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Must be Tuesday

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Must Be Tuesday is a light RPG that recreates the tone and plots of high school "Monster of the Week" television, particularly early Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Players take the role of high school students facing off against the forces of darkness besieging their school. The catch, however, is that the players themselves are also monsters, with their supernatural half constantly vying for control. Players must learn to effectively balance  their lives, or face the possibility that their high school diploma will be posthumous!


Must be Tuesday uses a unique combination of d6 dice pools, a character slider between a character's mundane and supernatural halves, and a simple, straightforward system of character traits, items, weaknesses and desires to create and resolve character-driven conflicts. Character creation takes just a few minutes and the game can be run with little prep-time thanks to the plot generator included in the book.


This 30 page PDF includes the basic rules and character creation, rules for combat, magic and research mechanics, 20 monster profiles to use for PCs and bad guys alike, a GM section, and a system for generating episodic sessions using a five-act structure. Full colour and fully illustrated, it contains everything you need to run the game in compact form.


If you're short for ideas for your characters or you're running a game off the cuff using the story generator, Must be Tuesday's Monsterous Book of Tables is just what you need; a pay-what-you-want product containing 16(!) different generators for everything a PC or Monster of the Week could need!


A group of teenagers face off against a werewolf.


 
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Reviews (1)
Discussions (2)
Customer avatar
April 26, 2015 8:29 am UTC
PURCHASER
I love this game's theme and its simplicity, but as I will soon be running it with some groups I had just one rules question though:

On page 7, it says that character development is basically just adding either a new Skill or a new Trait to your character at the end of the session, but that you can forgo the extra Skill or Trait to change your character’s Desire or Trouble to reflect changing circumstances.

That part I get, but the thing I wasn't so sure about is where it says you can opt to switch your current Secondary Item with your Iconic Item. Is switching your items like changing your character's Desire or Trouble and thus requires you to forgo the extra Skill or Trait? Or is it in addition to gaining an extra Skill or Trait?

Or to put it more simply, does a player get to add a new Skill or Trait when the session is over AND switch their Iconic Item and Secondary Item if they so choose, or do they have to make a decision to either add a new Skill or Trait OR switch...See more
Customer avatar
Erika C April 26, 2015 2:47 pm UTC
PUBLISHER
It is unconnected to the Skill/Trait/Desire/Trouble thing, so And, not Or.

Good luck with your game, and if you have a good time leave a review!
Customer avatar
April 26, 2015 2:53 pm UTC
PURCHASER
Thanks. I'll be sure to leave a review once we've done a few sessions.

Oh yeah, while I'm at it, one more thing: It says that the default for all Challenge rolls is 3d6, right? What about in the case of situational dice penalties, such as the ones suggested in combat? Can a dice penalty reduce the default dice pool below 3d6 (such as on a roll where the character has no relevant Traits or Skills, and doesn't get any dice from their place on the Slider), or does a player always have 3d6 to roll regardless of penalties?
Customer avatar
Erika C April 26, 2015 3:02 pm UTC
PUBLISHER
As Page 8 says, "You'll always be rolling at least 3 dice." This applies regardless of how many modifiers are in effect!
Customer avatar
April 26, 2015 3:10 pm UTC
PURCHASER
Yeah, that's what I thought, but I wanted to make sure. Thanks a bunch.

Hey, while I have you, one last question: if a vampire for example wanted to succumb to and indulge in their Desire for Blood, and another member of the party volunteers to let the vampire drink theirs, how might you calculate the damage for the volunteer? Usually, one moves down on the Slider towards Mundane when failing a Supernatural Challenge, but in this case this would be an Action rather than a Challenge, since the volunteer wouldn't need to roll any dice to let themselves be bitten and drained a little. So how might you determine the "damage" to their Health (or any other situation where one player character willingly volunteers to allow another player character to indulge their Instinct on them)?
Customer avatar
Erika C April 26, 2015 8:28 pm UTC
PUBLISHER
That's a GM call that I think it would depend on the tone of the game and the context with the characters. You could take a fixed amount in a more lighthearted game, or makie more dramatic by using an opposed check like it was an attack (with the possibility that the other character involuntarily backs out and the vamp's unfulfilled thirst slides them towards mundane inside).

Or just roll a dice if you wanna resolve it quick but with a risky outcome.
Customer avatar
April 27, 2015 3:51 am UTC
PURCHASER
Thanks. Oh yeah, I was wondering something about the Research section. Where it says things like "[The players] then declare what /sphere/ of information they are researching. If players successfully pass the challenge, they get to ask the GM one question about the /sphere/ they are researching, and for every additional success they get over the ones they needed to pass the Challenge, they get an additional question. Generally, players should only be able to attempt Research within a specific /sphere/ once in a session, unless they find a new source of information or something changes drastically."

Where it says "sphere," is it referring to the source of information (such as books, the Internet, Ouija boards, etc), the type of Challenge (Mundane or Supernatural), or the specific subject (a person, place, object, event etc.) that is being researched?
Customer avatar
Erika C April 27, 2015 5:03 am UTC
PUBLISHER
What kind of information they are looking for, basically.
Customer avatar
April 27, 2015 9:54 am UTC
PURCHASER
That's good to know. Oh yeah, when using the optional "Playing as Humans" rules at the end of the book, one of my players asked me what happens when regular human player characters go past 9 on the Supernatural end of the Slider. It doesn't mention anything in that section. So is it the same as with "Mundane Monsters" (non-supernatural human antagonists, such as serial killers), in which going past 9 on Supernatural means they are "defeated?" In this case, for a player character playing as a normal human does "defeat" mean dead, turned evil, or just scared off as is the case with "Everyday Non-Player Characters?"
Customer avatar
Erika C April 27, 2015 6:48 pm UTC
PUBLISHER
Both the Human and the Mundane Monster are unaffected by hitting the end of the Supernatural slider in game terms; the mundane monster is, well, already an evil monster, and the Human is just a human. You /could/ have the human character fall to darkness a la the monsters and combat back as a Mundane Monster later, if you wanted.

As for dead/turned evil/scared off, this is usually a contextual choice on the part of the GM and player.
Customer avatar
April 27, 2015 8:02 pm UTC
PURCHASER
Awesome. Hey, just ran my first "episode" (session) of the game, and it went pretty smoothly. The mechanics are simple enough and easy to understand. The only thing that we were wondering about regarding the character Slider mechanic is in the event of a failed attack roll. When making an attack as a Supernatural Challenge, a failure will result in going back on the Slider towards Mundane by the difference between rolls. So, basically a character could be forced to go off the Mundane side of the Slider simply from failing an attack roll. So, how does someone die from missing an attack? Are they killed later, perhaps on the opponent monster's next turn, or perhaps during a counterattack on the same action? Do they die from a heart attack or something? Trip and fall and have a fatal accident? How do you usually play that out when a character goes off the Mundane side of the Slider from failing at their attack roll?
Customer avatar
Erika C April 27, 2015 8:50 pm UTC
PUBLISHER
A character attacking another isn't a defined "attack" action. It's a struggle. When you fail, your actions had a poor outcome for you.

Think of attacks less like a D&D swing of a sword, and more like a few seconds worth of fight scene.
Customer avatar
April 28, 2015 1:26 am UTC
PURCHASER
Ah, that makes it much clearer to understand, thank you.

I was thinking of using the optional "Long Odds" rules, but I was wondering something. If two or more characters are engaged in an Opposed Challenge, and one gets more successes, but the other rolls three sixes, that person who rolled the three sixes automatically beats the other person, even if they rolled more successes than them, is that right? Well in such a case, how would the loser calculate their change down on the Slider, since its usually based on the difference?
Customer avatar
Erika C April 28, 2015 1:35 am UTC
PUBLISHER
Ooh, I legit hadn't thought of that! I might just patch the rulebook.

For now, I would give the winner exactly 1 more success than the loser.
Customer avatar
April 28, 2015 6:20 am UTC
PURCHASER
Awesome, thanks for all the clarifications. I ran a one-shot session yesterday with two friends that was sort of a play test warmup before my bigger game with four players that will be next weekend, so that's why I'm taking the time in between to go over the questions that came up in the "play test" session once I got a chance to give the system a try.

Since then, one player wanted to know if there's a way to physically fight without killing ones enemies? That is, we had a situation where one of the player characters was already really high on the Supernatural end of the Slider, and was attacked by a group of thugs (bullies). Her dice pool was so large compared to the bullies that it was almost certain that not only would she succeed against each of them, but that the difference could quickly take them off the Mundane end of the Slider. Since these thugs were human, she didn't want to kill them though, she only wanted to defend herself or try to escape. So, is there a way that a player character...See more
Customer avatar
Erika C April 28, 2015 6:54 am UTC
PUBLISHER
This are all things that the GM should rule on contextually when they come up. For non-lethal combat, if the players are trying not to hurt people or if they want prisoners, the GM can have an opponent give up; that way the players can accidentally go to far and leave somebody injured or dead (for drama). The other stuff is all completely up to the GM; this system is fast and loose for a reason. Generally, Supernatural should be used for any kind of life-or-death fighting or issues first and foremost, so Mundane athletics or sparring by regular folks is acceptable, and there's nothing stopping a Mundane vs Supernatural check at all!
Customer avatar
April 28, 2015 10:55 pm UTC
PURCHASER
That's good to know, thank you. How about Traits? They add dice to Challenges and lower the difficulty of otherwise impossible Actions to achievable actions, but are some of them meant to be more for roleplaying than just dice rolling and are just assumed to be "active" all the time, such as a ghost's "Incorporeal" Trait, even without a roll?

And how do Traits like the Werewolf's "Healing Factor," the Frankenstein's "Easy to Fix," and the Blob's "Regenerative" work, since there isn't any mention about rules for healing aside from the Heal spell in the Magic section?
Customer avatar
Erika C April 28, 2015 11:05 pm UTC
PUBLISHER
To a degree. Traits like Incorporeal and Healing Factor mostly open up new avenues for players to try to solve problems. For example, a werewolf player could use their Healing Factor to carry an cursed object that would burn the flesh off a regular person (as a Challenge). I would also allow both these traits to be used in combat in appropriate circumstances; the Healing Factor would be a huge benefit if something went for the Werewolf using a knife or claws. All the Skills/Traits are word association; if the player can justify their use, it's good, and as a GM, you should also factor these things into the roleplaying.
Customer avatar
April 28, 2015 11:28 pm UTC
PURCHASER
That makes sense, thanks. Oh yeah, during Fighting, in situations where a victim is completely restrained, unconscious, under a spell, or for whatever other reason is in a condition where they can't or won't resist, and so for the attacker rather than an Opposed Challenge their roll becomes a Challenge, or even just an Action if there's no way they could miss, how would damage be calculated for the victim if they are not (or not able to) oppose the Challenge, or its just an Action on the part of the attacker? Would you suggest the same possible methods you suggested previously regarding a volunteer willingly letting another character use them to indulge their Instinct?
Customer avatar
Erika C April 29, 2015 12:02 am UTC
PUBLISHER
These situations are not combat, and you probably don't need to roll any dice to resolve it.
Customer avatar
April 29, 2015 8:50 am UTC
PURCHASER
All right, that's good to know. Oh, hey, the Rule of Ten says that you can never roll more than ten dice at a time. However, the Bad Guys section says that Supernatural enemies can't be driven off the Supernatural end of the slider and so they just keep going and getting more powerful. So can Supernatural NPC antagonists roll more than ten dice, or are they too capped at the ten dice maximum?
Customer avatar
Erika C April 29, 2015 8:56 am UTC
PUBLISHER
They too are capped. It just makes them harder and harder to wear down.
Customer avatar
April 29, 2015 9:40 am UTC
PURCHASER
Thanks a bunch. Oh yeah, when intentionally fulfilling ones Desire or succumbing to ones Instinct so as to "power up," one would need to succeed at a tough Challenge for the former or a simple Action or an easy Challenge for the latter. What if the Desire or Instinct requires an Opposed Check because it requires another person (such as a Desire to beat tough opponents at collectible trading card games, or an Instinct like Kill or Lure or pretty much most of the Instincts since they usually involve doing antisocial things to other people? Are these still treated like regular Challenges even when against others and do not require an Opposed roll, does an Opposed Challenge in these cases instead replace the need for a tough Challenge or simple Action/easy Challenge, or does one need to succeed at both an Opposed Challenge for whatever the activity is, and then a regular Challenge for the Desire/Instinct roll in addition?
Customer avatar
Erika C April 29, 2015 11:27 am UTC
PUBLISHER
As it says, those are just guidelines to creating dramatically appropriate Challenges. It's up to you as a GM to rule which you should be using based on context; it should always be easy to give in to your Instinct, and always be more difficult to meet your Desires. Outside of that, using Opposed or fixed Challanges and what difficulty they use are up to you and what you think is best for the circumstances.
Customer avatar
April 30, 2015 2:52 am UTC
PURCHASER
Awesome, thanks again. By the way, is there a recommended minimum and maximum number of players for this game?
Customer avatar
Erika C April 30, 2015 11:13 am UTC
PUBLISHER
Not particularly. I've played it as a 1-on-1 and with 6 players and a GM before. Worked p good either way.
Customer avatar
April 30, 2015 8:32 pm UTC
PURCHASER
Have you ever had someone fall off either the Mundane or Supernatural end of the character Slider while still early in the session, such as Act 2 or Act 3? What do you usually do then, just have the player make up a new character on the spot, or wait until later?
Customer avatar
Erika C May 01, 2015 3:29 am UTC
PUBLISHER
Every group has different conventions for handling player death, and I didn't feel a need to impose anything different. Do whatever you normally do to handle character death; writing up a new character on the spot is well-supported due to the fast character creation.
Customer avatar
May 01, 2015 8:57 am UTC
PURCHASER
Thanks for your suggestions. Oh yeah, do you have a rule of thumb for about how many minions/bullies there should be in a fight per player character so that it'll be challenging but not overwhelming?
Customer avatar
Erika C May 01, 2015 9:29 am UTC
PUBLISHER
Again, this depends entirely on your campaign and the tone you are trying to strike. As I like my baddies scary, I prefer using a roughly equal number of Minions with fairly high Supernatural, so my players are incentivized to have a member or two walk the line of high Supernatural themselves. They still go down in one hit, so it's easy for the tide to turn against them, and I make sure they are always moving towards an objective in addition to or other than murdering the players so they can "win" without ending the game.
Customer avatar
May 01, 2015 10:54 pm UTC
PURCHASER
By the way, here's something that came up during the last game: well, if a character is close to one end of the Slider, and is presented with a Challenge on the opposite side (for example, being at 8 Supernatural and facing a Mundane Challenge, or being at 8 Mundane and facing a Supernatural Challenge), there's a good chance that the character's next failure would push them off the end of the Slider, either killing them or turning them evil. So when the GM tells the player what the difficulty of the Challenge would be, the player backs out of the action realizing that there's no way they can succeed (such as their pool of dice being smaller than the required number of successes). So, in that case, the character is spared the potential of dying/turning to the dark side, but has to instead deal with the narrative consequences of their choice (getting in trouble for refusing to take the math test, being stuck on one side of the ravine because they were too chicken to try to jump across, etc.).

However,...See more
Customer avatar
Erika C May 02, 2015 12:44 am UTC
PUBLISHER
This is fairly simple to resolve; the narrative consequences of choosing not to roll an opposed challenge against a horrible beastie is to be captured or killed by it.
Customer avatar
May 02, 2015 12:53 am UTC
PURCHASER
Yeah, that's what I figured and makes the most sense.

By the way, Monsters are controlled by Giam fiat, and don't have to roll for Challenges and such while off-screen unless its relevant to players. But what about when its on-screen, but only involves NPCs but while the player characters are present to possibly interfere? For example, if during a fight with the player characters and a Monster there are some NPC family members and/or Rivals present, if the Monster's action is to attack one of said NPCs and none of the Player Characters are able to use an action to protect them, do you actually make an Opposed Challenge roll between the NPC monster and the NPC human, or just state what happens by fiat?
Customer avatar
Erika C May 02, 2015 1:29 am UTC
PUBLISHER
Unless you absolutely need to have something work a certain way for the plot, follow the rules and make the monsters roll. It's more interesting that way.
Customer avatar
May 02, 2015 11:40 am UTC
PURCHASER
Ah, that's good to know. So, just out of curiosity, in the section on "Everyday Non-Player Characters," Rivals and Bullies have suggested Attributes mentioned, but nothing is said about Family members suggested Attributes. Is that because non-antagonistic NPCs (that is, ones that aren't intentionally around to try to push the character's off the Supernatural end of the Slider) don't really need stats, or is it because they'd follow the same guidelines as other human NPC types?
Customer avatar
Erika C May 02, 2015 1:31 pm UTC
PUBLISHER
A little of both, really.

I'm really interested to hear how your game goes. If you don't mind, could you leave a review after you run a few sessions letting me know what you thought?
Customer avatar
May 02, 2015 1:35 pm UTC
PURCHASER
Sure, will do, and thanks again for your input. I've had two "play-test" sessions over the week with a friend already (which is where all these questions arose from) and tomorrow is my "for real" game with my big group, so we'll see how it goes.
Customer avatar
May 03, 2015 3:09 am UTC
PURCHASER
Normally a session of Must be Tuesday is like an episode of a TV show, beginning and ending with the five act structure, and resolving mostly everything by the end. But what if, due to time constraints, the group has to leave things "to be continued" and stop in the middle of say Act 3? Would the character's get Character Improvement at the end of each session of play regardless of whether it finished or not, or do they get the Character Improvement at the actual end of that story even if it takes two or three sessions to complete?
Customer avatar
Erika C May 04, 2015 6:27 am UTC
PUBLISHER
As the rulebook mentions, this is an ideal. Use the end of a storyline as the end of a session, not when you actually stop playing for the night.
Customer avatar
May 04, 2015 6:37 am UTC
PURCHASER
That's good to know, thanks. So we had our first big session with six players the other day. Went great. A few things that came up that I wasn't sure about was:

I understand how a tie in an Opposed Challenge normally works. But what about in the event of an Opposed Challenge for Research when a player character is trying to research information about the Monster of the Week? If it's a tie, does the player still get to ask one question about the Monster, or is it treated like a failure, or do they both re-roll?

Do NPCs go back to their starting position on the Slider when a new session begins, or do they continue where they left off just like with player characters?

If there is an Opposed Challenge with 3 or more people competing for the same thing, does each loser only calculate their difference against the winner, or do they calculate the difference against all the people involved who got higher than them? As an example, if 3 people were competing and the winner had 6 successes,...See more
Customer avatar
Erika C May 04, 2015 6:55 am UTC
PUBLISHER
1. As the Opposed Challenge rules say, neither side wins or loses anything. So no questions!
2. You can set an NPC wherever you need them between sessions. Per the rules, they operate on GM fiat, and its only really important to track during a session itself, for consistency.
3. It is the difference between what you rolled and the highest number of successes, so just the winner.
Customer avatar
May 05, 2015 11:35 am UTC
PURCHASER
As a GM, do you have a quick method for randomly rolling up a Desire, Trouble, and Skills for your Bad Guy Monsters and Everyday NPCs that you would recommend? The plot generation tables at the back of the book were really useful for making a quick scenario for a session, but still I found over the last three sessions that it takes time thinking up a Desire, Trouble, and Skills for each of the evil monster and everyday human NPCs. If there ever was a Must Be Tuesday supplement in the future, perhaps there could be additional random tables, with one page that has three d20 tables, each one for an appropriate Desire, Trouble, and Skills for supernatural NPCs, and another page with three d20 tables, each one for an appropriate Desire, Trouble, and Skills for mundane NPCs.

But until then, is there a method you use and would suggest to come up with those Mundane Attributes for NPCs on the fly?
Customer avatar
Erika C May 06, 2015 2:13 pm UTC
PUBLISHER
I don't actually have any secret sauce for that! But I think I can probably produce a set of d66 charts, as I eventually did for my other games. Might make that a project for today actually...
Customer avatar
May 06, 2015 2:26 pm UTC
PURCHASER
That sounds great. I'll be the first to purchase it as soon as it's up on DriveThruRPG.

Well, alternatively, with Skills and Traits, if a GM doesn't want to bother thinking up what Skills and additional Traits their antagonist might have, is there a rule of thumb for how many dice an antagonist should be rolling for a relevant action? For example, not counting whatever dice they may or may not be getting from their place on the character Slider, just considering the default 3 dice plus whatever Skills and/or Traits they may have that are relevant, about how many dice should that usually add up to?

Also, with Research to find out information about a monster, it's an Opposed Challenge, but if the Monster fails they don't go down on the Slider. But, do they still go up on the Slider as usual if they succeed?
Customer avatar
May 08, 2015 10:12 pm UTC
PURCHASER
Oh yeah, sorry for the double post but I can't edit my above message to add more, but by the way, one more suggestion to add to the above, if you ever did do a supplement, another thing that I think would be useful would be a few example player characters, as well as some NPC everyday humans and monster antagonists. Perhaps some of the ones that appear in the book's artwork, just to give players an idea of the kinds of Attributes that are fitting for a player character, and give the GM some ready-made everyday NPCs and/or monster antagonists to use straight out of the box.
Customer avatar
Erika C May 10, 2015 1:42 am UTC
PUBLISHER
As for the first question, you should try to think of Traits and Skills instead; it doesn't take much more effort and it can potentially make your story better. The second question, no, they shouldn't. As for the suggestion, that will be incorperated when I finally publish the story expansion for this thing.

A d66 table book with random skills, traits, desires and a pile of other things (it's seriously the biggest d66 set I've ever done) will be coming out tonight or tomorrow.
Customer avatar
May 10, 2015 1:58 am UTC
PURCHASER
That's great news. I really look forward to reading that supplement this weekend and using it for my next sessions. I'm currently running two different games of Must Be Tuesday each week, and might use it for some more.

So the Research thing, does that apply when doing Research on Everday Human NPCs too? If they lose the Opposed Challenge they don't go down, but if they win they don't go up either?

Also, with succumbing to an Instinct, a player can't be tricked into doing it. But what if a player says their character does an action that falls exactly into their Instinct, but they don't realize this and aren't doing it for the purpose of their Instinct? For example, a vampire is in a fight with an enemy, and describes their attack as biting and sucking the blood of their enemy with their fangs. Should the GM warn them before rolling that this would fall into their Instinct and so if they do it and succeed they'd have to roll the 2d6 to move up on their Supernatural?
Customer avatar
Erika C May 10, 2015 2:06 am UTC
PUBLISHER
Everyone operates under the same rules, so yes.

Warn the player first, before they take the action.
Customer avatar
May 10, 2015 2:16 am UTC
PURCHASER
Is that just for NPCs though, or do player characters also not move up or down on the Slider when succeeding or losing at Research? I wasn't sure because the book says "just roll a regular Opposed Challenge" so I wasn't sure if it's treated as normal, or a special exception.
Customer avatar
Erika C May 10, 2015 2:33 am UTC
PUBLISHER
It is the target of the research that are not affected. The researchers (the PCs) move on the Slider as normal.
Customer avatar
May 10, 2015 2:04 pm UTC
PURCHASER
Thanks a lot. Had another fun session today. I'm wondering now that my player characters are acquiring secondary items: is the limit on carrying just two useful items (the iconic one and a secondary one) only a limit to how many useful items they can carry with them at a time, or is it a limit to how many useful items they can own at one time? What I mean is, if a character already has an iconic item and a secondary item, and they come across some additional useful item in the field, would they have to permanently get rid of their current secondary item to claim the new one, or could they just leave the current secondary item somewhere else (like back at home or in their locker at school) and keep the new useful item they found on them, and then swap items back at the place where they keep their stash of collected items whenever they need to?
Customer avatar
Erika C May 11, 2015 5:26 am UTC
PUBLISHER
Everything not on their character sheet is in the territory of the GM. They can leave their stuff at home or in their locker, but it is now up to you if they can get it back.
Customer avatar
May 11, 2015 5:34 am UTC
PURCHASER
That's great to know, because items have been coming up.

Hey, with regular human NPCs, that check they get for finishing a session on the Supernatural end of the Character Slider, just to make sure, like with Character Development they only get that check at the end of an actual plot arc, even if it takes two or more sessions of game time to complete, is that right?
Customer avatar
Erika C May 11, 2015 5:39 am UTC
PUBLISHER
Correct.
Customer avatar
May 11, 2015 11:04 am UTC
PURCHASER
Generally speaking, should original Skills be things that are very broad, or very specific? For example, should a Skill be "Math" or something more specific like "Algebra" or "Calculus?" Should a Skill be "Science" or something more specific like "Biology" or "Chemistry?"

Oh, and by the way, I love the new supplement, it's even more than what I was expecting, well done Sir!
Customer avatar
May 11, 2015 3:07 pm UTC
PURCHASER
Ah, another thing I'm wondering is, I have my own ideas of how I might handle it, but I'm curious to hear how you would or if it's come up in your games, a situation similar to how in the optional rules a regular human might become a monster, what if the player of an already supernatural human (i.e. secret agents, witches/warlocks, and hunters) wanted to become an actual monster in-game, such as a vampire, werewolf, zombie, ghost, etc? Would you allow this, and if so how would you handle it? Would they just swap their existing Supernatural Traits for the ones of their new monster type? Or would you let them keep their old ones but let them start adding new Traits related to their new Monster type at the end of each session with Character Development? Or perhaps some other method?
Customer avatar
May 14, 2015 12:58 am UTC
PURCHASER
Greetings again. In addition to the above, some more questions came up in-game, some mechanical, some meta, that I'd love to hear your thoughts on when you get the chance:

3) Personally, in your games how do you explain not being able to carry more than one useful item, even if they are small items? That is to say, mechanically we can understand why characters can only carry two useful items at a time, but in universe if a character is already carrying something small and negligible like sunglasses and a fake ID, how do you usually explain in-game why they would have to ditch one of those items to then pick up and carry a lighter.

4) Can the Instruct/Imbue Magic Spell be used to teach any Skill or Trait, or only just ones known by the caster?

5) Following the above, if Instruct/Imbue can only be used to teach Skills and Traits known by the caster, what if the caster uses the spell on themselves?

6)The same with the Trouble/Weaken spell: can it be used to inflict...See more
Customer avatar
Erika C May 14, 2015 7:10 pm UTC
PUBLISHER
Skills can be as broad or narrow as you like. The GM is, of course, allowed to veto anything they think is trying to game the rules.

There's no specific rules for it in Must be Tuesday because the supernatural humans are already considered monstrous in nature. It would be up to the GM how to handle a story like that, but the obvious solution is to swap monster types and traits.

I don't bother explaining it. It's the rules, it's just how it is.

Any.

You can totally cast it on yourself.

Up to the GM. Personally I treat merpeople as aquatic mammals unless Gills or similar is taken as a trait.

Effectively, characters don't really benefit from being 7+ by default because dice are capped at 10. 3 (default) + 7 (slider) is 10, so you aren't going to get more dice for being at 8! With Shortened Sliders, characters die when they hit 7+.

No problem! If you like this game, the best thing you can do to get more of it is to tell people...See more
Customer avatar
May 15, 2015 12:09 am UTC
PURCHASER
Will do. I've been spreading the word little by little, purchasing the game for each of my players (I have two weekly games going right now, for a total of seven players who got the game), and may introduce the game to some others as well. Due to it's simplicity yet fun genre and content, it's currently my urban fantasy game of choice, especially with new players. I look forward to that upcoming Cypress Grove setting expansion, and also your upcoming magical girl game once that comes out.

Oh yeah, one last thing that I thought of while rereading some of the rules as a refresher before the next weekend games, on page 9 in the section about "The Slider and Challenges," one of the examples says:

"Phil swings his guitar at an oversized insect chasing him. He needs 3 successes to hit it and manages that easily. Emboldened by his success, he elects to shift 1 towards Supernatural, to give him a bit more of an edge in the fight."

So I was wondering why this was...See more
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Erika C May 15, 2015 7:42 am UTC
PUBLISHER
That is a rather confusing example, isn't it? I might just patch that. At the same time, though, there are situations where, as a GM, I would have players roll a standard check for an action, instead of an opposed roll. For example, if Phil was trying to, say, knock the bug off the back of a truck where it was clinging on... I might make that standard. The bug doesn't really have an opening to hurt Phil back, so the only thing that matters is "How hard can Phil hit him?"
Customer avatar
May 19, 2015 4:15 am UTC
PURCHASER
Hey, quick question, would Giant Insects include similar things like arachnids, arthropods, and other such bug-like things that aren't actually classified as insects?
Customer avatar
May 20, 2015 1:47 pm UTC
PURCHASER
Oh, and here's another one that came up: In the section on specific spells, it says: "Generally speaking, you shouldn’t allow spells that directly affect the attributes of characters or their position on the Slider, except for these ones." Well, what about spells that are magical attacks, like shooting fireballs, hurling lightning bolts, chucking icicles, etc? Those would cause damage to a victim, reflected by their position on the Slider going towards Mundane. So since damage-dealing spells affect a character's position on the Slider, does that mean that such kinds of magical attacks are normally not allowed?
Customer avatar
May 20, 2015 3:48 pm UTC
PURCHASER
And finally, when a character successfully performs a Challenge to achieve their Desire or Instinct, do they move up or down on the Slider as their choice as is the usual case with a successful Challenge roll in addition to then also rolling 1d6 or 2d6, or is the rolling of the 1d6 (Desire) or 2d6 (Instinct) for a successful Challenge to indulge ones Desire or Instinct instead of the normal moving up or down by 1 for a successful Challenge?
Customer avatar
Erika C May 21, 2015 4:13 pm UTC
PUBLISHER
Giant Insect can be anything bug-like! Though you could write a new Giant Spider monster if you wanted.

Something like a Fireball would just be an opposed check that would take advantage of a character's magic Traits.

The rolling replaces it.
Customer avatar
May 22, 2015 5:41 am UTC
PURCHASER
Thanks a lot for all the help, I really appreciate it. Oh, hey, two questions about teamwork during combat:

1) Player characters can help other characters with Challenges, right? But what about Opposed Challenges in combat? Can one player character help another in combat by adding the extra dice plus their Skills/Traits?

2) When an enemy declares they are going to attack one of your teammates, you can choose to defend that teammate by taking the Opposed Challenge in their place, right? Well, what if on the other hand one of your teammates has declared and made an attack against an enemy, and the enemy's Opposed Challenge check beats out your teammate, could you then use your action to then defend your teammate by taking the Opposed Challenge in their place? If not, could you instead then declare you are helping the character and instead just add one die plus Traits/Skills to their roll? Are either options possible?
Customer avatar
May 22, 2015 5:57 am UTC
PURCHASER
3) Related to the above, also about helping, does the Rule of 10 apply when helping others out? For example, if one player character is attempting a Challenge and puts 7 dice towards it, while another player character is helping him puts an additional 4 dice towards it due to his default one plus 3 from Skills/Traits. Is that considered 11 dice going towards the same action (and thus the max of 10 sets in) or are the two rolls considered separate, so it is still just 7 dice and 4 dice rather than 11?
Customer avatar
May 22, 2015 1:43 pm UTC
PURCHASER
4) And finally, fights can either be verbal (Mundane) or physical (Supernatural). But what if one side of the fight is trying to use physical actions while the other side of the fight is trying to use verbal actions? For example, what if the Right-Hand Monster of the Monster of the Week is attacking the player characters physically (using Supernatural Opposed Challenges as usual), but the player characters are trying to talk him down to reason with him and try to convince him to turn against his master (using a Mundane Opposed Challenge). How would a situation like that play out when one side wants to fight it out and the other side wants to talk it out?
Customer avatar
May 23, 2015 9:30 am UTC
PURCHASER
5) Have you ever had a situation where ones Desire and Instinct could be fulfilled by the same actions? For example, I now have a player with a demon that has "Go on a lot of dates!" as his Desire, while his Instinct is "Deceive." So what happens if he uses deception to lie his way into getting several people to go on a date with him? Would the player simply be able to choose whether they want to use the action as fulfilling their Desire or succumbing to their Instinct? Could they use it to do both (for example, rolling 1d6 for Mundane, and then 2d6 for Supernatural)?
Customer avatar
May 24, 2015 3:57 am UTC
PURCHASER
6) Oh yeah, and even though attacks can only target one victim at a time (so no hitting multiple targets with one punch), does the same go for magic spells as well? Can a witch/warlock target multiple victims with one spell roll, or would they have to target each victim individually?
Customer avatar
Erika C May 27, 2015 2:42 am UTC
PUBLISHER
1. Yes.

2. As the rule says, once the die are rolled, no going back.

3. The rule of 10 always applies. Always. That's why its at the front of the book. Always.

4. Just roll it out?

5. As stated, there has to be deliberate action and intent. If a person says "Imma fulfill both at once!" end the game as if they had divided by 0 and torn a hole in spacetime.

6. Why would magic attacks be different from regular attacks in any way but what words were associated with it?
Customer avatar
May 27, 2015 11:59 pm UTC
PURCHASER
RE:

"6) Oh yeah, and even though attacks can only target one victim at a time (so no hitting multiple targets with one punch), does the same go for magic spells as well? Can a witch/warlock target multiple victims with one spell roll, or would they have to target each victim individually? "

"6. Why would magic attacks be different from regular attacks in any way but what words were associated with it? "

Thanks for the info. As to the last question regarding spells and multiple targets, to clarify a bit more I didn't just mean in the case of magical attacks or other effects that would actually alter the victim's Attributes (such as causing damage by making them move on the Slider, or adding or removing a Skill/Trait/Weakness). I was thinking more in the case of spells that only had a narrative effect. For example, if a warlock wanted to cast a spell to make an entire gang of bullies' hair turn pink, or to make all the witnesses who were present for an event...See more
Customer avatar
June 02, 2015 10:47 pm UTC
PURCHASER
Greetings again. Hope all has been well for you during the last week. Whenever you get the chance I'd be interested in hearing your opinion on the above. As always I value your thoughts on the matter. Thanks in advance.
Customer avatar
Edward D July 22, 2014 7:44 pm UTC
PURCHASER
First congratulations on creating your first product.

Second any chance of a preview or some information on the mechanics of the game? Also $10.00 seems pretty high for 30 pages of content especially without any info on how it actually works.

Good luck with it.
Customer avatar
Erika C July 22, 2014 8:00 pm UTC
PUBLISHER
In short, the core of the system revolves around using a character slider to gain extra dice for a d6 dice pool for opposed or threshold challenges. The character slider represents the character's progression between grounded in the mundane world, or empowered supernaturally; they get more powerful in their respective spheres as they approach the terminal ends of the slider, but if they fall off either end of the slider, the character dies. In essence, it is a game about balance and duality.

If you are interested, we run samples of play on the Sufficient Velocity forums.

http://forums.sufficientvelocity.com/threads/world-in-danger-must-be-tuesday.1152/

As for the price point, all I can say is you get what you pay for. The book is fully illustrated, professionally edited and extensively playtested. It's 30 pages because we kept the rules tight and concise, and we refused to pad the book out with lore; the first campaign setting will be a free addition and kept separate to...See more
Customer avatar
Edward D July 22, 2014 8:27 pm UTC
PURCHASER
Thanks for the quick response, I'll check out the forum. I hope I didn't sound dismissive, creating a new system is quite an accomplishment and IMO the $10.00 might be a barrier. Obviously without seeing the product i'm only speculating. The thing that drew me to your product was it's only 30 pages rules light should be a lot of fun for this type of game.

So again congrats on your project and good luck with it in the future.
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