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SAS Support Kit (interactive version)
by Jason C. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 06/12/2014 13:53:00
Let's talk about "support". What does it mean to say a game is "supported"? Normally when gamers say this, they mean that it has a long string of supplements, and more planned. There will be location books, character books, modules and campaign books. Maybe even an art book or a novel or two! Of course (since I am posting here) I have no problems with any of that (except the art book, look at me scowling, can you see how grouchy I am??), but I've always asked the question:

What would be more "supportive" of a game - a campaign book, or a collection of differently laid-out character sheets?

A campaign book is cool, you might play all of it, or some of it, or maybe you just pull a NPC or two out of it and enjoy it in pieces in your own home campaign. But a character sheet...a character sheet is literally the thing that all players will be looking at and using virtually at every moment of the game. If your layout on the character sheet is bad, or even just not to someone's taste, and you have an alternate layout that is better, or just fits the taste of a different audience, then I have a hard time saying that level of "support" is less than a 500 page campaign book. Paizo puts out a gorgeous-looking module with glossy pages and nifty looking art, but their character sheets and GM tools are still the same old d20-era stat blocks, ho hum.

Almost unheralded, though, in 2009, White Wolf, through Eddy Webb and Will Hindmarch, put out a collection of sheets that are stunning in their ability to actually assist play at the table, and shortly thereafter, this product, the interactive version, came out, thanks to White Wolf sheet superstar Mr. Gone.

The Storytelling Adventure System (SAS) was White Wolf's way of classifying and organizing it's adventure/module products, since, lacking a "for levels 3-5" label, it was sometimes hard to get across what the expectation of players in the game should be. It uses simplified stats for non-player characters and rates scenes according to the three types of attributes in the World of Darkness systems: Physical, Mental and Social.

For those like me who think that Conditions are one of the best things about the new nWoD mechanics in the recent updates to various games, the old SAS systems should give you some good ideas and show you where some of that thinking came from. On scene cards, for example, you put ideas for improvised weapons (with ratings), environmental conditions (with references to page numbers if you need specifics), bonuses and penalties that characters obtain from their interaction with the environment. As Feng Shui taught us (and FATE solidified the lesson), you are better able to inhabit your characters and imagine their environment when there's mechanical reason to do so.

The layouts include the dress for standard World of Darkness characters, World of Darkness: Innocents, Vampire: the Requiem, Werewolf: the Forsaken, Mage: the Awakening, Promethean: the Created, Changeling: the Lost, Hunter: the Vigil, Geist: the Sin-Eaters, Exalted (?) and Scion (?!?) Each game has a customizable half-page character sheet with blank skill and Merit lists, a four-to-a-page NPC sheet that uses the more generalized SAS NPC rules that have become the standard in most nWoD games, a half-page character relationship page, and four scene cards. There are a few others like a Charms page for Exalted, but those are the best.

Although the price is absolutely on target, and I'm over the moon for the ability to type in what I want on the PDF and print them looking good, there are many areas where the SAS Support Kit falls short.

Perhaps the most important is a failing that all White Wolf character sheets have had since the launch of nWoD (and somewhat even before). Just listing a single line and a rating is not, repeat, NOT a good way to get across Merits or supernatural powers. Merits basically are special, unique rules or options - and supernatural powers are often very precise and fiddly. Just putting (say) "Dominate 3" on a Vampire's character sheet actually means that Vampire has three separate powers, all with their own rules.

I've been putting Merits and Powers on index cards for my home groups for some time and it's been going well. But that's just the crude fumblings of a decrepit hermit - someone who actually knew something about user interactions and layout might have a better idea than me. Nevertheless it's SO much better than simply putting a single line on a card. Even the Charm cards for Exalted only put one Charm per line by default and that's just insane.

Another area for improvement is that the SAS ratings themselves don't truly provide much guidance. What I would like to see is some way for me to look at the character sheets of the group, note their priorities (say, 2 people were Physical-Mental-Social, one was Social-Physical-Mental and one was Social-Mental-Physical) and determine how, mechanically to set up interesting, challenging scenes that would be fair and address their interests in the game. This seems like it could be done with the SAS ratings as the first step (somehow) but right now those ratings are just arbitrary 1-5 numbers without even any particular context.

Nevertheless, you will find these forms extremely practical and helpful. You will likely use them more than that NPC that you really liked in that city book. You will use them a lot more and you will improve your game with them more. Your game will be "supported" by this product tremendously. And it's free.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
SAS Support Kit (interactive version)
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Call to Battle
by Heinrich K. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/30/2014 19:26:34
Of the Werewolf: The Apocalypse related novels, this one is in my opinion the worst.
The Mage: The Ascension elements of the story and the weird uniqueness of the protagonist spoil every other aspect of the writing. And while the book happens to have a story set in the World of Darkness, the plot doesn't revolve around Werewolf: The Apocalypse theme or acceptable character.
So, for everyone who wants to read Werewolf: The Apocalypse, skip this one, ans aim for the tribe novels or some older Harper Collins licensed novels. Or stick with the anthologies that are on DriveThru....

Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
Call to Battle
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Vampire Translation Guide
by Chris H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/30/2014 07:43:48
Originally I was going to give it a one star rating, but to be fair to WW, which I have been a ravenous supporter since 1991, and especially Matt McFarland, I revisited it to be sure what I remembered was still the case. I got the VTG because I had been putting together an old WoD TT game but wanted to use the new WoD system because at the time I thought it was better and this book would be invaluable. Obviously, right?

Actually no, not so much. Hence my bitterness. I had put so much thought and research into my new hybrid system that by the time this book came out I simply could not accept what Matt had done. Up to that point I had no problem with his previous work. Primarily my displeasure was, and still is, for the disciplines. In my extensive investigation regarding them, I had eventually come up with a very unsatisfying answer from the developers and authors of disciplines. The concluding reason for the seemingly random array of Attribute+Ability+whatever else that were sometimes and sometimes not vs a multitude of the same type of combinations that were also sometimes subtracted dice and sometimes contested rolls was......”just because” and/or “that's what we felt like doing”.

I know that the editing from WW has been lacking (minor or otherwise) since the beginning of time, but the new WoD seems to have taken it to a whole new level of frenzied C&P without regard for formatting. I am happy though that they stopped using the font for subheadings they did in the Vampire core book and the frequency of offensive mishaps also seems to have lessened of the years.

Also, the first time I read VTG, it felt like it was written in a weekend and till now had held onto that thought. This was evidently successfully done with H.O.L. And that book was friggin' awesome, but in this case I did not like. It gave the impression that it was pushed out for publication as a place holder or to fit a quota or something like that. After looking at it again, I have to rescind that thought, but not completely. It still seems to lack “Quality” (for lack of a better word) and that disappointed me quite a bit. I do acknowledge that a .99 cent price tag could alleviate a lot of that perception, I am a collector as well and purchased the dead-tree format.

Along those same lines, I think there could have been a lot more to it. Both crunch and meat for both the content that is there and that which was missed or left out intentionally. There may have been at one time, but what they published simply seems inadequate at best. I would have gladly payed more for more and would have been happier for it.

All that said, my favorite rule in all of the WW games is “the golden rule” which is basically, if you don't like a rule, toss it and make something that works for you. I have been using this almost as long as I have been storytelling and it works well. I have spawned quite a few ideas in other ST's from my own. In one instance, a completely new WoD setting was dreamed up from an idea I had. My point here is, even if the ideas and rules in this book are not for you (me), it still does have the potential to procreate others simply by presenting them. I get ideas for games from some of the strangest places sometimes.

Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Vampire Translation Guide
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Tradition Book: Euthanatos (Rev Ed.)
by Johnathan W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/20/2014 11:40:35
The original Brucato Euthanatos Tradition book was one of my favorite Splatbooks in high school so i was initially weary on this new one. I happy to say it doesn't replace the old one but compliments it nicely in many ways, the main character in the book, Evelyn ( i think that's her on the cover too), is a neat take on a Euthanatos and lends weight to her oral retelling of the history of the Tradition. Although I do think the old book went a little deeper in the mystical aspect of the tradition.
The price was right for the PoD copy too as the original printing of this book goes for up to $40.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Tradition Book: Euthanatos (Rev Ed.)
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Fallen Tower: Las Vegas
by Johnathan W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/06/2014 16:18:33
First I just want to say the PoD version is well made. I was quite pleased with the quality of this PoD. While not as nice as the original printing and the margins around the edges make the book a bit larger when sitting on a shelf next to the old books, it is a welcomed blessing seeing as finding an original printing of this book is quite expensive new or used. My concern was since it wasn't made from the original electronic file, that it was a "scanned image" it would look subpar. I am happy to report it is very clear, the artwork pops, the blacks are hard black, and the greys in scale. They did some good work touching up a scan look like original copy.

As for the book itself.... It suffers from revised (3rd) edition-itis. Meaning it suffers from the rebooty-ness of the Revised edition metaplot. Which is a shame as this is the only proper city book made for mage. That said, it's still pretty decent although a bit tame and I would have preferred a Las Vegas on the verge of all-out ascension war. I'm still reading it though so maybe the story hooks give more options to have the technocrats and tradition mages go at it and have neon lit battles on top of casino signs (ooooo like the cover).

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Fallen Tower: Las Vegas
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Requiem for Rome
by Andrew V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/27/2014 19:20:25
Extremely well written, the most proof-read book I've read by far. I love this book.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Requiem for Rome
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Hunter: The Reckoning
by Jason H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/27/2014 04:24:36
Hunter: the Reckoning is the ideal system to introduce any gamer or wannabe gamer to White Wolf's deep and diverse World of Darkness setting*. The reason for this is within the setting, Hunter characters are seemingly chosen at random by an unseen force and they know nothing about the forces and creatures that have been shaping their world since time immemorial. The focus with Hunter is for players to create "ordinary people" as characters; whether they be an accountant or a rookie police officer. This set up means that players with no knowledge of the setting or the powers/limitations of it's various denizens are at an advantage of sorts.

Now for the pdf itself:
The pdf copy is a brilliant white, well scanned copy making it very easy to read. One of the very nice features of this book is any page references made in the book, except the Index, are hyperlinked allowing for very easy navigation of the book. This is particularly useful because the Bookamarks in the pdf are limited just simple chapter/section headings.
The simplicity of the bookmarks is the only thing preventing me from giving this a top mark, though anyone with Adobe Acrobat Pro can add these features themselves, which I intend to do since it's the WoD system I run the most often.

*(WoD books published pre 2004 or most reprints by Onyx Path)

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Hunter: The Reckoning
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World of Darkness Rulebook
by Jamey J. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/18/2014 17:54:15
This is a great game to play! The pdf are very well done.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness Rulebook
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World of Darkness Rulebook
by Chris D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/14/2014 15:22:14
A great sourcebook if not a little hard to follow. It takes a few read throughs in order to pick out the rules from the flavor text. This is not to say the flavor text is not well done, the text sets a great tone and draws you into the mechanics of being a Storyteller. I greatly enjoyed this product.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Changeling: The Lost Character Sheet Pad
by Chris D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/14/2014 15:17:55
A very extensive product. This gives you a great resource for creating any character you want in the world of Changeling the lost, (and trust me there are a lot of choices).

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Changeling: The Lost Character Sheet Pad
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World of Darkness: Character Pad
by Chris D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/14/2014 15:12:33
Very usefull and user friendly... Legend on the bottom explains almost everything you will need to know. Couple this with some of the quick start scenerios that Drive Thru offers and you have everything you need to see if World of Darkness is an RPG you want to invest in.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
World of Darkness: Character Pad
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Nightmare on Hill Manor
by Chris D. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/14/2014 15:08:12
This was an easy intro into World of Darkness for a first time story teller. This was a great story that ran smoothly while still having room for the personal touches of the person running it. I highly recommend this to anyone who wants a quick run through World of Darkness or to anyone who wants to see what World of Darkness is all about. Its very user friendly.

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Nightmare on Hill Manor
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The Horizon War Volume 1: The Road to Hell
by Burnace C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/13/2014 04:41:44
I have always had a soft spot in my heart for Mage, and this book just grabbed me and wouldn't let go! I have to stop myself from finishing it in one sitting so I can do my homework!

Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Horizon War Volume 1: The Road to Hell
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Exalted Second Edition
by Brian P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/25/2014 20:12:52
"Before the world was bent but after the Great Contagion, there was a civilization built in the image of the First Age. It sought to emulate the splendor of the bygone Golden Age, but it was in all ways less. It was a time of sorcery and heroism, of fabulous wonders and treacherous betrayals. Ruled by a decadent empire, it slipped inch by inch into barbarism and darkness, until one last cataclysm blotted it out forever. Yet, in its sunset, it was a splended thing, and glorious were the deeds of the Exalted."
-Exalted 1e Core

Exalted is one of my favorite games of all time. I ran a first edition game for five years, plus an additional year of random fiction extras and discussions about where the game might have gone, and I'd dare say that almost everything I learned about running an RPG I learned over the course of that game. I bought Exalted 2e when it came out, but after a discussion with my group we decided not to convert over and so I skimmed the book, and never really sat down to read it cover to cover until now. I'll try not to do too much comparison with 1e as I write, but with the context above it'll be hard. But, what comparison I'm going to do I'll get out of the way in the beginning here:

--I really don't like the art. 2e's art has a few great pieces--the picture of the hiker seeing Mount Mostath in the distance on page 51, for example--but generally I was lukewarm on it, and a lot of it I actively disliked. It didn't seem as thematically or stylistically unified as 1e did.
--I prefer the writing style of 1e. 2e has the benefit of a lot more setting material to draw on, but that also means it goes into much more detail and feels more like a technical manual and less like weird fiction. 1e's sense of wonder was due to most of the setting not being fleshed out yet, but it definitely got my imagination working more.
--The chapter comics do a decent job of setting the tone, especially the very first one with the river god, but I prefer the chapter fiction from 1e.
--While I think the concept is fine, I hate the word "Magitech."

That out of the way, let's dive in.

===Setting===

Exalted takes place in Creation, bordered by the swirling chaos of the Wyld on all edges and anchored by the Elemental Poles. To the west is the Elemental Pole of Water and a vast sea broken up by occasional islands until the sea and sky merge into one. To the south is the Elemental Pole of Fire and balmy coastal cities that give way to trackless sands and broken ground until in the far southern reaches the ground is too hot to walk on and the very air bursts into flame. To the east is the Elemental Pole of Wood, where fertile plains turn to dense forests whose trees grow taller and taller until the ground falls always and it's nothing but vast trunks going up and down into the misty green. To the north is the Elemental Pole of Air, from the temperate cities on the coast of the Inner Sea to the icy wastes of the north criss-crossed by tribes of nomads and haunted by the dead until it all becomes a vast sheet of ice. And in the center is the Blessed Isle, the stronghold of the Realm, the greatest empire in the world, and towering over the Realm is the Imperial Mountain, the Elemental Pole of Earth.

The assumed heroes of the game are the Exalted, empowered by the gods to fight the ancient Primordials and rule Creation. The Solars--the assumed protagonists of this book--were the greatest, until their hubris led to debauchery and chaos and they were overthrown, hunted down, and slain in incarnation after incarnation. Their enemies are the Dragon-blooded, elementally-empowered Princes of the Earth who rule the Realm and brand the Solars as Anathema. There are also the protean Lunars, the manipulative Sidereals, and the sinister Abyssals, among other, stranger beings. Like the Fair Folk who lurk in the Wyld beyond Creation and feed on human souls, or the spirits of the dead who watch over their ancestors, or the myriad of gods who govern every principle and location in Creation, from the concept of justice or the movement of the moon to the local god of an individual river or arrangement of boulders.

I am an unabashed lover of Creation. I could write pages and pages of setting description about the various areas of the setting and the people that live there, but in the interests of not turning this review into a book in its own right, I'll leave it at that.

It is a great setting, though. It's huge enough that it's possible to have wide diversity in cultures and physical geography without even accounting for the mutating effects of the Wyld, but the parts that are detailed are far-flung enough that it's easy to drop in your own kingdoms and civilizations in almost any place on the map. There are some places where the writers seem to forget this, though, like when they talk about how the Linowan, who are several thousand miles from the ocean, and would have to go several thousand more miles out of their way to get there by river, have a sea presence. I get that it's only a couple inches on the map, but each of those inches is a thousand miles. Creation is big.

There are also points where it gets a bit tedious. It's true that the Realm is the greatest power in the world and the Dragon-blooded are extremely important to the setting, but I'm not sure that we needed all that info about the inner workings of the Realm in this book. The assumed default is that the players will play Solars, and since repeated mention is made of how Solars who Exalt on the Blessed Isle almost never live very long, it probably would have been better to put that wordcount into describing the places where the characters will be spending their time.

The assumed tone of the game is Bronze Age epic crossed with high-powered wuxia film, with a greater or lesser proportion of either depending on the location chosen and the preferences of the players. I've noticed that the Bronze Age part tends to get lost in a lot of the online discussion, but the book does provide support for it through the setting. For example, the bestiary is filled with prehistoric creatures like dinosaurs or megafauna. On the wuxia side, the main staple crop of most places isn't maize, it's rice. Minor things, sure, but it does a lot to set the mood if the characters are fighting giant insects and velociraptors and getting jumped by ninjas in tea houses instead of fighting goblins and getting jumped by bandits in taverns.

Though you can do those too, if you want. Creation is large. It contains multitudes.

===System===

If you've played any of the other Storyteller games, you know the basic way the system works. A bunch of attributes, a bunch of abilities, add them together to get a dice pool, and try to beat a target number. A 7 or more is a success, and a 10 is two successes. Characters have Willpower that they can spend to increase their odds of success and Health Levels that stand between them and death. All that's the same.

There are some major differences between this and the various other Storyteller games, though, mostly relating to combat. For one, combat doesn't involve initiative and going around the table in turns. Instead, it's tick-based--each action a character can perform, including doing nothing, takes a certain number of "ticks" and reduces your ability to defend yourself by a certain amount until those ticks have gone by and you can act again. Similarly, defenses are no longer rolled out. Instead, everyone has a Defense Value that's automatically applied against incoming attacks. Damage and soak are still both rolled out, though, and damage is successes from the attack plus the weapon damage as is typical for Storytelling games. In addition, characters can move on every tick, which seems like it would help prevent the problem of people tuning out when it's not their turn, since they can block enemies, jockey for position, and so on even while they're waiting for their next action to come up. It does seem a little complicated, but I know there are fan-created accessories called Battlewheels to keep track of combatants' ticks-to-next-action, DV penalties, and so on.

Then, having created this elegant system, they created "flurries," a type of action that let people take multiple actions on the same tick, which seems like it gets rid of the whole point of having a timing-based system.

Combat is brutal, with rules for wounds becoming infected, bleeding to death, taking permanently crippling and disfiguring injuries, getting thrown to the floor or through walls, having armor and weapons smashed, and then the Exalted get to ignore almost all of those because they're just that awesome.

Each character has virtues as well: Compassion, Conviction, Temperance, and Valor. These have more of a mechanical effect in play, because a character has to fail a roll in order to go against any virtue rated 3 or higher. Failing a Valor roll to run from battle, for example, or failing a Compassion roll to execute a prisoner, or failing a Conviction roll to change their plan if ambiguous evidence of its failure comes through. It's not entirely a disadvantage, though, since characters can spend Willpower through a virtue to get bonus dice to appropriate rolls.

The main thing that makes the Exalted awesome is their Charms, and Solar Charms take up the single largest chunk of space in the book. Every ability, from Melee to Bureaucracy to Ride, has an array of special effects that can be invoked, letting Solars throw people across a football field, jump over mountains, raise a mob with a rousing speech, walk through walls, keep a ship from capsizing, survive a blow from a mammoth, or any number of other powers. There's a system of keywords for the Charms, like Obvious, meaning that it always causes some kind of physical manifestation that makes it easy to spot, or Emotion, meaning it affects the target's feelings. There's also sorcery, which lets the Exalted summon demons, teleport in the blink of an eye, part vast seas, or call down an acid rain that annihilates everything within its area of effect.

Two additional subsystems that weren't in Exalted 1e are the mass combat system and the social combat system. The mass combat system is a bit strange, because armies are modeled as essentially another piece of equipment that modifies the stats of the commander. It's a reasonable abstraction, but when mixed with the Charm and sorcery system it leads to weird effects. Some Charms have notes of how their usage change in mass combat, and some don't. Death of Obsidian Butterflies summons hundreds of razor-sharp butterflies and should carve a swath through any mortal army, but has no stats for mass combat. Adamant Skin Technique, which lets the Exalt stop all damage from an attack on them, can be used to block massed arrow fire because the army is an addition to the Exalt's stats. It does say that the GM should use their judgement, but I can see a lot of things that would get odd.

The social combat system is tick-based like physical combat, and involves making arguments and then either making a counterargument (social "parry") or stubbornly refusing to listen (social "dodge"), plus other actions. It also allows the recipient to spend a Willpower point to just say no and block the argument there, but the problems come in when supernatural persuasion is taken into account. Many supernatural powers require more than one Willpower to resist, and sometimes it has a periodic resistance cost. Furthermore, the book says: "Never forget that characters can flee the presence of individuals attempting to engage them in social combat or attack them in an attempt to cut short the conversation." Now admittedly, if someone can rewrite my beliefs then stabbing them in the face is a legitimate response for them trying to do so, but the image this conjures, of people running screaming from itinerant preachers or stabbing merchants who try to sell them goods they don't want to buy, is really odd.

The point of this is to affect the target's Intimacies and Motivation, which are a mechanical representation of their beliefs. They don't have much of a mechanical hook into the system, but they provide a basis for determining how characters are played.

There are some sloppy parts, though. The Fair Folk are supernaturally charming and can beguile the unwitting into believing in and accepting them, but there's no tie in with the social combat system. Buck-ogres have a note that they can "split their dice pools," even though that's a relic of the old Storyteller system and has been replaced by flurries. The aforementioned lack of interaction between large-scale battle sorcery and the system to handle large-scale battles. The listing of languages in NPC writeups has languages that aren't listed anywhere in the languages PCs can take, like Sijanese or River Valley.

And I won't even mention the errata. I have both the hardcopy and the PDF, and overlaid the errata as comments on the PDF, and some pages have up to a dozen comments on them. It's probably the most extensively-errataed RPG I've ever seen.

Exalted 1e has given me more fun than any RPG I own and I have a lot of love for the franchise because of that, but while this book does bring a lot of that to mind and even kindles it again in its own right, there are just too many small niggling things that bother me for me to give it five stars. A lot of that has to do with the system, though, not the setting. Creation is one of the most compelling fantasy worlds I'm familiar with, and I'd say Exalted is worth reading just for that.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Exalted Second Edition
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Monte Cook's World of Darkness
by Carol L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/23/2014 06:08:36
The name Monte Cook rings pretty loudly in the RPG world, I admit to buying more than one book because it had that embossed on the cover, and this book only adds to the weight of his gravity. In a sweeping reformation from earlier World of Darkness titles, Cook aligns the entire gaming mechanic to a d20 system that mirrors the world's greatest RPG. Most importantly he does it successfully- but did you expect any less?

Cook expands the entire gaming world with this title because he uses an easy mechanic that rarely alters itself and ties to so many other popular games. The d20 mechanic is easy to learn for a beginner and so completely realized new possibilities are always available to experienced gamers.Plus this title is actually self-contained , so it is the only necessary book for players to start gaming which is nice on the wallet.

The use of the d20 mechanic really is the best selling point to the title because it is a system so many people already know that they can forget learning a game and actually play it. The system allows an endless choice of creativity in that it already possesses setting titles for every time frame or reality that gamers wish to use, from true history to high fantasy to futuristic to modern day; and all of it fits together cohesively without any alteration.

In comparison to other WoD texts the Monte Cook version holds its own very well with an equal amount of game mechanic and flavor text that really sets the stage of the game. There is plenty of story line built in place within the system so there is never a want for gaming plot or characters.
The entire history and current status of the setting are fully explained in detail with strong examples of actual game usage.
There is one piece that defies my explanation within the text, why he granted extra hit dice to beginning characters, it seems that such a move creates imbalanced characters across the different game setting divide, but in the WoD setting alone it remains balanced since all characters receive them.

Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Monte Cook's World of Darkness
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