles über die Entstehung des Rollenspielhobbies zu vermitteln, was man je wissen möchte, und schafft dies auf ganzer Linie. Die vier Bände spannen einen fesselnden Bogen über vier Jahrzehnte und vermitteln sowohl einen detaillierten Blick in die Geschichte der jeweiligen Verlage als auch ein Gesamtbild über die Entwicklungen der ganzen Branche. Der präzise, nie unnötig trockene Schreibstil trägt dazu bei, dass die Lektüre stets ein wahres Vergnügen ist.


Der Fokus liegt dabei deutlich bei den Machern aus dem englischsprachigen Raum, wichtige Systeme anderer Länder werden nur am Rande erwähnt, so sie ihren Weg in die USA gefunden haben. Bedenkt man aber die überwältigende Bedeutung, die der US-Markt stets in diesem Hobby hatte, und dass auch kleinere einflussreiche Verlage in diesen Bänden beleuchtet werden, so mag man diesen Makel gern verzeihen.


Auch wenn sich Designers and Dragons optisch eher zweckmäßig schlicht gibt, so ist sein Innenleben tatsächlich die umfassendste Beschreibung über die Entstehung unseres Hobbies, die ich jedem nur ans Herz legen kann.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Designers & Dragons: The 90s
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Designers & Dragons: The 80s
by Roger (. L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 09/19/2015 02:55:22

Vor über vierzig Jahren erfand TSR mit Dungeons and Dragons das Rollenspiel. Seitdem haben zahlreiche Verlage, Autoren und Produktlinien dieses Hobby bereichert, ebenso viele sind wieder von der Bildfläche verschwunden. Die Reihe Designers and Dragons strebt an, die bewegte Historie dieser Branche so ausführlich aufzuzeichnen wie nie zuvor.


Rezension: Designers and Dragons – Die Geschichte des Rollenspiels


Im Herbst 2006 begann Autor Shannon Appelcline eine neue Kolumne auf rpg.net mit dem Titel „A brief history of the game“, in der er die Geschichte diverser namhafter Rollenspielverlage detailliert aufzeichnete. Diese Serie wurde schließlich 2011 in einem üppigen Hardcover von Mongoose Publishing unter dem Titel Designers and Dragons auch in Buchform veröffentlicht. Im Herbst 2014 wurde das Projekt dann von Evil Hat Productions nach einem sehr erfolgreichen Kickstarter in einer zweiten, überarbeiteten und großzügig ergänzten Auflage herausgegeben.


Inhalte
Die gesamte Reihe Designers and Dragons besteht aus vier dicken Softcover-Bänden, von denen jeder ein Jahrzehnt umfasst. Ausschlaggebend ist dabei das Gründungsjahr der beschriebenen Verlage, egal wie lange sie sich halten konnten: So findet sich die Firmengeschichte von TSR (1973-1997) im Band der 70er, während die von Wizards of the Coast (1990 – heute) – die ja erst mit der Veröffentlichung von Dungeons and Dragons 3e im Jahr 2000 zu einem der wichtigsten Häuser im Hobby aufstiegen – im Band der 90er auftaucht.


Die Serie nimmt sich aber nicht nur der großen Namen an: In dieser überarbeiteten Fassung kommen auch zahlreiche kleine Verlage zur Geltung, die nachhaltigen Einfluss auf das Rollenspiel hatten: So lassen sich beispielsweise die ersten Ideen, die schließlich in TSRs Dragonlance münden sollten, in der Geschichte von Tracy Hickmans erster Firma Day Star West Media nachlesen. Ein anderes Beispiel ist der kurzlebige Verlag SkyRealms Publishing, der durch sein originelles und durchdachtes Setting von Skyrealms of Jorune spätere Systeme wie Ars Magica oder Vampire: The Masquerade beeinflusste.


Der Schwerpunkt von Designers and Dragons liegt dabei aber klar auf dem englischsprachigen Markt. Der Großteil der Serie ist natürlich den us-amerikanischen Verlagen gewidmet, aber auch wichtige englische Häuser wie Games Workshop, Mongoose Publishing oder Cubicle 7 werden beleuchtet.
Nur selten werden auch Verlage aus anderen Ländern erwähnt, weil ein von dort stammendes System über eine englischsprachige Firma seinen Weg in die Staaten gefunden hat. Selbst dann bleiben sie oft nur Randnotizen, wie etwa die in den 90ern erschienenen Systeme französischen Ursprungs: Nephilim bei Chaosium, Metabarons bei der zweiten Inkarnation von West End Games und In Nomine mit einem eigenen System bei Steve Jackson Games. Der Verlag Metropolis erhält dank der Übersetzung des schwedischen Horrorrollenspiels Kult ein eigenes Kapitel, ebenso FanPro LLC, dank der Übernahme von FASAs Rollenspiellizenz für Shadowrun.


Als roter Faden ziehen sich durch alle vier Bände auch die weitreichenden Trends und Ereignisse, denen sich kein Verlag entziehen konnte, und vermitteln so einen sehr guten Überblick für die gesamte Situation des Hobbies in den jeweiligen Jahrzehnten.
So bekommt man etwa ein Gefühl dafür, wie unbedarft die 70er noch waren, was das Potential dieses neuen Spielgenres anging, und so die Entstehung von Drittpublikationen durch Verlage wie Judges Guild ermöglichten. In den 80ern sieht man, wie der Markt aufblühte und diverse Genres für sich entdeckte, auch hatte die Kundschaft kein Problem mit komplexen Systemen wie GURPS, Champions oder Rolemaster. In den 90er Jahren ging der Erfolg der Sammelkartenspiele an keinem Verlag vorbei, für viele altehrwürdige Namen wie GDW, West End Games oder ICE bedeutete er sogar das Ende. In den 2000ern schließlich erhält man einen umfassenden Blick auf die Auswirkungen der großen Publikationsblase, die die offene d20-Lizenz von Dungeons and Dragons mit sich brachte; aber auch das Aufkommen der kleinen Indie-Publikationen erhält gebührende Beachtung.


Neben diesen großen Strömungen und Phänomenen vergisst Autor Appelcline aber nie den Blick für Details. Wichtige personelle Veränderungen, Verhandlungen zu Übernahmen und Lizenzen oder der Beginn von Entwicklungsphasen lange vor der eigentlichen Veröffentlichung werden ausführlich dargestellt. Bei wichtigen Produkten werden zumindest die wichtigsten Neuerungen und Innovationen erläutert, die nachhaltigen Einfluss auf das Hobby haben sollten. Auch Erweiterungen der Produktpalette um Brett- oder Kartenspiele fehlen nicht. So entsteht für jeden beschriebenen Verlag ein eindrucksvolles Gesamtbild über dessen Entwicklung, inklusive sich anbahnender Erfolge oder Fehlentscheidungen.


Auch wenn das Sujet der Firmenhistorien zunächst als trockene Materie anmutet, so gelingt es Shannon Appelcline durch seinen sehr präzisen Schreibstil und hervorragenden Aufbau stets, einen spannenden roten Faden zu erschaffen, der den Leser Seite für Seite fesselt. Dabei verliert man auch nie den Überblick der manchmal unübersichtlichen Verknüpfungen zwischen Verlagen, Autoren und Lizenzen: Sorgfältig verweisen kurze Nebensätze darauf, wo deren Geschichte den aktuell beschriebenen Verlag verlässt und in einem anderen Kapitel wieder auftauchen wird. Ein kurzer Kasten am Kapitelende beinhaltet zudem alle Verweise, an welcher Stelle man die Lektüre fortsetzen kann, um einem erwähnten Designer oder der Geschichte einer Lizenz zu folgen, sei es im gleichen oder einem anderen Band.


Allerdings merkt man nebenbei auch, dass unser kleines Nischenhobby doch erstaunlich schnelllebig ist: Designers and Dragons betrachtet die Branche nur bis zu seinem Veröffentlichungsjahr 2014, so dass das im Folgejahr erschienene Dungeons and Dragons 5e nur in seiner Entwicklungsphase als DnD Next Erwähnung findet, oder das unlängst durch sein Auftauchen in Wil Wheatons Tabletop bekannt gewordene Fantasy Age gänzlich fehlt.


Die Beschreibungen der einzelnen Verlage sind je Band nicht einfach nur chronologisch nach Gründungsjahr sortiert, stattdessen fasst Shannon Appelcline sie immer nach übergeordneten Gemeinsamkeiten und Phasen in der Entwicklung des Hobbies zusammen. Nehmen wir als Beispiel Band 1 über die 70er: Dieser ist in vier Teile gegliedert und behandelt zuerst Gründervater TSR, darauf folgt die erste Welle von Verlagen, die auf das neue Genre des Rollenspiels aufsprangen, wie etwa Flying Buffalo oder Judges Guild. Teil 3 erzählt von Verlagen wie Metagaming Concepts oder Chaosium, die ihren Ursprung im Wargaming haben, um schließlich in Teil 4 von universellen Verlagen wie Grimoire Games oder Midkemia Press zu berichten.


Eingeleitet wird jeder Band durch ein Vorwort, das stets von einem Designer verfasst wurde, der das jeweilige Jahrzehnt maßgeblich geprägt hat; so etwa Glorantha-Erfinder Greg Stafford für die 70er oder der Gründer von Wizards of the Coast Peter Adkinson für die 90er. Zwei Anhänge vervollständigen jedes Buch: Der eine bietet 10 kurze Besonderheiten über den Stand des Hobbies und der Industrie im jeweiligen Jahrzehnt, im anderen werden die zahlreichen Quellen aufgelistet. Darauf folgt noch ein umfangreicher Index, der penibel die Namen jedes in einem Band erwähnten Verlags, Autors, Systems und sogar Produkttitels nachschlagen lässt.


Nutzen
Designers and Dragons ist nicht einfach nur die Sammlung von isolierten Firmenhistorien, stattdessen vermittelt die Serie einen hervorragenden Überblick über das gesamte Hobby. Verknüpfungen der Verlage untereinander werden gut deutlich, trotz des Umfangs von vier Bänden erhält man dank der vielen Querverweise und Detailbeschreibungen zum Wechsel von Designern, Lizenzen und Produktlinien ein umfassendes Gesamtbild.


Auch viele Publikationsentscheidungen, die bei ihrer Veröffentlichung für Überraschung, Verwirrung oder Kritik gesorgt haben, werden durch die Darstellung der Details im Hintergrund nachvollziehbar. So war für mich persönlich beispielsweise die ausführliche Erläuterung des Einflusses von Konzernriese Hasbro auf Wizards of the Coast eine sehr erhellende Lektüre.


Zuletzt zieht sich unterschwellig noch eine weitere Erkenntnis durch die vier Bände von Designers and Dragons: Auch wenn es immer wieder Verlage gibt, die durch kluge Geschäftsentscheidungen oder hochwertige Qualität sehr erfolgreich sind, so bleibt diese Branche doch letztlich vor allem eines: das Werk leidenschaftlicher Rollenspieler, die voller Enthusiasmus den Sprung vom heimischen Spieltisch in die Geschäftswelt gewagt haben.


Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis
Jeder einzelne Band von Designers and Dragons besticht durch einen enormen Umfang, der den Leser für geraume Zeit beschäftigen wird. Sowohl zum Preis für die physische (rund 20 EUR) als auch für die günstigere digitale Fassung (10 USD) erwirbt man außerordentlich viel Inhalt für sein Geld, zumal diverse andere Rollenspielprodukte oder Taschenbücher zu vergleichbaren Preisen mit dünner ausfallen.


Erscheinungsbild
Jedes der vier Softcover-Bücher misst 6 mal 9 Zoll und ist damit etwas größer als DIN A5. Der Einband ist vierfarbig mit einer sehr stimmungsvollen Illustration von Andrew Bosley. Das Motiv gibt zudem auch die großen Trends des beschriebenen Jahrzehnts wieder: So sieht man auf dem Titel des ersten Bands zu den 70ern, in denen Dungeons & Dragons alles dominierte, fantastische Recken im Kampf gegen einen Drachen, während der dritten Band über die 90er, geprägt von White Wolfs World of Darkness, übernatürliche Kreaturen im Wettstreit abbildet. Zudem verwendet jeder Einband eine andere Primärfarbe, was für eine noch prägnantere Unterscheidung sorgt.


Das Innenleben von Designers and Dragons ist vollständig in schwarz-weiß gehalten. Der Text ist der Buchgröße angemessen einspaltig gesetzt und wird immer wieder von den Titelbildern der Produkte, die gerade thematisiert werden, aufgelockert. Die regelmäßige Unterteilung der jeweiligen Verlagskapitel in mit eigenen Überschriften versehene Abschnitte lockert den Lesefluss zusätzlich auf, ebenso die in kursiv abgesetzten Zitate, die in den Text eingestreut sind.
Diese sachliche Schlichtheit ist dem Thema der vier Bände durchaus angemessen – die Serie brilliert durch Recherche und Schreibstil, nicht durch ihre Optik.


Die jeweiligen PDF-Fassungen präsentieren sich ähnlich einfach: Ebenen sind nicht vorhanden, auch nutzen die Dateien nicht die Möglichkeit von Verknüpfungen innerhalb des Dokuments. Gerade der sehr umfangreiche Index sowie die Empfehlungskästen an jedem Kapitelende, wo man nach gewünschtem Stichwort weiterlesen kann, hätten sich hierfür angeboten. Dafür sind die Lesezeichen vorbildlich gesetzt und ermöglichen über drei Stufen die Kapitel, Verlage und Abschnitte direkt aufzurufen.


Fazit
Designers and Dragons wirbt damit, dem Leser alles über die Entstehung des Rollenspielhobbies zu vermitteln, was man je wissen möchte, und schafft dies auf ganzer Linie. Die vier Bände spannen einen fesselnden Bogen über vier Jahrzehnte und vermitteln sowohl einen detaillierten Blick in die Geschichte der jeweiligen Verlage als auch ein Gesamtbild über die Entwicklungen der ganzen Branche. Der präzise, nie unnötig trockene Schreibstil trägt dazu bei, dass die Lektüre stets ein wahres Vergnügen ist.


Der Fokus liegt dabei deutlich bei den Machern aus dem englischsprachigen Raum, wichtige Systeme anderer Länder werden nur am Rande erwähnt, so sie ihren Weg in die USA gefunden haben. Bedenkt man aber die überwältigende Bedeutung, die der US-Markt stets in diesem Hobby hatte, und dass auch kleinere einflussreiche Verlage in diesen Bänden beleuchtet werden, so mag man diesen Makel gern verzeihen.


Auch wenn sich Designers and Dragons optisch eher zweckmäßig schlicht gibt, so ist sein Innenleben tatsächlich die umfassendste Beschreibung über die Entstehung unseres Hobbies, die ich jedem nur ans Herz legen kann.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Designers & Dragons: The 80s
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Displaying 31 to 45 (of 300 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates